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Monthly Archives: September 2009

LONDON SOCIALIST HISTORIANS GROUP SEMINARS

AUTUMN TERM 2009

12 October
Roger Seifert
Bert Ramelson and the communist way: powerful theory made real and real theory made powerful

9 November
Terry Ward
Class struggle in Shakespearian England

7 December
Gareth Dale
20 years since the events in Eastern Europe

Seminars take place on the above dates at 5.30pm in the Pollard Room at the Institute of Historical Research, Senate House Malet St WC1 ; further information from Keith Flett: keith.flett@btinternet.com; 07803 167266

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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Not What It Seems

Not What It Seems

CAPITALISM AND THE DIALECTIC

 

PRESS RELEASE
— A Clear introduction to ground-breaking but little-known approach to Marxian political economy —

Capitalism And The Dialectic: The Uno-Sekine Approach To Marxian Political Economy
John R. Bell
Released October 25th 2009
PB / £ 25.00 / 9780745329338 / 230mm x 150mm / 256pp

This book is a clear introduction to a groundbreaking but little-known approach to Marxian economics: the Uno-Sekine approach. With this perceptive and thoughtful volume, John Bell renders a great service to the interested Western reader – Tom Sekine

From the 1960s to the 1990s the ground-breaking Japanese economists Kozo Uno and Thomas Sekine developed a masterful reconfiguration of Marxist economics. The most well-known aspect of which is the levels of analysis approach to the study of capitalism. Written in Japanese, the Uno-Sekine approach to Marx’s work is little understood in the West. John Bell seeks to correct this, explaining how problematic elements of Marxian Political Economy such as the law of value and the law of relative surplus population can be solved by using a more rigorous dialectical analysis. Bell’s clear and accessible synthesis provides economists with the tools to interrogate capitalism in a more powerful way than ever before.

John R. Bell taught for over three decades at Seneca College, Toronto, Canada. His ‘Dialectics and Economic Theory’ appeared in ‘A Japanese Approach to Political Economy’ (1995); ‘From Hegel to Marx to the Dialectic of Capital’ appeared in ‘New Dialectics and Political Economy’ (2003). He and Thomas Sekine co-authored ‘The Disintegration of Capitalism: A Phase of Ex-Capitalist Transition’ in ‘Phases of Capitalist Development: Booms, Crises and Globalizations’ (2001). In 2004 he co-edited ‘New Socialisms’, to which he contributed, ‘Marx’s Anti-Authoritarian Ecocommunism.

For further information, to request a review copy or to speak to the author please contact Jon Wheatley at jonw@plutobooks.com or on 0208 374 6424

345 ARCHWAY ROAD, LONDON, N6 5AA
TEL: 0208 3482724 FAX: 0208 348 9133 http://www.plutobooks.com

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Work No More

Work No More

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 21st SEPTEMBER 2009

 

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

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RESOURCE AVAILABLE FROM CSEW: EDUCATION FOR CHANGING UNIONS

By B. Burke, J. Geronimo, D. Martin, B. Thomas, C. Wall

This book is destined to become a key work in popular education. Education for Changing Unions presents a rich, stimulating, and provocative storehouse of practical and structured activities, ideas, and debate about union education. Written in a clear and accessible style, the authors have created a book to inspire working people and teachers in many settings and locations. All the exercises and activities have been widely tested.

Between the Lines, 2003. Available online from publisher: http://www.btlbooks.com or on-line at http://www.amazon.ca

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FORUM: JOBLESS RECOVERY – BROKEN EI

Who is going to fix EI? As election fever starts to heat up, the Tories are desperate to pretend that they have dealt with the nagging issue of thousands of laid-off workers who can’t get EI benefits.

Monday, Sept. 21
Registration: 6:00 p.m.
Event starts: 6:30 p.m.

Location: Rogers Communications Centre, Ryerson University, 80 Gould Street (at Church Street), Room 204

Speakers:
Unemployed workers from the GTA;
Judy Rebick, CAW Sam Gindin Chair in Social Justice and Democracy; and
Gilles Paquette, Quebec Federation of Labour/Unemployed Coalition.

Contact: 416-441-3663 ext.224

Organised by the Good Jobs for all Coalition (http://www.goodjobsforall.ca)

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FORUM: SOLIDARITY. RESISTANCE. CHANGE: ORGANIZING WORKING CLASS COMMUNITIES

Public forum featuring: Steve Williams, Co-Director and co-founder of the California based group “People Organized to Win Employment Rights (POWER)” and co-author of the book “Towards Land, Work and Power”.

Friday October 2, 2009
7pm
Ryerson Student Centre
55 Gould Street, Room 115
Toronto

Directions: http://www.oakhamhouse.com/pages/directions.php

Co-sponsored by Socialist Project and Centre for Social Justice
Endorsed by Black Action Defence Committee (BADC), No One Is Illegal (NOII) and Ontario Coalition against Poverty (OCAP)

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TWITTER IS A MALL: WADE RATHKE, CHIEF ORGANIZER BLOG   

Author of Citizen Wealth: Winning the Campaign to Save Working Families (http://chieforganizer.org/citizen-wealth-the-book/)

Stephanie Ross from York University and Peter Sawchuk from University of Toronto had invited me to be the first speaker to discuss organizing with a group of academics and activists coming together on a 5-year project called APCOL:  Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning, a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. The project is fascinating and it will be interesting to see how it progresses and what conclusions it draws over the years, but right now it was interesting for the discussion it allowed about organizing and the challenges before us.

To read more: http://chieforganizer.org/2009/09/18/twitter-is-a-mall/

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DEBORAH BARNDT: POPULAR EDUCATION PHOTO EXHIBITS AVAILABLE

Over the past year, I produced two photo exhibits which are now available for use in conferences, community centres, and classes. They relate to popular education, community art, and social movements and are meant to stimulate the integration of these three.

“Cross-Pollinations: Photography and Social Change in the Americas – A Retrospective” is an exhibit of 18 photographs drawn from Deborah Barndt’s work in Peru, Nicaragua and Canada between 1976 and 1992.The photographs traces four key moments in Barndt’s photographic work – from creating foto-novelas and Freirean codes for literacy classes in Peru in the 1970s to making photo-stories and posters for ESL classes in Toronto in the 1980s, from teaching photo-journalism to adult educators in Nicaragua in the 1980s to coordinating collective photo-story production in the Moment Project in Toronto into the 1990s.

“If the Walls Could Speak…What Stories Would They Tell” is a traveling photo exhibit of community murals. Community murals are more than paintings on the wall – they encourage communities to dig into their histories, memorialize loved ones, express diverse identities, honour the land, name critical issues, brighten streets and alleys, tell stories of local people, envision a healthier community.

If you are interested in booking either one of them for an upcoming event or for display, please contact Andie Shabbar (andie13@yorku.ca), production and distribution assistant, and copy me at dbarndt@yorku.ca.

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JUST RELEASED: UNIONS, EQUITY AND THE PATH TO RENEWAL

Editors: Janice Foley and Patricia Baker

Trade unions in Canada are losing their traditional support base, and membership numbers could sink to US levels unless unions recapture their power. Advancing equity within an increasingly diverse membership has been identified as one important step in the union renewal process. This book shows that equity within unions is not simply one path among many — it is the path to union renewal.

Unions, Equity, and the Path to Renewal brings together a distinguished group of union activists and equity scholars to document how traditional union cultures, practices, and structures have eroded solidarity and activism and created an equity deficit in Canadian unions. Informed by a feminist vision of unions as instruments of social justice — and by an appreciation of the decades-long effort by labour and feminist activists to build union democracy, solidarity, and strength — the contributors propose the changes needed to encourage member participation and to reposition organized labour as a central institution in workers’ lives.

University of British Columbia Press, 2009. For more information or to order: http://www.ubcpress.ca/search/title_book.asp?BookID=299172753

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FROM SOCIAL JUSTICE TO POETIC JUSTICE: UN INTERNATIONAL DAY OF PEACE CELEBRATION

* Do you look at the world and feel that things need to change?
* Do you watch the news everyday in sadness and despair waiting for that one news item that would give you hope for the world you live in?
* Do you publicly laugh at beauty queens talking about world peace but secretly hope for the same?

Then come join The Transformative Learning Centre at OISE in observance of the UN International Day of Peace as we read, exhibit, and compose poems for peace. The Centre invites all those interested to come out and compose a peace poem or bring a poem/quote for peace from diverse traditions around the world. Everyone is invited!

Monday September 21, 2009
12:00 to 3 pm
7th Floor Peace Lounge
OISE, 252 Bloor St. W (at St. George)

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A NIGHT ON WATER JUSTICE: FILM AND DISCUSSION

with Susan Koppelman and Shawn Brant

Tuesday, September 22, 2009
7:30 – 9:30 p.m.
Koffler Auditorium, Room 108
569 Spadina Avenue, just north of College

First Nations peoples in Canada, and Palestinians, are facing similar challenges and systemic discrimination in obtaining their basic water needs. Join us for an evening of film screening and discussion on the challenges to obtain equity and justice in access to water, on how different communities are mobilising to obtain this basic right, and on how we can develop effective solidarity for these causes.

Organizers:  Bike Chain, GSU Social Justice Committee, Greenpeace, Science for Peace, the Really Free Market, Trinity College, Streets are for People, UTERN, OCAA, UTSU
Endorsers: OPIRG Toronto, SAIA

For more information:
http://www.opirguoft.org/index.php?cmd=ShowData&section=4&subsection=14&type=3

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2009 MAYTREE LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE – TELLING STORIES; CREATING CHANGE

Do stories matter to you and your organization?

Register now for the 2009 Maytree Leadership Conference – Telling Stories; Creating Change on Thursday, October 1.

This year’s Maytree Conference examines how organizational narrative and personal stories can become compelling and powerful catalysts for social change. John Cruikshank, publisher of the Toronto Star, kicks off the conference telling us why stories are so important to the media and what creates a story that “sticks.” Acclaimed author and filmmaker Nelofer Pazira closes the conference with the story of her own journey from Afghanistan to Canada and how she is rebuilding women’s lives in her native country.

You can choose from a range of workshops which give expert advice in the art of persuasion, communication and media skills, storytelling and much more.

Register now to avoid disappointment: http://www.maytree.com/training/2009-maytree-leadership-conference/registration

Become part of the conversation. Read our conference blog with daily posts on storytelling techniques, social change through storytelling, narrative as persuasion and other topics: http://www.maytree.com/2009-leadership-conference-blog/

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SOCIAL PLANNING TORONTO SYMPOSIUM – BUILDING THE FUTURE WE WANT: FINDING OPPORTUNITY IN ADVERSITY

The symposium will bring together a broad range of individuals and organizations to explore the ways in which the current economic and social crisis may provide opportunities to rethink how government, the non-profit sector and business can renew our social safety net for the 21st century. Ratna Omidvar, president of Maytree, will be one of the speakers.

Friday, October 2, 2009, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
New College, University of Toronto
Cost: $50.00 (includes lunch and refreshments)

For more information and registration: http://www.socialplanningtoronto.org/symposium.

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CENTRE FOR SOCIAL INNOVATION TOUR AND INFORMATION SESSION – SEPTEMBER DATES!

September 24, 2009
Centre for Social Innovation
215 Spadina Avenue, Suite 400
Toronto

Are you interested in permanent or part-time work space at CSI? Are you curious about our model? Do you want to check out the space and learn more about ‘how we do what we do’?

Join us for our weekly Tour and Information Session! Every week, a member of our staff team will offer a brief tour and then answer any questions you have about the Centre, the work we do, and how you can get involved.

Visit our events list for a listing of times and additional dates: http://socialinnovation.ca/community/events/listing

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LABOUR RIGHTS WEBSITE: UFCW CANADA VS. WALMART

The United Food & Commercial Workers (UFCW) Canada created and has maintained an excellent labour rights website at http://www.walmartworkerscanada.ca for workers at Walmart stores.  It’s an excellent example of grass-roots organizing by using the internet. Supporters of the workers are urged to go to http://www.walmartworkerscanada.ca/freespeech to join them in sending protest letters to Walmart; they are also using Facebook to spread the word about their campaign.

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DO THE MATH!

The Stop Community Food Centre is engaged in grass-roots work in all their work.  An imaginative campaign to build support for the province to increase financial assistance for persons who receive inadequate assistance is to add a healthy food supplement to what people receive now. “Do the Math” is explained at http://dothemath.thestop.org/ to illustrate how much money is necessary for a person to live with dignity and in health.

Indeed, some people are meeting their own MPPs to “do the math” with them, and so lobby for change using the exercise to educate their MPP. Groups of people who want to do this can get help and advice from Jonah Schein at the Stop, and also they can inform Jonah afterwards how successful their meeting was. Jonah is available at (416) 652-7867 x235 or at civicengagement@thestop.org.

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LEARN AT WORK WEEK: THE POWER OF A COMMUNITY LEARNING NETWORK INSPIRING LEADERSHIP IN LEARNING INNOVATION

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2009
6:00pm Light lunch and refreshments
6:30pm-7:20pm Speaker introduction, presentation, and Q & A
7:20pm- Networking

Royal Canadian Legion, 10425 Kingsway NW
Edmonton, Alberta
(FREE parking; license plate number sign-in)

Price:
Member price: $25.00+GST
Non-Member price: $30.00+GST

Payment Method:
VISA/MasterCard/AMEX only

The Canadian Society for Training and Development (CSTD) Edmonton chapter invites you to attend an interactive learning and networking event during Learn @ Work Week – Sept 21-25/09.

The Community Learning Network (CLN) is a provincial not-for-profit organization that supports community adult learning by providing leadership, resources and connections to Alberta’s 81 Community Adult Learning Councils who assist adults in the areas of ESL, literacy, general interest courses and courses that support the work environment.

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CANADIAN INDEX OF WELLBEING (CIW) FRONT AND CENTER AS A PICTURE OF CANADIAN WELLBEING

Sept 15 – Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/comment/article/695624

Sept 14 – National Post
http://www.nationalpost.com/news/world/story.html?id=1992691

Sept 13 – Toronto Star
http://www.thestar.com/comment/article/694584

Check out our website…
To find out more about the Institute, and look for our latest reports, please check out our website at http://www.ciw.ca. Everything produced by the Institute is available free of charge in both user-friendly and research-rich format.

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CANADIANS TO CLEAR UP HEALTH CARE MYTHS FOR AMERICANS
rabble.ca posts U.S. health care page debunking myths and posting health care testimonials

TORONTO – In the wake of President Obama’s health care speech, rabble.ca is asking Canadians to weigh in on the American health care debate by providing testimonials on a new section of their website that can be found at: http://rabble.ca/issues/healthcareUSA.

rabble.ca’s new “Health Care USA” section presents some simple facts about Canadian health care, links to resources on single-payer for Americans and testimonials from Canadians from all walks of life on the Canadian health system.

“Canadians are shocked and even angry that their health-care system, what we call ‘Medicare’, has been used to frighten Americans trying to make up their minds. Some of what has been said about our Medicare system are outright falsehoods, like the claim that we can’t choose our own doctors or that government ‘bureaucrats’ can deny us needed treatment,” said rabble Senior Contributing Editor Murray Dobbin. “These falsehoods would be laughable were it not for the fact that Americans might abandon the opportunity for excellent, less expensive health care because they believe these stories,” Dobbin said.

rabble will be posting testimonials from ordinary Canadians who have used our system and from the professionals, doctors, nurses, and administrators who provide the service.

rabble.ca is Canada’s most popular source of independent news and views, and features original news, opinion, book reviews, podcasts and live and pre-recorded video exploring issues facing Canadians. rabble.ca is in its 9th year of providing 100% free news content to Canadians.  rabble is a non-profit, community supported organization.

For more information contact:
Murray Dobbin, Contributing Senior Editor (604) 483-9667
Derrick O’Keefe, Editor (604) 803-6927
Kim Elliott, rabble.ca, Publisher (647) 477-8534
http://rabble.ca

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DOWN IN THE VALE: SUDBURY STEELWORKERS STRIKE AT VALE INCO

By Petra Veltri

For a valley so used to being torn up, spit out, and poisoned daily, everything is eerily quiet in and around Sudbury, Ontario these days. Beginning June 1st with a Vale Inco plant shutdown, that was then followed by a strike on July 13 when 3300 members of United Steelworkers of Canada (USW) Local 6500 rejected the concessionary demands of the Brazilian multinational subsidiary, the mines, smelter, mill, and refinery, and ‘superstack’ have all been closed. In addition, many mining supply and service companies are temporarily shuttered, idling thousands more usually employed in spin-off businesses.

To read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/253.php

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SOCIAL PLANNING TORONTO FORUM: IMPACTS OF SCHOOL CLOSURES ON CHILDREN AND COMMUNITIES

Friday, September 25
9:30 am to 12:30 pm

Presenters:

* Dr. Ranu Basu, York University
* Dr. David Clandfield, University of Toronto
* Annie Kidder, People for Education

The forum will address issues of school closures and the impact on citizenship; the role public policy plays in determining school closures and the importance of community hubs; and the Toronto District School Board perspective from the Toronto Lands Corporation.

To register, click here: http://socialplanningtoronto.org/machform/view.php?id=1

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Gilles Deleuze

Gilles Deleuze

DELEUZE & RACE

 

Jason Adams

While the relevance of Gilles Deleuze for a materialist feminism has been amply demonstrated in the last two decades or so, what this key philosopher of difference and desire can do for the theorization of race and racism has received surprisingly little attention. This is despite the explicit formulation of a materialist theory of race as instantiated in colonization, sensation, capitalism and culture, particularly in Deleuze’s collaborative work with Félix Guattari.

Part of the explanation of why there has been a relative silence on Deleuze within critical race and colonial studies is that the philosophical impetus for overcoming eugenics and nationalism have for decades been anchored in the conventional readings of Kant and Hegel, which Deleuze laboured to displace. Through the vocabularies of psychoanalysis, deconstruction, and moral philosophy, even the more sophisticated theorizations of race today continue the neo-Kantian/neo-Hegelian programme of retrieving a cosmopolitan universality beneath the ostensibly inconsequential differences called race.

Opposing this idealism, Deleuze instead asks whether the conceptual basis for this program, however commendable, does not foreclose its political aims, particularly in its avoidance of the material relations it seeks to change. The representationalism and oversimplified dialectical frameworks guiding the dominant antiracist programme actively suppress an immanentist legacy which according to Deleuze is far better suited to grasping how power and desire differentiate bodies and populations: the legacies of Spinoza, Marx and Nietzsche; biology and archeology; Virginia Woolf and Jack Kerouac; cinema, architecture, and the fleshy paintings of Francis Bacon. It is symptomatic too, that Foucault’s influential notion of biopolitics, so close to Deleuze and Guattari’s writings on the state, is usually taken up without its explicit grounding in race, territory and capitalist exchange. Similarly, those (like Negri) that twist biopolitics into a mainly Marxian category, meanwhile, lose the Deleuzoguattarian emphasis on racial and sexual entanglement. It would seem then, that it is high time for a rigorous engagement with the many conceptual ties between Foucault’s lectures on biopolitics, Deleuze and Guattari, and Deleuze-influenced feminism, to obtain a new materialist framework for studying racialization as well as the ontopolitics of becoming from which it emerges. While it will inevitably overlap in a few ways, this collection will differ from work done under the “postcolonial” rubric for a number of important reasons.

First, instead of the mental, cultural, therapeutic, or scientific representations of racial difference usually analyzed in postcolonial studies, it will seek to investigate racial difference “in itself”, as it persists as a biocultural, biopolitical force amid other forces. For Deleuze and Guattari, as for Nietzsche before them, race is far from inconsequential, though this does not mean it is set in stone.

Second, as Fanon knew, race is a global phenomenon, with Europe’s racism entirely entwined with settler societies and the continuing poverty in the peripheries. The effects of exploitation, slavery, displacement, war, migration, exoticism and miscegenation are too geographically diffuse and too contemporary to fit comfortably under the name “postcolonial”. Rather, we seek to illuminate the material divergences that phenotypical variation often involves, within any social, cultural or political locus.

Third, again like Nietzsche, but also Freud, Deleuze and Guattari reach into the deep recesses of civilization to expose an ancient and convoluted logic of racial discrimination preceding European colonialism by several millennia. Far from naturalizing racism, this nomadological and biophilosophical “geology of morals” shows that racial difference is predicated on fully contingent territorializations of power and desire, that can be disassembled and reassembled differently. That race is immanent to the materiality of the body then, does not mean that it is static any more than that it is simple: rather what it suggests is that its transformation is an always already incipient reality.

Possible themes:

CIVILIZATION AND ITS DISCONTENTS – Oedipus and racialization – fascist desire – civilization, savagery and barbarism – earth and its peoples – delirium and hallucination as racial – miscegenation

CAPITALISM – faciality – colonization and labor migration as racializing apparatuses of capture – urban segregation – environmental racism

POLITICS – hate speech and law as order-words – D&G, May ’68 and the third world – Deleuze and Palestine – Guattari and Brazil – terrorist war machines and societies of control – Deleuzian feminism and race

SCIENCE – neuroscience and race – continuing legacies of racist science and the “Bell Curve” debate – kinship, rhizomatics and arboreality – animals, plants, minerals and racial difference – miscegenation – evolutionary biology and human phenotypical variation – vitalism and Nazism

ART – affects of race (sport, hiphop, heavy metal, disco…) – primitivism (Rimbaud, Michaux, Artaud, Tournier, Castaneda, etc.) – vision, cinema and race – music, resonance and bodies

PHILOSOPHY – geophilosophy: provincializing canonical philosophy – race and becoming – decolonizing Spinoza, Leibniz, Hume, Schelling… – the effect of criticisms of Deleuze (Badiou, Zizek, Hallward) on antiracism Chapters will be between 4000 and 7000 words long.

Arun Saldanha will write the introduction and a chapter called “Bastard and mixed-blood are the true names of race”.

Jason Michael Adams will write the conclusion.

For more details on this project, contact Jason Adams at: adamsj@HAWAII.EDU

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Uncertainty

Uncertainty

THE GOVERNMENT OF UNCERTAINTY: HOW TO FOLLOW THE POLITICS OF OIL

 

Economy and Society Guest Lecture 2009

“The Government of Uncertainty: How to Follow the Politics of Oil”

Professor Timothy Mitchell, Columbia University, New York, 6.30pm – 8.00pm, Thursday 15th October 2009

Sheikh Zayed Lecture Theatre, London School of Economics and Political Science, Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE

Please RSVP to econsoc@lse.ac.uk

Professor Timothy Mitchell
Timothy Mitchell is professor in the Department of Middle East and Asian Languages and Cultures and the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. He is the author of Colonising Egypt (1991) and Rules of Experts: Egypt, Techno-Politics, Modernity (2002).

Mitchell has published articles in numerous publications including; American Political Science Review; Comparative Studies in Society and History; Theory and Society; and International Journal of Middle Eastern Studies

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Urban Spirit

Urban Spirit

FROM CRITICAL URBAN THEORY TO THE RIGHT TO THE CITY
Tuesday 6th October
6.30pm
London, UK

Peter Marcuse argues that the ultimate purpose of critical urban theory is to implement the demand for a Right to the City. Drawing on the work and witness of his father Herbert Marcuse, and on his own work and experience as a lawyer, planner and urban scholar and activist, he focuses on the differences between the crisis of 1968, which produced the demand for the Right to the City, and the crisis we confront today. He asks: ‘Is another world not only possible, but realistically attainable?’

His most recent publication is ‘Cities for People, Not for Profit’, jointly edited with Neil Brenner and Margit Mayer, a special issue of the journal City: analysis of urban trends, culture, theory, policy (13.2-3, June-September, 2009).

For further information on the lecture please visit: www.tandf.co.uk/journals/pdf/conferences/ccit-urban-theory.pdf.

For more information on the special issue ‘Cities for People, Not for Profit’ please visit:  www.tandf.co.uk/journals/pdf/CCIT_special_issue_2009_leaflet.pdf

 Posted here by Glenn Rikowski: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Evil Media

Evil Media

STUDIES IN EVIL MEDIA

 

University of East London School of Humanities and Social Sciences and Centre for Cultural Studies Research present:

Studies in Evil Media

October 7th 2009, 14:00-17:00, University of East London, Docklands Campus (Cyprus DLR – the station is literally at the campus), Room EB.3.19 (third floor, main building, turn left on entering the main square from station)

All Welcome

Matthew Fuller (Goldsmiths: Author of Media Ecologies) & Andrew Goffey (Middlesex University: Translator of Isabelle Stengers’ Capitalist Sorcery)

Evil Media

Evil Media updates Machiavelli’s ‘The Prince’ for the era of networked digital media and corporate governance. Addressing a range of objects, practices, techniques and knowledges traditionally excluded from the purview of media studies, it explores the sophistry that is quite literally embodied by the sophisticated technologies of the knowledge economy. ‘Evil’ explicitly references the antagonistic ethical and moral quality that an epoch gorging itself on progress has sought unsuccessfully to banish; and so Evil Media offers a useful prospectus of the ruses, subterfuges, deception, manipulation and trickery which media technics make possible and effective.  By adopting a perspective which counters the idealistic, liberal, assumptions encoded within the notion of representation or facilitation and enabling, it aims to re-situate the study of media within a framework which includes forms of media that are ‘below the radar’ of most contemporary theory and actively occluded by the framework of representation.  Here, media do not so much tell us about things, but are themselves things that exhibit behaviours.

Tony Sampson (University of East London: Author of Virality:Contagion Theory in the Age of Networks) – New Media Hypnosis

Drawing on the microsociology of Gabriel Tarde (1843-1904), and a number of other “Tardean scholars”, this presentation approaches the idea that new media landscapes function increasingly as a mode of hypnotic mass persuasion. Significantly, this is not a sociological perspective that concerns itself with rational, self-contained individuals, or indeed society as a whole, but rather responds to what one viral marketer (following a decidedly similar trajectory to Tarde) recently referred to as ‘the invisible currents that run between and among consumers’. These ‘invisible currents’, affective contagions (Thrift, 2007), or the radiation of imitation-suggestibility, as Tarde termed it, work at the intersections between attention inattention, cognition/noncognition, social/biological domains and consciousness/unconsciousness. The talk focuses on examples taken from the new science of networks,epidemiology, HCI, emotional design, affective computing, eye tracking technology, neuromarketing and evil media studies.

Respondent: Paul Gormley
(University of East London: Author of The New Brutality Film: Race and Affect in Contemporary American Cinema).

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Class in Education

Class in Education

CLASS IN EDUCATION

 

I looked at a copy of Class in Education: Knowledge, pedagogy, subjectivity edited by Deborah Kelsh, Dave Hill and Sheila Macrine yesterday. This is an excellent book in my view, and I urge to buy it and/or get your library to stock it!

Glenn Rikowski

Class in Education: Knowledge, pedagogy, subjectivity

Edited by Deborah Kelsh, Dave Hill and Sheila Macrine

Routledge, London & New York, 2010

ISBN 10: 0-415-45027-6 (hbk); ISBN 10: 0-203-87903-X (ebk)

CONTENTS:

Foreword: E. SAN JUAN JR.

Introduction: SHEILA MACRINE, DAVE HILL AND DEBORAH KELSH

1. Cultureclass – DEBORAH KELSH

2. Hypohumanities – TERESA L. EBERT AND MAS’UD ZAVARZADEH

3. Persistent inequities, obfuscating explanations: reinforcing the lost centrality of class in Indian education debates – RAVI KUMAR

4. Class, “race” and state in post-apartheid education – ENVER MOTALA AND SALIM VALLY

5. Racism and Islamophobia in post 7/7 Britain: Critical Race Theory, (xeno-)racialization, empire and education – a Marxist analysis – MIKE COLE AND ALPESH MAISURIA

6. Marxism, critical realism and class: implications for a socialist pedagogy – GRANT BANFIELD

7. Globalization, class, and the social studies curriculum – E. WAYNE ROSS AND GREG QUEEN

8. Class: the base of all reading – ROBERT FAIVRE

Afterword: the contradictions of class and the praxis of becoming – PETER McLAREN

Further details: http://www.routledge.com/books/Class-in-Education-isbn9780415450270

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Global Economic CrisisMARX AND THE GLOBAL ECONOMIC CRISIS

New articles and videos on the ‘Radical Perspectives on the Crisis’ web site:

Anwar Shaikh: http://radicalnotes.com/journal/2009/06/13/anwar-shaikh-on-marx-and-the-global-economic-crisis/

David McNally talk (video): http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x9hrct_david-mcnally-on-marx-and-the-globa_news

Radical Perspectives on the Crisis: http://sites.google.com/site/radicalperspectivesonthecrisis/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Lifelong Learning

Lifelong Learning

THE QUALIFICATIONS AND CREDIT FRAMEWORK (QCF): WHERE IS IT HEADING?

 

The Centre for Post-14 Research and Innovation
Current issues in Lifelong Learning Seminar Series:

The Qualifications and Credit Framework (QCF): Where is it heading?

29 September 2009, 5.30-7.00 pm, Drama Studio, Floor One, Institute of Education, 20 Bedford Way WCIH 0AL

The Qualifications and Credit Framework has been seen as key means of achieving a comprehensive and flexible qualifications system for young people and adults.  But it has been a long time in coming and its future still looks uncertain. Tony Tait will lead the seminar looking the origins of the QCF, its key design features and how it is likely to develop in what promises to be a turbulent political climate.  The seminar will also consider areas for further research and investigation.
 
Tony was involved in the pioneering work on qualifications and credit in the 1990s, which forms the basis for the QCF. Since then, he has worked in this area for number of key national agencies including QCA, LSC, LSDA, SSCs awarding bodies and providers.  He now works as an education advisor/consultant and holds a position as a Visiting Research Associate in the Centre.

This is one of a series of invitation seminars on current issues in lifelong learning to be led by Associates and Fellows of the Institute of Education attached to the Centre for Post-14 Research and Innovation.

To reserve a place at the seminar (numbers may have to be restricted) please contact R.Bull@ioe.ac.uk, 02076126671

Paul Grainger

Director (operations) Centre for Post-14 Research and Innovation, Institute of Education

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Alien Baby

Alien Baby

ALIEN BABY

 

This is a video from YouTube on a creature that was found in Mexico in 2007 which is unknown to scientists. Interesting video: alien becomes capital! So it’s no longer truly alien to and for us.

‘Alien Baby in Mexico Stumps Experts’: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WQrGwzLm1E

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk