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We Are the Crisis

We Are the Crisis

NEOLIBERALISM SINCE THE CRISIS

Please consider presenting a paper as part of a series of panels on ‘Neoliberalism since the Crisis’, being organised by Damien Cahill and Alfredo Saad-Filho as part of the International Initiative for Promoting Political Economy (IIPPE) Conference being held at the University of Leeds, UK, September 9-11, 2015 (http://iippe.org/wp/?page_id=2470).

Despite the most severe economic crisis since the Great Depression and persistent stagnation in most countries, neoliberalism seems to have defied many of its critics who predicted that the crisis would lead to neoliberalism’s demise. Indeed, almost a decade after the onset of the global crisis neoliberalism remains firmly entrenched as a set of economic relations and state institutions, and as a hegemonic ideology.

Nonetheless, as has been the case throughout its history, neoliberalism has been subject to persistent dissent across the world since the onset of the crisis. Most obviously this can be seen in the rise to power of anti-neoliberal parties and movements in several of the world’s ‘peripheral’ economies but, also in the emergence of a new generation of social movements in several countries.

During the same period, scholarly analyses of neoliberalism have burgeoned. Critics inspired by Marxism and other traditions of political economy have drawn attention to the uneven development of neoliberalism, interrogated its origins and examined the links between neoliberalism, financialisation, inequality, social reproduction and crisis. Yet, there remains little explicit engagement between these theoretical traditions, a settled definition of neoliberalism remains elusive, and the search for alternatives remains poorly theorised.

The proposed series of panels will investigate neoliberalism since the onset of the current global economic crisis. Paper givers are encouraged to reflect upon the distinctiveness of neoliberalism and its dynamics, consider the modalities of resistance to neoliberalism since 2007, and critically interrogate existing scholarly analyses of neoliberalism. Papers addressing similar topics will also be welcomed.

We hope to publish a selection of the papers either as an edited book, or as a special journal issue.

The submission deadline for abstracts is April 1 2015, and they should be submitted through the conference website AND to Alfredo Saad Filho (as59@soas.ac.uk) and Damien Cahill (damien.cahill@sydney.edu.au).

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-i-am-writing-to-invite-you-to-consider-presenting-a-paper-as-part-of-a-series-of-panels-on-2018neoliberalism-since-the-crisis2019-iippe

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

The Future PresentDERRY SOCIALISM CONFERENCE

Time for an Alternative

With Eamonn McCann, Bernadette Devlin McAliskey, US activist Tithi Bhattacharya, Goretti Horgan, Belfast City Cllr Gerry Carroll and others – speaker information below.

Saturday, March 21st

10AM-7:30PM

The Playhouse Theatre

5-7 Artillery Street, Derry

https://www.facebook.com/events/1401881060120082/

Grotesque inequality is growing but the super-rich have never been so wealthy. Oxfam reported that the share of the world’s wealth owned by the richest 1% has increased from 44% in 2009 to 48% in 2014, while the least well-off 80 currently own just 5.5%. If current trends continue the rich will own more than 50% of the world’s wealth by 2016.

Resistance to grinding poverty, zero-contract jobs and the destruction of desperately needed social services is spreading. The people of Greece elected a left-wing party committed to reversing austerity. Millions are demanding the same across Europe. In Ireland, North and South, struggles challenging austerity and cuts are developing. Across the North, thousands of people went on strike, marched and rallied on March 13th to say no to the Stormont House Agreement. Across the South, a mass movement is defying the government’s plans to impose water charges.

An alternative based on the priorities of the vast majority is needed and possible — but we can also see billionaires and their institutions from Egypt to Greece to Ireland are determined to stop fundamental change.

Join us in Derry to discuss the challenges we face and how we can effectively organise solidarity and resistance. We’ll be taking up crucial questions for everyone interested in social justice such as challenging exploitation and oppression; neoliberalism and austerity; immigration and immigrant rights; gender violence and women’s liberation; working class struggles North and South of the border; sectarianism and the peace process; and, how we can win a world based on the needs of the vast majority of people instead of profits and war.

Schedule:

10AM Registration and Radical Book Fair Open

11AM Neoliberalism, Gender Violence and Women’s Liberation with US activist Tithi Bhattacharya & Goretti Horgan

https://www.facebook.com/events/335498013317914/

1:15PM Workers of the World, Unite! When the Shankill and the Falls Fought Together with Sean Mitchell & Ruairi Gallagher

3:15PM Solidarity has no Borders: Capitalism, Racism and Immigrant Rights with Bernadette Devlin McAliskey & Shaun Harkin

https://www.facebook.com/events/347679658772065/

4:45PM   Dinner

Pizza Dinner Break-out: Questions for Socialists with Becca Bor & others

Pizza Dinner Break-out: After March 13th – where now for the trade union movement?​ with leading trade union activists in Belfast and Derry

5:45PM  Challenging Austerity and Sectarianism: Fighting for a Socialist Ireland with Eamonn McCann, Bernadette Devlin McAliskey, Nicola Curry & Belfast City Cllr Gerry Carroll

https://www.facebook.com/events/1550802688525779/

Speakers:

Bernadette Devlin McAliskey​, Co-ordinator of the migrants rights South Tyrone Empowerment Program (STEP) and author of The Price of My Soul. Bernadette was a student Civil-Rights leader with People’s Democracy and was elected to Westminster Parliament in 1969 as an independent socialist.

Gerry Carroll, Long-time student and community activist, and, People Before Profit Alliance Councillor. Gerry was elected to the Belfast City Council in May 2014 in the West Belfast Sinn Féin dominated Black Mountain Ward. On being elected Gerry told the Belfast Telegraph “There is a lot of anger in west Belfast at the minute over the situation at Royal Victoria Hospital’s A&E, the privatisation of leisure centres and the Casement Park issues – those residents have been trampled on. This is where we are strong. I am not a nationalist or a unionist, I am a socialist. Belfast has a strong history of socialism and this is it coming back.”

Eamonn McCann, Veteran activist and Civil-Rights movement founder; columnist for the Belfast Telegraph, Irish Times and Socialist Worker; author of War and an Irish Town, Bloody Sunday in Derry: What Really Happened, War and Peace in Northern Ireland, and, Dear God: The Price of Religion in Ireland. Eamonn is a long-time activist with the National Union of Journalists and leading member of the Derry Trades Union Council.

Tithi Bhattacharya, professor of South Asian History at Purdue University, Indiana. She is the author of The Sentinels of Culture: Class, Education, and the Colonial Intellectual in Bengal and a long time activist for Palestinian justice. She writes extensively on Marxist theory, gender, and the politics of Islamophobia. Her work has been published in the Journal of Asian Studies, South Asia Research, Electronic Intifada​, Jacobin Magazine​, Salon​ and the New Left Review. She is on the editorial board of the International Socialist Review (ISR)​.

Goretti Horgan, Social Policy lecturer at The University of Ulster and author of Abortion: Why Irish Women Must have the Right to Choose. She is Branch Secretary of University and Colleges Union at Ulster University and on the board of NI Anti Poverty Network. Goretti is a regular contributor to Socialist Worker and the Irish Marxist Review​.

Sean Mitchell, activist based in Belfast, regular contributor to the Irish Marxist Review, author of The Permanent Crisis of 21st Century Ulster Unionism and is currently working on book about the 1932 Belfast Outdoor Relief Strike. Sean is a UNISON member and shop steward at Coláiste Feirste in Belfast.

Nicola Curry, long-time activist and socialist in Dublin. Nicola is very active in the movement against water charges and is a local convenor of the Campaign Against Home and Water Taxes. She is the chairperson of the Ballyogan Environment Group which was set up by local residents because of concerns about a waste disposal centre located in her residential area. She stood as a candidate for People Before Profit Alliance in Dublin South.

Becca Bor, is an American socialist living in Derry. In Chicago, she was a member of the Chicago Teachers Union (CTU), including during the historic 2011 strike. Becca is the author of Race and Class in Obama’s U.S. in the Irish Marxist Review and Malcolm X – 50 years on at swp.ie

Ruairí Gallagher is a socialist activist from Derry and is a first year PhD student at NUI Galway. He is involved with NUI Galway’s Irish Centre for the Histories of Labour and Class (ICHLC) and is interested in class history and ‘history from below’. He is studying a comparative history of Labour militancy in Belfast & Glasgow, 1915-1924; particularly focusing on the shipyards and engineering industries in Clydeside and the Lagan. He has published an article in the Irish Marxist Review entitled ‘Irish Tories and Social Bandits of Seventeenth Century Ireland’ and has recently written book reviews for the latest addition of Saothar, journal of the Irish Labour History Society,(vol. 39, 2014)

Shaun Harkin, Derry native and long time socialist activist and writer in the United States. In Chicago, Shaun was an organiser for the March 10 Movement and the historic 2006 May 1st ‘Day Without Immigrants’ actions across the US demanding full legalisation, ending deportations and workers’ rights. His articles can be found at swp.ieSocialistworker.org, the International Socialist Review, Jacobin magazine, El Beisman and Counterpunch.org. He is currently working on a James Connolly Reader.

 

The Playhouse is Wheelchair accessible.

Contact us ASAP for Childcare.

Limited free housing is available.

Hosted by the Derry Socialist Workers Party

Contact SWPDerry@gmail.com for more information

https://www.facebook.com/derryswp

www.swp.ie

https://www.facebook.com/SWPIreland

https://www.facebook.com/IrishMarxistReview

 

Shaun

07960404137

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

ATHENS

ATHENS

DEMOCRACY RISING

THE GLOBAL CENTER FOR ADVANCED STUDIES (GCAS)

GCAS World-Conference Athens “Democracy Rising” (Free and Open to the Public)

The Global Center for Advanced Studies

Announces Our First World Conference

“Democracy Rising: From Insurrections to ‘Event’”

Date: July 16-19th 2015, Athens, Greece

 

Speakers: (The Following Speakers will be Present in Athens)

Keynote:

Costas DouzinasJodi Dean, Bruno Bosteels & Maria Aristodemou

Speakers:

Tariq Ali, Kenneth Surin, Stathis KouvelakisAzfar HussainPaul Mason, Alex CallinicosMaria Nikolakaki, Athena AthanasiouCreston DavisAthina Karatzogianni, Kostis KarpozilosLola Sánchez ,Giovanni TusaDimitris DalakoglouLeonidas VatikiotisClaudia Landolfi, Peter ThompsonAris Chatzistefanou IIJulie RescheTheodore KoulourisSigrid HackenbergSrecko HorvatPaolo GerbaudoDave Hill,Stavros Stavrides and special guests from Syriza and Podemos.

 

Description:

Margaret Thatcher’s slogan, “There is no alternative” was a declaration of war that installed the horrors of neoliberal policies that have eroded and systematically undermined democratic and public-based projects for more than 30 years.  The global financial crisis of 2008 exposed these neoliberal policies that have paved the way for the rise of an untouchable oligarchical class whose top 80 members now possess more wealth than the bottom half of the world’s population. It is now abundantly clear that neoliberalism has accelerated radical inequality and at the same time forced the world to conform to their unquestionable, anti-democratic policies, lest even greater disasters befall us.

Faced with no alternative, on their terms, in 2011 a new series of insurrections began to emerge from the Occupy movement to Tunisia, Egypt, Bahrain, Yemen, to Spain, Ireland, and Greece. The recent historic victory of Syriza brings forth the message that citizens must decide their own future and thus the reassertion of the primacy of politics takes place again in the world.

In the wake of Syriza’s victory and the hope it articulates for the world, we propose a conference comprised of academics and activists from the birthplace of democracy, Athens, Greece.  The purpose of the conference is to bring together intellectuals and activists to think through and propose strategic alternatives for democracy and its future.

 

Thematics:

  • Neoliberalism and Austerity Measures
  • Philosophy and Political Struggles
  • The Global Debt Crisis
  • Capitalism & Education
  • Democracy & Activism
  • European Union & the Euro-Zone
  • The Rise of Fascism in Europe
  • Neoliberalism and Globalization
  • Uniting the Workers with the Intelligentsia
  • The Hope of Left Governance
  • The Rise of Podemos in Spain
  • Organizing Locally & Globally
  • Inequality & Democracy

 

Format:

Academics and activists are invited to give papers on relevant topics that support the conference’s description.  Papers can be presented in Athens, Greece, or in some cases, via the Internet.  In either case, papers should be no longer than 20 minutes in length.  In addition to individual papers, we encourage panel proposals consisting of 2-4 participants.  Panel sessions should be no longer than 40 minutes in length.

This conference will be hybrid in that it will be broadcasted live on the internet making it one of the first academic conferences in the world to be live and available to all.

 

Call for Papers:

250 word Abstracts for Papers, and 500 word abstracts for Panel Proposals should be submitted no later than April 1, 2015 midnight Eastern European Time to: submit@thegcas.com. Please include a photo and a very short Bio in your submission.  Please also state in the subject title of your email either “Paper” or “Panel Proposal” and whether or not your paper or panel will be presented at the conference or via the Internet.

NOTE: Panel Presentations: If your panel is being delivered via the Internet the individual members that comprise your panel can present from anywhere in the world so long as their Internet connection is excellent. You will need to verify that all Internet connections range between 6-10 Mbps so that access quality is at a premium.

You can test your Internet speed here: http://www.speedtest.net/

Acceptance/Rejection emails will be sent no later than April 15, 2015. The papers will be judged by the Conference Organization Committee.

 

Registration:

Registration is free & open to the public for participants in Athens & $5 for participants on-line (to help cover Internet infrastructure including access (purchasing a subscription), security, equipment, and technical services).

Please register as soon as possible!  REGISTER HERE

Presenters Fees are $20 per person or $40 per panel presentation

Conference Dinner $30 Athens (TBA)

Registration deadline for on-line participants is 1 July 2015.

A course will be designed and offered on this conference, details forthcoming.

 

Outcome:

The Editors of Insurrections Series at Columbia University Press have agreed to consider supporting the proceedings for publication.  Some papers will also be considered for GCAS’s Journal via GCAS Press.

Language & Translation:

Greek & English

Translation capabilities will be available if enough donations are provided to support this service. Please consider donating.  When you donate please specify “GCAS Conference”.  Donate here.

Location: TBA

 

Organizational Committee:

Creston Davis

Maria Nikolakaki

Dimitris Dalakoglou

Kostis Karpozilos

Anghelos Palioudakis

George Souvlis

Bob Drury King

Evi Zevgiti

Che Brandes-Tuka

Steven A. Panageotou

Michael D Wassell

Salim Nabi

 

Scientific Committee:

Alain Badiou, President of GCAS

Azfar Hussain, Vice-President of GCAS

Maria Nikolakaki, Prof., University of Peloponnese & GCAS

Creston Davis, Director GCAS

 

Special Activities: 

There will be special tours of Athens that follow the events of the struggles for Democracy as well as other travel opportunities.

 

Accommodations: 

All participants are responsible for their own lodging.

Media Sponsor:  InforWar Productions

 

See more:

@ GCAS Blog: https://gcasblog.wordpress.com/2015/02/18/gcas-world-conference-athens-free-and-open-to-the-public/

Registration: https://globalcenterforadvancedstudies.wufoo.com/forms/z154dnz71hyo08b/

ATHENS

ATHENS

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

The World Society Foundation

The World Society Foundation

WORLD SOCIETY, PLANETARY NATURES: CRISIS AND SUSTAINABILITY IN THE CAPITALOCENE AND BEYOND

CALL FOR PAPERS

World Society, Planetary Natures: Crisis and Sustainability in the Capitalocene and Beyond

Binghamton University, July 10-11, 2015

An international conference sponsored by the World Society Foundation

CONFIRMED SPEAKERS INCLUDE:

  • Christian Parenti
  • Harriet Friedmann
  • Larry Lohmann
  • Doug Henwood
  • Tony Weis
  • Sasha Lilley
  • Jason W. Moore

DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS IS EXTENDED TO MARCH 15, 2015

TO SUBMIT YOUR ABSTRACT, PLEASE REGISTER HERE: http://goo.gl/forms/fLL348cSPG

Since 2008, a broad consensus has emerged among scholars of global change: ours is an era of “converging crises.” Popularly expressed in the language of “triple crisis” – climate, energy, and finance – there is considerable uncertainty as to how these crisis-tendencies fit together, and if they are nearly so independent as the language of convergence suggests. If many scholars view the unfolding turbulence of the 21st century as an era of multiple crises, others have turned towards a different way of seeing crisis. This emerging alternative seeks to unify dimensions of human and extra-human natures in the world history of the present – as in the distinctive approaches of the Anthropocene and world-ecology perspectives. Through this different way of seeing, a crucial question has taken shape: Are we living the Age of Humans (the Anthropocene) or the Age of Capital (Capitalocene)?

World Society, Planetary Natures seeks to bring together scholars of global social change and global environmental change in the pursuit of new syntheses of “political economy” and “political ecology,” broadly conceived. The conference therefore privileges a double engagement: 1) with the core concerns of world-historical and global studies; and 2) with a broader multi-disciplinary community focused on global environmental change, past and present.

The conference pursues three major goals. First, we encourage a serious intellectual cross-fertilization between scholars engaged in the study of global social change and those engaged in the study of global environmental change. Second, the conference will facilitate a sustained exploration of the relations unifying the differentiated moments of 21st century crisis. These include not only the “triple crisis” argument, but comprise a wide range of crisis tendencies – such as food, inequality, employment, and social reproduction – as well as to the emergent possibilities of “commoning.” Third, the conference welcomes creative elaborations of globalization – in its manifold historical and contemporary expressions – as “ways of organizing nature.” In contrast to seeing neoliberalism as acting upon global natures, this alternative encourages a view of globalization as developing through the web of life. Such an alternative rethinks aspects of recent (and longue durée) world history as new human-environment configurations in which humans make environments, and environments enter into the constitution of power, re/production, and inequality. This entails the socio-ecological reconstruction of taken for granted “social” phenomena, such as the Washington Consensus, financialization, the European Union, or the rise of the BRICS. To investigate, analyze, and narrate historical change as if nature matters – as producer no less than product of capital and power – implies a much more decisive shift than commonly recognized: in our theoretical frames, methodological choices, and narrative strategies.

TO SUBMIT YOUR ABSTRACT, PLEASE REGISTER HERE: http://goo.gl/forms/fLL348cSPG

We welcome papers, panels, and proposals related – but not restricted to – the following topics:

  • The Financialization of Nature: Commodities, Carbon markets, Conservation, etc.
  • One, Two, Many “Sovereignties”: Food, Land, Energy, and Beyond
  • Planetary Urbanization
  • Cheap Labor, Unpaid Work, and the Crisis of Human Natures
  • Green Catastrophism and the Theory of Global Crisis
  • Narratives of Nature, Crisis, and Capitalism
  • Modernity and Climate Change
  • Scientific Revolutions and Capitalist Natures
  • Class Dynamics of Agro-Ecological Change, North and South
  • Crises: Social, Ecological, or World-Ecological?
  • Ecology and Imperialism
  • The ‘Long’ Green Revolution: Renewal or Demise?
  • Culture as Ecology
  • Green Keynesianism and the Myth of Sustainability
  • Industrialization and the Production of Nature
  • Anthropocene or Capitalocene?
  • New (and Old) Practices of Commoning
  • World-Literature and World-Ecology
  • Value, Nature, and Ontological Politics
  • Environmental Histories of Capital, Empire, and Commodities
  • Commodity Frontiers, Past and Present
  • The Environment-Making State
  • Markets, Trade, Investment: Does Nature Matter?
  • Nature as Accumulation Strategy
  • Crises of Social Reproduction
  • Neoliberalism’s Crises… or Not?
  • Surplus Humanities
  • Climate and Capitalism: Two Crises or One?
  • Nature and Hegemony
  • Ecological Exhaustion and War

We welcome proposals for individual papers as well as paper sessions and panel discussions. TO SUBMIT YOUR ABSTRACT, PLEASE REGISTER HERE: http://goo.gl/forms/fLL348cSPG

Inquiries may be sent to: planetarynatures@gmail.com.

Venue: The conference will be held 10-11 July, 2015 at Binghamton University (USA). As a family friendly conference we are able to extend conference pricing for food and lodging to participant families, and we are arranging childcare for those who may need it.

Travel grants: The World Society Foundation sponsors a small number of travel grants for postgraduate students, young researchers, and for participants from Africa, Asia, Latin-America and Eastern Europe (ISA country categories B and C). Travel grants will be allocated on the basis of a competitive assessment of full papers (of about 8.000 words) submitted. Deadline for submission of papers for travel grants is March 15, 2015. Applicants receiving travel grants will be notified before 15 April, 2015.

Publication: Outstanding conference papers will be published in a conference volume.

Conference Sponsorship: The main sponsor of the conference is the World Society Foundation (Zurich, Switzerland). In addition the conference is co-sponsored by the Department of Sociology, University of Neuchâtel, the Department of Sociology, Binghamton University, the World-Ecology Research Network. For more information on the World Society Foundation and its activities, please check out the web site: http://www.worldsociety.ch/.

Organizing Committee: Christian Suter, Université de Neuchâtel; Diana C. Gildea; Jason W. Moore, Binghamton University

KRISIS

KRISIS

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski

SOME ADDITIONS TO ACADEMIA: FEBRUARY 2015

 

Over the last month I have added quite a few items to my Academia site.

 

Here are the main additions that have not been included on other blogs:

 

 

 

PAPERS

 

The Confederation of British Industry and the Business Takeover of Schools (2007)

https://www.academia.edu/11138462/The_Confederation_of_British_Industry_and_the_Business_Takeover_of_Schools

 

Postmodernism in Educational Theory (with Peter McLaren, 2002)

https://www.academia.edu/11135246/Postmodernism_in_Educational_Theory

 

Prelude: Marxist Educational Theory After Postmodernism (2002)

https://www.academia.edu/11012712/Prelude_Marxist_Educational_Theory_After_Postmodernism

 

Time and Speed in the Social Universe of Capital (with Mike Neary, 2002)

https://www.academia.edu/10545768/Time_and_Speed_in_the_Social_Universe_of_Capital

 

Marxist Educational Theory Transformed (2000)

https://www.academia.edu/11086968/Marxist_Educational_Theory_Transformed

 

Working Schoolchildren in Britain Today (with Mike Neary, 1997)

https://www.academia.edu/11108460/Working_Schoolchildren_in_Britain_Today

 

 

 

VOLUMER ARTICLES

 

Post-Fordism and Schools in England (2008)

https://www.academia.edu/11048029/Post-Fordism_and_Schools_in_England

 

Forms of Capital: Critique of Bourdieu on Social Capital (2008)

https://www.academia.edu/11049106/Forms_of_Capital_Critique_of_Bourdieu_on_Social_Capital

 

Utopia and Education (2008)

https://www.academia.edu/11139021/Utopia_and_Education

 

Globalisation and Education Revisited (2008)

https://www.academia.edu/11109450/Globalisation_and_Education_Revisited

 

Snowballs and Risk in Schools (2008)

https://www.academia.edu/11027085/Snowballs_and_Risk_in_Schools

 

Nihilism and the Devaluation of Educational Values in England Today (2008)

https://www.academia.edu/11135945/Nihilism_and_the_De-valuation_of_Educational_Values_in_England_Today

 

Forms of Capital: Critique of Bourdieu on Cultural Capital (2008)

https://www.academia.edu/11048536/Forms_of_Capital_Critique_of_Bourdieu_on_Cultural_Capital

 

Playground Risks and Handcuffed Kids: We Need Safer Schools? (2007)

https://www.academia.edu/11074776/Playground_Risks_and_Handcuffed_Kids_We_Need_Safer_Schools

 

On Education Studies (2007)

https://www.academia.edu/11137286/On_Education_Studies

 

Education the HSBC Way (2007)

https://www.academia.edu/11109879/Education_the_HSBC_Way

 

The ‘Standards’ Language-game for Schools in England (2007)

https://www.academia.edu/11109014/The_Standards_Language-game_for_Schools_in_England_Today

 

Higher education and Confused Employer Syndrome (2006)

https://www.academia.edu/11075569/Higher_Education_and_Confused_Employer_Syndrome

 

On Tranhumanism and Education (2006)

https://www.academia.edu/11108794/On_Transhumanism_and_Education

 

 

Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Herbert Marcuse

Herbert Marcuse

PRAXIS AND CRITIQUE: LIBERATION, PEDAGOGY, AND THE UNIVERSITY

International Herbert Marcuse Society Sixth Biennial Conference

Praxis and Critique: Liberation, Pedagogy, and the University

12-15 November 2015, Salisbury University (Salisbury, Maryland, USA)

 

CALL FOR PAPERS: Abstracts due May 20, 2015

 

In recent years, the problems and contradictions intrinsic to capitalist society have resulted in a number of manifest, seemingly permanent, crises. Many researchers, academics, and activists have seized on the urgency of recent coalescing crises—from environmental degradation to economic inequality, political instability to social unraveling, and beyond—in an attempt to ameliorate and analyze the consequences of these dilapidated social relations. The work of Herbert Marcuse aims to radically re-envision social relations via critical theory as a way to formulate a praxis of liberation. However, if we live in a society, as Marcuse puts it, “without negation,” how shall this critical rationality be cultivated?

The International Herbert Marcuse Society seeks papers for the 2015 biennial conference, “Praxis and Critique: Liberation, Pedagogy, and the University,” that address the broad pedagogical concerns of cultivating emancipatory rationality. Faculty, independent scholars, activists, artists, and others are invited to submit papers. Papers may want to address, but are certainly not limited to, the following problematics:

  • What role can and should critical pedagogy play in today’s institutions of higher education? Given Marcuse’s emphasis on praxis, critical pedagogy cannot be limited to classroom space in universities – how can a critical rationality translate into programs of activism, agitation, and organization?
  • How is the work of Marcuse, the Frankfurt School, and/or critical theory generally relevant to the current context of political, social, economic, and cultural struggles?
  • What is the meaning of praxis and critique today? Do Marcuse’s contemporary interlocutors help us refine, understand, recast, or critique visions of a critical rationality?
  • What can we learn from activists and scholars from a wide range of critical theories, dealing with liberation in areas such as critical race theory, intersectionality, LGBTQIA studies, disability studies, and postcolonial theory?
  • How does Marcuse’s critical theory provide a lens through which to assess the current condition of advanced industrial society?

Student participation is also encouraged. The conference organizers are particularly interested in encouraging undergraduate and graduate student participation. To this end, we encourage faculty to teach related or special topics classes in fall 2015 and to bring students of all levels to the conference. Undergraduate students are invited to present papers in special concurrent sessions. Undergraduate and graduate students will also have the opportunity to submit conference papers for publication to special conference editions.

This conference is an interdisciplinary, multimedia engagement with the many dimensions of Herbert Marcuse’s work. So, in addition to the presentation of papers, the conference will also present artistic work.

Artistic Presentations:

The Salisbury University Gallery will present two related exhibitions.

The first is “Versprechen, dass es anders sein kann” (Promises that it can be different) by painter Antje Wichtrey.
Salisbury University Gallery Director, Elizabeth Kauffman, will curate the second exhibition.

For more information, contact the conference organizers:

Dr. Sarah Surak (smsurak@salisbury.edu) and Dr. Robert Kirsch (rekirsch@salisbury.edu)

 

**END**

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Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

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Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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The Future PresentMARX’S CAPITAL: THE BASEMENT TAPES

The 2015 Institute on Culture and Society (ICS)
Sponsored by the Marxist Literary Group (MLG)
June 24-28, 2015, Georgetown University

The first volume of Capital was the only one completed by Marx and published during his lifetime. Volumes II and III were published by Engels, some ten years after Marx’s death, from unfinished manuscripts; Theories of Surplus Value was published after Engels’s death. Volume I has, with good reason, assumed renewed currency in the years since the global financial crisis of 2007-8, but the “later” volumes — written before Volume I was prepared for publication — have remained largely the province of specialists. This is unfortunate, not only because these volumes begin to fill in the system of which Volume I is a sketch, and not only because some of Capital’s alleged blind spots and deficiencies are pre-emptively addressed there, but because some of Marx’s most potent and controversial thinking on political economy emerges in these pages.

In a departure from recent practice, this year’s Institute on Culture and Society will center on an intensive series of reading groups on the posthumous volumes of Marx’s Capital. Accepted papers may take the form of considered responses to some aspect of Capital, to be circulated in advance of the Institute but intended as preparation for discussion in the reading groups rather than as material for direct discussion. Alternatively, papers may take the more traditional form of round-table presentations of 5-8 minutes, on any topic that bears substantially on issues relevant to Marxist theory and practice, from Heraclitus and the dialectic to race and capital accumulation. Both kinds of papers will be listed on the program by presenter’s name and presentation title. Additionally, the Institute welcomes the participation of non-presenters.

In addition to roundtable proposals and paper proposals of both kinds, we invite proposals to lead reading sessions discussing particular sections of the posthumous volumes of Capital, or questions, issues, problems, or connections raised by them. The aim of this Institute is not only to study these volumes in depth, but to move them out of the exclusive province of specialists and to open them up to a diversity of approaches, interpretations, valences, and relevancies. In recent years articulations with feminism and queer theory have become a particular strength of the ICS, and engagements with research on race, postcolonial history, and other vectors of inequality are warmly encouraged.

Please send reading group session proposals (title, section or sections to be discussed, discussion facilitator or facilitators, and a very brief justification), paper proposals of either kind (title and 250-word abstract), roundtable proposals (title, presenters’ paper proposals, and a very brief justification), or intention to participate without presenting to MLGICS2015@gmail.com by March 2, 2015 (extended deadline).

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

 

Time and Space in the Social Universe of Capital’ – by Michael Neary and Glenn Rikowski, now at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/10545768/Time_and_Speed_in_the_Social_Universe_of_Capital

APOCALYPSE NOW

APOCALYPSE NOW

APOCALYPSE NOW: NEOLIBERALISM AND APOCALYPTIC NARRATIVES

 

Apocalypse Now: Neoliberalism and Apocalyptic Narratives

Conference website: http://www.unil.ch/aponow

Graduate colloquium

English Department, University of Lausanne

22-23 June, 2015 – Lausanne, Switzerland

With the participation of the University of York, and the University of Utrecht

 

Keynote Speakers:

Christian Arnsperger, University of Lausanne

Adam Kelly, University of York

Organizer: Anas Sareen (Anas.Sareen@unil.ch)

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

Western culture has a long-standing investment in the apocalyptic. Events such as 9/11, global warming, or the financial crisis of 2008 have directly impacted the way we perceive the world, and the ways in which we conceive of social structures. The recent events in Paris exemplify these apocalyptic interruptions in Western society, which bring issues of freedom of speech and democratic ideals to the fore, and reveal unresolved questions of race, religion, and ethnicity. Similar dynamics exist between the U.S. and North-Korea. After cyber terrorists hacked Sony Pictures in retaliation against the release of the film The Interview, public debates on race, satire, and cyber-terrorism have reanimated tensions between the two countries. The highly publicized hacker group Anonymous demonstrates yet another case of Internet-born geopolitics, though the ambivalence the group evokes does raise questions about our public sentiments towards the placelessness of virtual security. Evidently, the apocalyptic abounds today, and urges us to re-think issues of national identity, economy, and ethics in light of shifting geopolitical configurations. Immersed in such geopolitical shifts, neoliberal capitalism is the silent victor of many an apocalypse.

As established by David Harvey among others, the elusive object that capitalism is resurges with a renewed ideological agenda during the 1970s, particularly under the governments of Thatcher in Britain, and Reagan in the U.S., coalescing into what we now term ‘neoliberalism’ or ‘neoliberal capital’. Evidently, the apocalyptic urges us to consider the geopolitical configurations of national identity, economy, ethics. Neoliberal capitalism and the apocalyptic recently converged in the 2008 financial crisis, a circumstance of speculative excess pushed over the brink and salvaged by American and European government bailouts. Given these ties between neoliberalism and the nation, what might we mean today when we speak of the apocalyptic?

The ambivalence of the term ‘apocalypse’ may be the starting point of this reflection. If the ‘apocalypse’ means both the ‘end of the world’, and a ‘revelation’, then what does the apocalyptic reveal?

This colloquium aims to explore the ways in which the apocalyptic destabilizes social or narrative structures and, in doing so, reveals the constructed nature of both inclusionary and exclusionary modes of being/living. What are the dynamics behind ‘the end’ and behind renewal? What remains? What disappears? How long does an apocalypse last? Questions of temporality invite articulations around issues of questions of gender, sexuality, race, subjectivity, politics, and ethics among many others.

Therefore, we seek contributions that address such critical categories from a number of different locations, objects, and orientations. We invite innovative papers of 20 minutes (followed by 10 min discussion), which explore the apocalyptic/and neoliberal capitalism by engaging in contemporary cultural products.

Topics may include (but are not restricted to) the following:

  • Architecture and dystopia in contemporary film and literature
  • Apocalypse and the nation in contemporary film and literature
  • Apocalypse and the everyday
  • Apocalypse, capitalism, and seriality (TV series, comics)
  • Civil disobedience and/or “epistemic disobedience” (see Walter Mignolo, 2009)
  • Dancing on the edge: dance and capitalism/dance and the apocalyptic
  • De-colonial perspectives on capitalism/the apocalyptic
  • Hi-stories of apocalyptic capitalism from the Global South
  • Interrupted flows: music, capitalism, and the apocalyptic
  • Nuclear families, and alternative modes of belonging, kinship (queer theory, for example Lee Edelman’s No Future, Judith Butler’s Antigone’s Claim)
  • Posthumanism and capitalism (zombies, cyborgs, animals)
  • ‘Revealing race’ and the geopolitics of the apocalyptic
  • Staging apocalyptic capitalism
  • Social mouvements, and countering neoliberalism (new forms of political activism)
  • Subjectivity and affect under neoliberalism (for example Lauren Berlant’s Cruel Optimism)
  • The narrative architecture of the apocalyptic (the immediate and the aftermath)
  • The political capital of (cyber-) terrorism

 

Please send abstracts of 300 words, including an author’s bionote,

to aponow@gmail.com by 21 March 2015. Notification of acceptance on 1 Apri l 2015.

Scientific committee:

Catherine Chen (Columbia University), Anna Iatsenko (University of Geneva), and Anas Sareen

(University of Lausanne)

Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

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Karl Marx

Karl Marx

THE SEMINAR IN CONTEMPORARY MARXIST THEORY

The Seminar in Contemporary Marxist Theory is a collaborative project by Marxist scholars at King’s College London based in the departments of European and International Studies, Geography, and Management.

The following three talks are scheduled, and there are more to follow.
Bob Jessop (Lancaster University)
‘Re-reading Poulantzas in and for the current crisis’
21 January 2015 5pm
King’s College London, Strand Campus, Strand WC2R 2LS – Room K3.11

Matt Vidal (King’s College London)
‘Postfordism: the geriatric stage of Atlantic capitalism’
18 February 2015 5pm
King’s College London room TBC

Lucia Pradella (University of Venice Ca’ Foscari and SOAS)
‘Globalization and the critique of political economy: new insights from Marx’s manuscripts’
18 March 2015 5pm
King’s College London room TBC

Please direct any enquiries to Stathis Kouvelakis, stathis.kouvelakis@kcl.ac.uk

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

UNICONFLICTS

UNICONFLICTS In Spaces of Crisis: Critical Approaches In, Against and Beyond the University

International Open Gathering

11–14 June 2015

At the Department of Architecture, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

Encounters and Conflicts in the City

Details: http://urbanconflicts.wordpress.com/

 

Calling

The group “Encounters and Conflicts in the City” calls radical research groups, critical workshops and researchers, students and collectives that are placed in, against and beyond the neoliberal university in an open gathering on the 11-14th June 2015 at the Department of Architecture at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki.

Through this gathering, we aim to create a public space of dialogue transcending divisions among academic and scientific disciplines and to critically approach the urban issues of the era of crisis, through a dialectic, intersectional and postcolonial approach.

The central questions that we wish to raise are two:

  1. What is the role of knowledge, of the university and of researchers in the era of crisis?
  2. What are the critical epistemological and methodological tools for studying the spatial expressions of the ongoing crisis at multiple scales?

Within this context, we seek to examine the ongoing crisis not just as an over-accumulation crisis but also as a crisis of social disobedience and of the inability of the circulation of capital, patriarchy and nationalism. Moving against the mystification of the crisis, we are interested in critical approaches that focus on the spatialization of social relations and examine the spaces of dissent. Particularly, we wish to examine the articulations, the limits, the contradictions and the dialectic relation of commons, enclosures, inclusion, exclusion, insurgency and counter-insurgency as well as their hybrid intermediate forms, which emerge in and through physical space, modes of communication and the constitution of communities. Overall, we aim to break the North/South or East/West dichotomies and to focus on the fields of gender, race, class and culture.

Building on the critical evaluation of social relations, the circulation of social struggles and subjects and communities in motion, we search for their contentious spaces and their spatial transformations, limits, possibilities and contradictions in the era of crisis. Moreover, understanding education as a unity of theory and practice, we seek these epistemological and methodological tools that emerge from and aim to the deepening and the circulation of social struggles and social movements. In the context of today’s global and local crisis, we note that while a plethora of social struggles and insurgencies emerge, the academic research often appropriates and commercializes their ideas. It is exactly here that we identify the dead-end.

Hence, we seek to surpass the so called academic activism and to set as a main target of this open gathering the critical examination of the following:

A. The role of knowledge and of researchers in the university and in social movements

The neoliberal University and the educational system constitute strategic mechanisms for the production and reproduction of social relations. In particular, within a dynamic process of neoliberalization, the university studies are intensified and are linked more and more to the labour market. Within this context, we wish to examine issues such as the production of knowledge, knowledge as a common, the neoliberalization of the University, the new educational enclosures and the concept of Anti-university.

The transformation of knowledge into private property and consequently into a commodity creates new enclosures in the field of knowledge. These new enclosures in neoliberal education are expressed both through the commodification of the physical space of the universities and through the objectification of human abilities. Some indicative examples are the increase of studying costs, the studying loans, the control of access to information, the commercialization of academic papers and books, the securitization of the University space, the criminalization and the rhetoric against student mobilizations, the suppression of the struggles of university employees and the restriction of the freedom of speech.

However, since 1960s and 1970s, the universities are spaces of collective emancipatory movements, of social struggles and of radical experiments of self-organization for the production of knowledge. As a response to these movements, since 1980s, a number of educational reforms have been introduced. These reforms seek to promote the marketization of the university, aiming to produce the appropriate competitive workforce and to supress student movements.

Yet, during the last decade, many dynamic student movements have emerged in France (2006), Greece (2006-2007), the USA (2009-2010), the UK (2010), Italy (2010-2011) and so on, which targeted the enclosure of knowledge and were connected and inspired many other urban social movements.

 

Axes of Discussion

A.1 Social education and emancipatory movements in the universities

-Student movements: limits and contradictions, connection with other urban movements, confrontation of their suppression and criminalization

-Perspectives of a radical pedagogy towards the knowledge as common

-Ideas and practices of free–‐autonomous universities beyond the education of the neoliberal university

A.2 Control and commodification of knowledge

-Public, state and private education in the neoliberal era

-Politics of knowledge enclosures and copyrights

-The suppression of academic freedom and of the freedom of speech

-Knowledge as private property and commodity for the production of value and surplus value

-Student loans and study costs as mechanisms of disciplining

-The cultural politics of the neoliberal university

-Paid and unpaid work at the University

A.3 The role of the researcher

-Lifelong education, competitiveness and the precarious status of the researcher

-The researcher as producer of dominant discourses and her/his role in the reproduction of power

-Competitiveness, academic carrie and academic divisions and hierarchies

-The biopolitical character of the neoliberal education and the construction of new identities

-Education as praxis, understood as a unity of theory and practice

-Researchers, networks and groups against and beyond the neoliberal university

 

B. Critical epistemological and methodological tools for the study of the crisis’s spatial expressions at multiple scales

Against the privatization and commodification of the academic knowledge and the intended hegemony of the neoliberal perspectives, we seek those critical epistemological tools of knowledge production that encourage social emancipation.

During the last years, urban movements and a plethora of visible and invisible practices of resistance and emancipation offer a variety of tools for the destabilization of the dominant ideologies, ways of disaggregation of power, negotiation of contradictions and visibility of differences. In parallel, today there is the urgent need for the promotion, circulation and deepening of these critical perspectives and their linking to social struggles. Thus, we aim to discuss epistemological and methodological tools, such as the following:

B1. Dialectic critical urban theory

Which are those critical approaches that assist us to perceive and examine the multiple dimensions of urban space? How do dialectic approaches and critical urban theory contribute to the understanding of the spaces of social movements and the spaces of capital, racism and patriarchy?

B2. Intersectionality and urban space in the era of crisis

How does intersectionality contribute to the study of the urban space? Which are the intersectional crossings of the multiple systems of domination, oppression and discrimination such as race, class, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, religion, dis/ability, age, cast, language, culture, body size, education level or citizenship?

B3. Cultural and postcolonial approaches

How do cultural and postcolonial studies contribute to the understanding of urban space and the conceptualization of body, identity and modes of communication. How does the criminalization and the suppression of alternative modes of culture, information and lifestyle operate as mechanisms of control, disciplining and normalization? What is the role of social media in the communication of social struggles? We seek the expression of the ongoing crisis through the spaces of architecture, art, media, and internet.

 

Within the above context, we call critical research groups, workshops, collectives and individuals to participate in a gathering during 11-14 June 2015. If you would like to participate, please provide us with your abstract (300 words) by 1 March 2015 at the latest, to the following e-mail: urbanconflicts@gmail.com

Participation is free and we will try to provide accommodation for as many participants as possible.

 

“Encounters and conflicts in the city” group

Costas Athanasiou, Eleni Vasdeki, Elina Kapetanaki, Maria Karagianni, Matina Kapsali, Vaso

Makrygianni, Foteini Mamali, Orestis Pangalos, Haris Tsavdaroglou

Thessaloniki

Thessaloniki

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Crisis

Crisis

Crisis

Crisis

WHAT IS CAPITALISM?  AND HOW TO ABOLISH IT?

SUNDAY, JANUARY 18, 2015

6:00-8:30 PM

Westside Peace Center

3916 Sepulveda Blvd., near Venice Blvd. (free parking in rear)

Suite 101-102, press #22 at door to get into building

Culver City (LA area)

SPEAKERS:

Matt Owen, labor and Latin America solidarity activist

Sarah Mason, former Occupy LA activist

As we view the current crises – over racist police murder and brutality, endless war, poverty wages, and environmental destruction – activists are increasingly looking at capitalism as the underlying source of these problems and the obstacle to their solution.  While many point to neoliberal capitalism as the culprit, this implicitly suggests that another, more humane and just capitalism is possible.  This meeting will take a different tack, examining capitalism as such, as a system in need of total uprooting.

Background readings for those interested these questions are almost limitless, but for starters we suggest Marx’s “Wage Labor and Capital,” a short text written for workers.

Sponsored by the West Coast Chapter, International Marxist-Humanist Organization

More information: <arise@internationalmarxisthumanist.org> and http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/

Join our Facebook page: “International Marxist-Humanist Organization” https://www.facebook.com/groups/imhorg/

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

THE ACADEMIC MANIFESTO: FROM AN OCCUPIED TO A PUBLIC UNIVERSITY

Willem Halffman and Hans Radder

 

First published in Krisis: Journal of Contemporary Philosophy, 2013, Issue 3 (in Dutch)

Now available in English: translated by Jan Evertse

 

Willem Halffman and Hans Radder

The academic manifesto: From an occupied to a public university

 

1 The occupied university

The university has been occupied – not by students demanding a say (as in the 1960s), but this time by the many-headed Wolf of management.1 The Wolf has colonised academia with a mercenary army of professional administrators, armed with spreadsheets, output indicators and audit procedures, loudly accompanied by the Efficiency and Excellence March. Management has proclaimed academics the enemy within: academics have to be distrusted, tested and monitored, under the permanent threat of reorganisation, discontinuance and dismissal. The academics allow themselves to be meekly played off against one another, like frightened, obedient sheep, hoping to make it by staying just ahead of their colleagues. The Wolf uses the most absurd means to

remain in control, such as money-squandering semi- and full mergers, increasingly detailed, and thus costly, accountability systems and extremely expensive prestige projects.

This conquest seems to work and the export of knowledge from the newly conquered colony can be ever increased, but inland the troubles fester. Thus, while all the glossed-up indicators constantly point to the stars, the mood on the academic shop floor steadily drops. The Wolf pops champagne after each new score in the Shanghai Competition, while the university sheep desperately work until they drop2 and the quality of the knowledge plantations is starting to falter, as is demonstrated by a large number of comprehensive and thorough analyses.3 Meanwhile, the sheep endeavour to bring the absurd anomalies of the occupation to the Wolf’s attention by means of an endless stream of opinion articles, lamentations, pressing letters and appeals. In turn, the Wolf reduces these to mere incidents, brushes them aside as inevitable side effects of progress, or simply ignores them.

Although our description and evaluation were written from the perspective of Dutch universities, the gist of our account (and quite a few details) applies to other countries as well, especially in Europe.4 While management’s occupation may not be as advanced in the Netherlands as it is in England (Holmwood 2011), it has already established a powerful continental bridgehead (De Boer, Enders and Schimank 2007). To show how these developments are more than just incidents, we list six critical processes and their excesses below. We will then proceed to analyse causes and suggest remedies.

 

Notes:

This article is a slightly updated and edited translation of the Dutch original, which appeared in Krisis: Tijdschrift voor actuele filosofie 2013 (3), pp. 2-18. We are grateful for helpful commentary on that version by the Krisis editorial team, in particular René Gabriëls. We would also like to thank Ilse and Jan Evertse for translating the Dutch text into English.

2 According to accepted clinical norms, a quarter of Dutch professors of medical science (especially the younger ones) suffer from burn-out (Tijdink, Vergouwen en Smulders 2012).

3 See, e.g., Ritzer (1998); Graham (2002); Hayes and Wynyard (2002); Bok (2003); Washburn (2003); Evans (2005); Shimank (2005); Boomkens (2008); Gill (2009); Tuchman (2009); Radder (2010); Krijnen, Lorenz and Umlauf (2011); Collini (2012); Sanders and Van der Zweerde (2012); Dijstelbloem et al. (2013); Verbrugge and Van Baardewijk (2014).

4 See Lorenz (2006 and 2012); Krücken (2014). In line with the situation in most European

 

See the full article in English at: https://www.academia.edu/9923660/The_academic_manifesto_From_an_occupied_to_a_public_unversity

Krisis: Tijdschrift voor actuele filosofie: http://www.krisis.eu

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

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