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Tag Archives: Anti-Capitalism

Occupy London

Occupy London

CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES ON INTERSECTIONALITY

CHICAGO EVENT WITH INTERNATIONAL PARTICIPATION
Critical Perspectives on Intersectionality: Addressing Struggles over Race, Gender, Class, and Ecology
The social theory of intersectionality has gained prominence among and activists and academics as a way to address the question of inclusion and social solidarity that was often overlooked by the traditional Left focus on the working class. Does “intersectionality” deliver on its promise to theorize radical social change in an inclusive way? Does it offer a real alternative to capitalism?  How might intersectionality be understood in the context of contemporary struggles?
In this discussion, panelists will be engaging these questions from various critical perspectives focused on race, gender, class, and ecological struggles.

Speakers:
Lenore Daniels, “The Marginalization of Black Radicalism in the Obama Era” (activist and writer on Cultural Theory, Race and Gender)
Sarah Mason, “From Occupy to Marx: Ecology, Labor, and the New Society” (former activist, Occupy Los Angeles)
Kevin Anderson, “Karl Marx and Intersectionality” (author Marx at the Margins)
Sandra Rein, “The Gendered Subject at the Crossroads” (author Reading Raya Dunayevskaya)
David Black, “Philosophy, Ecology, and Anti-Capitalism” (author, Philosophical Roots of Anti-Capitalism)

Friday, July 25, 6:30 p.m.
Corboy Law Center
25 East Pearson St. Chicago
Room 208
Sponsored by the Loyola University Department of Philosophy
Co-sponsored by the International Marxist-Humanist Organization

See: http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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Kshama Sawant

Kshama Sawant

ANGELA DAVIS, HARRY BELAFONTE, CORNEL WEST, KSHAMA SAWANT, AMY GOODMAN, DAVID HARVEY, AND STANLEY ARONOWITZ TO SPEAK AT LEFT FORUM 2014

Left Forum 2014

May 30th – June 1st

John Jay College of Criminal Justice, The City University of New York

524 West 59th Street New York, NY, 10019

Left Forum is the largest annual conference in the United States of the broad spectrum of left and progressive intellectuals, activists, organizations and the interested public. Each year thousands of conference participants come together in New York City to discuss pressing local, national and global issues; to better understand commonalities and differences, and alternatives to current predicaments; or to share ideas to help build social movements to transform the world. This year’s theme is “Reform and/or Revolution: Imagining a World with Transformative Justice.” Panels can be proposed until the deadline of April 27th.

 

Propose a panel or workshop

http://www.leftforum.org/panels/instructions

 

Download Call for panels

http://www.leftforum.org/content/left-forum-2014-conference-theme

 

2014 Theme

http://www.leftforum.org/content/left-forum-2014-conference-theme
Left Forum Newsletter

http://www.leftforum.org/files/newsletter/Left-Forum-Newsletter-2013.pdf
Register for the conference here

http://www.leftforum.org/sites/all/modules/civicrm/extern/url.php?u=126823&qid=418374

 

Left Forum: www.leftforum.org

David Harvey

David Harvey

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Marx's Concept of the Alternative to Capitalism

Marx’s Concept of the Alternative to Capitalism

RECENT ARTICLES AND FEATURES IN THE INTERNATIONAL MARXIST-HUMANIST WEBZINE (November 2013)
http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/

A LAND OF BOUNDLESS POSSIBILITIES: COMMENTS FOR PANEL DISCUSSION ON ‘NEW EDITIONS OF ROSA LUXEMBURG?S WORK’ — by Peter Hudis
Peter Hudis, co-editor of the LETTERS OF ROSA LUXEMBURG and of her COMPLETE WORKS, discusses the theorist’s invaluable legacy in the context of Verso’s English publication of her Complete Works. The speech was written for the International Conference on Rosa Luxemburg, held in Paris 4 and 5 October 2013.

RAYA DUNAYEVSKAYA AND HER LEGACY: A REVIEW OF PETER HUDIS, ‘MARX’S CONCEPT OF THE ALTERNATIVE TO CAPITALISM’ — by Out To Lunch (Ben Watson)
Out To Lunch: Ben Watson is host of weekly radio show Late Lunch With Out To Lunch on Resonance FM: London’s Arts Station, and author of ADORNO FOR REVOLUTIONARIES.

HAVE YOU HAD ENOUGH OF THE MADNESS OF CAPITALISM? IS IT TIME TO CONSIDER WHAT MARX REALLY SAID? — by Dr. Lenore Daniels
This discussion of Peter Hudis’s MARX’S CONCEPT OF THE ALTERNATIVE TO CAPITALISM connects it to the struggles of African-Americans and workers in the U.S., especially since the economic crisis.  Originally appeared in OpEdNews,
http://www.opednews.com/articles/1/Have-We-Had-Enough-of-the-by-Dr-Lenore-Daniels-Activism_Capitalism_Capitalism_Crisis-130926-853.html

HOW TO THINK ABOUT SYRIA? ANTI-IMPERIALISM, ASSAD REGIME BARBARISM, AND THE SEARCH FOR AN ALTERNATIVE — by Kevin Anderson
Notes from a presentation to the West Coast Chapter of the International Marxist-Humanist Organization, held at the Westside Peace Center, Los Angeles. Critiques positions of some on the Left and discusses the position on Syria of the International Marxist-Humanist Organization.

THE U.S. LEFT AND SYRIA — BY MICHAEL PUGLIESE
Past and present alignments of sectors of the anti-imperialist left impede effective analysis and solidarity with the Syrian people.
Presented to the West Coast Chapter of the International Marxist-Humanist Organization.

ENTER THE GENUINE CONSERVATIVES: AUSTRALIA’S ELECTION IN 2013 – by Roland Boer
The Australian General Election has produced the first fully conservative government in the country?s history.  Roland Boer explores the contradictions of a right-wing ideology that is suspicious of market capitalism.

*** OTHER LANGUAGES
MANY ARTICLES on our site have recently been translated from English into Persian, French, Hindi, and other languages. (See the Languages Pages.)

***RECENT BOOKS OF INTEREST:
MARX’S CONCEPT OF THE ALTERNATIVE TO CAPITALISM — by Peter Hudis
Historical Materialism Series, now in paperback with Haymarket Books
MARX ON GENDER AND THE FAMILY: A CRITICAL STUDY — by Heather Brown
Historical Materialism Series, now in paperback with Haymarket Books
THE PHILOSOPHICAL ROOTS OF ANTI-CAPITALISM: ESSAYS ON HISTORY, CULTURE AND DIALECTICAL THOUGHT — by David Black, Studies in Marxism Humanism Series, Lexington Books, forthcoming fall 2013

***SPECIAL EVENT IN LONDON, UK
International Marxist-Humanist Organization presents

“New Marxist Perspectives on Gender, Race, and Colonialism”

Speakers:
Heather Brown (author of ‘Marx on Gender and the Family’ — shortlisted for the Deutscher Prize 2013), on “Marx and the Dialectics of Gender and the Family”

Kevin B. Anderson (author of ‘Marx at the Margins’ — 2010), on “Marx and Said on Colonialism”

Peter Hudis (author of ‘Marx’s Concept of the Alternative to Capitalism’ — 2012), on “Frantz Fanon as a Hegelian-Marxist”

Date: Thursday, November 7, 2013
Time: 7.30 pm
Venue: The Artists Room, Conway Hall, Red Lion Square (5 mins from Holborn tube)
ALL WELCOME

THE INTERNATIONAL MARXIST-HUMANIST is the webzine of the INTERNATIONAL MARXIST-HUMANIST ORGANIZATION (IMHO): http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/
Contact: arise@internationalmarxisthumanist.org
We would love to hear your thoughts on our website or our organization, either through the “arise” email account above or as a comment in our (moderated) comments pages.
Follow us on Twitter (upper right on IMHO homepage) for immediate notice of new posts.

 

Heather Brown

Heather Brown

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Protest

Protest

PROTEST

Call for Papers: ‘Protest’

Global Discourse: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Current Affairs and Applied Contemporary Thought
Volume 3: Issue 4: January/February 2014
 
Food riots, anti-war protests, anti-government tirades, anti-blasphemy marches, anti-austerity demonstrations, anti-authoritarian movements, and anti-capitalist occupations: the politics of the twenty-first century is marked by dissent, tumult and calls for radical change. Contemporary political protests have emerged as a key tool for the expression of dissent, are born of both the Right and the Left and are staged in both the global North and the global South. In marked contrast to the triumphalism of neoliberal ideology, different instantiations of protest all over the world have drawn attention to the deep fissures that are papered over by the idea of the global market place. Given the diversity of justice claims and political persuasions that are expressed in protests today, a key task of political inquiry is to understand the convergences and divergences between them, and whether these protests are a precursor of profound global social change. There have been numerous theoretical engagements with the questions of global social change in recent years:  Hardt and Negri have engaged directly the notion of inherent crisis in the capitalist system; David Graeber has raised questions about anarchism, debt and democracy in recent work; neo-Gramscians have enquired into the role of hegemony in the global political economy, and postcolonial theorists have explored the enduring legacy of the colonial encounter in the present.

In this issue of Global Discourse, we wish to explore the nature and context of protest, seeking to evaluate the notion of links between different protests. Among others, we welcome submissions examining the following broad topics:

–          locations, sites and spaces of protest

–          forms of resistance, assembly and protest

–          local, national, international and transnational solidarity in protest

–          questions of universality and difference

–          development and modernity in protest

Building upon previous symposia with the likes of Noam Chomsky, Andrew Linklater and Cynthia Weber, the issue will contain review symposium with David Graeber, who will respond to reviews of his recent The Democracy Project: A History, A Crisis, A Movement, and Teivo Teivainen, who will respond to reviews of his forthcoming Democracy in Movement.

Submission deadlines

Abstracts: May 20th 2013

Full articles of around 8,000 words (solicited on the basis of review of abstracts): August 18th 2013

Publication: January 2014

UK REF Considerations: Papers can appear online as soon as they are accepted and processed. However, we will be able to accommodate the wishes of authors to delay publication until the beginning of 2014 because they wish their papers to be included in the 2014- REF.

Instructions for authors:  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=rgld20&page=instructions#.UX-WG8qSJHo

Further details: http://www.tandfonline.com/rgld (previous website: http://global-discourse.com)

Editor contact details: s.suliman@uq.edu.aus.brincat@uq.edu.au and matthew.johnson@york.ac.uk

Journal Aims and Scope
Global Discourse is an interdisciplinary, problem-oriented journal of applied contemporary thought operating at the intersection of politics, international relations, sociology and social policy. The journal’s scope is broad, encouraging interrogation of current affairs with regard to core questions of distributive justice, wellbeing, cultural diversity, autonomy, sovereignty, security and recognition. Rejecting the notion that publication is the final stage in the research process, Global Discourse seeks to foster discussion and debate between often artificially isolated disciplines and paradigms, with responses to articles encouraged and conversations continued across issues. The journal features a mix of full-length articles, each accompanied by one or more replies, shorter essays, rapid replies, discussion pieces and book review symposia, typically consisting of three reviews and a reply by the author/s. With an international advisory editorial board consisting of experienced, highly-cited academics, Global Discourse welcomes submissions from and on any region. Authors are encouraged to explore the international dimensions and implications of their work. With a mix of themed and general issues, symposia are periodically deployed to examine topics as they emerge.

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Rosa Luxemburg

WHAT DOES ROSA LUXEMBURG HAVE TO SAY TO TODAY’S ANTI-CAPITALIST MOVEMENTS?

Thursday, March 15 at 8 pm

Judson Garden Room
239 Thompson Street
New York, NY 10012

“[In the 1905 Russian Revolution] there fermented throughout the whole of the immense empire an uninterrupted economic strike of almost the entire proletariat against capital – a struggle which caught, on the one hand, all the petty bourgeois and liberal professions, commercial employees, technicians, actors and members of artistic professions – and on the other hand, penetrated to the domestic servants, the minor police officials and even to the stratum of the lumpenproletariat, and simultaneously surged from the towns to the country districts and even knocked at the iron gates of the military barracks.” — Rosa Luxemburg, The Mass Strike

Speaker: Peter Hudis, author of Marx’s Concept of the Alternative to Capitalism (2012), co-editor of The Letters of Rosa Luxemburg (Complete Works of Rosa Luxemburg Vol. I).

With Comments by Kevin Anderson, author of Marx at the Margins: On Nationalism, Ethnicity, and Non-Western Societies.

Sponsored by the International Marxist-Humanist Organization

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live). A new remix and new video:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales). A new remix and new video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo   

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski

SYMPATHETIC MATERIALISM: AN EVENING WITH ALLAN SEKULA

Sunday – 02.12.12 – Sympathetic Materialism – An Evening with Allan Sekula

Contents:
1. Introduction to Sunday
2. A note on sympathetic materialism
3. Untitled preface to Waiting for Tear Gas
4. Lottery of the Sea: Prologue and Ending
5. The Forgotten Space – screening at MoMA, Monday, 02.13.11
6. Related readings/viewings
7. Filmography
8. About Allan Sekula

__________________________________________________
1. Introduction to Sunday

What: A screening and conversation with Allan Sekula
Where: 16 Beaver Street, 4th Floor
When: 7pm
Who: Free and open to all

We propose to organize this evening’s discussion with Allan into two parts, which we’re calling “world” and “globe.”

Looking back at the recent resurgence of anticapitalist street protest in the US, we would like to begin with a look at his documentation of the Seattle counterglobalization demonstrations of 1999.

Looking forward to the screening of his newest film, The Forgotten Space, the following day (Monday), we’ll look at some of his other work that engages globalization and maritime space.

— Part 1 – World – Waiting for Tear Gas [White Globe to Black] (1999–2000)

Taken on the streets of Seattle during the 1999 WTO protests, Waiting for Tear Gas is a sequence of color slides that sketches a kind of group portrait of the demonstrators. Ben Young will open the discussion with a set of questions and proposals raised by looking at Waiting for Tear Gas today, especially after the renewal of anticapitalist street demonstrations in the US by Occupy Wall Street. Some of these include: the persistence of the human figure after humanism; the genre of the (group) portrait in an age of individuals; the ethics and politics of care in the face of social and economic violence; waiting as an experience of exposure, radical passivity, means without ends, or messianic time; the tempo of attentive expectation  that runs counter to the insistent rush of direct action; the street as a space of appearance that is both material and virtual; and what the practice of “antiphotojournalism” (as Sekula calls it) and the reinvention of documentary look like today, especially in the context of social media.

— Part 2 – Globe – Lottery of the Sea: Prologue and Ending (2006, 25 min.)

If the world is a form of relating to others, a continually renewed set of social bonds, then the globe can be understood as the instrumental grasping of the earth as a map, as a tool, as a space to be measured, calculated, and mastered. While much recent criticism of capitalism has focused on the financialization of the world, Sekula has been engaged in the long-term investigation of the material circuits of manufacturing and commodity exchange, focusing on the ocean as the unseen matrix of globalization. We’ll get a sense of this work by screening the prologue and ending to his video Lottery of the Sea. This is partly a tale of the mobility of capital, under the flag of convenience, chasing profits across the globe by evading limits on environmental damage and exploiting the poorest workers; it also pictures something like the promise of a world community that capital establishes materially but prevents politically. At the same time, this work also helps mark Sekula’s shift from “disassembled movies” created with still photography to the essay film, and what he had earlier resisted as “the tyranny of the projector.” How has this also shifted the balance between the triad of literature, painting, cinema that framed his earlier work, and what does it mean for art, documentary, or antiphotojournalism?

We hope that looking at both works together will open up a discussion to which many voices will contribute.

__________________________________________________
2. A note on sympathetic materialism

“Sympathetic materialism” is a term Allan Sekula has used to describe a solidarity “born of seasickness” in certain seafaring writers accustomed to the long duration of ocean travel. But it can equally be applied to his own work: the patient, careful attention of the photographer to the conditions and details of everyday life seen from below, especially the impingements and labors of the body.

As a writer, he has criticized the latent humanism of much social documentary, on one hand, and the dream of autonomy in formalist aesthetics, on the other. As a photographer, he has cannily reworked the photo and text-based series inherited from conceptual art, continually questioning the fullness and sufficiency of any single image. But this emphasis on questioning images is not a simple negation or refusal of the particular, the phenomenological, or the aesthetic. Rather, by arranging pictures into sequences and often paring them with text, his is a materialism attentive to the manifold surfaces of the world, one that seeks to forge links within this profusion of details. It is also a materialism that returns again and again to the human figure in its milieu: not only in the workplace, but also the in-between spaces of transit, transport, and circulation, as well as the spaces of unemployment and unworking–at the margins of work and exchange. This is perhaps partly what led him to the sea as the vantage point for much of his work of the last twenty years.

In the reversal of perspective produced by going to sea, it may no longer be possible to hold onto the earth, or the space of the street, as the static ground of life or politics; instead, when viewed from the ocean, the land becomes another island or ship floating alongside us. And we know that the water does not raise all boats, but can sink them too. If the capitalist order forces us all to sea, it threatens us not only with seasickness, but total wreckage. It may then be a question of cultivating something like sympathetic materialism among those in the lifeboats.

–Benjamin Young

__________________________________________________
3. Allan Sekula, untitled preface to Waiting for Tear Gas [White Globe to Black] (1999-2000)

In photographing the Seattle demonstrations the working idea was to move with the flow of protest, from dawn to 3 AM if need be, taking in the lulls, the waiting and the margins of events. The rule of thumb for this sort of anti-photojournalism: no flash, no telephoto lens, no gas mask, no auto-focus, no press pass and no pressure to grab at all costs the one defining image of dramatic violence.

Later, working at the light table, and reading the increasingly stereotypical descriptions of the new face of protest, I realized all the more that a simple descriptive physiognomy was warranted. The alliance on the streets was indeed stranger, more varied and inspired than could be conveyed by cute alliterative play with “teamsters” and “turtles.”

I hoped to describe the attitudes of people waiting, unarmed, sometimes deliberately naked in the winter chill, for the gas and the rubber bullets and the concussion grenades. There were moments of civic solemnity, of urban anxiety, and of carnival.

Again, something very simple is missed by descriptions of this as a movement founded in cyberspace: the human body asserts itself in the city streets against the abstraction of global capital. There was a strong feminist dimension to this testimony, and there was also a dimension grounded in the experience of work. It was the men and women who work on the docks, after all, who shut down the flow of metal boxes from Asia, relying on individual knowledge that there is always another body on the other side of the sea doing the same work, that all this global trade is more than a matter of a mouse-click.

One fleeting hallucination could not be photographed. As the blast of stun grenades reverberated amidst the downtown skyscrapers, someone with a boom box thoughtfully provided a musical accompaniment: Jimi Hendrix’s mock-hysterical rendition of the American national anthem. At that moment, Hendrix returned to the streets of Seattle, slyly caricaturing the pumped-up sovereignty of the world’s only superpower.

–from Alexander Cockburn, Jeffrey St. Clair, and Allan Sekula, Five Days That Shook the World: Seattle and Beyond_ (London: Verso, 2000). Also available online:
http://www.holy-damn-it.org/plakate/download/AllanSekula_engl.pdf

__________________________________________________
4. Lottery of the Sea: Prologue and Ending (2006, 25 min.)

The Lottery of the Sea takes its title from Adam Smith, who in his famous Inquiry into the Wealth of Nations (1776) compared the life of the seafarer to gambling. Thus notions of risk were introduced by Smith through an allegory of the sea’s dangers especially for those who did the hard work, and also for those who invested in ships and goods. The film asks: is there a relationship between the most frightening and terrifying concept in economics, that of risk, and the category of the sublime in aesthetics?

It is an offbeat diary extending from the presumably “innocent” summer of 2001 through to the current “war on terror” by way of a meandering, essayistic voyage from seaport to seaport, waterfront to waterfront, and coast to coast. What does it mean to be a maritime nation? To rule the waves? Or to harvest the sea? An American submarine collides with a Japanese fisheries training ship. What does this suggest about the division of labor in the Pacific? Panama decides whether to expand the width of its canal, over which it now exercises a certain qualified measure of sovereignty. How is it that a scuba diver would be most prepared to question this great flushing of the jungle watershed? Galicia is presented with an unwanted gift of oil, with important questions following about the monomania of governments able only to conceptualize danger in one dimension. Barcelona turns anew to its seafront, producing a pseudo-public sphere and new real estate value to the north and even greater maritime logistical efficiency to the south. In between, we visit blizzards and demonstrations in New York, drifting prehistoric mastodons in Los Angeles, militant drummers and bemused African construction workers in Lisbon, millionaires or millionaire-impersonators in Amsterdam, and the stray dogs of Athens, all by way of thinking through seeing the sea, the market, and democracy.

__________________________________________________
5. The Forgotten Space – screening at MoMA, Monday, 02.13.11

What: screening and discussion of The Forgotten Space with Allan Sekula
Where: Museum of Modern Art, theater 2
When: 7pm

The Forgotten Space (dir. Allan Sekula and Noël Burch) follows container cargo aboard ships, barges, trains and trucks, listening to workers, engineers, planners, politicians, and those marginalized by the global transport system. We visit displaced farmers and villagers in Holland and Belgium, underpaid truck drivers in Los Angeles, seafarers aboard mega-ships shuttling between Asia and Europe, and factory workers in China, whose low wages are the fragile key to the whole puzzle. And in Bilbao, we discover the most sophisticated expression of the belief that the maritime economy, and the sea itself, is somehow obsolete.

A range of materials is used: descriptive documentary, interviews, archive stills and footage, clips from old movies. The result is an essayistic, visual documentary about one of the most important processes that affects us today. The Forgotten Space is based on Sekula’s Fish Story, seeking to understand and describe the contemporary maritime world in relation to the complex symbolic legacy of the sea.

http://www.moma.org/visit/calendar/film_screenings/14501

__________________________________________________
6. Related readings/viewings

——Waiting for Tear Gas——-

Alexander Cockburn, Jeffrey St. Clair, and Allan Sekula, ‘Five Days That Shook the World: Seattle and Beyond’ (London: Verso, 2000).

Allan Sekula, ‘TITANIC’s wake’, (Cherbourg-Octeville, France: Le Point du Jour Editeur, 2003)

——The Forgotten Space——-

The Forgotten Space (website): http://www.theforgottenspace.net/

Allan Sekula and Noël Burch, “Notes on the Forgotten Space” http://www.theforgottenspace.net/static/notes.html

Discussion with Benjamin Buchloh, David Harvey, and Allan Sekula after a screening of The Forgotten Space at Cooper Union, May 2011 (21 min.): http://www.afterall.org/online/material-resistance-allan-sekula-s-forgotten-space

——other works on globalization and maritime space——-

Sekula interview with Grant Watson, “Ship of Fools” (22 min.): http://vimeo.com/12397261

Allan Sekula, “Between the Net and the Deep Blue Sea (Rethinking the Traffic in Photographs),” October 102 (Fall 2002): 3–34.
http://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1162/016228702320826434

Sekula, ‘Fish Story’ (Rotterdam and Dusseldorf: Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art and Richter Verlag, 1995).

Sekula, ‘Deep Six/Passer au bleu’ (Calais: Musée des Beaux Arts, 2001).

‘Allan Sekula: Dead Letter Office’ (Rotterdam: Netherlands Foto Instituut, 1997).

Sekula, ‘Performance Under Working Conditions’ (Vienna: Generali Foundation, 2003).

__________________________________________________
7. Filmography

The Forgotten Space (2010, with Noël Burch)
The Lottery of the Sea (2006)
Short Film for Laos (2006)
Gala (2005)
Tsukiji (2001)
Reagan Tape (1984, with Noël Burch)
Talk Given by Mr. Fred Lux at the Lux Clock Manufacturing Plant in Lebanon, Tennessee, on Wednesday, September 15, 1954 (1974)
Performance under Working Conditions (1973)

__________________________________________________
8. About Allan Sekula

Allan Sekula is an artist, photographer, writer, and, more recently, film and video maker. Since the mid-1970s he has exhibited and published many photography-based works; he is also the author of a number of key essays in the history of photography (including “On the Invention of Photographic Meaning,” “Dismantling Modernism, Reinventing Documentary,” “The Traffic in Photographs,” and “The Body and the Archive”).

Recent works Ship of Fools (1990–2010) and Dockers’ Museum (2010) are currently on view in “Oceans and Campfires: Allan Sekula and Bruno Serralongue,” San Francisco Art Institute; earlier works are currently included in “State Of Mind: New California Art Circa 1970,” Orange County Museum of Art; “Under the Big Black Sun: California Art 1974–1981,” Museum of Contemporary Art, LA; and “Light Years: Conceptual Art and the Photograph 1964-1977,” Art Institute of Chicago. Polonia and Other Fables (2009) was recently on view at the Renaissance Society, Chicago; Zacheta Gallery, Warsaw; and the Ludwig Museum, Budapest.

__________________________________________________
16 Beaver Group
16 Beaver Street, 4th fl.
New York, NY 10004

For directions/subscriptions/info visit: http://www.16beavergroup.org

TRAINS:
4,5 — Bowling Green
2,3 — Wall Street
J,Z —  Broad Street
R — Whitehall
1 — South Ferry

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Hobgoblin

WHAT DOES ROSA LUXEMBURG HAVE TO SAY TO TODAY’S ANTI-CAPITALIST MOVEMENTS?

PUBLIC MEETING

‘What Does Rosa Luxemburg Have to Say to Today’s Anti-Capitalist Movements?’

7.30 pm Thursday 10 November, Brockway Room, Conway Hall, Red Lion Square, London WC1R 4RL (5 mins Holborn Tube).

“[In the 1905 Russian Revolution] there fermented throughout the whole of the immense empire an uninterrupted economic strike of almost the entire proletariat against capital – a struggle which caught, on the one hand, all the petty bourgeois and liberal professions, commercial employees, technicians, actors and members of artistic professions – and on the other hand, penetrated to the domestic servants, the minor police officials and even to the stratum of the lumpenproletariat, and simultaneously surged from the towns to the country districts and even knocked at the iron gates of the military barracks.” — Rosa Luxemburg, ‘The Mass Strike’

Speaker: Peter Hudis, co-editor of ‘The Letters of Rosa Luxemburg’ (Complete Works of Rosa Luxemburg Vol. I) 2011.

With comments by Kevin Anderson, author of ‘Marx at the Margins’, David Black, author of ‘The Philosophic Roots of Anti-Capitalism’, and Heather Brown, author of ‘Marx on Gender and the Family’

Sponsored by the International Marxist-Humanist Organization (www.usmarxisthumanists.org) and Hobgoblin Online (www.thehobgoblin.co.uk)

ALL WELCOME

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowidewas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Space

SPACES OF TRANSFORMATION

Topology
Spaces of Transformation
The Vast Space-Time of Revolutions Becoming

Saturday 12 May 2012, 14.00–17.00

With Drucilla Cornell on ‘The Site of Revolution’, David Harvey on ‘The Spaces of Anti-Capitalist Transition’ and Achille Mbembe.

Chaired by Doreen Massey

This keynote conversation is followed by a performance by Rubedo in the Starr Auditorium starting at 19.00.

Tate Modern Starr Auditorium
£15 (£12 concessions)
For tickets book online
or call 020 7887 8888.

Details: http://www.tate.org.uk/modern/eventseducation/talksdiscussions/24993.htm

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

 

Occupy London

TENT CITY UNIVERSITY / OCCUPY LONDON

The Tent City University forms part of Occupy London as is ever on the look out for people to contribute their time and knowledge.

If you’d like to get involved while you’re in town for the Historical Materialism conference, please contact: cos01kd@gold.ac.uk.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Capitalism in Crisis

DEMOCRATIC ALTERNATIVES TO CAPITALISM PART 3: COMMODITY FETISHISM OR FREELY ASSOCIATED LABOR?

Saturday, MAY 14, 2011

1:00-3:00 PM

Community Room A, Westside Pavilion,Los Angeles

(Westside Pavilion is at Pico & Westwood Boulevards; Community Room A is on east side of the mall, third floor, behind food court; free parking in mall lot)

Speaker:

Kevin Anderson, author of Marx at the Margins

In Capital, Vol. I, Marx describes commodity fetishism as a system in which human relations are as relations between things, because that is the reality of life under capitalism.  However, in a little-known part of this analysis of fetishism, he also sketches a positive alternative to capitalism, a society based on freely associated labor.  At a time when the Arab revolutions have toppled dictators and asserted the power of the working class, it is urgent to re-examine Marx’s vision of a truly anti-capitalist revolution. 

Suggested readings:

Karl Marx, Capital, Vol. I, chapter 1, section 4 (pp. 163-77, Fowkes edition, esp. pp. 171-3)

Sponsored by West Coast Marxist-Humanists

More information: arise@usmarxisthumanists.org and http://www.usmarxisthumanists.org/

Future meetings (same time and location):

June 11, PART 4: on Marx’s discussion of from each according to their abilities and each according to their needs – and the steps to get there – in Critique of the Gotha Program.

***END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Ghosts

ON HAUNTOLOGY \ CAPITALIST REALISM – TWO TALKS BY MARK FISHER

THE COLLOQUIUM FOR UNPOPULAR CULTURE AND NYU’S ASIAN/ PACIFIC/ AMERICAN STUDIES PROGRAM present:

TWO TALKS BY MARK FISHER

What are grey vampires and how do they retard the insurrectionary potential of digital  discourse?  How does Derrida’s notion of hauntology contribute to an understanding of dubstep artist Burial?  Is ‘Basic Instinct 2’, routinely derided as a cine-atrocity, a Lacanian reworking of Ballard, Baudrillard and Bataille in service of the creation of a ‘phantasmatic, cybergothic London’?  What is interpassivity and in what ways has it come to define the corporatized incarceration of modern academia?

Over the last decade, Mark Fisher has established a reputation as one of the exhilarating cultural theorists in Britain.  A co-founder of the Cybernetic Culture Research Unit (CCRU) at Warwick University ­and described by Simon Reynolds as the academic equivalent of Apocalypse Now’s Colonel Kurtz ­ he brings together psychoanalysis, political analysis and speculative fiction to create an extraordinary body of rogue scholarship, a theory-rush with few parallels.

Fisher is the author of ‘Capitalist Realism’, the editor of ‘The Resistible Demise of Michael Jackson’ (both Zer0 Books, 2009), and writes regularly for Sight and Sound, Film Quarterly, The Wire and Frieze, as well as maintaining a well-known blog at http://k-punk.abstractdynamics.org.  He teaches at the University of East London, Goldsmiths, University of London, and the City Literary Institute.

The Colloquium for Unpopular Culture and NYU’s Asian/ Pacific/ American Studies program are pleased to be hosting Fisher’s first talks inAmerica.

See ‘ The Metaphysics of Crackle’, at: http://pontone.pl/pontones-special-guest-mix-k-punk-the-metaphysics-of-crackle/

***

MARK FISHER, THESE ARE NON-TIMES AS WELL AS NON-PLACES: REFLECTIONS ON HAUNTOLOGY
 
WHEN: Wednesday 4 May 2011, 6:30pm
WHERE: Room 471, 20 Cooper Square [East 5th and Bowery]
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

”Through their generic and transient qualities ­ workstations devoid of personal effects, relations with colleagues as fleeting as those with passengers on a commuter journey ­ many workplaces now resemble non-places, either literally, as in the case of a hotel, corporate coffee chain or out-of-town supermarket, or symbolically, in the form of temporary assignments for faceless employers (dis)located in anonymous buildings, where the worker-commuter then follows the same global timetables, navigates the same software applications and experiences the same sense of placelessness, the feeling of being mere data in the mainframe.”

So writes Ivor Southwood in his analysis of precarious labour, ‘Non-Stop Inertia’ (2011). In the last decade, the proliferation of corporate non-places has been accompanied by the spread of cyberspace-time, or Itime, a distributed or unpunctuated temporality. It’s no coincidence that, as this unmarked time increasingly came to dominate cultural and psychic space, Derrida’s concept hauntology (re)emerged as the name for a paradoxical zeitgeist.  In ‘Specters of Marx’, Derrida argued that the hauntological was characterised by ‘a time out of joint’, and this broken time has been expressed in cultural objects that return to a wounded or distorted version of the past in flight from a waning sense of the present. Sometimes accused of nostalgia, the most powerful examples of hauntological culture actually show that nostalgia is no longer possible.

In conditions where pastiche has become normalised, the question has to be: nostalgia compared to what? James Bridle has recently argued that ‘the opposite of hauntology … [is] to demand the radically new’, but hauntology in fact operates as a kind of thwarted preservation of such demands in conditions where – for the moment at least – they cannot be met. Whereas cyberspace-time tends towards the generation of cultural moments that are as interchangeable as transnational franchise outlets, hauntology involves the staining of particular places with time – albeit a time that is out of joint. In this lecture, Fisher will explore the hauntological culture of the last few years in relation to the question of place, using examples from music (Burial, The Caretaker, Ekoplekz, Richard Skelton), film (Chris Petit, Patrick Keiller) and fiction (Alan Garner, David Peace).

MARK FISHER, DEPACIFICATION PROGRAM: FROM CAPITALIST REALISM TO POST-CAPITALISM

WHEN: Thursday 5 May 2011, 6:30pm
WHERE: Room 471, 20 Cooper Square [East 5th and Bowery]
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

”It would be best, perhaps, to think of an alternate world – better to say the alternate world, our alternate world – as one contiguous with ours but without any connections or access to it. Then, from time to time, like a diseased eyeball in which disturbing flashes of light are perceived or like those baroque sunbursts in which rays from another world suddenly break into this one, we are reminded that Utopia exists and that other systems, other spaces, are still possible” (Fredric Jameson, ‘Valences of the Dialectic’).

In his 2009 book ‘Capitalist Realism’, Mark Fisher started to explore some of the affective, psychological and political consequences of the deeply entrenched belief that there is no alternative to capitalism. After 1989, capital seemed to enjoy full spectrum dominance of both global space and the unconscious. Every imaginable future was capitalist.  What has been mistaken for post-political apathy, Fisher argued, was a pervasive sense of reflexive impotence in the face of a neoliberal ideological program which sought to subordinate all of culture to the imperatives of business. The subject of post-Fordist capitalism is no passive dupe; this subject actively participates in an ‘interpassive’ corporate culture which solicits our involvement and encourages us to ‘join the debate’.

As Fisher argues in the book, education has been at the forefront of this process, with teachers and lecturers locked into managerialist self-surveillance, and students induced into the role of consumers.

In the eighteen months since ‘Capitalist Realism’ was published, the neoliberal program has been seriously compromised, but capitalist realism has intensified – with austerity programs pushed through on the basis that it is unthinkable that capitalism should be allowed to fail. At the same time, this new, more desperate form of capitalist realism has also faced unexpected challenges from a militancy growing in Europe, the Middle East and even in the heartlands of neoliberalism such as the UK and the US. Now that history has started up again, and Jameson’s ‘baroque sunbursts’ flare brighter than they have for a generation, we can begin to pose questions that had receded into the unimaginable during the high pomp of neoliberal triumphalism: what might a post-capitalism look like,
and how can we get there?

Fisher will argue that the Left will only succeed if it can reclaim modernity from a neoliberal Right that has lost control of it. This entails understanding how the current possibilities for agency are contoured and constrained by the machinery of what Deleuze and Foucault called the Control Society, including cyberspace, the media landscape, psychic pathologies and pharmacology – failures to act are not failures of will, and all the will in the world will not eliminate capitalism. It also entails recognising that neoliberalism’s global hegemony arose from capturing desires which it could not satisfy. A genuinely new Left must be shaped by those desires, and not be lulled, once again, by the logics of failed revolts.

Queries: ss162@nyu.edu

***END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Capitalist Crisis

CAPITALISM IN CRISIS AND POLITICAL ALTERNATIVES

The Critical Studies Graduate Research Group at the Universityof Brighton is pleased to invite you to a day of workshops on ‘Capitalism in Crisis and Political Alternatives’ on Friday 20th of May with Mary Mellor, Alberto Toscano, Mark Fisher and Mark Devenney.

You can find a link with more information on our webpage: http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/csrg.

The event is free, but registration is essential. There are only a few places remaining which will distributed on a ‘first come, first serve’ basis. If you would like to attend, please send an email to B.A.Hofstaetter@brighton.ac.uk

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com