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AutodownloadPERSISTENT UNEMPLOYMENT, AUTOMATION, AND THE TRANSCENDENCE OF CAPITALISM

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2015

6:30-9:30 PM

Westside Peace Center

3916 Sepulveda Blvd., near Venice Blvd. (free parking in rear)

Suite 101-102, press #22 at door to get into building

Culver City (LA area)

 

SPEAKERS:

Sarah Mason, former Occupy LA activist

Ali Kiani, Iranian Marxist activist and translator

 

Capitalism today is marked by persistent unemployment, particularly of youth, as well as low-wage labor.  This is not only a local but also a global problem. Although the displacement of human labor by machines is as old as industrial capitalism, it has accelerated and moved into new sectors in recent years.  These issues have been debated widely from Marx’s time, to the Critical Theorists and Marxist-Humanists of the 1950s and 1960s, to today.  Is persistent unemployment due to technological change a further oppression of the working people, or does it offer possibilities for human liberation?  How can both of these issues be connected, in dialectical fashion?  We will explore these issues by examining some pages from Marx’s GRUNDRISSE and CAPITAL, from Herbert Marcuse and Raya Dunayevskaya on automation, and from Paul Mason today.

 

Suggested readings:

Paul Mason, “The End of Capitalism Has Begun,” GUARDIAN, July 17, 2015: http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/jul/17/postcapitalism-end-of-capitalism-begun

Raya Dunayevskaya, “The ‘Automaton’ and the Worker,” PHILOSOPHY AND REVOLUTION, pp. 68-77

Herbert Marcuse, on automation, ONE-DIMENSIONAL MAN, pp. 28-37 http://www.marcuse.org/herbert/pubs/64onedim/odm2.html

Karl Marx, Section 5: “The Struggle between Worker and Machine,” in Ch. 15: “Machinery and Large-Scale Industry,” in CAPITAL, Vol. I https://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1867-c1/ch15.htm#S5

Karl Marx, on machinery in GRUNDRISSE, Nicolaus translation, pp. 699-713, online here https://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1857/grundrisse/ch13.htm and here https://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1857/grundrisse/ch14.htm

tech_assembly-automation

Sponsored by the West Coast Chapter, International Marxist-Humanist Organization

More information: arise@internationalmarxisthumanist.org and http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/

Here is URL for meeting for Facebook, Twitter, etc.: http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/events/los-angeles-persistent-unemployment-automation-and-the-transcendence-of-capitalism

Join our Facebook page: “International Marxist-Humanist Organization” https://www.facebook.com/groups/imhorg/

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

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Working to Death

Working to Death

WORKING US TO DEATH: ALIENATED LABOR UNDER CAPITALISM

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2015

6:30-9:30 PM

Westside Peace Center

3916 Sepulveda Blvd., near Venice Blvd. (free parking in rear)

Suite 101-102, press #22 at door to get into building

Culver City (LA area)

 

SPEAKERS:

Stephan Hammel, Marxist musicologist

Kevin Anderson, author of Marx at the Margins

Mansoor M., Iranian computer engineer and cultural worker

 

Since the 19th century, capitalism has radically transformed work, making the worker, in Marx’s language, a mere “appendage to the machine.”  This deepened under 20th century assembly lines and has been extended globally today, as seen in places like China or Bangladesh.  In recent years, alienated labor has begun to spread from the factory floor into white collar and professional work in the U.S. and other developed countries. All of this is fueled by fear in a system wherein ever-larger sectors of the population face permanent unemployment and precarity.

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Suggested readings:

Recent New York Times article on Amazon (white collar and professional workers) http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/16/technology/inside-amazon-wrestling-big-ideas-in-a-bruising-workplace.html?_r=0

New York Times article on suicides of Apple workers in China from 2012 (factory workers) http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/26/business/ieconomy-apples-ipad-and-the-human-costs-for-workers-in-china.html

Marx: Alienated (Estranged) Labor essay from 1844: https://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1844/manuscripts/labour.htm

Marx: Fetishism section from Capital https://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1867-c1/ch01.htm#S4

download (11)

Sponsored by the West Coast Chapter, International Marxist-Humanist Organization

More information: arise@internationalmarxisthumanist.org

http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/

Here is URL for meeting for Facebook, Twitter, etc.: http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/events/los-angeles-working-us-to-death-alienated-labor-under-capitalism

Join our Facebook page: “International Marxist-Humanist Organization” https://www.facebook.com/groups/imhorg/

download (6)

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

No Future

No Future

WHY IS THERE UNEMPLOYMENT?

WHY IS THERE UNEMPLOYMENT?

WHY ARE THOSE WITH JOBS OVERWORKED?

WHAT CAN WE DO?

SUNDAY, MAY 3, 2015

7:00-10:00 PM

Westside Peace Center

3916 Sepulveda Blvd., near Venice Blvd. (free parking in rear)

Suite 101-102, press #22 at door to get into building

Culver City (LA area)

 

SPEAKERS:

Ali Kiani, Iranian Marxist activist and translator

Sarah Mason, former Occupy LA activist

 

Questions to be addressed:

**Why is the U.S. economy characterized by persistent unemployment for tens of millions? Does it stem from the downturn since 2008, from neoliberal capitalism, or is it a permanent feature of capitalism itself?

**Why at the same time are tens of millions required to work long hours, often far beyond the 40-hour-week?  Why has the 40-hour standard, in place for 80 years, not been reduced?

**Are more jobs the solution to unemployment, or does the whole concept of work and wage labor need to be questioned?

 

Those seeking more background before the meeting might consult these readings:

Marx, “The Progressive Production of a Relative Surplus Population or Industrial Reserve Army,” in CAPITAL, Vol. 1 (14 pp.)

Marx, “The Struggle for a Normal Working Day,” in CAPITAL, Vol. 1, Ch. 10, section 6 (24 pp.)

Peter Frase, “Post-Work: A Guide for the Perplexed,” in JACOBIN 2-25-13 (3 pp.)

 

Sponsored by the West Coast Chapter, International Marxist-Humanist Organization

More information: arise@internationalmarxisthumanist.org

http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/

Here is URL for meeting for Facebook, Twitter, etc. http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/events/los-angeles-why-is-there-unemployment-why-are-those-with-jobs-overworked-what-can-we-do

Join our Facebook page: “International Marxist-Humanist Organization” https://www.facebook.com/groups/imhorg/

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Co-operationCO-OPERATIVES AND THE WORLD OF WORK

Call for papers

ICA-ILO International Research Conference

Cooperatives and the World of Work

Antalya, Turkey

9-10 November, 2015

 

Abstracts: February 15, 2015

Notification of acceptance: April 15, 2015

Early bird registration: September 15, 2015

 

Conference Objectives

The International Co-operative Alliance Committee on Cooperative Research (ICA CCR) and the International Labour Organization (ILO) will host a research conference on 9-10 November 2015 in Antalya, Turkey. The conference will bring together researchers, students, practitioners, advocates, policy makers and representatives of employers’ and workers’ organizations working in areas of cooperative enterprises and social and solidarity economy organizations, as well as labour research and themes related to the world of work.

The ILO/ICA research conference will be an opportunity, among others, to:

  • Bring cooperative researchers and labour researchers together around the themes of world of work;
  • Raise visibility and interest in research on decent work (job creation, rights at work, social protection, social dialogue) in the world of cooperatives, to encourage more systematic and effective engagement with world of work issues;
  • Raise visibility and interest in qualitative and quantitative research on cooperative enterprises among labour economists and researchers; and
  • Establish contacts and potentially a research network around cooperatives and the world of work.

 

Conference Background

The crisis in the world of work, which ranges from unemployment to unfairness and inequality in the labour market, the widespread lack of social protection and the impact of climate change along with food and fuel crises, has generated growing interest of policy makers in the cooperative enterprise model. Across continents, cooperative enterprises have been established to confront the crises and have grown both in membership and return at such times.

Today when cooperative principles are put into action, they continue to show their relevance and value [1]. Worker cooperatives are emerging as a way to rescue failing enterprises, and legislation is often following to catch up with the economic realities in a number of countries. Consumer and producer cooperatives as well perform functions that improve the standard of living of workers and they are often cited as “best places to work”.

The cooperative form of enterprise and organization is growing and fulfilling a range of social, economic and environmental functions and responding to the needs of their members. They are increasingly being established among vulnerable categories of workers such as migrant workers, people with disabilities, and workers in the informal economy (for example, street vendors, waste pickers, home-based, domestic, construction and transport workers); as well as in innovative sectors, including social care cooperatives (for elderly, disabled and child care), tourism cooperatives, and renewable energy production and distribution cooperatives.

As global attention focuses on the challenges of sustainable development, from the world of work perspective, cooperative enterprises are well-placed to be leaders to advance the decent work dimension of a just transition. Nevertheless, although their role as key building blocks for a jobs-oriented recovery strategy may seem obvious, evidence-based policy in that regard requires further research and statistics to track the quantity and quality of the jobs created [2].

The cooperative movement must be in a position to articulate and measure the forms of value that cooperatives produce in leveraging more and better jobs, so key questions are:

  • What impact do the ownership structure and the active participation of workers and members in cooperatives have on the productivity of such enterprises?
  • What impact does broadening ownership have on job quality and working conditions?
  • What is the record of cooperatives on labour compliance?
  • What is the qualitative and quantitative contribution of cooperative enterprises to advancing full and productive employment and decent work, in particular for vulnerable groups?

 

Message from Guy Ryder, ILO Director-General, on International Cooperative Day 2013

http://www.ilo.org/global/about-the-ilo/who-we-are/ilo-director-general/statements-and-speeches/WCMS_216859/lang–en/index.htm

As global attention focuses on the challenges of sustainable development, from the world of work perspective, cooperative enterprises are well-placed to be leaders to advance the decent work dimension of a just transition. Nevertheless, although their role as key building blocks for a jobs-oriented recovery strategy may seem obvious, evidence-based policy in that regard requires further research and statistics to track the quantity and quality of the jobs created.

The cooperative movement must be in a position to articulate and measure the forms of value that cooperatives produce in leveraging more and better jobs, and in this respect crucial issues are:

  • What impact do the ownership structure and the active participation of workers and members in cooperatives have on the productivity of such enterprises?
  • What impact does broadening ownership have on job quality and working conditions?
  • What is the record of cooperatives on labour compliance?
  • What is the qualitative and quantitative contribution of cooperative enterprises to advancing full and productive employment and decent work, in particular for vulnerable groups?

 

Notes:

[1]. Message from Guy Ryder, ILO Director-General, on International Cooperative Day 2013

http://www.ilo.org/global/about-the-ilo/who-we-are/ilo-director-general/statements-and-speeches/WCMS_216859/lang–en/index.htm

[2]. Guy Ryder’s opening remarks to the UNRISD Conference on Social and Solidarity Economy held in May 2013 in Geneva. http://www.ilo.org/global/about-the-ilo/who-we-are/ilo-director-general/statements-and-speeches/WCMS_212653/lang–en/index.htm

 

Conference Topics

The conference will address, but is not limited to, the following research areas:

  • Cooperatives and labour law compliance
  • Cooperatives and trade unions
  • Cooperatives and employers’ organizations
  • Cooperatives and employment creation
  • Cooperatives and child labour
  • Cooperatives and forced labour
  • Cooperatives and formalizing the workers in the informal economy
  • Cooperatives and decent work in the rural economy
  • Cooperatives and youth employment
  • Cooperatives on women’s economic empowerment and gender equality
  • Cooperatives and labour statistics
  • Cooperatives and codes of conduct
  • Cooperatives and labour legislation and policies
  • Cooperatives and productivity
  • Employment in cooperatives across value chains
  • Cooperatives and social protection
  • Cooperatives and social dialogue
  • Innovation in cooperatives (social, organizational and technical)
  • Enterprise restructuring and worker cooperatives
  • Cooperatives and labour in socialist and transition economies
  • Theoretical advancements on cooperatives and labour issues
  • Comparative performance of worker cooperatives and (non-cooperative) employee owned firms
  • Cooperatives and human development and education/training

 

Call for Papers

We invite practitioners, researchers, and policy makers in the cooperative and social and solidarity economy to submit an abstract no longer than 300 words on the listed topics, or other topics related to cooperatives and the world of work. Proposals for presentations or for panels (up to six participants) and sessions (three or four presenters of research papers on a common theme) are welcome.

The abstracts should be submitted by email to: coop@ilo.org no later than February 15, 2015.

The email communications should indicate ICAILO2015 and the family name of the corresponding author in the subject area (eg. ICA-ILO2015 – Smith).

The message should indicate clearly the type of proposal – paper abstract, panel, or a session. A panel or session proposal needs to include names of all presenters, as well as abstracts of all three (or maximum four) papers for a session.

 

Young scholars programme (YSP)

Young/new researchers (graduate students, doctoral and post-doctoral students, and new scholars within two years of receiving their degrees) are invited to submit their proposals as indicated in the above Call for Papers, also indicating their wish to participate in the ‘Young scholars programme’. Depending on interest, a decision about the exact shape of the program will be made with inputs from the applicants.

This may be a pre-conference workshop for new scholars, related to the themes of the conference, or a discussion forum related to their research.

Deadline to express interest in YSP to be submmited by email to: snovkovic@smu.ca by February 15, 2015.

Limited space.

Young scholars will also be eligible for a reduced registration fee. Financial travel support is possible, but it will depend on the number of applicants and available resources. More details will be available on the conference website closer to the date.

 

Websites: http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/—ed_emp/—emp_ent/—coop/documents/event/wcms_310424.pdf

http://ccr.ica.coop/sites/ccr.ica.coop/files/attachments/Call%20for%20Papers%20Coop%20and%20WoW%20Final2.pdf

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

An Industrial Sewing Machine

An Industrial Sewing Machine

MATERIALITY AT WORK

BSA Work, Employment and Economic Life Study Group

‘It’s not immaterial’ – Materiality at work

The BSA WEEL group is holding a half day seminar/workshop on materiality at work on Friday 24th January 1pm – 5pm.

How does the material environment of work matter? How are working lives and the organisation of the workplace impacted by the spaces, size, weight, smells, sounds and other material characteristics of particular jobs? In what ways do workers physically interact with the material world in order to perform work? How do instruments or tools mediate this interaction? Are interactions with organic materials different from interactions with non-organic materials? To what extent can we understand interactions with technology as material, rather than immaterial?

Generally, what can an understanding of work as material contribute to the sociology of work and employment?

The event will be held in the BSA meeting room, Imperial Wharf, London. Costs to participants £20 BSA Members, £25 Non-members, free unwaged/student.

We are especially keen for attendees who wish to do so to contribute five minute micro-presentations in which they explore the role of materiality in their research. These are *not* expected to be fully developed papers but instead should raise ideas that have come out of research and suggest issues that may be of interest to others.

If you are interested in contributing to the seminar in this way please submit a two sentence (max 50 word) proposal for a five minute overview of how your research relates to the materiality of work to Ben at b.m.fincham@sussex.ac.uk

See: http://www.britsoc.co.uk/media/61490/WEEL_240114.pdf

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The New Left Book Club: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2014/01/05/the-new-left-book-club-call-for-papers/  

Work

Work

JOURNAL OF LABOR SCIENCES

I would  like to divulge the table of contents of the first number of the Labor Sciences Journal, a new academic/activist journal founded by DIEESE – the Inter-Union Department of Statistics and Socioeconomic Studies in Brazil. The titles of the articles are below, in Portuguese and English, as well as the link to access them. It’s an excellent resource for scholars of labor in Latin America.

Cordially, Professor Dr. Sean Purdy
Departamento de História
Universidade de São Paulo

CONTENTS:

-Strikes and the gender question: a panorama of the work stoppages motivated by questions related to women between 1983 and 2011

-Apprenticeship as an instrument for the implementation of the fundamental human right to professionalization

-Gender Assymmetries In The Brazilian Labor Market: Crisis And Public Policies

-Juridical Forms of the Reduction of the Workweek in Brazil

-Labor As Seen By Social Anthropology

-Labor, industry and strategies of development

-Modern Times: a reading of labor through images

-The recent evolution of the Brazilian labor market from the perspective of the concept of the industrial reserve army

Barbara Weinstein: The Discourse of Technical Competence: Strategies of Authority and Power
in Industrializing Brazil

http://rct.dieese.org.br/rct/index.php/rct/issue/view/2/showToc

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Knowledge

Knowledge

THE DYNAMICS OF VIRTUAL WORK: THE TRANSFORMATION OF LABOUR IN A DIGITAL GLOBAL ECONOMY

Sponsored by COST (European Co-operation in Science and Technology), Work Organisation Labour and Globalisation, Competition and Change and Triple C

To be held at the University of Hertfordshire, UK, September 3-5, 2014

Globalisation and technological change have transformed where people work, when and how. Digitisation of information has altered labour processes out of all recognition whilst telecommunications have enabled jobs to be relocated globally. But ICTs have also enabled the creation of entirely new types of ‘digital’ or ‘virtual’ labour, both paid and unpaid,  shifting the borderline between ‘play’ and ‘work’ and creating new types of unpaid labour connected with the consumption and co-creation of goods and services.  The implications of this are far-reaching, both for policy and for scholarship. The dynamics of these changes cannot be captured adequately within the framework of any single academic discipline. On the contrary, they can only be understood in the light of a combination of insights from fields including political economy, the sociology of work, organisational theory, economic geography, development studies, industrial relations, comparative social policy, communications studies, technology policy and gender studies

COST Action IS1202 brings together an international network of leading experts from 29 European Countries with researchers from other parts of the world to develop a multi-faceted approach to understanding these phenomena. This international conference will open up an interactive dialogue between scholars both inside and outside the network.

Papers drawing on theoretical, methodological or empirical research are welcomed on the following topics:

The new international division of labour
Restructuring of value chains – theoretical perspectives
Relocation or Global sourcing? New patterns of spatial mobility
Does ‘place’ still matter, and why?
Interactions between the gender division of labour and the spatial division of labour.
Changes in skills and occupational identities in the digital economy
The creation of new occupational identities and the disintegration of old ones
Reskilling or deskilling? New forms of Taylorisation or new opportunities for creativity?
Changing patterns of working time, work-life balance and gender division of labour
New forms of organisation inside and outside the workplace
Value creation in the Internet Age
The monetisation of the Internet – theoretical and methodological challenges
Commodification and value creation in online activities
‘Prosumption’, ‘co-creation’ and ‘playbour’: conceptualising the shifts between labour, consumption and leisure activities
Virtual work and immaterial production (including crowdsourcing, goldfarming and other forms of online work)
Policy implications of virtual work
Implications of virtual work for employment in creative industries
User-generated content – threat or opportunity for employment?
Implications of virtual work for work-life balance and equality
Regulation of work and industrial relations in virtual work environments (the global context)
Implications of virtual work for work-life balance and equality
Effects of virtual work on occupational profiles, skills and HR practices

The conference will be organised in four streams, with plenary sessions on each day.

All submissions will be subject to peer review.
Deadline for submission of extended abstracts: January 31st, 2014
Confirmation of acceptance: April 30th, 2014
Some scholarships may be available for attendees from Developing Countries.

The Dynamics of Virtual Work: http://dynamicsofvirtualwork.com/

The Conference website and Call for Papers: http://dynamicsofvirtualwork.com/call-for-papers/

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/virtual-work-conference-registrati200bon-now-open

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo   

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

An Industrial Sewing Machine

An Industrial Sewing Machine

FACTORY LIFE

Lyka Thorn

At the age of fifteen I started working in a factory. This was three years before the law allowed. I was able to work there because it was a small family-run garment factory in the city, not a big multinational one, and they did not worry about such things. I worked about twelve hours a day from 7am until 7pm. I didn’t know anything about the work but I tried hard and they came to teach me how to work the machines. It was very dangerous; I had to be careful all the time. The factory was in a big house with no windows. It was very noisy, and we couldn’t talk to each other.

After about three months, I was moved to another factory owned by the same family, and at the same time I changed from working days to the night shift. This factory was in a villa on the outskirts of the city. It had a lovely garden, although we couldn’t see it when we were working because, again, there were no windows. This was partly to keep the noise in, and partly to stop people looking in. It was a bit quieter, and I met a lot of new friends. We worked hard for just US $3.50 a day – 7 days a week until the order was completed. After that we had to wait up to a day without pay, before starting on the next order. The industrial sewing machine I used was large and cumbersome, encompassing twenty individual sewing devices. I had to stand up and walk from one side of the machine to the other, checking for problems for about 12 hours a day. In the first two and a half years, I got the needle of the machine stuck in my finger three times. When this happened, my workmates would remove the needle with a pair of pliers, making sure that none of the needle was left inside my finger. One of these times, I had to go to see the doctor because my friends couldn’t find the point of the needle. Fortunately the doctor couldn’t find it in my finger, either.

One night I went to work and felt pain of all over my body. I knew I was sick but I carried on working until I fell over, the result of being on my feet every day for extended periods, and eating irregularly and inconsistently. I had to go to the clinic where the doctor gave me medicine to build me up. He asked me why I had rheumatism at such a young age. I was off work about a week in pain and with a fever. For each day I was unable to work, $3.50 was deducted from my wages.

After three years, I started studying English when the night shifts were over. I had only seven hours free time a day. Life was tough. After studying for a year, I had to give it up at the age of nineteen because a marriage was being arranged for me. We never actually got married but started living together.

Soon, I discovered I was pregnant and had to give up work because of morning sickness. I decided to stop working until the baby was born. When I was seven months pregnant my partner left me after a big argument with my dad, and after a month I moved back to my family home.

My baby was born on the 19 September 2007 at 11 am, after I had been in labour for twelve hours, and when I saw her I forgot about all the pain. She looked very cute and all my family loved her because she was the first grandchild.

Three days after she was born, her dad came to the hospital and begged me to take him back. He said he would stop lying to me and would look after me and our daughter. By the time Rita was nine months old, she was costing us a lot of money, and her dad’s wages as a motorcycle taxi driver were not enough. I therefore decided to go back to work in another factory near my family home. The factory employed more then a thousand workers. I worked about eight hours a day- six days a week for US $ 2 a day and I had to work longer hours if they told me to. I had to get up at 4.30 am and often did not get home until 10 pm. I earned about $130 a month but I was exhausted. If I was off for one day they took $5 from my wages.

Factory life is very hard, especially for women. We worked for peanuts until we dropped, and we never ate well, with just one hour a day break at midday. To go home and come back to the factory took about forty minutes, so I had to eat cheap food, which I bought outside the factory gates. This was dirty, of poor-quality and very unhealthy.

Although my partner gave me next to nothing from his wages, and all my wages went on looking after us and our daughter, he accused me of giving my wages to my family. When I denied this, he left me again. I stayed in the factory for another 3 months, then I got very depressed, I couldn’t work, and I decided to stop working there.

Soon after he came back and again asked if we could get back together, but I said, “no”. He nagged me until I agreed to live with him again. I went back to work in the factory for the third time.

I worked there a year, after which we split up again. I tried to commit suicide but even that didn’t seem to bother him. My family looked after me until I felt well. After all this I was totally fell fed up with the factory and my life. I had spent about seven years of my life there, and I decided to end factory life, and start a new one. I just wanted to start again and try to forget about the past.

My new job was a cashier in a bar. I worked from 7pm to 7am every night. I did not have time to look after my daughter, from whom I had never been apart before but because I needed the money I had to leave her with my mum. When I woke up late afternoon, she would say, “mum I miss you, can’t you stay with me tonight?”. I was very sad and told her, sorry I couldn’t, I had to work because of her.

I had been working about six months in the bar, when my ex-partner came back again, and I told him it was too late. I could take care of myself and my daughter. I was fed up with our life together. He left and never came back. He never came to see his daughter. I know she is sad about this, and she used to tell everyone that her dad is dead.

After we split up for good, my sister went to England with her partner and all our family took her to the airport and stayed there for about two hours until she left. When we got back home, we realised we had been burgled. I went straight to the place I had hidden some jewellery, bought during the four years I had worked in the factory before living with my partner – worth about $2000. It had gone. I was very sad. I had worked hard for nothing.

Life is a story, but this was not the end. I worked as a cashier for another year and I met a man from England. He is a good man, and very kind. We got married a year ago, and I now have a spouse visa, and can live in England until 2015, when I need to apply for another visa. My husband looks after me and my family. My daughter, Rita, who is now six years old, and my husband get on very well, and she now thinks of her new-step-father as her only father and calls him ‘papa’. Two months ago, she visited us for six weeks, and we are now waiting for the result of a settlement visa application for her.

An Asian factory worker who knew nothing about the world, I am now studying English and learning more and more about life every day. At last my life is good, and full of happiness and laughter.

© Lyka Thorn, 4th December 2013

Email: adav2011@yahoo.com

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Peter Hudis

Peter Hudis

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 7th OCTOBER 2013

EVENTS

RYERSON SOCIAL JUSTICE WEEK (OCTOBER 7 – 11)
A week of events, speakers, exhibit and cultural events to transform Ryerson into a hub of social justice and solidarity.

Monday October 7th

Rally: Decent Work For All!
Time: 12:00pm – 1:30pm
Location: Gould Street & Victoria
-Drumming
-Student and Worker Speakers

Social Justice ‘Walking Tour’
Time: 2:00pm – 3:30pm
Location: Meet at Ryerson statue

Opening Lecture – Idle No More: Reframing the Nation To Nation Relationship
Time: 6:30pm – 8:30pm
Location: TRS1067 (TRSM Building – 55 Dundas St. West)

For more info on the week’s events: http://www.ryerson.ca/socialjustice/events/index.html

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REBELS WITH A CAUSE FILM FESTIVAL AT YORK UNIVERSITY

Tuesday, October 22- Friday, October 25, 2013
York University
4700 Keele St., Toronto

The Rebels with a Cause Film Festival is brought to the York U community by artists and activists who seek the delicate balance between both creative and political work. We believe that film should not pacify or be escapist, but politicize and give us the courage to transform ourselves and our communities. The films selected are artistic reflections on social justice issues and critical documentations of unsung community work. Located within a university context, Rebels engages in dialogue outside the classroom through conversations after screenings. We hope that the communal act of viewing and sharing our ideas about films will strengthen our community and empower our work on York campus and beyond.

For more info: http://rebelsfilmfest.wordpress.com/

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FROM INDUSTRIAL FOOD TO WORLD FOOD: A BOOK LAUNCH AND PANEL DISCUSSION ON WORLD FOOD DAY

Wednesday, Oct 16
6pm – 8pm
FoodShare Toronto
90 Croatia Street, Toronto

Contact: Robyn Shyllit – 416.363.6441 x282 – robyn@foodshare.net

The event is FREE and snacks will be provided. Books will be available for sale and signing. Wheelchair accessible.

Celebrate World Food Day on October 16, with a special book launch and panel discussion featuring author of The Industrial Diet Anthony Winson, No Nonsense Guide to World Food, Second Edition author Wayne Roberts, FoodShare Executive Director Debbie Field, and Executive Director of Marin Organic in California Jeffrey Westman.

Plus, meet the author’s of FoodShare’s first cookbook, Marion Kane and Adrienne De Francesco, and purchase your own signed copy of share: Delicious Dishes from FoodShare and Friends.

For more info: http://www.foodshare.net/events/from-industrial-food-to-world-food-a-book-launch-and-panel-discussion/

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GETTING IN & STAYING IN: LABOUR MARKET CHALLENGES FACING YOUTH

Monday, 4 November 2013
9:00 AM to 4:00 PM
Toronto Central YMCA Centre
20 Grosvenor Street, Toronto

Youth are experiencing unprecedented barriers to entering the workforce and are resorting to creative, and sometimes unpaid, outlets to gain meaningful experiences, network and secure stable employment. Join Social Planning Toronto, Toronto Workforce Innovation Group and McMaster University’s School of Labour Studies as we explore overall trends in youth unemployment in Canada and Ontario; the rise in unpaid internships; the debate around skills mismatch; youth & unions; youth in self-employment; and the public policy options and promising practices available to support youth in these difficult times.

For more info: http://bit.ly/17elObc

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WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH – OCTOBER 2013

In 1992, October was proclaimed Women’s History Month to acknowledge and celebrate the achievements of women throughout Canadian history. October was chosen to coincide with anniversary of the Persons Case, which on October 18, 1929 – through the courage and determination of the Famous Five, the five Canadian women who launched the case – established once and for all that women were “persons” when the Privy Council overturned a Supreme Court of Canada decision and ruled that women were indeed persons, and could become Senators. The ruling not only opened the political doors for Canadian women. It also clearly asserted that women’s equality rights in Canada were fundamental.

What the law allows is one thing, but what opportunity allows is another. For millions of Canadian women, their opportunity to fully use their talents and vision continues to be limited by access to affordable and accessible quality child care. In Canada, women’s share of unpaid work, including childcare, remains double to that of men; so the lack of quality, affordable child care falls particularly hard on women and their access to work outside the home.

Women’s History in Canada deserves to be celebrated and acknowledged. It is a time to look back, but also to commit to a future  where a lack of quality, affordable child care is a historical footnote  — and where no woman is limited by an uncaring government. Add your voice to make that future happen. UFCW Canada members, activist and allies are also encouraged to download and share a special poster to commemorate Women’s History Month.

Take action on child care: http://www.ufcw.ca/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=3664&Itemid=358&lang=en

Download the poster: http://www.ufcw.ca/templates/ufcwcanada/images/media/posters/Women-History-Month/2013/WoHistyMo_oct2013_EN_8x11_email.pdf

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FEAST FOR FAIRNESS

Join us at a Feast for Fairness at Toronto’s St. Lawrence Market!  Help us win a minimum wage increase for all workers!

Saturday October 12
10:30am to 12pm
St. Lawrence Market
Meet at the corner of Front St. E and Jarvis.
(1 block south of King St. E) Toronto

This Thanksgiving weekend, many low-wage workers are resorting to food banks in order to get by and restaurant workers continue to see their wages stagnate. Many migrant workers are excluded from minimum wage laws altogether.

Join the Campaign to Raise the Minimum Wage and Migrant Workers Alliance for Change as we demand an immediate increase to the minimum wage to $14 and ending minimum wage exemptions for all workers!

Under the banner of “Poverty Wages? NO THANKS!” this event will be just one of many province-wide actions taking place around the Thanksgiving weekend calling for a $14 minimum wage, and in alliance with the Raise the Rates Week of Action from Oct. 14-20.

Find out more here: http://raisetheminimumwage.ca/updates/look-whos-putting-food-on-your-table/

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NEWS & VIEWS

VIDEO – “MADE IN THE USA” DOCUMENTARY CRITIQUES HUDAK’S PLANS FOR A LOW-WAGE ONTARIO

In June 2012, Ontario PC leader Tim Hudak published a “white paper” outlining the changes his party would like to make to the province’s labour laws. Hudak and the Tories say employees in unionized workplaces should be allowed to receive the benefits of union representation without paying the dues that make those benefits possible. While this proposal would violate current Ontario law and an historic legal ruling by Supreme Court Justice Ivan Rand, such “free rider” laws are used to suppress union activity in 24 U.S. states, where they are commonly referred to as “right to work” laws.

In June 2013, veteran journalist Bill Gillespie climbed in a van with a camera crew and headed south to get the real story about “right to work.” His documentary film, Made in the USA: Tim Hudak’s plan to cut your wages, is the result.

“There is a lot of great research out there about the dangers of ‘right to work’ laws,” says Gillespie. “Our goal in making this film was to present that research in a way that was accessible to a wide audience. By presenting the facts through the stories of people who have personal experience with right-to-work laws, I think we’ve succeeded in doing that.”

Made in the USA was financed by the Ontario Public Service Employees Union.

Watch the video: http://www.madeinusamovie.ca/

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CALL FOR ABSTRACTS! GENDER, WORK AND ORGANIZATION

Gender, Work and Organization
8th Biennial International Interdisciplinary Conference
24th – 26th June, 2014, Keele University, UK

As a central theme in social science research in the field of work and organisation, the study of gender has achieved contemporary significance beyond the confines of early discussions of women at work. Launched in 1994, Gender, Work and Organization was the first journal to provide an arena dedicated to debate and analysis of gender relations, the organisation of gender and the gendering of organisations. The Gender, Work and Organization conference provides an international forum for debate and analysis of a variety of issues in relation to gender studies. The 2012 conference at Keele University attracted approximately 380 international scholars from over 30 nations. The Conference will be held at Keele University, Staffordshire, in Central England, the UK’s largest integrated campus
university.

For more info: http://labouringfutures.com/network/stream-for-gender-work-and-organization-2014/

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SOCIAL PLANNING TORONTO (SPT) DEPUTATION TO ONTARIO MINIMUM WAGE PANEL

On Sept. 6, 2013, Social Planning Toronto presented its deputation to the Ontario Minimum Wage Advisory Panel. Part of SPT’s mission is to be actively involved in highlighting the impact of poverty and income inequality on Toronto residents. With nearly half of Canadian workers living paycheque to paycheque, SPT strongly believes the Ontario government has a key role and responsibility to ensure that its labour force is not working for poverty level wages.

Read more: http://www.socialplanningtoronto.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/SPTDeputation.OntMinimumWagePanel.13.09.061.pdf

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PROSPECTS FOR A CONTINENTAL WORKERS’ MOVEMENT: A FRIENDLY DEBATE

From The Bullet

The two articles that follow are part of a debate on the prospects and problems of building international working-class solidarity and struggle. They focus on these issues for the case of North America, a continent bound together through NAFTA, continental economic integration, overlapping labour markets, and U.S.-Canadian unions. Dan La Botz’ article presents a very positive but critical commentary on Richard Roman and Edur Velasco Arregui’s book, Continental Crucible: Big Business, Workers, and Unions in the Transformation of North America. La Botz questions what he sees as an overly optimistic analysis of prospects for the working class movement in North America. The reply by Roman and Velasco Arregui argues for a cautious optimism, an optimism based both on characteristics of the present moment of globalized capitalism and the historical ties between the working classes of North America. This debate seeks to contribute to both the rebuilding of the Left and the building of a class-wide, continent-wide and eventually international, fight against capitalism, two tasks that are inseparably intertwined.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/885.php

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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS – MAYWORKS FESTIVAL 2014

The Mayworks Festival – Toronto is pleased to invite submissions for its 29th festival season. Applications are accepted from groups and individuals in a range of disciplines, including: visual art, music/ poetry, film, video, interdisciplinary, and theatre. We also welcome unions and art organizations to propose panel presentations, forums, and screenings, and to sponsor or co-sponsor events.

Mayworks Festival is a multi-disciplinary arts festival that celebrates cultural production working class culture. We seek to showcase high calibre art by artists at all stages in their careers that are politically and socially engaged with labour realities.  Mayworks Festival is especially committed to providing a platform to support the underrepresented labor of indigenous peoples, people with disabilities, migrants, women, queer-identified people, people of color, and youth.

Submissions will not be accepted after the deadline date: Nov. 1, 2013.
Proposals selected will be notified by email by December 2013. The festival dates (TBD) will be in early May 2014.

For more info: http://www.mayworks.ca

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JOB POSTINGS

CO-ORDINATOR, CENTRE FOR RESEARCH ON LATIN AMERICA & THE CARIBBEAN (CERLAC), YORK UNIVERSITY

Please note: The Centre Coordinator is required to speak, read and write Spanish fluently.

The Centre Coordinator supports the Centre Director for the overall operation of Centre-related activities, including providing support to financial activities; program administration and secretarial support to the Centre Director and projects.

Education:
Completion of university degree in a related field such as Humanities, Development Studies and any related field in the Social or Environmental Sciences.

Experience:
2-3 years of related work experience in an academic or related research focused unit or NGO environment providing administrative support. Experience with, or demonstrable knowledge and awareness of, issues related to critical social science research, international development, and social justice and Latin American and Caribbean region and/or communities. Experience in Latin America and the Caribbean and/or with Latin American and Caribbean communities is an asset.

For more info: http://webapps.yorku.ca/nonacademicpostings/summary.jsp?postingnumber=8577

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HEAD OFFICE SECRETARY– BILINGUAL, CANADIAN LABOUR CONGRESS

The Canadian Labour Congress requires a bilingual Head Office Secretary. The primary role of the Head Office Secretary is to proofread and format French and English documents.

Duties:
– use word processing software to produce correspondence, memos, reports, briefs, bulletins, letters and documents;
– proofread and format existing documents including memos, reports, briefs and letters;
– use desktop publishing software to format and/or draft layout design for publications;
– enter information in databases;
– act as relief and assume responsibilities of other secretarial positions;
– ensure correct filing of electronic and physical documents;
– register participants for conferences;
– draft routine correspondence and reply to email enquiries;
– provide switchboard relief;
– post information on the intranet and CLC websites.

Qualifications:
– 2 years office experience performing similar tasks;
– oral and written fluency in English and French;
– excellent proofreading and formatting skills in French and English;
– ability to work as part of a team;
– completion of post-secondary office administration training is preferred.

For more info:
https://charityvillage.com/jobs/search-results/job-detail.aspx?id=281857&l=2

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PUBLIC SERVICE ALLIANCE CANADA: REGIONAL EDUCATION OFFICER (BILINGUAL) – ATLANTIC

Under the direction of the Regional Coordinator and as part of a regional team that includes other regional office staff, the Regional Council, the Regional Education Committee, and other regional union bodies such as the Alliance Facilitators’ Network, the Regional Education Officer builds the union and fosters membership solidarity by coordinating the development and delivery of a quality program of membership education and empowerment in the region. The Regional Education Officer closely collaborates with other Regional Education Officers and with the staff of the Education Section in
Ottawa to maintain a core Program of PSAC Membership Education that is relevant, comprehensive, innovative and dynamic.

For more info: https://charityvillage.com/jobs/search-results/job-detail.aspx?id=281800&l=2

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Educating from Marx

Educating from Marx

 

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 23rd SEPTEMBER 2013

EVENTS

THE NORTH AMERICAN LABOR HISTORY CONFERENCE 2013
2013 Theme: Geographies of Labor
Oct. 24-26
Detroit, Michigan

Over the last several centuries, transformations in technology and in economic, social, political, and cultural practices have created new spatial regimes within and across geographic boundaries. Whether negotiating the changes around them or taking advantage of new possibilities to shape alternatives, workers have been central to remapping this emergent environment. Inspired by the “spatial turn” in the social sciences, this conference will explore the myriad ways in which workers have interacted with a variety of geographic categories.

More info: http://nalhc.wayne.edu/

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DAVID ROVICS IN CONCERT

Back by popular demand!

Friday October 11, 2013
8 pm
Winchevsky Centre
585 Cranbrooke Ave., Toronto

Tickets: $20.00 at the door
$15.00 in advance (by Oct 10)
Reserve today!

For more info: (416) 789-5502 or info@winchevskycentre.org

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THE HIDDEN HISTORY OF WORKPLACE RESISTANCE:  U.S. AUTOWORKERS SPEAK OUT

Saturday October 26
1:00 pm
USW Hall, 25 Cecil St., Toronto

Three prominent UAW shop floor activists describe current life on American assembly lines and keeping resistance alive.

– At the height of the recent economic crisis auto companies were bailed out while workers’ concessions were accelerated and working conditions made even more brutal.
– Profits are now at record levels again but pressures on workers continue. What are the barriers to fighting back?

Intro: Sam Gindin, former Research Director of the (former) CAW

Speakers:
– Gregg Shotwell: 30 years at General Motors. Machine operator turned rebel. Generally recognized as one of the most articulate voices of the U.S. working class. Author of Autoworkers Under the Gun.
– Scott Holdieson: Electrician at Ford’s Chicago Assembly Plant, writer and editor of the local union paper, long-time activist for union democracy and equality among workers.
– Sean Crawford: Great grandfather was Vice Chair of the Flint sit-down strike and great grandmother and great aunt were part of the Women’s Emergency Brigade. Hired on as lower-waged (‘second-tier’) worker at GM.

Sponsors: Greater Toronto Workers’ Assembly at http://www.workersassembly.ca, Centre for Social Justice

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SEPTEMBER SALES AND EVENTS GALORE FOR GREAT TITLES!

Book lovers know that the fall is a time of new books, book events, and great deals. Our September book sale goes until the end of the month and you can get 50% off all of our labour/union titles and free shipping on ALL Between the Lines books. Click on our “labour and unions” category tab on our website to order your copies. We’ll have new books on sale and older books on deep sale.

Order here: http://btlbooks.com/categoryinfo.php?index=10

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GLOBAL LABOUR SPEAKER SERIES, FALL 2013: YOUNG WORKERS, UNPAID LABOUR AND THE INTERN ECONOMY

Thursday, October 3rd
12:00-2:00pm
Sociology Common Room / Vari Hall 2101
York University, Toronto

Speakers:
– Dr. Nicole Cohen: Assistant Professor, Institute of Communication Culture and Information Technology, University of Toronto Mississauga
– Andrew Langille: Lawyer, Andrew Langille Law Firm; founder, Youth and Work blog
– Katherine Lapointe: Canadian University Press Associate Member Program; Coordinator, Communication Workers of America Canada
– Sean Smith: Mobilizing Coordinator, Unifor Local 2002 (Airlines)

A collaboration of York University’s Global Labour Research Centre, Work & Labour Studies Program, Canada Research Chair in Comparative Political Economy, Canada Research Chair in the Political Economy of Gender & Work.

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NEWS & VIEWS

VIDEO – PRIME YOUR MIND FOR RESISTANCE TO THE “RIGHT TO WORK” LIE

Bankers get bailed out, corporations get incentives, workers get attacked… and ‘right to work’ laws threaten to take this much further.

Moderated by Tracy Macmaster, President of the OPSEU Greater Toronto Area Council.

Presentations by:
– John Cartwright, President of Toronto and York Region Labour Council
– Sonia Singh, Workers’ Action Centre
– Sam Gindin, Retired research director, CAW

Organized by the Labour Committee of the Greater Toronto Workers’ Assembly.

Watch the video: http://www.socialistproject.ca/leftstreamed/ls186.php

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VIDEO – UNIFOR INTERVIEW SERIES: BRUCE ALLEN, LOCAL 199

Over the next week, Rankandfile.ca will be publishing a series of interviews with Unifor union leaders, staff, and rank-and-file members.

We kick off our series with Bruce Allen, an outspoken member of the CAW/Unifor.

Bruce is Vice-President of the former CAW Local 199 (now Unifor) representing St. Catharines General Motors workers. He is also a Vice-President of the Niagara Regional Labour Council. On August 31, he nominated Lindsay Hinshelwood for Unifor president from the floor of the founding Unifor convention.

Watch the video: http://rankandfile.ca/2013/09/12/unifor-interview-series-bruce-allen-local-199/

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NEW BOOK – FROM DEMONIZED TO ORGANIZED: BUILDING THE NEW UNION MOVEMENT

Author(s): Nora Loreto

From the Introduction:

“This book seeks to explain unionization to my generation; to my friends who distrust civil society organizations as much as they distrust government; to my unemployed friends who are living from contract to contract and who would kill for a stable, unionized job; for the workers who have never had the benefit of being represented when facing injustice at work; for the workers who would rather not think of what would happen if they were injured on the job.

“It’s a reminder to unionized folks that many of the truths that they take for granted are not obvious to others and that the labour movement must change how it reaches out to its members, its communities and to non-unionized workers if it hopes to grow. It’s a call to action for activists to share their stories, debunk the existing right-wing, anti-union rhetoric, re-engage in their communities, and build a movement that can defeat neoliberal policies and their political proponents.”

See more at: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/demonized-organized#sthash.qP9m71YL.dpuf

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BEYOND THE ECONOMIC CRISIS: THE CRISIS IN TRADE UNIONISM

By Sam Gindin, The Bullet

Discussions on the left about the economy might be summarized as warning that things are going to get a lot worse before they get…worse. This is not just a matter of the sustained attacks on the labour movement but as much a reflection of the crisis within labour. For some three decades now, labour has been stumbling on, unable to organizationally or ideologically rebut the attacks summarized as ‘neoliberalism.’ Though the Great Financial Crisis held out the promise of finally exposing the right and its supporters and potentially opening the door to a union offensive and possible revival, the attacks on labour actually intensified and labour continues to have no coherent counter-response. As a prelude to directly addressing that impasse in labour, it is useful to begin with something that Greg Albo recently posed: What is the larger historical significance of this particular crisis?

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/878.php

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SEEKING BOARD MEMBERS – CANADIAN LABOUR INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

Are you passionate about film, workers’ struggles, activism or all three?

If you said yes please join us, the CLiFF Board of Directors. The Canadian Labour International Film Festival (CLiFF) is a publicly attended free film festival, which is national in scope. The first iteration of CLiFF was held in 2009 across Canada in nine provinces and all three territories. The Board of Directors is made up of volunteers from across Canada.

We are currently recruiting for people with any of the following experience:
– individuals from Atlantic Canada, Northern Canada, Quebec, Western provinces
– individuals with event planning experience
– individuals with fundraising experience.

Directors commit 3-5 hours per week and get to work with like-minded individuals who are passionate and committed to the success of CLiFF. Volunteers are also needed to promote and run the Toronto location of the film festival November 22 – November 24, 2014. Please forward all inquiries to: info@labourfilms.ca, 416-550-8694, or http://www.labourfilms.ca

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ADULT LEARNING JOURNAL CALL FOR PAPERS

Adult Learning is interested in publishing empirical research and conceptual papers and is actively soliciting manuscripts of 4,000-4,500 words.

Adult Learning is a practitioner-oriented journal sponsored by the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education (AAACE) and published by SAGE. The journal publishes empirical research and conceptual papers for researchers and practitioners that approach practice issues with a problem-solving emphasis.  The audience includes those who design, manage, teach, and evaluate programs of adult and continuing education.

To learn more about the journal, go to http://alx.sagepub.com/

For information about submitting a manuscript, go to http://www.sagepub.com/journals/Journal202126/manuscriptSubmission

To submit a manuscript, go to http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/al

If you have any questions, please contact Cathy Cherrstrom, managing editor, at adultlearning@tamu.edu

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JOB POSTINGS

TWO POSITIONS AVAILABLE AT CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK (CUNY) MURPHY INSTITUTE

1) Academic Program Manager for Labor Studies. The person in this position will oversee all labor programs at the Murphy Institute. These include a) graduate and undergraduate degree programs in Labor Studies, b) undergraduate and graduate certificates in Labor Relations (including the Institute’s joint Cornell/CUNY certificate), and c) New York Union Semester – a paid internship program for college credit. The Program Manager will supervise a Labor Studies team and will work closely with faculty, unionists, and university staff to the build labor programs. S/he will also be involved in other aspects of the Institute’s work, i.e., public programming, our journal (New Labor Forum), and non-credit training. The ideal candidate should have considerable experience in the labor movement and higher education administration. For more information, go to: http://bit.ly/1b6paUW

2) Coordinator, Union Semester Program. The individual in this position will supervise all aspects of Union Semester – the Murphy Institute’s internship program for visiting college students. S/he will work closely with faculty, union mentors, and Institute staff in such areas as admissions and registration, internship placement and mentor selection, student orientation, and academic progress. S/he will also be responsible for developing and implementing a recruitment plan to expand the program nationally and internationally. For more information, go to: http://bit.ly/19Ipky9

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ASSISTANT/ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR – ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING, DEPARTMENT OF LEADERSHIP, HIGHER AND ADULT EDUCATION, OISE/UT

Closing Date: October 15, 2013

The Ontario Institute of Studies in Education, University of Toronto invites applications from outstanding scholars for a tenure-stream appointment in Organizational Learning in the Department of Leadership, Higher and Adult Education. The appointment will be at the rank of Assistant or Associate Professor and commence on July 1, 2014. The position resides in the Adult Education and Community Development program which is internationally recognized. We seek applicants with a doctorate in adult education or a related field, a distinguished record of research and teaching excellence in the area of organizational learning that fosters sustainable social change, both locally and globally.

The ideal candidate will have expertise in the growing range of theories, policies, and practices which promote, define and regulate learning opportunities for adults through organizations in Canada and internationally. In particular, we seek a dynamic educator with critical research and practice in some or all of the following areas: organizational learning, workplace leadership, team-based and professional learning, organizational development and change, and sustainable, collaborative and equitable practices in organizational settings.

For more info: https://utoronto.taleo.net/careersection/10050/jobdetail.ftl?job=1300977

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JOB DEVELOPER, LABOUR EDUCATION CENTRE (LEC), TORONTO

LEC’s Employment Service Program is part of the Employment Ontario (EO) network and plays a vital role in assisting workers and employers to meet the needs of the labour market.

We are currently seeking a highly motivated and experienced job developer to work with the Employment Service team to ensure the Youth Employment Fund (YEF) and Job Matching Placements and Incentives services (JMPI) are provided to employers and job seekers in the GTA.

The position is for 14 hours per week (or 2 days) and will run from October, 2013 to March 31, 2014 with the possibility of extension. The deadline for receipt of applications is October 4, 2013. Please send your resume and covering letter to wtanner@laboureducation.org in a single file with the filename in this format: (YOUR NAME) JD POSTING

More info: http://www.laboureducation.org

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Faith Agostinone-Wilson

Faith Agostinone-Wilson

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 30th JULY 2013

EVENTS

AERC (ADULT EDUCATION RESEARCH CONFERENCE) 2014 CALL FOR PROPOSALS

June 5-7, 2014
Harrisburg, PA
Pre-Conferences on June 4, 2014

Paper Proposals: Papers are reports of completed research and will be published in the conference proceedings. There are three categories for papers: (a) empirical research, (b) model or theory development, and (c) theorizing from the literature. The time allotted for each session is 50 minutes. Audience participation, as a principle of adult education, is stressed.

Symposium Proposals: A symposium presents diverse or conflicting perspectives on a compelling topic or issue that is or should be of concern to adult education practitioners. A symposium should NOT be merely a presentation of a related set of papers. Symposia will be published in the conference proceedings. The time allotted for each session is 90 minutes.
Audience participation is encouraged.

Deadline for receipt of proposals is September 23, 2013. Send proposals via email as an attachment to aerc2014@yahoo.com.

For more details go to the AERC website at http://adulterc.org/

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MAKING THE YOUTH COUNT IN CANADA’S FUTURE: THE STRUGGLE OF YOUNG WORKERS IN THE AGE OF AUSTERITY AND NEOLIBERAL GLOBALIZATION

August 3, 2013
United Steelworkers’ Hall
25 Cecil Street, Toronto
Registration fee is $15 (includes meals and conference materials)

In Ontario, youth unemployment is at 16.2% as of March 2013. As the province with the highest tuition fees in the country, ballooning student debt coupled by a labour market characterised by the general decline of secure and meaningful full-time jobs, the youth have little choice but to accept ‘flexible/contractual’ jobs, often in the low-wage sector, despite high levels of educational attainment.

As part of the Congress of Progressive Filipino Canadians (CPFC), the Filipino Canadian Youth Alliance/Ugnayan Ng Kabataang Pilipino sa Canada–Ontario (FCYA/UKPC-ON) cannot accept a future or fate that can only be left up to the fluctuations of the market economy. For FCYA/UKPC-ON, it is imperative that we expose and oppose the current neoliberal agenda and all its manifestations here in Canada to counter the attacks being imposed on us, and make the youth count in Canada’s future.

Registration for this conference is now available online: http://www.magkaisacentre.org/2013/04/18/maketheyouthcount/

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WORKERS’ HISTORY OF SPADINA

Workers’ History of Spadina Heritage Toronto walk.
Jul 31, 6:30 pm; Aug 11, 10:30 am.
Free/pwyc. Location provided upon registration
Pre-register at http://www.heritagetoronto.org

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SOCIAL PLANNING TORONTO FORUM – ORGANIZING FOR CHANGE: CONNECTING THE EVERYDAY WITH POLICY CHANGE INITIATIVES

Thursday, August 22
9:30am-11:30am
Social Planning Toronto
Suite 1001, 2 Carlton Street, Toronto

There is a growing need for the social service sector to engage in policy change initiatives. As the gap between the rich and poor increases and the austerity agenda requires the community to do more with less, concerted effort must be made to address both immediate adversities, as well as the structural and systemic issues that create them.

Join us at our Member Forum to explore ways of connecting daily occurrences with policy change initiatives, and the presentation of new SPT report entitled “Linking Community Organizing with Policy Change Initiatives: Implications for Future Community Practice in Toronto”.

Guest Speakers:
– Kuni Kamizaki, author of Linking community organizing with policy change initiatives
– Rob Howarth, Executive Director, Toronto Neighbourhood Centres
– Deena Ladd, Coordinator, Workers Action Centre

Registration: Visit http://augustmemberforum-eorg.eventbrite.ca/ or contact Sharma Queiser at squeiser@socialplanningtoronto.org or 416-351-0095 ext.227.

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NEWS & VIEWS

WALMART TRIES—AND FAILS BADLY—TO PUSH BACK AGAINST WORKERS’ AWFUL STORIES

By Laura Clawson, Daily Kos Labor

Walmart is not happy. After Gawker’s Hamilton Nolan posted stories emailed in by Walmart workers, the company put up a post on an internal website asking current employees to send Nolan cheery stories of how amazing and wonderful it is to work at Walmart. While some people complied, others responded directly to the boss’s request, on the Walmart employee website, with comments like:

“Sadly, the Gawker stories match my Walmart experience.”
(http://gawker.com/wal-mart-employees-rip-the-company-on-its-own-internal-755057616)

The initial stories, by the way, included reports of rats and health violations, sexual harassment, and, of course, low pay and unpredictable part-time scheduling (http://gawker.com/and-now-a-few-more-stories-from-wal-mart-employees-721527870).
And that’s what Walmart workers are saying directly to the company, on an internal website, matches their experiences.

All of this is happening against the backdrop of Walmart’s threats to pull out of Washington, D.C., if the city follows through on instituting a $12.50 wage for workers at stores with more than $1 billion annual corporate sales and more than 75,000 square feet. The city council passed the Large Retailer Accountability Act with just short of a veto-proof majority, and Mayor Vincent Gray has hinted he might veto the ordinance. Urge Mayor Gray to give big box workers a living wage (http://campaigns.dailykos.com/p/dia/action3/common/public/?action_KEY=472).

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CAMPAIGN TO RAISE THE MINIMUM WAGE!

Ontario workers are struggling to get by working 2 or 3 low paying jobs. No one should work full time and yet still live in poverty.

The minimum wage has been frozen at $10.25 for three years. It’s time for an increase!

We need a minimum wage of $14 in 2013 to bring workers and their families 10% above the poverty line – and a commitment to annual cost-of-living adjustments.

Contact us at raisetheminimumwage@gmail.com to get connected to local actions, or to get support to start-up a minimum wage campaign in your community.

Follow actions and updates from across Ontario by liking the Raise the Minimum Wage facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Campaign-to-Raise-the-Minimum-Wage/376591935781724?ref=hl

The Campaign to Raise the Minimum Wage is coordinated by ACORN, Freedom 90, Mennonite New Life Centre, OCAP, Ontario Campaign 2000, Parkdale Community Legal Services, Put Food in the Budget, Social Planning Toronto, Toronto and York Region Labour Council and the Workers’ Action Centre.

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STUDENT DEBT AND THE AMERICAN DREAM: INTERVIEW WITH SAM GINDIN

By Álvaro Guzmán Bastida, The Bullet

This interview is part of a larger piece on the student debt crisis in America the author wrote as an assignment for one of his classes at the Graduate School of Journalism at Columbia University. The piece offers a longform, narrative, character-driven tale of three indebted students and how being in debt jeopardizes their personal development, their career prospects and their ability to pursue their dreams and even be free. Following them throughout the process of getting loans, accumulating debt and meeting (or not meeting) payments, the article gives the whole story and history of student debt: its political and financial ramifications, the consequences it has on students and society as a whole and the different approaches to tackling the crisis.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/847.php

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BARISTAS RISE UP IN HALIFAX

From RankAndFile.ca

The low wage service sector is one of the most difficult sectors for workers to form unions.  The small workplaces’ lack of union tradition, high staff turnover and aggressive anti-union managers and owners in the sector have meant that most unions have stayed away from organizing places such as coffee shops.

In Halifax, Nova Scotia coffee shop workers at several workplaces have started to come together to try to transform the low wage, precarious work of baristas into something better by forming unions with the Service Employees International Union Local 2. Organizing in this sector is necessary if the union movement is to remain vibrant and relevant.

Read more: http://rankandfile.ca/2013/07/18/baristas-rise-up-in-halifax/

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NURSES AT RISK: EXPLORING GENDER AND RACE IN WORKPLACE ILLNESS, INJURY AND VIOLENCE

The webinar recording is now online! View the webinar here (55 minutes): https://cwhn.adobeconnect.com/_a844234029/p8dc7coyiks/?launcher=false&fcsContent=true&pbMode=normal

Moderated by Prof. Pat Armstrong, York University Sociology and Women’s Studies

Presented by Prof. Jacqueline Choiniere and Prof. Judith MacDonnell, York University School of Nursing

Introduced by Anne Rochon Ford, Canadian Women’s Health Network’s Executive Director

Canadian nurses face mounting workplace health and safety problems. Reports detailing precarious employment, work-related illness, injury, disability and violence are multiplying.

In this webinar, Jacqueline Choiniere and Judith MacDonnell explore findings from two stages of their qualitative research for the SSHRC-funded project, Nurses at risk: Exploring gender and race in workplace illness, injury and violence, (Pat Armstrong, PI, with Co-Investigators Hugh Armstrong, Jacqueline Choiniere, Tamara Daly, Walter Giesbrecht and Judith MacDonnell).

Informed by a feminist political economy lens, researchers were concerned that despite this growing evidence, there was a paucity of analysis linking these problems to broader social and political structures, including gender, race, ethnicity, and the changes in how nurses’ work is organized.

They discuss interviews with key informants who illustrate the everyday and complex nature of the violence that diversely-situated nurses face, and focus specifically on nurses working in the mental health sector.

By attending to the ways that intersections of gendered, racialized and neoliberal dynamics reproduce social inequality, these findings point to the importance of addressing not only individual nurses’ experiences of violence in order to create effective support, but also the structural violence that underpins the conditions and environments in which nurses work.

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Article: Credit Where Credit is Due in Non-Credit Adult Education

By Mike Newman

The author sings the praises of non-credit adult education, and enlists a number of philosophers to help in the chorus. He examines the motives people might have for enrolling in non-credit courses, and makes the following claims: that good non-credit adult education can give us a purpose, provide some order in our unpredictable lives, encourage us to reason freely, nurture our consciousness, foster a civil society, protect valuable elements of our lifeworld, and teach us to assert ourselves.

(Michael Newman writes about adult education and social and political action.)

Read the article: http://concept.lib.ed.ac.uk/index.php/Concept/article/view/235

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JOBS/INTERNSHIPS

TRAINING & EDUCATION COORDINATOR, THE BROADBENT INSTITUTE

The Broadbent Institute is a national non-profit organization, based in Ottawa and Toronto, which is dedicated to developing and supporting individuals, organizations and policies that advance a progressive vision of compassionate citizenship.

Position Summary & Core Expectations

The Broadbent Institute is seeking a highly-organized and good-humoured Training & Education Coordinator located in Montreal or Quebec City to execute the logistics of a national training and education program for the organization.

Responsibilities

Working with the Director of Training & Education, support the delivery of a training program focused on furthering democratic engagement, deepening political literacy, and training a new generation of progressive leaders. The program will involve the development of new curriculum, the creation of on-line delivery tools, and the organization of events across the country.

For more info: http://rankandfile.ca/2013/07/17/job-posting-training-education-coordinator-the-broadbent-institute/

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ANDREW JACKSON PROGRESSIVE ECONOMICS INTERNSHIP

A joint internship with the Alternative Federal Budget and the Growing Gap Project (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives-CCPA)

About the Alternative Federal Budget

The Alternative Federal Budget (AFB) is one of the CCPA’s longest running projects, now entering its 20th year. It consists of 27 chapters written by over 90 contributors. Each chapter examines a different federal issue and progressive policy prescription for each. All policy recommendations are fully costed and paid for within a larger macro-economic framework. The implications of AFB measures on the federal debt, deficit and employment are also determined.

About the Growing Gap Project

The Growing Gap team tracks the changing nature of Canada’s economy, work and income trends, and policies that help or worsen the problem of income inequality. The research to date has been clear: Governments have a strong role to play in implementing policies that help keep a lid on growing inequality, to make sure Canada’s economy works for everyone, not just a privileged few.

The CCPA is an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with social, economic and environmental justice. For more information, visit http://www.policyalternatives.ca

Job Responsibilities

– Research and review relevant academic and policy literature concerning income inequality in Canada;
– Organize meetings with various AFB writers and contributors;
– Review individual AFB chapters and the macro-economic framework;
– Assist with other data analysis and report writing, as required. Some of this will be generic research assistance to David Macdonald.

For more info and to apply: http://rankandfile.ca/2013/07/23/andrew-jackson-progressive-economics-internship/

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NETWORK ORGANIZER AT LEADING CHANGE NETWORK

The Leading Change Network is a global community of practice of some 100 organizers, researchers and educators. Initiated by Marshall Ganz, Harvard Kennedy School, and others, its purpose is to support its participants in developing the leadership, building the organizational capacity, and improving the ability of democratic organizing to meet the critical challenges of our times. At present, for example, participants in 11 countries work on topics that range from immigration reform, human rights, gender equity, and economic justice to climate change, public health, and domestic violence. The demand, however, far exceeds our current capacity to respond, indicated by a growing data base of over 2000 interested persons in more 25 countries who would like to engage with us. The purpose of our search is to find a person who can enable us to respond.

We seek a proactive, creative and “well organized” online organizer to work with a diverse leadership team to build the network, grow the network, and manage network infrastructure (database, web site, social media, etc.)

For more info and to apply: http://www.leadingchangenetwork.com

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LABOR EDUCATOR, UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA

The Labor Education Service (LES) at the University of Minnesota is seeking a full-time labor educator to join our teaching staff.

Job responsibilities include leading labor education courses for working adults, designing customized curriculum, and coordinating and implementing educational programs, often in collaboration with other staff.  The position requires teaching expertise using diverse methodologies, substantial experience with labor unions and organizing, and effectiveness at relating with a wide variety of worker organizations.

Duties include:
– Developing, teaching, and administering labor education courses and programs for a variety of unions and related organizations throughout the state of Minnesota.
– Designing and developing curriculum and course materials, with particular attention to the changing needs and growing diversity of the labor movement.
– Collaborating with LES staff and others on program development and coordination, including conferences and special events.
– Fostering and maintaining productive relationships with labor organizations and other community groups committed to economic and social justice.

Application Deadline: August 23, 2013

How to apply:
All applicants must apply online through the University of Minnesota website at https://employment.umn.edu/applicants/jsp/shared/Welcome_css.jsp
Applications must include a letter of interest, a resume or CV, and names and contact information for three references.

Questions? Email Mary at LES@umn.edu or phone the LES office, 612-624-5020.

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ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education. For more information about this project, visit http://www.apcol.ca

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Work

Work

WORKING USA: CALL FOR ARTICLES

From: Kim Scipes: kimscipes@earthlink.net

Working USA:  The Journal of Labor and Society
Call for Papers: “Building International Labor Solidarity”

Working USA: The Journal of Labor and Society will devote a thematic issue to Building International Labor Solidarity, which will be published in early 2014.  The thematic editor is Kim Scipes of Purdue University North Central who will work closely with Working USA editor, Immanuel Ness.

As new labor movements emerge in Africa, the Middle East, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania, we seek essays that focus on research that is designed to build international labor solidarity with these and other workers.  The editors seek in-depth, critical description and analyses of efforts motivated by the rise of workers movements that engage in transnational solidarity, as well as articles that examine imperial and global power efforts to control, guide, and circumscribe them. Historical examples must retain focus that refract on today’s problems and concerns. Paper proposals are encouraged that address labor unions and workers’ movements in the United States and beyond, but priority will be given to research across the developed-developing country divide, or among developing countries of the Global South.

Proposals for papers in the journal should be submitted by August 15, 2013, with a length of 250-500 words.  Final papers will be peer-reviewed by referees appointed by the editorial board, and should not exceed 7,500 words.  For author guidelines, go to the following website:

See: http://working-usa.org

Papers must be received by October 15, 2013.  E-mail for questions or submissions: kscipes@pnc.edu and iness@brooklyn.cuny.edu

Book Project
Concurrently, the editors of the special issue are separately publishing a collection on Building International Labor Solidarity, for which they are seeking submissions.  Contributors can submit papers to both the journal issue and the book, but they must be separate essays.  This will supplement issues addressed in the journal and go beyond them.  Each chapter can reach 10,000 words, and focus on practical, on-the-ground experiences and critical reflections on the subject.  This collection is planned as an activist-oriented project, and we are looking for accounts that address
specific issues raised in the practice of or literature about building international labor solidarity that examine the history and unfolding of events.  Again, priority will be given to work across the developed-developing country divide, or among developing countries/Global South.

Proposals for chapters in the collection should be submitted by September 15, 2013, with a length of 250-500 words.  Chapters are due by June 1, 2014, and authors should check with either editor about their proposed papers.

Immanuel Ness, Brooklyn College, City University of New York, New York, USA, Email: iness@brooklyn.cuny.edu

Kim Scipes, Purdue University North Central in Westville, Indiana, USA,
Email   kscipes@pnc.edu

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/call-for-articles-for-working-usa-building-international-labor-solidarity

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski