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Monthly Archives: October 2009

AUTONOMIST EVENTS

Antonio Negri

Antonio Negri

NEW YORK

Silvia Federici and George Caffentzis on the Politics of Oil
On Tuesday NOVEMBER 10th at 6:30PM

Join Silvia Federici and George Caffentzis as they discuss big oil’s cultural and political violence with Peter Maass, contributing editor at The New York Times Magazine and the author of the recently published Crude World: The Violent Twilight of Oil.

The event is moderated by Ashley Dawson, Associate Professor of English, The Graduate Center, CUNY.  The event will take place at the Graduate Center, 365 5th Ave btwn 34th and 35th (The Skylight Room, 9100)

Ariel Salleh on Eco-Sufficiency with Silvia Federici
On Wednesday, November 11th at 7:00PM, ARIEL SALLEH will be presenting on a feminist and ecologically integrated politics of the commons, themes central to her recently edited volume, Eco-Sufficiency & Global Justice: Women Write Political Ecology (Pluto Press, 2009).  She will be introduced by and in dialogue with SILVIA FEDERICI. The event takes place at Bluestockings Bookstore (172 Allen Street, NYC 10002).

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Capitalism

Capitalism

WHITHER FINANCIALISED CAPITALISM?

 

International Conference
One Year on from the Panic of 2008:
WHITHER FINANCIALISED CAPITALISM?
Saturday 7 November 2009, 9 am to 6 pm, SOAS (Rooms G2 and G3), London

09.00-09.45 Registration and Coffee

09.45-12.15: Welcome Addresses and Opening Plenary: Financialised Capitalism and the International Crisis
* Gérard Duménil, National Centre for Scientific Research, Paris: Neoliberalism adrift: Perspectives for the coming decades
* Gary Dymski, University of California Center Sacramento: Reimagining finance in a post-crisis world of neoliberal design mechanisms?
* Costas Lapavitsas, SOAS, London: Will the crisis change the course of financialisation?

12.15-13.15 Lunch

13.15-15.30 Parallel Sessions

Contemporary Finance, Regulation and the Real Economy
* Malcolm Sawyer, Leeds University Business School Re-structuring the financial sector to reduce the burdens imposed on the economy
* Jan Toporowski, SOAS, London: Institutional investors and forced indebtedness: The theory of capital market inflation revisited
* Paulo L dos Santos, SOAS, London: The distinctive content of consumption debt – Varieties of Financialisation
* Engelbert Stockhammer, Vienna University of Economics and Business: The finance-dominated accumulation regime, income distribution and the present crisis
* Trevor Evans, Berlin School of Economics: Limits of finance-led capitalism
* Claude Serfati, University of Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines: From securitisation to fictitious capital : a political economy of the financial crisis

15.30-15.45 Coffee

15.45-18.00 Plenary
The Social Costs and Implications of Financialisation
* Karel Williams and Ismail Erturk, CRESC, Manchester: Regulatory closure, city elites and the politics of banking reform
* Andrew Leyshon, University of Nottingham: Financialisation ‘off-plan’: Domesticating financial futures and the
displacement of UK buy-to-let
* Robin Blackburn, University of Essex

For more information, contact rmf@soas.ac.uk, or visit http://www.soas.ac.uk/events/event54441.html
 ___________
Jeff Powell
School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS)
University of London
+44 (0)7817184435

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

DeadwingWORK, PLAY & BOREDOM

Call for Papers on ‘Work, Play & Boredom’ for an ephemera Conference at University of St. Andrews, 5-7 May 2010. Deadline for abstracts: 31 January 2010.

In recent years, play has become an abiding concern in the popular business literature and a crucial aspect of organizational culture. While managerial interest in play has certainly been with us for some time, there is a sense that organizations are becoming ever-more receptive to incorporating fun and frivolity into everyday working life. Team-building exercises, simulation games, puzzle-solving activities, office parties, themed dress-down days, and colourful, aesthetically-stimulating workplaces are notable examples of this trend. Through play, employees are encouraged to express themselves and their capabilities, thus enhancing job satisfaction, motivation, and commitment. Play also serves to unleash an untapped creative potential in management thinking that will supposedly result in innovative product design, imaginative marketing strategies and, ultimately, superior organizational performance. Play, it seems, is a very serious business indeed.

But this has not always been the case. Until very recently, play was seen as the antithesis of work. Classical industrial theory, for examples, hinges on a fundamental distinction between waged labour and recreation. Play at work is thought to pose a threat not only to labour discipline, but also to the very basis of the wage bargain: in exchange for a day’s pay, workers are expected to leave their pleasures at home. Given this context, we can well understand Adorno’s (1978: 228) comment that the purposeless play of children – completely detached from selling one’s labour to earn a living – unconsciously rehearses the ‘right life’. But play no longer holds the promise of life after capitalism, as it once did for Adorno; today, the ‘unreality of games’ is fully incorporated within the reality of  
organizations. When employees are urged to reach out to their ‘inner child’ (Miller, 1997: 255), it becomes clear that the traditional boundary between work and play is in the process of being demolished.

A certain utopianism underpins contemporary debates about play at work, evoking the pre-Lapsarian ideal of a happy life without hard work. In this respect, organizations seem to have taken notice of Burke’s (1971: 47) compelling vision of paradise: ‘My formula for utopia is simple: it is a community in which everyone plays at work and works at play. Anything less would fail to satisfy me for long’. But such idealism is not necessarily desirable. For while play promises to relieve the monotony and boredom of work, it is intimately connected to new forms of management control: it is part of the panoply of techniques that seek to align the personal desires of workers with bottom-line corporate objectives. We should not be surprised, then, when an overbearing emphasis on fun in the workplace leads to cynicism, alienation, and resentment from employees (Fleming, 2005).

While play at work has been extensively discussed in the popular and academic literature, the role of boredom in organisations has been somewhat neglected. It seems that boredom is destined to share the fate of other ‘negative emotions’, such as anger and contempt, which have generally been silenced in organization studies (Pelzer 2005). But boredom remains an important part of organisational life. As Walter Benjamin (1999: 105) observes, ‘we are bored when we don’t know what we are waiting for’. Boredom thus contains a sense of anticipation, even promise: ‘Boredom is the threshold to great deeds’ (ibid.). Since capitalism is preoccupied with fun and games, perhaps it is boredom rather than play that now serves unconsciously to rehearse the ‘right life’ in contemporary times.

This ephemera conference and special issue ask its participants to explore the interrelated themes of work, play, and boredom alongside an exploration of the cultural and political context out of which they have emerged.

Possible topics include:
–    The politics of play
–    Play and reality
–    Anthropology of play
–    Play and utopia
–    The boredom of play
–    Boredom as resistance
–    Identity and authenticity when played
–    The blurring of work and play
–    Playfulness at work
–    Creativity and play
–    Experience economy
–    Management games
–    Cultures of fun
–    Play and pedagogy
–    Seriousness and indifference
–    Foolishness and fooling around
–    Tedium and repetition
–    Humour, jokes, and cynicism
–    Childishness and management
–    Invention and innovation through play
–    Organizing spontaneity

The best papers of the conference will be published in a special issue of ephemera.

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:
Professor Niels Åkerstrøm Andersen, Professor at the Department of Management, Politics and Philosophy, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark. Author of many books, including his recent Power at Play: The Relationship between Play, Work and Governance (2009, Palgrave Macmillan).

Professor René ten Bos, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands. His many books include Fashion and Utopia in Management Thinking (John Benjamins, 2000).

Dates and Location:

5-7 May 2010 at School of Management, University of St Andrews, Scotland, UK.

Deadline, Conference Website, and Further Information:

The deadline for abstracts is 31 January 2010. The abstracts should be submitted as a Word document to Martyna Sliwa at martyna.sliwa@newcastle.ac.uk  The conference fee has not been set yet, as it is dependent on the number of participants, but will be kept to a minimum. PhD candidates pay a reduced fee.

Further information about the conference can be found on the conference website: http://www.ephemeraweb.org/conference With queries, you can also contact one of the conference organizers: Bent Meier Sørensen (bem.lpf@cbs.dk), Lena Olaison (lo.lpf@cbs.dk), Martyna Sliwa (martyna.sliwa@ncl.ac.uk), Nick Butler (nick.butler@st-andrews.ac.uk), Stephen Dunne (s.dunne@le.ac.uk), Sverre Spoelstra (sverre.spoelstra@fek.lu.se).

References:

Adorno, T. (1978) Minima Moralia: Reflections from Damaged Life. London and New York: Verso.
Benjamin, W. (1999) The Arcades Project. Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap Press.
Burke, R. (1971) ‘“Work” and “play”’, Ethics, 82(1): 33-47.
Fleming, P. (2005) ‘Workers’ playtime? Boundaries and cynicism in a “culture of fun” programme’, Journal of Applied Behavioural Science, 41(3): 285-303.
Miller, J. (1997) ‘All work and no play may be harming your business’, Management Development Review, 10(6/7): 254-255.
Pelzer, P. (2005) ‘Contempt and organization: Present in practice – Ignored by research?’ Organization Studies, 26(8): 1217-1227.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Deadwing

Deadwing

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

ModernismMODERNISM AFTER POSTMODERNISM

The Centre for Cultural Studies Research, University of East London presents:

Modernism After Postmodernism: Is there a future beyond capitalist realism?
November 11th 2009
2:00pm – 5:00pm
UEL Docklands Campus
Room EB.1.01
(First floor, main building, turn left upon entering the main square after leaving Cyprus DLR, Cyprus DLR is literally situated at the campus)
Free, All welcome

Has the idea of ‘postmodernism’ left any legacy but that of a generalised capitulation to the demands of liberal capitalism? What can contemporary urbanism learn from the era of unabashed ‘militant modernism’? Is the most controversial living philosopher, Alain Badiou, with his radical re-conceptualisation of Truth, Event and Subject, to be understood as advocating a neo-modernist programme, or something quite different? Can there be any progressive radicalism that does not ultimately embrace the revolutionising logic of modernism?

Speakers:

Mark Fisher
Capitalist Realism, or the Political-Economic Logic Of Postmodernism
Mark Fisher teaches at UEL, the City Lit and Goldsmiths and is the author of Capitalist Realism (Zer0, 2009)

Nina Power
Is Badiou a Modernist?
Nina Power is a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at Roehampton University and the author of One-Dimensional Woman (Zer0, 2009)

Owen Hatherley
They Are Rebuilding The City, Always: Regeneration now and its post-war predecessors
Owen Hatherley is a freelance writer, a researcher at Birkbeck and author of Militant Modernism (Zer0 2009)

Jeremy Gilbert
New Times Again: Legacies of Left Postmodernism
Jeremy Gilbert teaches at UEL and is the author of Anticapitalism and Culture (Berg 2008)

Here is something I wrote on Postmodernism and Education:

Rikowski, G. (2008) Postmodern Dereliction in the Face of Neoliberal Education Policy, 27th April, London, online at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=articles&sub=Postmodern%20Dereliction%20in%20the%20Face%20of%20Neoliberal%20Education%20Policy

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

HarvestingTHE HUMAN REVOLUTION

The Radical Anthropology Group is running the following seminars for the Autumn Term 2009:

November 3rd: Marx’s anthropological writings and the current global crisis – HILLEL TICKTIN

November 10th: ‘Beauty Magic’: Cosmetics and the origins of culture – CAMILLA POWER

November 17th: Living cosmology day-to-day: the Mbendjele hunter-gathereres of Congo – JEROME LEWIS

November 24th: What future for the forest people? – JEROME LEWIS

December 1st: Hobbits and ‘Out of Africa’ – CHRIS STRINGER

December 8th: Totem and taboo – CHRIS KNIGHT

December 15th: A Christmas fairy tale: ‘The Shoes that were Danced to Pieces’ – CHRIS KNIGHT

All lectures take palce at the St. Martin’s Community Centre, 43 Carol Street, London NW1. Tuesdays 6.15-9.00

Website: http://www.radicalanthropologygroup.org

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Historical Materialism 6

Historical Materialism 6

HISTORICAL MATERIALISM SIXTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE – REGISTRATION

 

Sixth Historical Materialism Annual Conference
Another World is Necessary: Crisis, Struggle and Political Alternatives
27–29 November 2008
School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) and Birkbeck College, London, WC1
In association with Socialist Register and the Isaac and Tamara Deutscher Memorial Prize Committee

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN!
http://mercury.soas.ac.uk/hm/conference2009.htm

The annual Historical Materialism conference is organised by the editorial board of Historical Materialism in association with the Deutscher Memorial Prize committee and the Socialist Register. The conference has become an important event on the Left, providing an annual forum to discuss recent developments on the agenda of historical-materialist research and has attracted an increasingly high attendance over the past four years. The Editorial Board of Historical Materialism welcomes attendance and active engagement in discussion with panellists from new as well as prior participants with an interest in critical-Marxist thought.

One of the principal objectives of the conference has been to build bridges among the various Marxist communities, including the breaking down some of the linguistic and intellectual barriers which continue to hamper the circulation and expansion of critical-Marxist thought. The sixth annual Historical Materialism Conference, under the banner of ‘Crisis, Struggle and Political Alternatives’, promises to continue and take forward this objective.

The conference is organised around three plenary sessions (the Deutscher lecture, the launch of the Socialist Register 2010, and Historical Materialism’s plenary) and a host of workshops dedicated to specific themes.

THE FULL TIMETABLE WILL BE AVAILABLE SOON

For more details, please contact: historicalmaterialism@soas.ac.uk

Attendance is free, but participants must register in advance online (if this is not possible, please contact historicalmaterialism@soas.ac.uk). However, the conference is largely self-funded and we will depend on voluntary donations by attendants and participants to support the organisation and running of the event. The suggested advanced online donation is £40 for waged and £15 for unwaged: http://mercury.soas.ac.uk/hm/conference2009.htm, , and the suggested donation on the door is £50 for waged and £20 for unwaged.

For logistical and other support, Historical Materialism would like to thank the School of Oriental and African Studies and the Centre for International Security and Diplomacy. For sponsorship, thanks to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS, SOAS Student Union, Brill Academic Publishers, the Deutscher Memorial Prize committee, Socialist Register, Journal of Agrarian Change, the International Initiative for the Promotion of Political Economy and Bookmarks.

The Editorial Board of Historical Materialism

THEMES FOR THIS YEAR’S CONFERENCE INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING: A LEFT PROJECT: TRANSFORMING THE STATE? * AGENCY * AGRARIAN CHANGE IN CONTEMPORARY CAPITALISM: TECHNICAL DYNAMICS AND ENVIRONMENTAL * TRAJECTORIES * ALTHUSSER AND PHILOSOPHY * APOCALYPSE MARXISM * ART AGAINST CAPITALISM * ART AND CRITIQUE IN GERMANY BETWEEN THE WARS * BOOK LAUNCH: ALEX CALLINICOS’S IMPERIALISM AND GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY * BOOK LAUNCH: KARL MARX AND CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY * CAPITALISM, CITIZENSHIP AND CRISIS * CLASS AND CONFLICT IN ANCIENT GREECE * CLASS AND POLITICS IN THE ‘GLOBAL SOUTH’ * CLASS, CRISIS, DISTRIBUTION * COGNITIVE MAPPING, TOTALITY AND THE REALIST TURN * COMMODIFYING HEALTH CARE IN THE UK * CUBAN REVOLUTION AND CUBAN SOCIETY * DERIVATIVES * DEVELOPMENTALISM, THE STATE AND CLASS FORMATION * DIMENSIONS OF THE FOOD CRISIS * EASTERN CENTRAL EUROPE FROM TRANSITION TO EU ENLARGEMENT: CHANGE AND CONTINUITY IN THE GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY * ECOLOGICAL CRISIS * EMPIRE AND IMPERIALISM * ENERGY AND GEOPOLITICS * ENERGY, WASTE AND CAPITALISM * EPISTEMOLOGY, DIALECTICS AND HISTORICAL MATERIALISM * EXTENDING THE MINERALS-ENERGY-COMPLEX * FEMINISM AND SOCIALIST STRATEGY * FINANCE, THE HOUSING QUESTION AND URBAN POLITICS * GLOBAL LAW AND HUMAN RIGHTS: MARXIST REFLECTIONS * GRAMSCI RELOADED * GREEN CAPITALISM AND ENVIRONMENTAL CRISIS * HISTORICAL MATERIALISM AND LATE CAPITALIST DEVELOPMENT * HISTORICAL MATERIALISM AND SOCIAL RESEARCH * HISTORICISING HISTORICAL MATERIALISM * HM BOOK SERIES LAUNCH:  MIKKO LAHTINEN ON ALTHUSSER AND MACHIAVELLI * HM BOOK SERIES LAUNCH: PETER THOMAS’S THE GRAMSCIAN MOMENT * IN MEMORY OF PETER GOWAN * INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES ON THE CRISIS * INTERPRETATIONS OF THE CRISIS * ISAAC AND TAMARA DEUTSCHER MEMORIAL PRIZE LECTURE: KEES VAN DER PIJL, NOMADS, EMPIRES, STATES * KNOWLEDGE, NATURE, PROPERTY * LABOUR * LABOUR AND THE ECONOMIC SUBJECT IN CONTEMPORARY ART * LABOUR BEYOND THE FACTORY * LATIN AMERICAN WORKING CLASSES * LEARNING FROM PAST CRISES * LINEAGES OF NEOLIBERALISM * LISTEN TO VENEZUELA SCREENING AND DISCUSSION * MARXISM AND LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY * MARXISM AND NATIONALISM TODAY * MARXISM AND POLITICAL VIOLENCE * MARXISM AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS * MARXISM AND TIME * MARXISM BETWEEN ETHICS AND UTOPIA * MARXISM, DEMOCRACY AND CLASSICAL POLITICAL THEORY * MIGRATION * MONEY * MORBID SYMPTOMS: HEALTH UNDER CAPITALISM * NEOLIBERALISM, AESTHETICS AND THE RECUPERATION OF DISSENT * ON THE OBJECTS OF COMMUNISM: A HACKING PANEL * PHILOSOPHY AND COMMUNISM IN THE EARLY MARX * PLANNING, LOCALISM AND THE LEFT * POSTNEOLIBERALISM * PRESENTATION OF THE JOURNAL CHTO DELAT/WHAT IS TO BE DONE? * RACE, NATION AND ORIENTALISM * RED PLANETS: MARXISM AND SCIENCE FICTION * RE-EMBEDDING MARXISM: COERCION AND POLITICAL ECONOMY * REGISTERING THE CRISIS: A SOCIALIST REGISTER ROUNDTABLE * RESEARCH ON MARX * RESTRUCTURING, OUTSOURCING, DISTRIBUTION: DIMENSIONS OF THE GLOBAL CRISIS * REVOLUTIONARY THEORY, AUTONOMIST MARXISM AND THE CRITIQUE OF POLITICAL ECONOMY * SLAVERY AND CAPITALISM IN THE US SOUTH * SOCIAL MOVEMENTS IN LATIN AMERICA: THE CURRENT CONJUNCTURE * STUDENT MOVEMENTS AND YOUTH REVOLTS * THE ARTS AND CAPITALIST CRISIS: THE NEW DEAL EXPERIENCE * THE CRITIQUE OF RELIGION AND THE CRITIQUE OF CAPITALISM * THE POLITICAL AESTHETICS OF REALISM * THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF WORK * THE POLITICS OF FINANCE * THE POLITICS OF THE WILL * THE POLITICS OF VALUE * THE RIGHT: RACE, NATION, IDENTITY * THE TURN TO ETHICS AND THE CRITIQUE OF CAPITALISM * ‘TURBULENCE: IDEAS FOR MOVEMENT’, NEW ISSUE LAUNCH * UNION STRUGGLES * UNOISM, ECOLOGY AND CRISIS * UTOPIAS, DYSTOPIAS AND SOCIALIST BIOPOLITICS * WEBLOGS AND THE OPPOSITIONAL PUBLIC SPHERE: A DISCUSSION * WHAT IS ABSTRACTION? * WORKERS AND STRUGGLE TODAY * ZIONISM, 
ANTISEMITISM AND THE LEFT – A DEBATE

SPEAKERS INCLUDE: Gilbert Achcar * Gregory Albo * Robert Albritton * Peter Alexander * Noaman Ali * Kevin B. Anderson * Ricardo Antunes * Caroline Arscott * Sam Ashman * John Ashworth * Ilker Atac * Jairus Banaji * Fletcher Baragar * Banu Bargu * Colin Barker * Tom Barnes * Luca Basso * Matthew Beaumont * Pinar Bedirhanoglu * John Bell * Aaron Benanav * Halil Berktay * Armin Beverungen * Robin Blackburn * Paul Blackledge * Max Blechman * Derek Boothman * Mark Bould * Bill Bowring * Ulrich Brand * Craig Brandist * Michael Brie * Wendy Brown * Dick Bryan * Adrian Budd * Verity Burgmann * Alex Callinicos * Mauro Farnesi Camellone * Bob Cannon * Thomas Carmichael * Warren Carter * Giorgio Cesarale * Maria Elisa Cevasco * Dae-op Chang * Vivek Chibber * Andrew 
Chitty * Christopher Chitty * Joseph Choonara * Sheila Cohen * Alex Colas * Tim Cooper * Stipe Curkovic * Steve Cushion * Gareth Dale * Neil Davidson * Gail Day * Tim Dayton * Kathryn Dean * Angela Dimitrakaki * Demet Dinler * Kevin Doogan * Elizabeth Dore * Nick Dyer-Witheford * Juliane Edler * Aram Eisenschitz * Hester Eisenstein * Fuat Ercan * Adam Fabry * Daniel Fairfax * Mariano Feliz * Ben Fine * Robert Fine * Mark Fisher * Peter Fleming * Gregory C. Flemming * Keith Flett * John Foran * Vassillis Fouskas * Carl Freedman * James Furner * Alexander Gallas * Andreia Galvao * Ferruccio Gambino * Earl Gammon * Mike Geddes * Lindsey German * Frantz Gheller * Lesley Gill * John Glenn * Jesse Goldstein * Maya Gonzalez * Jeff Goodwin * Jamie Gough * Nick Gray * Juan Grigera * Peter Hallward * Ayeesha Hameed * Carrie Hamilton * Bue Hansen * Jane Hardy * Chris Harman * Stefano Harney * Barnaby Harran * David Harvie * Owen Hatherley * Mike Haynes * Lesley Henderson * Christoph Henning * Rob Heynen * Andy Higginbottom * Sarah Hines * John Holloway *  John Holst * Patricia Howard * Peter Hudis * Liz Humphries * Robert Jackson * Dhruv Jain * Fredric Jameson * Elinor Jean * Seongjin Jeong * Bob Jessop * Bonn Juego * Anush Kapadia * Brian Kelly * Sami Khatib * Jeff Kinkle * Kelvin Knight * Meri Koivusalo * Ahmet Hasim Kose * Conor Kostick * Primoz Krasovec * Maria Kyriakidou * Xavier Lafrance * Mikko Lahtinen * Alex Levant * Les Levidow * Iren Levina * William Lewis * Nicola Livingstone * Jean-Guy Loranger * Monica Clua Losada * David Mabb * Andreas Malm * Gonzo Poso Martin * Randy Martin * Jonathan Martineau * Meade McCloughan * David McNally * Angela McRobbie * Simon Mohun * Peter P. Mollinga * Kim Moody * Colin Mooers * Jason W. Moore * Adam Morton * Sara Motta * Tadzio Müller * Vlad Mykhnenko * Ozgur Narin * Jonathan Neale * Mike Newman * Susan Newman * Benjamin Noys * Blair Ogden * Ozlem Onaran * Deidre O’Neill * Ebru Deniz Ozan * Melda Ozturk * Leo Panitch * Giorgos Papafragkou * David Parker * Jaime Pastor * Jody Patterson * Knox Peden * Alexei Penzin * Simon Pirani * Iain Pirie * Amedeo Policante * Nicolas Pons-Vignon * Charles Post * Moishe Postone * Nina Power * Gonzalo Pozo-Martin * Lucia Pradella * Toni Prug * Ozren Pupovac * Thomas Purcell * Hugo Radice * Ravi Raman * Akbar Rasulov * Gene Ray * John Rees * Tobias Reichardt * Paul Reynolds * Sébastien Rioux * John Roberts * Ed Rooksby * Ellen Rosen * Christina Rousseau * Sheila Rowbotham * Sally Ruane * Frank Ruda * Alfredo Saad-Filho * Spyros Sakellaropoulos * Birgit Sauer * Johannes Dragsbaek Schmidt * Alan Sears * Thomas Sekine * Ben Selwyn * Greg Sharzer * Stuart Shields * Subir Sinha * Gary Slater * John Smith * Johan Soderberg * Clare Solomon * Panagiotis Sotiris * Dimitris Sotiropoulos * Susan Spronk * Kerstin Stakemeier * Julian Stallabrass * Engelbert Stockhammer * Adam Swain * Erik Swyngedouw * Lotta Takala-Greenish * Daniel Tanuro * Jean Baptiste Thomas * Peter Thomas * Hillel Ticktin * John Timberlake * Bruno Tinel * Massimiliano Tomba * Jonathon Tomlinson * Alberto Toscano * Ben Trott * Julian Tudor-Hart * Emily van der Meulen * Marco Vanzulli * Leandro Vergara-Camus * Zaira Rodrigues Vieira * Dmitry Vilensky * Marina Vishmidt * Andriana Vlachou * Hilary Wainwright * Mike Wayne * Xiaoping Wei * Duncan Wigan * Evan Calder Williams * Michael Wood * Phil Woodhouse * Galip Yalman * Karel Yon * Christian Zeller * Alexander Zevin * Mislav Zitko *

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

 

John Holloway

John Holloway

CRACK CAPITALISM – A DISCUSSION WITH JOHN HOLLOWAY

7-9pm, Monday 26th October, London

At the height of the anti-capitalist movement, John Holloway’s book Change The World without Taking Power _<http://libcom.org/library/change-world-without-taking-power-john-holloway>_provoked an international debate*. Eight years later, after the failure of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, combined with the failure of the capitalist economy, anti-capitalism is back on the agenda.

John Holloway will introduce his forthcoming book, Crack Capitalism, followed by a discussion on how we can change the world without repeating the tragedies of twentieth century socialism.

Come and join the debate.

*To read the debate around the book Change The World Without Taking Power, go to: _http://www.herramienta.com.ar/debate-sobre-cambiar-el-mundo/presentacion-e-indice-de-articulos_

VENUE: The Great Hall, Queen’s Building, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1, Mile End Tube. (The event will be followed by a social at the Half Moon pub, 213-233 Mile End Road, London E1)

Supported by Mute Magazine (mute AT metamute.org) and the Queen Mary School of Business and Management

Crack Capitalism at Amazon: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Crack-Capitalism-John-Holloway/dp/0745330088/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1256420697&sr=1-8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Radical Pedagogy

Radical Pedagogy

EDUCATION FOR LIBERATION

 

Saturday 14 November, 11am – 4pm

Taking place at Haverstock School, 24 Haverstock Hill, NW3 2BQ (opposite Chalk Farm tube)

Speakers include: Michael Rosen (former children’s laureate), Steven Rose (Director of the Brain and Behaviour Group, Open University), Alan Gibbons (children’s author), Ken Jones (Professor of Education, Keele University), Meg Maguire (Professor of Education, King’s College London), Kevin Courtney NUT executive, Jan Hoby (Danish Nursery Teachers Union), Martin Allen and Patrick Ainley, John Yandell (Institute of Education).

Organised by the Socialist Teachers Alliance

A conference on what education should be for education

Workshops include: What is Assessment for Learning? L What do we mean by anti-racist education? | Can there be a radical pedagogy in Physical Education? | Vygotsky and theories of learning l What sort of curriculum do we need? | What should maths education look and feel like? | Teaching about conflict- Palestine a case study

TICKETS: £10 (waged) £5 concessions (includes Beginning Teachers)

Book Online at: http://www.socialistteachersalliance.org.uk/ed4lib

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Karl Marx - 1872

Karl Marx - 1872

COMMODITIES AND VALUES

 

King’s College London Reading Capital Society

October 20th 2009

– – –

http://www.kclreadingcapital.blogspot.com

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=49539959005

– – –

Thanks to all who attended our re-launch meeting with Ben Fine (apologies for those who had to sit on the floor and stand by the door!). There is an mp3 of the meeting (http://rapidshare.com/files/293932707/Ben_Fine_13Oct2009.mp3) for download along with older sessions on the blog. It’s a big file, but worth the wait!

We hope that everyone found the meeting interesting and will consider reading Capital with us. Details of our first meeting are below:

’Commodities & Values’

The wealth of societies in which the capitalist mode of production prevails appears as an ‘immense collection of commodities’.

Marx begins Capital by looking at the elementary building block of capitalism, the commodity.

Marx identifies in the commodity a dual aspect, use-value and exchange value. One gives the commodity its usefulness for the consumer, the other commensurability with other commodities.

– – –

Chris Harman, editor of International Socialism Journal (http://www.isj.org.uk), introduces a discussion on:

‘Commodities & Values’
Tuesday 27th October 2009
6pm
Room 2.42 F-WB
Waterloo Campus
King’s College London

N.B. We will be reading the first 3 sections of Chapter 1 in preparation.

All welcome!

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

 

Strike

Strike

STRIKES AND SOCIAL CONFLICT IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

 

 

A message from Sjaak van der Velden: svv@iisg.nl

Call for Papers
International Conference
Strikes and Social Conflicts in the Twentieth Century
Lisbon, 17, 18, 19 March, 2011

The Institute of Contemporary History (New University of Lisbon), the International Institute of Social History (Amsterdam), The Archive Edgard Leuenroth (Unicamp/Brasil), the Centre for the Study of Spain under Franco and Democracy (Autonomous University of Barcelona) and the Maison des Sciences de l’Homme (France) start the call for papers for the International Conference on Strikes and Social Conflicts in the Twentieth Century that will take place in Lisbon between 17 and 19 March 2011.
The twentieth century has been confirmed as the century when the capital-labour conflict was most severe. The International Conference on Strikes and Social Conflicts in the Twentieth Century will host submissions on the strikes and social conflicts in the twentieth century and works on the theoretical discussion on the role of unions and political organizations. We also invite researchers to submit papers on methodology and the historiography of labour.

We welcome submissions on labour conflicts that occurred in factories, universities or public services, on rural and urban conflicts and also on conflicts that developed into civil wars or revolutions. National and international comparisons are also welcome.

After the Russian revolution the relative strengths of capital and labour were never again the same, with a period of revolution and counter-revolution that ended with World War II. Protagonist of the victory over fascism, the labour movement found itself neglected in the core countries under the impact of economic growth in the 1950s and the 1960s. But May 1968 quickly reversed the situation, with a following boom of labour studies during the 1970s. Nevertheless once the crisis of the 1970s was over, capital has regained the initiative, with the deterioration of labour laws, the crisis of trade unions and the subsequent despise in the academy for the study of social conflicts. The recent crisis, however, shows that workers, the ones who create value, are not obsolete. The social movements regain, in the last decade, a central role in the world.

The intensification of social conflicts in the last decade promoted a comeback to the academia of the studies on labour and the social movements. This conference aims to be part of this process: to retrieve, promote and disseminate the history of social conflicts during the twentieth century.

The Scientific Committee:
Alvaro Bianchi (AEL)
Raquel Varela (IHC)
Sjaak van der Velden (IISH)
Serge Wolikow (MSH)
Xavier Domïnech (CEDIF)

Calendar:
Papers submission:   January 2010 – 30th June 2010
Notification of acceptance:  July 30th, 2010
Papers:  December 15th, 2010
Conference: March, 17-19, 2011

Important: The deadline for delivery of completed papers/articles is 15th December 2010. For reasons of translation no papers will be accepted after this date. The paper should be no longer than 4000 words (including spaces) in times new roman, 12, line space 1,5. For Registration Form see below.

Conference Languages: Conference languages are Portuguese, English, French and Spanish (simultaneous translation Portuguese/English).

Preliminary Program: The Conference will have sessions in the mornings and afternoons. There will be conferences of invited speakers, among other, Marcel van der Linden, Fernando Rosas, Serge Wolikow, Beverly Silver, Kevin Murphy, Ricardo Antunes, Alvaro Bianchi, Dave Lyddon, Xavier Domïnech. During the conference there will be an excursion guided by Prof. Fernando Rosas (Lisbon of the Revolutions); a debate about cinema and labour movement and a debate about Crisis and Social Change.

Thusday-17/03/11 Friday-18/03/11

Saturday-19/03/11
9:00 – 11:00 Opening Conference Sessions
Excursion: Lisbon of the revolutions (guide by Prof. Fernando Rosas)
11:15 – 13:15 Sessions  Sessions Sessions
13:15 � 14:30  Lunch Lunch Lunch
14:30 � 16:30 Sessions Sessions Sessions
16:45 � 18:45 Sessions Sessions Sessions
19:30 Debate: Movies and Working class in the twentieth century.
Debate: “The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it”. Crisis and Social Change.
21:00

Dinner (Uai)

Dinner (Portug�lia)

Dinner (Casa do Alentejo)

Conference Fees
Fees including dinners and excursion Lisbon of the Revolutions: 80 euros
Fees without dinners and excursion: free
Entrance free

Presidents/Research directors of the Institutes
Fernando Rosas (IHC)
Fernando Teixeira da Silva (AEL)
Marcel van der Linden (IISH)
Pere Y Solanes (CEDIF)
Serge Wolikow (MSH)

Registration form/Papers Submission
International Conference
Strikes and Social Conflicts around the World in the Twentieth Century
Lisbon, 17, 18, 19 March, 2011

For Registration/Papers Submission fill out this registration form and send it to ihc@fcsh.unl.pt

First Name:  Family Name:

Position: Professor/ Associate Professor/ Assistant Professor/ Lecturer/ Ph.D Candidate/ Postgraduate/ Independent Researcher etc..

University/Organization/Job:
Detailed Post Address (Important!):
City: 

Country:

Postcode:
Telephone: Mobile (Important): Email (Important):

Paper Title: Abstract (max 200 words)

Contact information:
Instituto de Hist�ria Contempor�nea/ Faculdade de Ci�ncias Sociais e Humanas (Universidade Nova de Lisboa)
Av. de Berna, 26 C
1069-061 Lisboa, Portugal
E-Mail: ihc@fcsh.unl.pt

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

 

The Battle in Seattle - by Glenn Rikowski

The Battle in Seattle - by Glenn Rikowski

Signs of Revolt – Creative Resistance and Social Movements since Seattle

EXHIBITION AND TALKS: Space Hijackers/Ultimate Holding Company/Reel News/kennardphillipps/ Cactus Network/Jonathan Barnbrook/Pedro Inhoue/Noel Douglas/David Gentlemen/Guy Smallman/Jody Boehnart/ Jess Hurd/Notes from Nowehere/Movement of the Imagination/Rebel Clown 
Army/ Indymedia London/Laboratory of Insurrectionary Imagination/ Creative Resistance Research Network/ Turbulence/War Boutique/Josh On

Opening FRIDAY 13 NOVEMBER 6pm then SATURDAY 14–SUNDAY 22 NOVEMBER
Opening Times: Weekends 10-10pm, Weekdays 12–9pm
Shop 14
The Old Truman Brewery
91 Brick Lane
London
E1 6QL
 

10 years ago, in November 1999 an alliance of direct action activists, environmentalists and trade unionists shut down the meeting of the World Trade Organisation in Seattle, stopping the next trade round of Capitalist Globalisation. In the process they sparked a Movement of Movements right across the globe its slogan became ‘Another World is Possible’.

This November exactly 10 years from that momentous demonstration, and with most of the predictions of the movements rapidly coming true what with the crisis of the economy, a permanent state of war and the collapse of our eco-system wrecking lives across the planet, the rich and powerful meet again in Copenhagen to discuss the next Climate treaty after Kyoto, yet again activists are preparing to challenge the idea that the Market can solve the problems of the world, and take another step toward that possible world after Capitalism.

Signs of Revolt is an exhibition that weaves together the story of the past decades social movements, drawing out the influences and connections between and across the movements against Capitalism, War and Climate Change. Using archive material and documentary photography and video from movement photographers and filmmakers, it reveals the story of how we got from Seattle to Copenhagen.

Interspersed in this narrative are works by artist and designer activists and collectives, produced during, within and for the movements, this is the first time such a collection has been brought together in the UK and it will be a chance to reflect upon and celebrate the new creative impulses that the movements spawned and the possibilities for developing the creative capacity of future movements, these issues will also be discussed in greater depth during a series of talks during the exhibition.

As Capitalism threatens our very existence, Signs of Revolt defiantly maps out possible routes to a future filled with hope… http://www.signsofrevolt.net

Festival of Radical Communication–a weekend of talks as part of Signs of Revolt: http://signsofrevolt.net/?page_id=41

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?invites&eid=152633464034

Contact and to register for the weekend (it’s free but we need to know numbers!): show@signsofrevolt.net

“they can cut all the flowers, but they cannot stop the coming of spring” Pablo Neruda

Noel Douglas
http://www.noeldouglas.net
http://www.movementoftheimagination.org
http://www.myspace.com/freemachine
+44[0]7989 471159

The Battle in Seattle: Its Significance for Education – by Glenn Rikowski: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Battle-Seattle-Significance-Education-Hilcole/dp/1872767370 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Incident

The Incident

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 18th OCTOBER 2009

 

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

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SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE – UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 2009-2010 LUNCHBOX SPEAKERS’ SERIES

October Speakers’ Panel – Student Co-operatives

When:  Wednesday, October 21, 2009, noon – 1:30 pm
Where:  Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto,
252 Bloor St. West, Toronto, Room 12-199

Speakers:

* Marisa Charland will give an overview of Ontario Student Co-operative Association, the federation that unites all Ontario student co-operatives.
* Debbie McKay will present the development of, and services provided by the Guelph Campus Co-operative enterprise at University of Guelph.
* Andrew Haydon will discuss the challenges in developing the newest student housing co-operative in Ontario, located in Cambridge.

* Sonja Carrière, Education Manager of On Co-op, will moderate this panel.

Bring your lunch and a mug – coffee, tea and water will be provided.

For more information, contact Lisa White at secspeaker@oise.utoronto.ca, or visit our website at http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca

This event will also be webcast live on the Internet. Please see our website for detailed instructions: http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca/english/webcast.php

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PEOPLE FOR EDUCATION ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Register now to attend on Saturday November 7, 2009!

Amazing speakers and workshop leaders are looking forward to sharing their expertise with you.

* Meet other parents, principals, school and school board staff from around the province.
* Come and share ideas, raise concerns, find solutions and learn a lot!
* Connect with others who care passionately about our schools.

When: Nov. 7th, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m

Where: York University, Toronto, ON

Cost: $50 and you can save $10 by becoming a member of People for Education (costs $25 but gets you lots of other privileges too!)

To view the registration form, click here: http://www.peopleforeducation.com/registration09 (Fill it out, save to your computer, then email back to jan@peopleforeducation.com)

To view the conference flyer, click here (share this by email – bring a friend or someone from your school): http://www.peopleforeducation.com/conferenceflyer09

To view the agenda and session descriptions, click here: http://www.peopleforeducation.com/conference09/sessionsupdate

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URGENT ACTION: STOP THE U OF T ATTACKS ON ACCESS & EQUITY

October 19 & 21

Students who face barriers to access education are about to be hit even harder. The Transitional Year Program (TYP), a 40 year old access program, is about to face drastic changes that will inevitably destroy it. These changes include taking away TYP’s autonomy by putting it under Woodsworth College, taking away TYP’s independent space, reducing teaching and support staff, and slashing the TYP budget.

We need your support on Monday October 19 and Wednesday October 21. On these dates university bodies will be voting to decide the fate of the program. We need a mass turnout of people to stop these committees from rubber-stamping these heinous changes:

Monday October 19, 3-5pm
Faculty of Arts and Science Council
Munk Centre, Campbell Conference Centre,
1 Devonshire Place (Devonshire and Hoskin)

Wednesday October 2,1 4:30-6pm
Woodsworth College Council
Woodsworth Residence, Waters Lounge
321 Bloor Street (Bloor and St. George)

The University has told students that they are not closing TYP. However, TYP will be unable to serve its mandate and support its students under the proposed move to Woodsworth. Reducing staff, faculty and funding limits the ability of the program to meet the needs of its students. Taking away our space by moving us into a few rooms at Woodsworth further marginalizes us by removing the supportive environment that our home at 49 St. George provides.

The University and TYP administration have been repeatedly asked to consult students through this process. After a battle, the TYP administration began meeting with the Transitional Year Program Preservation Alliance, sharing limited information and calling it consultation. Never have students or the communities TYP serves been allowed input into the process.

The future of these marginalized students is in your hands. Please join us in asking the University of Toronto to reconsider shutting the doors on this essential program.

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THIRD CANADIAN CONFERENCE ON SOCIAL ENTERPRISE

“Living Our Values: Social Enterprise in Action”
November 18-20, 2009

Join hundreds of existing and prospective social enterprise operators from every region in Canada at the Third Canadian Conference on Social Enterprise taking place in Toronto, November 18-20, 2009. The conference will consist of three days of training and work sessions toward a national policy agenda and action plan.

Day 1: Intensive training sessions geared to your stage of planning, development or growth.

Days 2 and 3: Working sessions with fellow practitioners, funders, government officials, network organizations, and supporters designed to create a national policy agenda and action plan for social enterprise in Canada.

The Third Canadian Conference on Social Enterprise is an initiative of the Social Enterprise Council of Canada. For more information on the conference, please email: info@torontoenterprisefund.ca or visit http://www.enterprisingnonprofits.ca/resources/secouncil#CCSE

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WHAT’S WRONG WITH CANADA’S IMMIGRATION SYSTEM?

A Migrant Justice Assembly with Salimah Valiani, Amina Sherazee, Himani Bannerji and David McNally

Friday, October 23
6:00pm
245 Church Street
Room ENG-LG11

* Did you know that in 2008 more temporary workers entered the workforce than permanent residents in to Canada?
* Did you know that Canada has cut its refugee acceptance rate in half over the last 20 years?
* Did you know that there are over half a million people in the country without status, over half in the GTA?

Come and hear about how the broken immigration system is being shattered. Share your own stories. Build relationships. Develop ideas for the way ahead. Come prepared to talk back!

Registration and Refreshments at 6:00; Event starts at 6:30pm sharp.

Read more: http://toronto.nooneisillegal.org/node/336

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NOTES ON NO: ABSTINENCE AND THE PROBLEM OF THINKING IN SEX EDUCATION

CUHI (Centre for Urban Health Initiatives) Youth Sexual Health RIG Seminar Series

With Jen Gilbert, Ph.D., Faculty of Education, York University

Wednesday October 28th, 2009, 1:30-3:00 pm
York University, Room 280N, York Lanes
For Directions: http://www.yorku.ca/yorkweb/maps/keele.htm
Free, all are welcome, please RSVP to adrian.guta@utoronto.ca

This paper explores the problem of prohibition in sex education. Drawing on a two-year study of the language of abstinence in the United States, Dr. Gilbert considers many of the different ways that adults and youth use “no” in sex education. Feminists and other have critiqued the use of “no” as a restrictive and punitive gesture, containing sexuality’s potential in the lives of youth, particularly girls, youth of color, and LGBT youth. While she recognizes the importance of these critiques, she takes a detour through psychoanalytic theories of negation and considers the ways “no” can, often unwittingly, make room for thinking and thoughtfulness.

Please see our website for upcoming seminar summaries and other events: http://www.cuhi.utoronto.ca

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CREATIVE PLACES + SPACES CONFERENCE    
        
Oct. 28-30, 2009

Creative Places + Spaces is a multi-media, interactive, art-infused experience designed to inspire, empower, and connect thinkers, policymakers and practitioners working to build vibrant, dynamic, sustainable and creative places. The conference runs from October 28 – 30, 2009 and is hosted by Artscape.

During Creative Places + Spaces:  The Collaborative City, delegates and speakers together will have the opportunity to hear, see, exchange and practice global perspectives on collaboration and connect them to local opportunities for change. If you are interested in building bridges across boundaries in order to solve problems, generate new ideas, and foster transformation, check out the conference schedule and register today for a crash-course in the global groundswell around collaboration.

To find out more: http://www.creativeplacesandspaces.ca/conference

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THE MAYTREE FOUNDATION: REGISTER FOR THE FIVE GOOD IDEAS FALL 2009 PROGRAM

* Creating an Automatic Marketing Culture

with Donnie Claudino

Thursday, October 22, 2009
12:00 to 2:00 pm

Are you one of those people who rarely forward emails? Yet on that rare occasion, something strikes you as special–and you are inspired to ‘pass-it-on.’ Something about it clicked with you. Perhaps you can’t even explain it; a certain … je ne sais quoi. That ‘something’ is often described by marketers as “stickiness.” Stickiness is typically associated with “Viral Marketing.” But who wants to spread a virus? When we connect with a message, a video, a website–we automatically engage with it, and want to share it. We don’t have to be asked, because it’s automatic. Attend this Lunch & Learn to discover 5 things your organization can do to grow an automatic marketing culture–and have your messages exponentially spread by your constituents.

*Managing Volunteers

with Gail Nyberg, Executive Director, Daily Bread Food Bank

Wednesday, November 18, 2009
12:00 to 2:00 pm

Most non-profit organizations rely on volunteers to not only enhance their programming, but run day-to-day operations. At Daily Bread Food Bank the job of distributing over 15 million pounds or food to over 200 food programs would not get done without the hard work of volunteers. Volunteers help to sort food, participate in events, provide information to the public and run community food banks. Last year, 15,521 volunteers helped Daily Bread with over 107,259 hours of work. Our volunteers do great work, and we are constantly looking at ways to improve our programs and our volunteer opportunities. Come and find out more about what we’ve learned over the years (and are still learning) about how to run a successful volunteer program.

Location for both sessions:

St. Michael’s College – Elmsley Hall, Charbonnel Lounge
81 St. Mary Street
At St. Mary and Bay Streets, two blocks south of Bloor, closest subway access from Bay and Wellesley stations.

Please note that though the sessions are free, registration is required. Brown bag lunches are provided on a first come, first served basis.

Please RSVP to: kvukobratovic@maytree.com

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ECHO AND OWHN WANT TO HEAR YOUR VOICE ON OCTOBER 21, TORONTO

Please join Echo and the Ontario Women’s Health Network and share your views on: The Minister of Health’s 10-Year Mental Health and Addictions Strategy

Date: Wednesday October 21, 2009
Time: 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Place: Chestnut Conference Centre
89 Chestnut Street, Toronto
(east of University/south of Dundas )

Together we will:

1)   discuss the Minister’s report called Every Door is the Right Door;
2)   prepare comments that will be shared in a report to the Minister of Health;
3)   enjoy a women-friendly day of sharing and conversation to ensure your voices are heard
4)   share a healthy breakfast, lunch and snacks.  

This is an event for community women, service providers & community planners.

Please register by contacting OWHN at 416-408-4840 or by email at: owhn@owhn.on.ca

Please ask about support for childcare and local transportation.

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REPORT LAUNCH: WHY DON’T WE WANT THE POOR TO OWN ANYTHING?

The Metcalf Foundation invites you to the launch of a new report by Metcalf Innovation Fellow John Stapleton:

Why don’t we want the poor to own anything? Our relentless social policy journey toward destitution for the 900,000 poorest people in Ontario

When: Wednesday, October 21, 2009 from 1:00 to 3:00 pm
Where: St. Christopher House – Community Hall
248 Ossington Avenue (Dundas at Ossington), Toronto

This new report explores the issue of the very low levels of savings and assets allowed for people on welfare and some other social security programs. It makes recommendations for reform to rules that are impoverishing people and almost guaranteeing they will grow old in poverty.

Low-income community members may qualify for assistance to attend this event. Please call Rick Eagan at St. Christopher House at (416) 532-4828 ext. 238 for details.

Please RSVP to Heather Dunford at hdunford@metcalffoundation.com or (416) 926- 0366 ext. 33

To view launch details: http://fpyn.ca/system/files/Launch%20invite.pdf

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ORDER NOW! OUR TIMES MAGAZINE SPECIAL FALL ISSUE ON CLIMATE CHANGE

“The division between labour movements and social justice movements is an artificial one that serves to impede our ability to make progressive and sustained change.”
Angela Robertson, Social Justice Activist
“What Binds Us Together”

Here we go again! Our Times’ special fall issue on climate change (Vol. 28 No.5) will be heading to the printer shortly. If you’d like extra copies (more than 20), please let us know as soon as possible.

In this issue we’re featuring the efforts of workers and unions to go green and create long-term sustainable jobs. We’re bringing you a fantastic photostory by B.C. photographer Joshua Berson about the firefighters who fought the massive fires this year in Kelowna. And you’ll hear about the joint efforts of the Highlander Center in Tennessee and Toronto’s Labour Education Centre to build a cross-border, cross-movement dialogue. Of course, we’ll also have great new instalments of our regular columns, including WebWork and the Our Times Tally.

If you think you may want to order extra copies of this issue as an education resource for your workshops, schools, or to include in your conference or convention kits, please contact our business manager by Monday, October 19 at the latest. Telephone: 416-703-7661. Toll-free: 1-800-648-6131. E-mail: office@ourtimes.ca. Discounted prices are available for bulk orders.

Either way, I hope you enjoy the issue and find it of use. Thank you for your support for Our Times.

In Solidarity,
Lorraine Endicott
Editor, Our Times
http://www.ourtimes.ca

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CANADIAN JOURNALISM FOUNDATION FORUM – DIVERSITY IN THE MEDIA: A CASE STUDY

In an effort to bring lessons learned about diversity and programming to a wider audience, CJF Forums presents Joan Melanson, executive producer at CBC Radio, Toronto; and Nick Davis, producer of Metro Morning, in a discussion on reaching out to diverse audiences. Suanne Kelman, a professor at Ryerson’s School of Journalism, will interview the panel.

Date:
Tuesday, October 20, 2009
6:30 PM – 9:00 PM (ET)

Location:
Innis Town Hall
2 Sussex Ave.
Toronto, Ontario M5S 1J5

After the discussion there will be a Q&A with the audience, followed by a cocktail reception.

The event is free, but guests are encouraged to make a $15 contribution to help support CJF programs upon registration.

To register:  http://www.eventbrite.com/contact-organizer?eid=451282799

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BOOK LAUNCH (TORONTO) – HARVEST PILGRIMS: MEXICAN AND CARIBBEAN MIGRANT FARM WORKERS IN CANADA

Between the Lines and the Stephen Bulger Gallery invite you to celebrate the launch of Vincenzo Pietropaolo’s new book of photography. Harvest Pilgrims tells the little-known story of Canada’s migrant workers. The photographs in the “Harvest Pilgrims” collection have been highly acclaimed internationally through many publications and exhibitions, including a travelling show curated by the Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography that opened in Mexico City. Pietropaolo will present a slideshow of his work on the subject, and talk about the project, which has been 20 years in the making.

Tuesday, November 10th, 2009
7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
Stephen Bulger Gallery
1026 Queen Street West
Toronto, ON

For more information, contact Between the Lines, 1.800.718.7201or email: info@btlbooks.com

About the Book:
Harvest Pilgrims: Mexican and Caribbean Migrant Farm Workers in Canada
Vincenzo Pietropaolo
144 pp | paper | 80 + duotone photos
ISBN 978-1-897071-54-0 | $49.95 | October 2009

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OISE/UT DISABILITY STUDIES SPEAKERS SERIES – “DISABILITY IN DANGEROUS TIMES”

With Dr. Catherine Frazee

Thursday, November 5
3:30 pm
OISE Library, 252 Bloor Street West
Toronto, ON (above St. George Subway stop)

All Welcome, ASL provided

Catherine Frazee, D.Litt., LLD.
Professor of Distinction
Co-director, Ryerson-RBC Institute for Disability Studies Research & Education

Catherine Frazee has been involved in the equality rights movement for many years, most notably during her term as Chief Commissioner of the Ontario Human Rights Commission from 1989 to 1992. Her current work as a writer, educator and researcher focuses upon the rights, identity, experience and well-being of persons with disabilities. Catherine is a committed activist who has lectured and published extensively in Canada and abroad on issues related to disability rights, disability culture and the disability experience. She is currently a member of DAWN Canada’s Equality Rights Committee and serves on the Board of Directors of the Canadian Association for Community Living, where she chairs the Association’s Task Force on Values and Ethics. Catherine was awarded an honorary Doctor of Letters from the University of New Brunswick in October 2002.

For more info, contact Tanya Titchkosky, 416-978-0451 or email: tanyatitchkosky@oise.utoronto.ca

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SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE – UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 2009-2010 WORKSHOP SERIES

October 30: Board-Management Relations
with Vic Murray (Schulich School of Business, York University; School of Public Administration, University of Victoria)

For years, books, articles, websites and consultants have been offering all kinds of advice on how boards ought to operate and relate to the organizations they govern. Yet many boards have a very difficult time living up to these ideals or choose not to even try. Why is this? Is it the fault of the boards and managers? Or is it possible that the advice itself is not always what is needed?

Join us in this workshop to:

* Explore the gaps between the ideal and reality in board governance
* Learn how to develop ways of bringing the ideal and reality closer together
* Learn how to use contingency-based analysis and tailored board development approaches

Date:  Friday, October 30, 2009 – 9:00 am – 4:00 pm.

Cost: $140 + GST; Each additional participant from the same organization will receive a $15 discount, as will those who register for more than one workshop. Student rate available. Refreshments, coffee & tea served, but lunch not provided.

To Register: http://sec.oise.utoronto.ca/english/workshops.php or contact Lisa White at secworkshops@oise.utoronto.ca, 416-978-0022

Location:  Social Economy Centre of the University of Toronto, 252 Bloor St. W. (5th floor), Toronto, ON M5S 1V6, (St. George Subway Station)

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TELELEARNING SESSION 15: POVERTY REDUCTION IN CANADA

1. What are some public policy trends and instruments supporting poverty reduction in Canada?
2. What are some community-based approaches to poverty reduction in Canada?

If you want to know the answers to these questions and more, please join:

Jean Marc Fontan, Professor at UQÀM/Co-director of the Social Economy Community-University Research Alliance in Quebec; and Shauna McKinnon, Director of the Canadian Centre for Policy in an engaging telelearning session hosted by Jessica Notwell, Manager of the Women’s Economic Council.

Call Logistics:

* Session Date: Wednesday October 21st, 2009
* Call begins at 12:00 pm Eastern time, 9:00 am Pacific time
* Call in information will be given upon registration
* Register before October 20 to obtain dial in information and background papers
* This session is in English.

Session Format: 1 Hour
Welcome: 5 min
Presentations: 10 min by each speaker
Discussion: 35 minutes

Registration:
Register by phoning 250-472-4976, or e-mailing sekm@uvic.ca with your name, location, and work or volunteer position.

Limited number of spaces available – Register soon!
(This session is only available to Canadian Residents)

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AUDITOR’S REPORT REINFORCES NEED FOR GREATER PUBLIC CONTROL; LESS PRIVATIZATION: OPSEU

The findings by the Auditor General that greater public oversight would have prevented the spending scandal at eHealth was strongly embraced by the Ontario Public Service Employees Union.

“Let’s hope the Premier and his government learned a valuable lesson today: the more you hand over control of a vital public service like health care to the private sector, the more costs are going to skyrocket at the expense of the tax-paying public,” said OPSEU president Warren (Smokey) Thomas.

“We couldn’t agree more with Auditor General McCarter. The private consultants behind the eHealth spending scandal weren’t able to contain themselves from pinching the public purse for every last dime. That simply wouldn’t happen under a genuine public system with built-in checks, oversight and accountability.”

In his report, the Auditor General specifically pointed to the fact that “there was a heavy, and in some cases almost total, reliance on (private) consultants. By 2008, the Ministry’s eHealth Program Branch had fewer than 30 full-time employees, but was engaging more than 300 consultants …”

Thomas said watching the eHealth scandal unfold was like reading a familiar old story.

He cited the Auditor’s report from 2008 which revealed the privatization of the William Osler Hospital in Brampton cost almost $500 million more than had Ontario used traditional public procurement and financing.

For further information: Greg Hamara, OPSEU Communications, (647) 238-9933 cell

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GROCERY UNIONS JOIN WITH COMMUNITY TO BUILD BETTER SUPERMARKETS

by Tiffany Ten Eyck, Labor Notes

In New York City 11,600 retailers sell food, but fewer than 5 percent of them are grocery stores. In Detroit, more than half the city’s residents live in a “food desert,” where they’re closer to a fast food joint or a convenience store than to a supermarket.

UFCW locals in both cities are building community coalitions to create more and better grocery stores – which they hope, one day, will be union.

To read more: http://labornotes.org/node/2461

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LABOUR BOOK OF THE WEEK – THE KILLING OF KAREN SILKWOOD

It has now been 35 years since the murder of American trade unionist Karen Silkwood.

Silkwood was working at a plutonium processing plant and was killed in a mysterious car crash on her way to deliver important documents to a newspaper reporter.

She had been working on health and safety issues at the plant. She was 28 years old when she died.

To learn more about Karen and to celebrate her life please buy a copy of The Killing of Karen Silkwood — this week’s Labour Book of the Week.

The issues this book explores — whistle-blowers, worker safety, the environment, and nuclear vulnerability — are as relevant today as they were 35 years ago.

To read more: https://ssl30.pair.com/unionist/ccp51/cgi-bin/cp-app.cgi?rrc=N&pg=prod&ref=silkwood&affl=labourstart

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk