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Education Crisis

Education Crisis

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 16th DECEMBER 2012

EVENTS

12 DAYS OF ACTION TO STOP WAGE THEFT!

This holiday season the Workers’ Action Centre needs you to take action to stop wage theft.

Starting this week, we will profile 12 stories highlighting wage theft.
Please join us every day – we only need a minute or two of your time.

To find out more: http://www.workersactioncentre.org/12-days-of-action/

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RALLY FOR RIGHTS AND DEMOCRACY

Protest at the at the Ontario Liberal Convention
1:00 pm
Saturday, January 26, 2013

Rally at Allan Gardens in Toronto (Jarvis & Carlton), followed by march to the Ontario Liberal Convention at Maple Leaf Gardens.

The Ontario government has been shut down while worker’s rights are under threat and cuts to jobs and services are hurting every community.

It’s time to defend everyone’s democratic and economic rights.

For details, visit: http://ofl.ca/index.php/campaigns/democraticrights

Rally hosted by the Ontario Federation of Labour.

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CLC WINTER SCHOOL 2013 – REGISTER ONLINE

The CLC Ontario Region’s 2013 Winter School will be held from March 3 to 8, 2013 at the CAW Family Education Centre in Port Elgin.

We are pleased to let you know that online registration is now available. In order to secure the space in your selected course, your payment must be received within 10 days of your online registration.

Register here: http://sms.clc-ctc.ca/imis15_prod_public/Core/Events/eventdetails.aspx?iKey=13ONS-WS&TemplateType=A

For further details and course descriptions, please read the Winter School 2013 brochure:
http://documents.clc-ctc.ca/ontario/2013-Winter-School-Brochure.pdf

If you need a hard copy of the brochure, please do not hesitate to contact our office at 416-441-3710 Ext. 222 or 221 or ontario@clc-ctc.ca

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SOCIAL ECONOMY WORKSHOP: FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT IN COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS

Presenter: Eric Plato, Director of Finance, Frontier College

Friday, Jan 11, 2012
9:30 am – 4:00 pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
University of Toronto, 252 Bloor Street West (St. George subway station).

– Do you find it difficult to put together a budget for a proposal?
– Do you ask yourself ‘what am I looking at?’ when someone gives you financial reports?
– Are you responsible for managing the finances for a project, but are not sure what that means?

If so, join us in this workshop to learn:
– How to put together a budget for an organization or project
– Methods to deal with overhead costs
– How to read financial reports
– How to monitor a budget

Cost: $140 + HST; each additional participant from the same organization will receive a $15 discount, as will those who register for more than one workshop. Student rate available.

To register: complete the online registration form here: https://socialeconomy.wufoo.eu/forms/the-social-economy-centre-sec-workshop-option-2/ or contact Keita Demming at secworkshops@gmail.com or at 416-978-0022

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HOLIDAY SALE AT PM PRESS – 50% OFF ALL BOOKS UNTIL DECEMBER 31
   
By using the coupon code below everyone gets a taste of being a Friend of PM (FOPM), isn’t it great? The other fantastic benefit, getting monthly shipments of every release while supporting radical writers, filmmakers, and artists, can be had by joining as a FOPM (which also makes a great gift).

From politics and the economy to prison abolition and parenting – we have books, CDs, and DVDs that span a wide assortment of topics and genres that we are offering to you at the phenomenal rate of 50% off list price through December.

To get your 50% discount at checkout, type in the coupon code: Holiday

This special offer does not have a minimum (or maximum) quantity required for getting the 50% discount, so strike while it’s hot!

Please also note: this special offer is not available for any further discount to resale customers or Friends of PM.

See more about the month long sale here: http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?llr=8s7txxcab&v=001BowwB-ubI_EvWD4wecYddZoDUVdiFALeIyA8MbCGsa0w83HvGUY9Xy3laa1YYZ5mTB3h7Y3GkuMY8kxyl5LPFdoMGod9LnWa6FoNvKmEtKQ%3D

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NEWS & VIEWS

BOOK REVIEW – PETE SEEGER: “YOU STICK TOGETHER ’TIL IT’S WON”

By Kim Ruehl, YES! Magazine

When a pair of writers expressed interest in publishing Pete Seeger: In His Own Words, one of Seeger’s first requests was “Don’t make me out to be a saint.”

Banjo in hand, Seeger has championed causes from labor to civil rights to the environment, revived our oldest folk songs, and co-authored new folk classics like “If I Had a Hammer,” so the impulse to portray him as saintly is understandable.

He has considered, at every turn, what it means to sing out in a world where the din of injustice is often deafening. But his songs assert that to sing is to recognize the power of one’s own voice, to declare and defend its worth.

Read more: http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/what-would-nature-do/pete-seeger-you-stick-together-til-its-won

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CORPORATE CANADA SHAPING INEQUALITY – CANADIAN CENTRE FOR POLICY ALTERNATIVES

The latest study from our Growing Gap project, “A Shrinking Universe: How concentrated corporate power is shaping income inequality in Canada”, links the rise of the richest Canadians with a shift toward more concentrated power within the country’s largest corporations. The study finds that effectively 60 Canadian-based firms are dominating the push for corporate profits, and are accelerating the trend toward inequality.

Read more: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/reports/shrinking-universe

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THE CAMPAIGN AGAINST THE RAND FORMULA

By Evert Hoogers, Donald Swartz and Rosemary Warskett, The Bullet

It has been widely reported that Pierre Poilievre, the Federal Conservative MP for Nepean-Carleton, has launched a campaign to change the rules regarding the payment of union dues [See his November 2012 letter to his constituents]. The object of Mr. Poilievre’s ire is the “Rand Formula” – the union security clause found in most collective agreements and labour relations legislation in Canada. Under this formula, no employee in a unionized workplace is required to be a union member, but all have to pay union dues, with the employer deducting the money from the pay checks of all
employees and transferring it to the union.

This dues paying formula was created by Supreme Court Justice Ivan Rand in 1946 when settling a strike between the Ford Motor Company and its workers. At its core is the principle that all those who benefit from the negotiated collective agreement should pay union dues and that there should be no free riders.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/736.php

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SOVEREIGN DEBT CRISIS: OUR SUFFERING IS THEIR ABUNDANCE

By Jack Gerson, Facts for Working People

Even before Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp swallowed the Wall Street Journal, that newspaper was renowned for its free marketer editorials and opinion pieces. Not only has this policy remained intact under Murdoch, but also the coverage of news and features is now fully in line with the right-wing
editorial policy.

So I was quite surprised a week ago to find, tucked away on page A-11 of the November 30 edition, a piece by the WSJ’s Stephen Fidler that actually hinted at the identity of the real beneficiaries of the bailouts and debt crises:

“Despite the complications, this week’s deal on Greece’s debt points to an (almost) iron rule of sovereign-debt crises: Significant losses fall on taxpayers in creditor countries because debt originally extended by private creditors, one way or another, ends up on the balance sheet of the public sector.”

This sounds eerily like the searing indictment of the bailout in a recent book by York University professor David McNally:

“In short, the bad bank debt that triggered the crisis in 2008 never went away – it was simply shifted on to governments. Private debt became public debt. And as the dimensions of that metamorphosis became apparent in early 2010, the bank crisis morphed into a sovereign debt crisis. Put differently, the economic crisis of 2008-9 did not really end. It simply changed form. It mutated.”

Read more: http://weknowwhatsup.blogspot.ca/2012/12/sovereign-debt-crisis-our-suffering-is.html

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JOIN THE MAYWORKS BOARD OF DIRECTORS!

Mayworks Festival of Working People and the Arts is currently inviting applications to be considered for new Board members. We are a multi-disciplinary arts festival that celebrates working class culture. Founded in 1986 by the Labour Arts Media Committee of the Toronto and York Region Labour Council, Mayworks is Canada’s largest and oldest labour arts festival. The Festival was built on the premise that workers and artists share a common struggle for decent wages, healthy working conditions and a living culture.

For more information on Mayworks Toronto, please visit our website: http://mayworks.ca/

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TEN THOUSAND AGHAST AS ‘RIGHT TO WORK’ PASSES IN MICHIGAN

By Jane Slaughter, Labor Notes

Union protesters in front of the Michigan Capitol today knocked down an enormous tent erected by Americans for Prosperity, the Koch-brothers-funded group that helped bring right to work to the state. State troopers arriving on horseback were helpless, bringing to mind images of Humpty Dumpty and all the king’s men.

Several dozen protesters were sitting down in the Capitol Rotunda, risking arrest, and more were outside the governor’s office. Three school districts were forced to close schools because so many teachers called off for the day.

Four giant inflatable rats in the 10,000-person crowd were named for prominent Republican politicians and their richest backer.

But despite the anger and the chants, the legislature made it official.

Read more: http://labornotes.org/2012/12/ten-thousand-aghast-right-work-passes-michigan

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

 

*****END*****

 

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com 

Merchant Bankers

Merchant Bankers

TAX THE RICH: AN ANIMATED FAIRY TALE

Tax the Rich: An Animated Fairy Tale is narrated by Ed Asner, with animation by Mike Konopacki. Written and directed by Fred Glass for the California Federation of Teachers. An 8- minute video about how we arrived at this moment of poorly funded public services and widening economic inequality.

Things go downhill in a happy and prosperous land after the rich decide they don’t want to pay taxes anymore. They tell the people that there is no alternative, but the people aren’t so sure. This land bears a startling resemblance to our land.

For more info, go to http://www.cft.org

Watch the video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S6ZsXrzF8Cc

 

There is a critique of this video: Tax the Rich: A Critiquehttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RA21fu9Y4uA  

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

The Individuality Pr♥test: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/transcontinental/the-individuality-prtest

I Love Transcontinental: http://ihearttranscontinental.blogspot.co.uk/

Raya Dunayevskaya

RAYA DUNAYEVSKAYA: BIOGRAPHY OF AN IDEA

Marxist-Humanist Initiative is hosting a screening and discussion of a new documentary on the ideas of Raya Dunayevskaya this Thursday night in NYC. Details are below. 

Film and Discussion:– THURSDAY JUNE 28, 6:30 TO 9:00 P.M.

“RAYA DUNAYEVSKAYA: BIOGRAPHY OF AN IDEA”: http://i45.tinypic.com/54d1rs.jpg

Marxist-Humanist Initiative will screen and discuss a new documentary film about the ideas of the philosopher, activist, and feminist who developed Marxist-Humanism over much of the last century.

This month marks the 25th anniversary of her death. The film’s title and content follow from Dunayevskaya’s declaration that her biography ‘is the biography of an idea’. 

Dunayevskaya was the author of Marxism and Freedom, from 1776 to Today; Philosophy and Revolution, from Hegel to Sartre and from Marx to Mao; Rosa Luxemburg, Women’s Liberation and Marx’s Philosophy of Revolution; American Civilization on Trial, Black Masses as Vanguard, and many other works. The film emphasizes how contemporary her ideas remain today. 

The film-maker will be present for the discussion by Skype.
 
At TRS Inc. Professional Suite, 44 East 32nd Street, 11th floor (bet. Madison and Park Aves.), Manhattan

Contribution requested but not required. 

For more information, visit MHI’s website, www.marxist-humanist-initiative. org

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

 

The Island

‘LAND OF DESTINY’ – A FILM BY BRETT STORY

The Committee on Globalization and Social Change Presents

Brett Story – Filmmaker and Geographer, University of Toronto

Land of Destiny (80 minutes, 2010)

Friday, March 2nd, 2012 | 6.30 – 8.30 pm

Segal Theatre, The CUNY Graduate Center

365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY10016

A hard-working petrochemical town is rocked by revelations that its workers suffer an epidemic of cancers. But even more terrifying is the looming spectre of deindustrialization and joblessness.

Retired pipefitters serving fries, basement musicians, boilermakers and volunteer firemen, heartbroken widows and an optimistic mayor – the lives of a diverse medley of characters intersect to reveal the dramas and contradictions of an industrial town out of sync with a post-industrial economy. In the rich fabric of the city’s landscape – rows of boarded storefronts, the bright sprawl of petrochemical plants and the swollen rooms of hospital wards and crowded bars – one finds a microcosm of the 21st century. A portrait of a working-class city in paralysis and a meditation on work and place in the modern economy, Land of Destiny offers an intimate story about work, struggle, and
survival.

Brett Story is a writer, organizer, and independent documentary filmmaker based out ofToronto. She is currently working toward a PhD in geography at the University of Toronto, conducting a project about the relationship between prisons and cities.

Free and open to the public
The Committee on Globalization and Social Change Email: globalization@gc.cuny.edu
Website: http://globalization.gc.cuny.edu

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‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub,Bangor, northWales)  

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Karl Marx and Cinema

BRISTOL RADICAL FILM FESTIVAL

27th Feb – 4th March 2012

The Bristol Radical Film Festival screens some of the most socially and politically engaged documentary films from around the world. Taking place over the course of a week, the festival hosts screenings in a variety of community-based venues, culminating in a weekend of screenings, talks, workshops and debates at the entirely volunteer-run and not-for-profit cinema, The Cube. The variety of venues reflects the festival’s aim to bring this kind of cinema out from the shadows and into the community.

The fight back is on. Come and see what cinema can do to help.

For more information, visit: http://www.bristolradicalfilm.org.uk/index.html, or see our Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/RadicalFilmFestival?sk=app_106878476015645

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Karl Marx in Film

LONDON SOCIALIST FILM CO-OP

AT THE RENOIR CINEMA, Brunswick Square, London WC1
Nearest London Tube: Russell Square
Buses: 7, 17, 45, 46, 59, 68, 91, 168, 188

10.30 FOR 11AM SUNDAY 12 FEBRUARY 2012

JUST DO IT
Emily James, UK 2011 [12A], 88 mins

Emily James spent a year within the environmental movement documenting the clandestine activities of the major players. In this feature documentary, she presents an insider’s account of the new global movement, an independent group funded by volunteers; inspiring, anarchic individuals with inventive strategies challenge the multi-nationals, frustrate the police and create confusion. This film shows what one group of committed individuals can achieve.

NOT IN OUR NAME
Gabrielle Tierney, Ireland/UK 2009 [12A], 30 mins

Nine men were totally acquitted of their £350,000 criminal damage to the International Arms manufacturer in Derry in 2006. The decision became a legal benchmark; an act of deliberate civil disobedience recognised as a weapon in the fight for peace. This film documents the victory and their solidarity with the people in the Lebanese town of Qana; knowledge of the production of those weapons and their use in the Israeli massacre became an impetus for the men to act.

Discussion led by Emily James, Gabrielle Tierney and Anne-Marie O’Reilly, Outreach Co-ordinator, Campaign Against Arms Trade

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski

SYMPATHETIC MATERIALISM: AN EVENING WITH ALLAN SEKULA

Sunday – 02.12.12 – Sympathetic Materialism – An Evening with Allan Sekula

Contents:
1. Introduction to Sunday
2. A note on sympathetic materialism
3. Untitled preface to Waiting for Tear Gas
4. Lottery of the Sea: Prologue and Ending
5. The Forgotten Space – screening at MoMA, Monday, 02.13.11
6. Related readings/viewings
7. Filmography
8. About Allan Sekula

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1. Introduction to Sunday

What: A screening and conversation with Allan Sekula
Where: 16 Beaver Street, 4th Floor
When: 7pm
Who: Free and open to all

We propose to organize this evening’s discussion with Allan into two parts, which we’re calling “world” and “globe.”

Looking back at the recent resurgence of anticapitalist street protest in the US, we would like to begin with a look at his documentation of the Seattle counterglobalization demonstrations of 1999.

Looking forward to the screening of his newest film, The Forgotten Space, the following day (Monday), we’ll look at some of his other work that engages globalization and maritime space.

— Part 1 – World – Waiting for Tear Gas [White Globe to Black] (1999–2000)

Taken on the streets of Seattle during the 1999 WTO protests, Waiting for Tear Gas is a sequence of color slides that sketches a kind of group portrait of the demonstrators. Ben Young will open the discussion with a set of questions and proposals raised by looking at Waiting for Tear Gas today, especially after the renewal of anticapitalist street demonstrations in the US by Occupy Wall Street. Some of these include: the persistence of the human figure after humanism; the genre of the (group) portrait in an age of individuals; the ethics and politics of care in the face of social and economic violence; waiting as an experience of exposure, radical passivity, means without ends, or messianic time; the tempo of attentive expectation  that runs counter to the insistent rush of direct action; the street as a space of appearance that is both material and virtual; and what the practice of “antiphotojournalism” (as Sekula calls it) and the reinvention of documentary look like today, especially in the context of social media.

— Part 2 – Globe – Lottery of the Sea: Prologue and Ending (2006, 25 min.)

If the world is a form of relating to others, a continually renewed set of social bonds, then the globe can be understood as the instrumental grasping of the earth as a map, as a tool, as a space to be measured, calculated, and mastered. While much recent criticism of capitalism has focused on the financialization of the world, Sekula has been engaged in the long-term investigation of the material circuits of manufacturing and commodity exchange, focusing on the ocean as the unseen matrix of globalization. We’ll get a sense of this work by screening the prologue and ending to his video Lottery of the Sea. This is partly a tale of the mobility of capital, under the flag of convenience, chasing profits across the globe by evading limits on environmental damage and exploiting the poorest workers; it also pictures something like the promise of a world community that capital establishes materially but prevents politically. At the same time, this work also helps mark Sekula’s shift from “disassembled movies” created with still photography to the essay film, and what he had earlier resisted as “the tyranny of the projector.” How has this also shifted the balance between the triad of literature, painting, cinema that framed his earlier work, and what does it mean for art, documentary, or antiphotojournalism?

We hope that looking at both works together will open up a discussion to which many voices will contribute.

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2. A note on sympathetic materialism

“Sympathetic materialism” is a term Allan Sekula has used to describe a solidarity “born of seasickness” in certain seafaring writers accustomed to the long duration of ocean travel. But it can equally be applied to his own work: the patient, careful attention of the photographer to the conditions and details of everyday life seen from below, especially the impingements and labors of the body.

As a writer, he has criticized the latent humanism of much social documentary, on one hand, and the dream of autonomy in formalist aesthetics, on the other. As a photographer, he has cannily reworked the photo and text-based series inherited from conceptual art, continually questioning the fullness and sufficiency of any single image. But this emphasis on questioning images is not a simple negation or refusal of the particular, the phenomenological, or the aesthetic. Rather, by arranging pictures into sequences and often paring them with text, his is a materialism attentive to the manifold surfaces of the world, one that seeks to forge links within this profusion of details. It is also a materialism that returns again and again to the human figure in its milieu: not only in the workplace, but also the in-between spaces of transit, transport, and circulation, as well as the spaces of unemployment and unworking–at the margins of work and exchange. This is perhaps partly what led him to the sea as the vantage point for much of his work of the last twenty years.

In the reversal of perspective produced by going to sea, it may no longer be possible to hold onto the earth, or the space of the street, as the static ground of life or politics; instead, when viewed from the ocean, the land becomes another island or ship floating alongside us. And we know that the water does not raise all boats, but can sink them too. If the capitalist order forces us all to sea, it threatens us not only with seasickness, but total wreckage. It may then be a question of cultivating something like sympathetic materialism among those in the lifeboats.

–Benjamin Young

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3. Allan Sekula, untitled preface to Waiting for Tear Gas [White Globe to Black] (1999-2000)

In photographing the Seattle demonstrations the working idea was to move with the flow of protest, from dawn to 3 AM if need be, taking in the lulls, the waiting and the margins of events. The rule of thumb for this sort of anti-photojournalism: no flash, no telephoto lens, no gas mask, no auto-focus, no press pass and no pressure to grab at all costs the one defining image of dramatic violence.

Later, working at the light table, and reading the increasingly stereotypical descriptions of the new face of protest, I realized all the more that a simple descriptive physiognomy was warranted. The alliance on the streets was indeed stranger, more varied and inspired than could be conveyed by cute alliterative play with “teamsters” and “turtles.”

I hoped to describe the attitudes of people waiting, unarmed, sometimes deliberately naked in the winter chill, for the gas and the rubber bullets and the concussion grenades. There were moments of civic solemnity, of urban anxiety, and of carnival.

Again, something very simple is missed by descriptions of this as a movement founded in cyberspace: the human body asserts itself in the city streets against the abstraction of global capital. There was a strong feminist dimension to this testimony, and there was also a dimension grounded in the experience of work. It was the men and women who work on the docks, after all, who shut down the flow of metal boxes from Asia, relying on individual knowledge that there is always another body on the other side of the sea doing the same work, that all this global trade is more than a matter of a mouse-click.

One fleeting hallucination could not be photographed. As the blast of stun grenades reverberated amidst the downtown skyscrapers, someone with a boom box thoughtfully provided a musical accompaniment: Jimi Hendrix’s mock-hysterical rendition of the American national anthem. At that moment, Hendrix returned to the streets of Seattle, slyly caricaturing the pumped-up sovereignty of the world’s only superpower.

–from Alexander Cockburn, Jeffrey St. Clair, and Allan Sekula, Five Days That Shook the World: Seattle and Beyond_ (London: Verso, 2000). Also available online:
http://www.holy-damn-it.org/plakate/download/AllanSekula_engl.pdf

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4. Lottery of the Sea: Prologue and Ending (2006, 25 min.)

The Lottery of the Sea takes its title from Adam Smith, who in his famous Inquiry into the Wealth of Nations (1776) compared the life of the seafarer to gambling. Thus notions of risk were introduced by Smith through an allegory of the sea’s dangers especially for those who did the hard work, and also for those who invested in ships and goods. The film asks: is there a relationship between the most frightening and terrifying concept in economics, that of risk, and the category of the sublime in aesthetics?

It is an offbeat diary extending from the presumably “innocent” summer of 2001 through to the current “war on terror” by way of a meandering, essayistic voyage from seaport to seaport, waterfront to waterfront, and coast to coast. What does it mean to be a maritime nation? To rule the waves? Or to harvest the sea? An American submarine collides with a Japanese fisheries training ship. What does this suggest about the division of labor in the Pacific? Panama decides whether to expand the width of its canal, over which it now exercises a certain qualified measure of sovereignty. How is it that a scuba diver would be most prepared to question this great flushing of the jungle watershed? Galicia is presented with an unwanted gift of oil, with important questions following about the monomania of governments able only to conceptualize danger in one dimension. Barcelona turns anew to its seafront, producing a pseudo-public sphere and new real estate value to the north and even greater maritime logistical efficiency to the south. In between, we visit blizzards and demonstrations in New York, drifting prehistoric mastodons in Los Angeles, militant drummers and bemused African construction workers in Lisbon, millionaires or millionaire-impersonators in Amsterdam, and the stray dogs of Athens, all by way of thinking through seeing the sea, the market, and democracy.

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5. The Forgotten Space – screening at MoMA, Monday, 02.13.11

What: screening and discussion of The Forgotten Space with Allan Sekula
Where: Museum of Modern Art, theater 2
When: 7pm

The Forgotten Space (dir. Allan Sekula and Noël Burch) follows container cargo aboard ships, barges, trains and trucks, listening to workers, engineers, planners, politicians, and those marginalized by the global transport system. We visit displaced farmers and villagers in Holland and Belgium, underpaid truck drivers in Los Angeles, seafarers aboard mega-ships shuttling between Asia and Europe, and factory workers in China, whose low wages are the fragile key to the whole puzzle. And in Bilbao, we discover the most sophisticated expression of the belief that the maritime economy, and the sea itself, is somehow obsolete.

A range of materials is used: descriptive documentary, interviews, archive stills and footage, clips from old movies. The result is an essayistic, visual documentary about one of the most important processes that affects us today. The Forgotten Space is based on Sekula’s Fish Story, seeking to understand and describe the contemporary maritime world in relation to the complex symbolic legacy of the sea.

http://www.moma.org/visit/calendar/film_screenings/14501

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6. Related readings/viewings

——Waiting for Tear Gas——-

Alexander Cockburn, Jeffrey St. Clair, and Allan Sekula, ‘Five Days That Shook the World: Seattle and Beyond’ (London: Verso, 2000).

Allan Sekula, ‘TITANIC’s wake’, (Cherbourg-Octeville, France: Le Point du Jour Editeur, 2003)

——The Forgotten Space——-

The Forgotten Space (website): http://www.theforgottenspace.net/

Allan Sekula and Noël Burch, “Notes on the Forgotten Space” http://www.theforgottenspace.net/static/notes.html

Discussion with Benjamin Buchloh, David Harvey, and Allan Sekula after a screening of The Forgotten Space at Cooper Union, May 2011 (21 min.): http://www.afterall.org/online/material-resistance-allan-sekula-s-forgotten-space

——other works on globalization and maritime space——-

Sekula interview with Grant Watson, “Ship of Fools” (22 min.): http://vimeo.com/12397261

Allan Sekula, “Between the Net and the Deep Blue Sea (Rethinking the Traffic in Photographs),” October 102 (Fall 2002): 3–34.
http://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1162/016228702320826434

Sekula, ‘Fish Story’ (Rotterdam and Dusseldorf: Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art and Richter Verlag, 1995).

Sekula, ‘Deep Six/Passer au bleu’ (Calais: Musée des Beaux Arts, 2001).

‘Allan Sekula: Dead Letter Office’ (Rotterdam: Netherlands Foto Instituut, 1997).

Sekula, ‘Performance Under Working Conditions’ (Vienna: Generali Foundation, 2003).

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7. Filmography

The Forgotten Space (2010, with Noël Burch)
The Lottery of the Sea (2006)
Short Film for Laos (2006)
Gala (2005)
Tsukiji (2001)
Reagan Tape (1984, with Noël Burch)
Talk Given by Mr. Fred Lux at the Lux Clock Manufacturing Plant in Lebanon, Tennessee, on Wednesday, September 15, 1954 (1974)
Performance under Working Conditions (1973)

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8. About Allan Sekula

Allan Sekula is an artist, photographer, writer, and, more recently, film and video maker. Since the mid-1970s he has exhibited and published many photography-based works; he is also the author of a number of key essays in the history of photography (including “On the Invention of Photographic Meaning,” “Dismantling Modernism, Reinventing Documentary,” “The Traffic in Photographs,” and “The Body and the Archive”).

Recent works Ship of Fools (1990–2010) and Dockers’ Museum (2010) are currently on view in “Oceans and Campfires: Allan Sekula and Bruno Serralongue,” San Francisco Art Institute; earlier works are currently included in “State Of Mind: New California Art Circa 1970,” Orange County Museum of Art; “Under the Big Black Sun: California Art 1974–1981,” Museum of Contemporary Art, LA; and “Light Years: Conceptual Art and the Photograph 1964-1977,” Art Institute of Chicago. Polonia and Other Fables (2009) was recently on view at the Renaissance Society, Chicago; Zacheta Gallery, Warsaw; and the Ludwig Museum, Budapest.

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16 Beaver Group
16 Beaver Street, 4th fl.
New York, NY 10004

For directions/subscriptions/info visit: http://www.16beavergroup.org

TRAINS:
4,5 — Bowling Green
2,3 — Wall Street
J,Z —  Broad Street
R — Whitehall
1 — South Ferry

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Critical Pedagogy

EDUCATIONAL SPACES OF ALTERITY

CALL FOR PAPERS

Educational Spaces of Alterity
University of Nottingham, Tuesday 26th April 2010

Nottingham Critical Pedagogy invites contributions for a day of workshops considering spaces (both inside and outside the academy) that may help challenge the dominance of neoliberal logics, alienated practices and Eurocentric hegemony in contemporary educational practice, and in so doing contribute to radical social change. We are pleased to announce that John Holloway will be hosting a keynote workshop at the event.

We hope to welcome contributions from a variety of disciplines and from inside and outside the academy. These can be in any format, but we especially encourage those that break from traditional conference paper models: workshops, artistic engagements, poster presentations and performances would all be welcomed. We welcome suggestions for entire workshop sessions (90 minutes), or single contributions, which we will group into workshops.

Our event partners Spaces of Alterity: a conference hosted by the University of Nottingham’s Department of Culture, Film and Media on Wed 27th-Thurs 28th April, with keynote addresses by China Miéville and Alberto Toscano. Both events are designed to work on their own, but participants are more than welcome to attend both should they wish, and we will be co-curating an Annexinema film night with Spaces of Alterity (details tbc) to show short films which touch upon the themes of the two events.

A non-exhaustive list of themes you may wish to consider is offered over the page. Please do not feel these are mutually exclusive:

Critical Education and ‘The Crisis’

  • How can critical education respond to the crisis in higher education and wider societal crises?
  • Do these crises close down or create spaces of hope for critical education?
  • Defending the university? Transforming the university? Abandoning the university?

 

Education and the Affective

  • Emotional epistemologies and pedagogies.
  • The role of hope in critical education.
  • ‘Radical love’.

 

Community Education

  • Skillshare workshops.
  • Social movements/community politics.
  • Challenging the borders between HE and community.
  • The role of non-traditional educational spaces (art galleries, social centres, etc).

 

Border Thinking and Hybridity

  • The importance of identity and difference for critical education.
  • Challenging hegemonic and Eurocentric perspectives.
  • How can we introduce the subaltern into the classroom?

 

Reflections on Practice

  • Experiences of critical education.
  • What can we learn from past experiences, experiments and struggle?

 

Art, Music and Critical Education

  • The role of art and music in critical education.
  • Resonances between critical education and contemporary theory and practice in art and music.
  • Problems of assessment in critical and artistic education: or is assessment the problem?

 

Please send abstracts and information on the format you wish your presentation to take to nottinghamcriticalpedagogy@gmail.com no later than Tuesday 8th February. These should be no more than 300 words, but may contain links to further reading regarding your chosen method of presentation.

Registration is free for Educational Spaces of Alterity but there are fees for Spaces of Alterity: attendance for one day is £25/£35; for both days it’s £45/55 (cheaper price for students and unwaged).

We have a limited amount of money to help cover the travel and accommodation costs of participants who would not otherwise be able to attend, or to help with fees for those who wish to stay for Spaces of Alterity. Details will be announced once abstracts have been received. Food and drink will be provided for all.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Socialism and Hope

FIGHTING BACK: REBUILDING OUR MOVEMENT, RENEWING THE LEFT CONFERENCE

Fighting Back: Rebuilding Our Movements, Renewing the Left
2010 Solidarity Northeast Educational Conference
Friday, Nov. 19 – Saturday, Nov. 20, New York University

Sponsored by Solidarity: A Revolutionary Socialist, Feminist and  Anti-Racist Organization and the Radical Film and Lecture Series (NYU)

Conference website (Schedule, Logistics, Speakers and Registration): http://nysolidarity.org/2010conference

Pre-registration is strongly encouraged so we can anticipate childcare, housing and catering needs. If you have any questions, send an email to nyc@solidarity-us.org.

Download a promo leaflet for the conference here: http://nysolidarity.org/drupal/sites/default/files/fightingbackleaflet.pdf.

Confirmed speakers include:

David McNally (New Socialist Group, Canada)
Gilbert Achcar (Fourth International; Author of Arabs and the Holocaust)
Paul Street (Author of Empire’s New Clothes)
Cinzia Arruzza (Solidarity, New School)
Adriana Mulero (Comité de Estudiantes en Defensa de la Educación Pública, CEDEP; Unión de Juventudes Socialistas-Movimiento Socialista de Trabajadores, Puerto Rico)
Blanca Misse (Student Worker Action Team, University of California-Berkeley)
Bill Zoda (Philadelphia Association of Staff Nurses and Allied Professionals)
Steve Downs (Transport Workers Union Local 100)
Wes Strong (Defend Public Education)
Adaner Usmani (Labour Party Pakistan)

*Organizational affiliations listed for identification purposes only

Solidarity and the Radical Film and Lecture Series bring you a weekend of discussion regarding the key issues that radical activists face today, as capitalism enters the third year of a profound crisis that has presented stark challenges to social movements and left organization.

Both the left and the ruling class struggle to find strategies that will see their side through the crisis, while workers and the oppressed continue to pay for the economic crisis and the endless wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

But even as the crisis has exacted enormous cost from the working class and its organizations, popular struggles have emerged that we can not only celebrate but also learn from—that’s what this weekend is about. Drawing lessons and inspiration from the strikes and struggles that have marked this period and charting our course in a difficult political terrain.

Join us for a weekend of debate and discussion about where movements have gone in the wake of the biggest crisis in seventy years, the role of the anti-capitalist left in rebuilding mass movements that can win—and the political renewal that is necessary for left politics to become relevant in a world marked by the resurgence of the right.

Conference Program

Main Sessions:

Two Years In: Socialist Activists and the Crisis
Obama’s America: Resistance at Home and Abroad
Rebuilding the Movements, Renewing the Left

The conference will also feature workshops on The Labor Movement • Defending Higher Education • Public Sector Fightback • The Rise of the Right and more

Lunch and coffee breaks will be provided by the conference organizers and are included in registration costs.

Free housing, childcare and meals provided.

Travel subsidies available for Solidarity members and friends in the Northeast region

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com