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New Materialism

New Materialism

WHAT IS NEW MATERIALISM? MARXISMS, NEW MATERIALISMS AND THE NATURE / CULTURE DIVIDE

4th March 2016

Westminster Forum

5th Floor

University of Westminster

32-38 Wells Street

London

W1T 3UW
Tickets here 

Programme:

12 – 2: Plenary panel: David Chandler, Felicity Colman, Nicholas Kiersey, Phoebe Moore.
2.30 – 5.30: Speakers: Helen Palmer, Paul Rekret, Daniela Tepe–Belfrage, Michiel van Ingen. Discussant: Christian Fuchs

In response to a perceived prioritization of ‘mind over matter or culture over nature’ in the humanities and cultural studies, contemporary philosophers Braidotti and DeLanda separately named a shift in research that brings attention to the body or corporeal and explores immanence over transcendence in ontology as new materialism (or neo-materialism) in the 1990s. Since then, feminist, poststructuralist, historical materialist, science and technology, geography and critical realist researchers have begun to explore what it means to move away from the confines of discourse analysis and research that is limited to analysis of the cognitive, introducing research on human subjectivity as embodied, denying quantification of the affective field, rethinking categories of agency and causality and taking seriously questions around what it means to be human. New materialism is a critical ontological position that transcends thought traditions and advances studies that transgress mind-body dualism from the side of the mind and rejects research that eliminates possibilities for lived experiences except as efficient, rational, managed subjects.

The workshop ‘What is new in new materialism? Marxisms, new materialisms and the nature/culture divide‘ serves partly as an introduction to new materialism and partly as a space to critique and develop nascent work in this emerging area. We will ask, what is the difference between immanent, transcendental approaches and materialist ontology? Where do historical materialists stand on questions of nature and culture? What new questions of the human can we pose and what is the promise of the posthuman? Is this arena one where Marxist and poststr ucturalist agendas harmonise? What is the difference between mechanical materialism, historical materialism and new materialism? And, what is at stake in the connection between the human and materialism?

Co-organised with the Materialisms Reading Group run by David Chandler and & the CSE South Group run by Phoebe Moore and Martin Upchurch. (Capital & Class is the CSE journal.)

Conference of Socialist Economists (CSE): Two Spring Events: https://phoebevmoore.wordpress.com/2016/01/23/cse-south-group-two-spring-events/

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

New Materialism

New Materialism

Cultural Studies

Cultural Studies

INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL STUDIES: CULTURE, TECHNOLOGY AND POWER

A Free Course!

First Session: 23rd February 2016

OPEN SCHOOL EAST

 

Open School East
The Rose Lipman Building
43 De Beauvoir Rd
London N1 5SQ

 

Details of a free course in Cultural Studies at Open School East in London, starting next week, can be found at https://jeremygilbertwriting.wordpress.com/2016/02/10/free-course-introduction-to-cultural-studies-culture-technology-power/

Please disseminate to anyone who might be interested
Thanks
Jeremy Gilbert
http://www.jeremygilbert.org
@jemgilbert

 

Free Course! Introduction to Cultural Studies: Culture, Technology & Power

From February to June this year, I’ll be teaching on a free fortnightly course at Open School East in Dalston which will be be covering a number of key issues in contemporary cultural politics – race, gender, sexuality, technology, neoliberalism, music, money, the future, etc. I’ll be taking most of the sessions – Stephen Maddison will do the one on queer politics.

Anyone is welcome and it should be very interesting.

These lectures / seminar are technically the second part of a free course titled ‘Introduction to Cultural Studies: Culture, Technology & Power’, but they should be accessible and interesting whether you are completely new to these things, or an advanced cultural theory postgrad, or anything in between.

Please do pass on to anyone who might be interested.

For more details about the course, the context, etc. see HERE and HERE

 

Open School East: http://www.openschooleast.org/

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

images (9)SPACE, IDENTITIES AND MEMORY

Birkbeck Institutes of Social Research and the Humanities Graduate Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS

Space, Identities and Memory

Deadline for Submission of Abstracts: 11/03/2016.

Contact: bihbisrconference@gmail.com

We invite postgraduate researchers, academics, activists, artists, and practitioners from across disciplines to contribute to the Birkbeck Institutes’ (BIH/BISR) annual two day conference held from the 13th to the 14th  May 2016.

This year’s conference theme seeks to examine the interplay between identity, space and memory, exploring the ways in which identities may be created, formed and informed by spatial and temporal contexts. In particular, we seek to examine to what extent identities are performed in response to political, social and cultural pressures, including historical circumstances leading to the construction of acceptable and unacceptable identities.

The conference aims to capture the complex overlaying of identities in time and space, and the agency of individuals and communities as they address their own complex understandings of the temporality of identity. Conversely, we hope the conference will highlight how space and time are influenced and shaped by everyday life, sociabilities, mobilisations and processes of subjectivation. In particular we are seeking papers that engage with topics such as:

 

  • The built environment: how are housing, architecture, urbanity and concepts of public and private space harnessed in the self-fashioning of individual and communal identity?
  • Gender, sexuality and race, the politics of becoming and the deterritorialisation of the body;
  • ’Home’, domesticity and concepts of solitude and isolation across time and space;
  • Spaces of dissent and resistance: how is memory imbricated in public spaces as sites of encounters, direct action and creative practices?
  • Displacements and borders: constructing or disassembling boundaries from local to global;
  • Explorations in the use of maps, social cartography and critical geography;
  • Exclusion and inclusion in institutional spaces: how have institutionalised spaces cemented or challenged contemporary and past perspectives on identity?
  • Narrating the past: memorialisation, contestation and re-enactment
  • Innovative methods and approaches in the investigation of the intersections between space, identity and memory

 

Our first confirmed keynote speaker is Andy Merrifield. The conference will conclude with a round table bringing together activists, practitioners and academics.

This is an interdisciplinary conference, designed to foster creative thinking and new research agendas. To this end, we encourage papers from a diversity of disciplinary backgrounds that explore the interconnections of space, identity and memory.

We are particularly interested in receiving contributions from artists and practitioners in education, the heritage sector or related fields to participate in this interdisciplinary conference.

Proposals

We warmly welcome abstracts for 20-minute panel papers. Abstracts should be between 200-300 words in length. Please include a short biography with your submission.  The deadline for submission of abstracts is the 11/03/2016. Authors will be notified regarding the acceptance of their paper after submissions have been reviewed and no later than 31/03/2016.

Contact Details

Please send enquiries and proposals to Beth Hodgett, Calum Wright, Eva Lauenstein & Moniza Rizzini at:

bihbisrconference@gmail.com

images (11)

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

images

 

bIOdownload

LONDON MATERIALISMS READING GROUP MEETINGS

We are very pleased to announce an exciting series of events co-sponsored/co-organised by the Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster:

1) The next London Materialisms Reading Group meeting is:

Thursday 3 December 2015 – Nick Srnicek (co-author of the Verso manifesto Inventing the Future: Postcapitalism and a World Without Work) will be introducing Graham Harman’s Bruno Latour: Reassembling the Political

Future dates for your diary:

21. Thursday 21 January 2016 – Philip Cunliffe (University of Kent) will be introducing Alexander Wendt’s Quantum Mind and Social Science: Unifying Physical and Social Ontology

22. Thursday 25 February 2016 – introduction (tbc) we will be discussing Chapter 1 ‘Introduction: Rhizome’ of Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari’s A Thousand Plateaus

23. Thursday 31 March 2016 – Michiel van Ingen (University of Westminster) will be introducing Kate Soper’s What is Nature: Culture, Politics and the Non-Human

Reading group meetings are open to all and take place Thursdays 6.30-8.00pm, Westminster Forum, Department of Politics and International Relations, 5th Floor, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW (5 minutes from Oxford Circus tube). Wine and nibbles are provided.

 

If you wish to be on the Materialisms Reading Group mailing list please email me at d.chandler@wmin.ac.uk. Further information available here: http://www.davidchandler.org/materialisms/.

2) The next in the Living in the Anthropocene series of workshops is:

Decolonising the Anthropocene
Friday 27 November, 1-5pm, Westminster Forum, Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW (5 minutes walk from Oxford Circus tube station)

Convenors: Olivia Rutazimbwa (University of Portsmouth), Angela Last (Glasgow University), Kathryn Yusoff (Queen Mary)

Speakers and roundtable discussants: Patricia Noxolo (Birmingham), Robbie Shilliam (Queen Mary), Kathryn Yusoff (Queen Mary), Olivia Rutazibwa (Portsmouth), Angela Last (Glasgow).

The concept of the Anthropocene involves the rejection of one of modernity’s most important tenets: the nature/culture divide. Yet from a post-western perspective this can hardly be seen as a ground-breaking discovery. The colonial experience has for long evidenced the destructive nature of this divide while indigenous cosmologies, religious worldviews as well as other (non-western) philosophies have provided alternatives to the nature/culture divide and continue to do so. Does the holistic and relational understanding of reality entailed in the idea of the Anthropocene present an opportunity to rethink the sources of our knowledge production and work towards a more inclusive and sustainable use and distribution of the available planetary resources; or is the ‘discovery’ of the Anthropocene yet another stage of Eurocentric knowledge production?

Who sets the agenda, which voices and topics continue to be silenced and do they consolidate or dissipate existing inequalities? How much space is there for the ‘pluriversality’ Walter Mignolo calls for in the potentially totalising proclamation of the Anthropocene? What does the attention to complexity and non-linearity mean for post- and decolonial understandings and attachment to issues of agency, autonomy and self-determination? This workshop will examine these and other questions, both theoretically and empirically, to explore the merits and challenges of the Anthropocene to decoloniality and vice versa. Understood as a triple invitation to de-mythologise, de-silence and de-colonise, decoloniality combines both a deconstructive toolbox for critique at the epistemological level and a constructive imperative to counter the colonial (material) forms of extreme power inequality.

Information and registration here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/decolonising-the-anthropocene-tickets-19330332545 further information on the series: http://rethinkingtheanthropocene.blogspot.co.uk/

3) Call for papers, Centre for the Study of Democracy and Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment joint University of Westminster workshop:

Design After Planning: Examining the Shift from Epistemology to Topology https://designafterplanning.wordpress.com/

10.00 – 17:30, Friday 5 February 2016, University of Westminster, London

Confirmed keynote speakers:  Filip de Boeck (KU Leuven) & Erik Swyngedouw (University of Manchester)

The question of how different types of ‘planning’ should deal with uncertainty has taken on fresh importance. On the one hand, existential threats such as climate change, overpopulation, and new forms of global conflict expand the temporal and spatial horizons of our sense of responsibility as never before. On the other, the world is constructed increasingly as emergent, complex and non-linear; the ‘wicked’ problems it throws up are not amenable to modernist, top-down solutions. The intelligence required to tackle contemporary problems is understood to be dispersed and enacted, rather than a pre-given object to be gathered by the state. In Mol’s (2002) formulation, epistemological questions (‘how can we be sure?’) are increasingly usurped by pragmatic ones (‘how can we live with doubt?’).

In this embrace of uncertainty, concerns over the limitations of representational ‘modelling’ are being dislodged by an ideal of unmediated, dynamic problem-resolution whereby the ‘topologies’ of complex reality continually reveal themselves. In practical terms, this has entailed a shift towards iterative processes of dispersed governance; policy makers no longer attempt to impose order on a chaotic outside, but rather attempt to ‘see’ through the emergent systems themselves. Thus, goals of international developmental aid are no longer determined from the centre so much as coproduced in specific locations with the aid of the internet of things and the citizen as sensor; top-down planning of the built environment has given way to localised, discursive decision-making alongside an embrace of informality; the residual modernism of sustainable development is increasingly inflected with ‘resilience’.

If the broad project here is to work with emerging, complex systems, rather than against or in spite of them, might it then be productive to conceptualise the role of governing and city-making in terms of ‘design’ rather than planning?  If so, is there value in retheorising design so as more explicitly to capture contemporary interactive logics of emergent causality and agency?  Or, alternatively, does linear planning have a newly important role to play? Might it function as a type of normative resistance to the ‘market logic’ with which these new forms of governance are perhaps aligned?

We plan to include three panels on: • disaster and risk design – examining the rise of topological approaches to international aid and disaster relief, digital humanitarianism, crowd-sourcing and citizens as sensors • designing with emergent urban systems – exploring the potential for iterative and decentred modes of governance and urban design to overcome the shortcomings of liberal-modernist planning • resilience versus sustainability – investigating the theoretical and practical purchase of resilience and sustainability in relation to the ‘topologies’ of complex reality, and the problematic theoretical interface between the two concepts.

Submitting abstracts: We invite papers relating to any of the panels above, which contribute to a theorisation of spatial planning and urban, national, or international governance as processes of design, as well as those which question this endeavour. Speakers from all academic disciplines are welcome to participate (and there will be no registration fee).Please send your abstract (c.350 words) to: Isis Nunez Ferrera (i.nunez-ferrera@psi.org.uk), Tudor Vilcan (tudorvilcan@gmail.com), and Rob Cowley (robert.cowley@kcl.ac.uk) by 1 December 2015.

Best wishes,
David Chandler, Professor of International Relations, Director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW. Tel: ++44 (0)776 525 3073.
Journal Editor, Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/resi20

Amazon books page: http://www.amazon.co.uk/David-Chandler/e/B001HCXV7Y/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Personal website: http://www.davidchandler.org/
Twitter: @DavidCh27992090

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Dreamscape

Dreamscape

PRETERNATURAL ENVIRONMENTS: DREAMSCAPES, ALTERNATE REALITIES, LANDSCAPES OF DREAD

Call for Papers for a special issue of Preternature (Issue 6.1)

Preternatural Environments: Dreamscapes, Alternate Realities, Landscapes of Dread

Deadline for submissions: March 1, 2016.

This special issue of Preternature seeks papers that examine elements and/or depictions of the preternatural in all sorts of environments. Scholars are increasingly drawing attention to the importance of spaces and their contexts, the stories we tell about them, and our interactions with them. This volume focuses on preternatural aspects of natural and unnatural environments such as dreamscapes, alternate worlds, and eerie landscapes.

Papers should investigate the connections between preternatural environments and literary, historical, anthropological, and artistic forms of understanding. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • Defining the “preternatural environment” / preternatural aspects of an environment.
  • Superstition and spaces.
  • Demonic domains.
  • Artistic representations of preternatural environments across the ages.
  • Aspects of the uncanny in various physical settings.
  • The pathetic fallacy and narrative theory.
  • “Unnatural” landscapes and environments.
  • Bridging natural and preternatural spaces.
  • Preternatural ecology and ecocriticism.
  • Connections between material environments, literary narratives, and the preternatural.
  • Eerie landscapes as characters or significant presences in literature, history, and culture.
  • How preternatural environments inform human behaviour, or how behaviour informs preternatural environments.

Preternature welcomes a variety of approaches, including narrative theory, ecocriticism, and behavioural studies from any cultural, literary, artistic, or historical tradition and from any time period. We particularly encourage submissions dealing with non-Western contexts.

Contributions should be 8,000 – 12,000 words, including all documentation and critical apparatus.

For more information, see: http://www.psupress.org/journals/jnls_submis_Preternature.html or submit directly at: https://www.editorialmanager.com/preternature/default.aspx.

Preternature is published twice annually by the Pennsylvania State Press and is available through JSTOR and Project Muse. This periodical is also indexed in the ATLA Religion Database® (ATLA RDB®), http://www.atla.com.

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Preternature: Critical and Historical Studies on the Preternatural can be viewed at: https://muse.jhu.edu/journals/preternature/

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

images (22)

Social Movements

Social Movements

OCCUPATION CULTURE

New book on art & squatting released…
Occupation Culture: Art & Squatting in the City from Below
Alan W. Moore

Occupation Culture is the story of a journey through the world of recent political squatting in Europe, told by a veteran of the 1970s and ‘80s New York punk art scene. It is also a kind of scholar adventure story. Alan W. Moore sees with the trained eye of a cultural historian, pointing out pasts, connections and futures in the creative direct action of today’s social movements.

Occupation Culture is based on five years of travel and engaged research. It explicates the aims, ideals and gritty realities of squatting. Despite its stature as a leading social movement of the late twentieth century, squatting has only recently received scholarly attention. The rich histories of creative work that this movement enabled are almost entirely unknown.

PDF available freely online: http://www.minorcompositions.info/?p=684

“Reporting on close to forty years of exploits Alan W. Moore’s Occupation Culture is no academic treatise but a Picaresque adventure story filled with both detailed observations and broader reflections on the political and cultural significance of art and squatting that stretches across the Atlantic from the United States to Europe.” – Gregory Sholette, author of Dark Matter: Art and Politics in the Age of Enterprise Culture

“Occupy wasn’t just a movement, it is a long-standing strategy and, frankly, a form of living. Alan W. Moore has seen firsthand more squats and occupations than anyone, and he brings his sensibility to bear on this global phenomena. A must read for occupiers, whether artist, activist or renter.” – Nato Thompson, curator at Creative Time, editor of Living as Form: Socially Engaged Art from 1991-2011

Bio: Alan W. Moore worked with the artists’ groups Colab and helped start the cultural center ABC No Rio in New York City. He has published on artists’ groups, cultural districts and cultural economies, and is the author of Art Gangs: Protest and Counterculture in New York City (2011). He lives in Madrid.

Released by Minor Compositions, Wivenhoe / Brooklyn / Port Watson
Minor Compositions is a series of interventions & provocations drawing from autonomous politics, avant-garde aesthetics, and the revolutions of everyday life.

Minor Compositions is an imprint of Autonomedia
www.minorcompositions.info | minorcompositions@gmail.com

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

images (5)DICTIONARY OF UNTRANSLATABLES

Book Launch

Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon, edited by Barbara Cassin, Princeton University press, Princeton and Oxford 2014.

Goldsmiths College, University of London

26th June 2015, 5pm

French philosopher and philologist Barbara Cassin visits Goldsmiths on 26 June to launch both her new book and our latest multi-disciplinary research centre, the Centre for Philosophy and Critical Thought (CPCT).

At the evening event organised by Dr Alberto Toscano (Co-Director, CPCT) and Filippo Del Lucchese (Brunel University), Barbara will be joined by Étienne Balibar (Kingston), Lucie Campos (Institut Français) and Jacques Lezra (NYU) for a panel discussion on Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon – an encyclopedic dictionary of 400 important philosophical, literary, and political terms and concepts that defy easy, or any, translation from one language and culture to another.

The Centre for Philosophy and Critical Thought was established in May 2015, based in Sociology, and run jointly with the Centre for Cultural Studies. Its Co-Directors are Alberto Toscano (Sociology) and Julia Ng (CCS). CPCT has anacademic membership and advisory board drawn from various departments across the college, and an international roster of external affiliates.

A home for philosophical inquiry and rigorous intellectual dialogue at Goldsmiths, the Centre’s work draws on those traditions which view the practices of critique and criticism as central to the definition of philosophy, and which consider reflection on philosophy’s complex relationships with other disciplines and forms of thought as constitutive of philosophical activity itself.

CPCT will provide teaching and learning support for the Philosophy modules on the new Politics, Philosophy & Economics (PPE) degree, based in Politics.

All are welcome to attend the launch event on 26 June (5pm-8pm, RHB 137a) – booking is not required.

For more information, visit www.gold.ac.uk/sociology/research-centres/cpct.

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/book-launch-dictionary-of-untranslatables-a-philosophical-lexicon-edited-by-barbara-cassin-princeton-university-press-princeton-and-oxford-2014

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Inca

Inca

RADICAL AMERICAS SYMPOSIUM 2015

“Washing one’s hands of the conflict between the powerful and the powerless means to side with the powerful, not to be neutral” – Paulo Freire

We are delighted to announce a Call for Papers and Panels for our Third Symposium to be held at the UCL Institute of the Americas, London, on the 14-15 September 2015.

The aim of the event is to bring a range of disciplinary and geographical perspectives to bear on radicalism throughout the Americas. Our definition of “radicalism” is a broad one, encompassing both political radicalism as an object of study, and radical analytical approaches to the societies and cultures of the Americas.

We welcome proposals that deal with any aspect of radicalism, from the democratic and republican radicalisms of the nineteenth century; to the socialist, anarchist, communist, and populist radicalisms of the twentieth century; as well as contemporary identity politics, social movements, and twenty-first century radicalisms.

When arranging panels we will encourage conversation between people working on specific national topics as well as those who follow comparative o r transnational approaches.

We would especially encourage proposals on the following topics, though any subject within our broad remit is welcome:

* Radical theory/approaches
* Intersectional radicalism
* Political violence
* Radical memory and commemoration
* Cultural radicalism
* Political economy/ecology

The symposium seeks to develop the global community of scholars, researchers and activists who have been part of the Radical Americas Network since its creation in 2011. Past events have attracted people at various stages of academic and non-academic life who have presented work from a range of disciplines, including anthropology, politics, history, international relations and cultural studies.

The symposium also marks the launch of the eagerly anticipated Radical Americas journal. The first issue of the e-journal will be availab le in September and will include peer-reviewed articles (some based on work presented at previous network events) as well as interviews and book reviews. We would like to encourage participants at the symposium to submit work to the journal, which is designed to showcase cutting-edge research on radicalisms throughout the Americas.

Guidelines for symposium paper and panel submission
[All communication to radicalamericas@gmail.com]

1. Papers
Please send a proposal of no more than 300 words along with a short bibliographic note to the contact details below. Presentations should be between 15 and 20 minutes in duration depending on the final panel size.
Deadline: 20 June 2015

2. Closed panels
Please list the three or four speakers, provide the titles and abstracts of the individual papers and indicate whether a chair will be required.
Deadline: 30 June 2015

3. Open panels
Please reply with a title and panel abstract which we will then forward to our members and contacts. Please also stipulate whether a chair will be required.
Deadline:  01 June 2015

Conference Website: http://www.community-languages.org.uk/radical-americas/conference.html

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/call-for-papers-radical-americas-symposium-2015

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Social Class

Social Class

SOCIAL CLASS IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY

AMSTERDAM RESEARCH CENTER GENDER AND SEXUALITY

Conference: ‘Social Class in the 21st Century’

October 22-23, 2015

See: http://arcgs.uva.nl/news-events/events/social-class-conference/social-class-conference/content/folder/social-class-conference.html

Theme

Intersections between class, gender and sexuality revisited

The question of social class has re-emerged as a central concern for the analysis and politics of gender and sexuality in the public sphere in many societies worldwide. The ascent and subsequent crisis of global neoliberalism have been deeply implicated in growing inequalities, which have affected the shape of gender and sexual meanings and relations in fundamental ways.

Confirmed keynote speakers: Professor Cecilia Ridgeway and Professor Anoop Nayak + Roundtable by Professor Gloria Wekker

  • Whereas some women have emerged as highly successful agents in the new global economy, their ascent to wealth and power is almost always contingent upon the labor and ongoing exclusion of other – the working classes, the poor, migrants, and/or women of colour.
  • Similarly, with the introduction of some openly lesbian women and gay men into the cosmopolitan-managerial and so-called ‘creative’ global classes, very particular articulations of LGBTQ identity and culture – mostly middle-class and ‘homonormative’ – have become more visible.
  • At the same time alternative and marginalized expressions of LGBTQ identity have increasingly disappeared from public view. Among other factors, social class has played a key role in these dynamics. While institutional sexism and homophobia have perhaps lessened for social upper classes, the social exclusion of others has increased as the result of growing inequality and precarity.
  • These dynamics call for greater attention to the interconnections between social class, race and ethnicity, and gender and sexuality.

Focus on Class

Contemporary global developments exemplify what has long been seen as a central topic of scholarly inquiry: class and other social and cultural divisions have affected lived experiences and have had an impact on people’s abilities and opportunities, as well as on their constructions of gender and sexual identities, categories, and politics. A focus on ‘inclusion’, equal rights and democratic citizenship runs the danger of obscuring growing structural inequalities. Inside and outside of the academy, intersectional and other new forms of critical analysis have gone a long way in accounting for such inequalities, as well as for the divergent social positioning of actors. Nonetheless, these new approaches have not been productive on all levels of social relations and dynamics. Partly as the result of the crisis of Marxism and the theoretical problems associated with overtly reductive class analyses, the effects of class on gender and sexuality remain under-theorized and have suffered from insufficient empirical investigation.

The dominance of white, middle-class, homonormative, and cisgender LGBTQ cultures and identities in scholarly debates conceals class differences and the dominance of a particular ontology. A focus on class and its interconnection with race, ethnicity, gender and sexuality enables scholars to take seriously the complexities of contemporary gender and sexual dynamics in a global world. Class analysis not only unveils inequality but brings to light difference, distinction and dissent, both between and within social groups. Such an analysis questions the dominance of particular identities, but does not satisfy itself with explanations attributing alternative experiences to essentialized or depoliticized notions of cultural difference.

Dominance of global Western ontologies

A major question that needs to be addressed is the dominance of global Western ontologies in the study of social class. North–south comparisons (as well as comparisons unsettling this binary) will bring fresh insights into the way in which global dynamics have reconfigured relations between classes or the concept of class itself.

For instance, class identification in many parts of the world is a matter of how well connected one is transnationally, resulting in specific forms of gender inequality. Transnational migration also reveals class dynamics in configuration with sexuality, from exploitation and labour rights in migrant sex work to examples of successful transgender migration patterns. Neo-liberalisation is often and rightly so critiqued for creating (more) inequalities, but for some groups in the global South it also implies new opportunities. Recent studies on the global middle classes, for instance, have also emphasized the symbolic meaning of class. Eventually, such studies point out the necessity of questioning how the material and cultural dimensions are dialectically intertwined in the generation of gendered class subjectivities and relations. Exploring the class dynamics of gender and sexuality in and from the global South thus brings new understandings.

Interconnected developments 

Four interconnected developments background our call for a focus on class:

  • Gender and sexuality are often largely absent from class analysis.
  • Class since the 1980s has increasingly been abandoned as a theoretical tool in feminist theory, even though Marxism had informed feminist theory and practice until the 1980s.
  • The central role that queer approaches to social and cultural analysis attributes to choice, change, and the destabilization of categories comes at a cost, namely the lack of attention to more enduring power relations and inequalities.
  • Taking a transnational standpoint will help further theorise the questions of social classes in the 21st century.

Unpacking the concept of class – aim of this conference

The way forward, we suggest, is to start unpacking the concept of class. Interestingly, while most of us recognise immediately the notion of class, definitions of it remain elusive and differ tremendously in their reach and implications.

During this conference we intend to explore various routes to unpack the formulation of class through the prism of gender and sexuality:

  • The first question is the matter of scale: from day-to-day interaction, via various levels to the state, and the transnational level: when does class matter?
  • Hence, what makes class matter?
  • What are the material and/or symbolic characteristics of class and how do they matter?
  • Which social, political or cultural ideas, practices and institutions ‘form’ social class?
  • Last but not least, how can class analysis shed light on gender and sexual relations, and how does gender and sexuality analysis shed light on class?

We invite papers from the wide range of social sciences, including social history, to take up these questions and engage in an interdisciplinary debate.

Call for Papers

We invite papers from the wide range of social sciences, including social history, to take up these questions and engage in an interdisciplinary debate.

Please send:

  • Name of panel for which you are submitting
  • Author name and email address
  • Title
  • Abstract (up to 250 words)

Online form 

Please use the online form below to submit paper proposals for the conference Social Class in the 21st Century. Submission is open from April 15, 2015 until May 29, 2015 Authors will be notified of the decision by mid-June 2015.

Submission of Papers: http://arcgs.uva.nl/news-events/events/social-class-conference/social-class-conference/content/folder/call-for-papers/call-for-papers/call-for-papers/cpitem-2/link/papers.html

Registration and Fees: http://arcgs.uva.nl/news-events/events/social-class-conference/social-class-conference/content/folder/registration/registration.html

images (1)

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SALVAGE

SALVAGE

SALVAGE

Salvage is a new quarterly magazine of politics, arts, culture and polemic. But magazines don’t come cheap…

For Issue 1 we’re asking for your help. For more information visit:

Salvage: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/salvage–3

—————

Issue 1 featuring Laura Oldfield Ford, Trish Kahle, Magpie Corvid, Rosie Warren, Joana Ramiro, Benjamin Kunkel, Alberto Toscano, Neil Davidson, China Mieville and more.

£10 / ISSN 2058-6361 / 1st May 2015

—————

The crisis of capitalism has been a crisis of its opposition. We stand in the rubble of the post-Left. The implosion has brought no victors but the predators…

With the financial crisis of 2008, it appeared to many that the neoliberal project would finally be laid to rest. The early signs – from Iceland to Greece, the Arab uprisings to Occupy – pointed to a renewed and reinvigorated left with the potential to break free from the ossified dogmas of the past and challenge the economic and political orthodoxy. Yet, seven years later and the neoliberal corpse staggers on while the Left, notwithstanding a few real glimmers of embattled hope, such as Syriza’s victory, lurches from one catastrophe to the next

Salvage Magazine is a new quarterly magazine of politics, art, culture and polemic aimed to debris neoliberalism. Founded in 2014 by Editors Rosie Warren and Jamie Allinson, Art Editor China Miéville, and Contributing Editors Richard Seymour, Charlotte Bence and Magpie Corvid, Salvage has drawn inspiration from the rise of intellectually, politically and culturally engaged publications on both sides of the Atlantic in the past decade,including Jacobin, Strike, n+1, New Inquiry and The White Review. ‘Intellectual and committed without being academic, dogmatic or philistine – and believing that serious content deserves the best design – its aim is to engage with the most pressing political and cultural questions of the day while advancing engagement and discussion on the left

Stridently internationalist and fearlessly political, Salvage issue 1 will feature a range of new and established writers, poets, activists and artists. It will include essays from some of the biggest names on the left: Magpie Corvid whores Marxism; Joana Ramiro reports from Greece; Jamie Allinson accelerates; Benjamin Kunkel defends the money-form; Rosie Warren objectifies women; China Miéville waxes Dystopian; Richard Seymour dissects Farrageism; Trish Kahle damns Missouri; Pablo Mukherjee submerges Modi; Alberto Toscano translates the forgotten genius of Salvage-Marxism; Kunle Wizeman is interviewed about the Nigerian political scene; Neil Davidson uncovers the Neoliberal gravediggers of capital; Morgan Merteuil builds the industrial struggle; Gareth Brown and Nicholas Beuret walk with the dead; Mark Bould roasts Milton Friedman; Mary Robertson rehouses Engels; Daniel Hartley communizes the Anthropocene.

With the poetry of:

Caitlin Doherty

Kunle Wizeman

With the artwork of:

Season Butler

Karen Mirza

Laura Oldfield Ford

With future projects by:

Jordan/a Rosenberg, Rob Knox, Charlotte Bence and many more.

—————

Of the £10,000:

£5000 will go on our first print run

£800 will pay our writers and artists

£3000 will pay our designer, Rupa, our accountant, Sylvia, and our videographer, Becky.

£1000 will pay the wages for a part-time admin assistant, John, at London living wage

£200 will pay for tote bags and merchandise

Anything we raise above £10,000 will help to pay for our launch and future events, and allow us to subsidise the next print run so that we can sell Salvage at the lowest price possible.

 

We will give you things for your donations.

 

£10 gets you

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on our website

 

£15 gets you

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on our website

& a tote bag

 

£20 gets you

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

 

£25 gets you

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

 

£35 gets you

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

& a Salvage keyring

 

£60 gets you

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

& Salvage keyring

& named thanks on the inside

& a one year subscription to Salvage (four issues)

 

£150 gets you

(x 50)

The first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

& named thanks on the inside

& lifetime subscription to Salvage

or

(x 3)

The first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

& named thanks on the inside

& a one year subscription to Salvage (four issues)

& one of three dirty stories written by Magpie Corvid written for and about YOU

 

£300 gets you (x 3)

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

& named thanks on the inside

& a one year subscription to Salvage (four issues)

& one advance copy of Three Moments of an Explosion, China Miéville’s forthcoming short-story collection (publishing in July 2015)

 

£1000 gets you (x 1)

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

& named thanks on the inside

& a one year subscription to Salvage (four issues)

& a one-of-a-kind copy of the Subterranean Press limited edition of Perdido Street Station personally ‘Salvaged’ by China Miéville

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/salvage-new-magazine-of-left-politics-art-culture-looking-for-funding

Salvaging, Steven Wilson: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gl2OJe5TwdQ

Salvage Too

Salvage Too

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

 

Social Movments

Social Movments

CULTURAL DIFFERENCE AND SOCIAL SOLIDARITY NETWORK: 4TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE
“New Directions in Reconciling Solidarity and Difference in Contemporary Societies”
Website: http://www.differenceandsolidarity.org
Hosted by Middle East Technical University – Northern Cyprus Campus
June 30th – July 3rd 2015

Strategies for addressing problems of social solidarity in states and communities in a contemporary globalized world while respecting difference and diversity within the boundaries of those communities have become more important than ever with the problematization – and some would say decline – of multiculturalist solutions. In the last decades there has been a rise in moral panics about immigration and right-wing nationalist responses, whilst the emergence of new globalized labor flows and diasporic identities have given rise to cultural conflicts as well as mutual enrichment within urban settings. There has also been a sharper and more prejudicial relationship between western states and Islamic peoples, with a rise in Islamophobia mirroring an apparent hardening of faith-based positions on both sides, intersecting with legitimate concerns about the contradictions and conflicts between traditional faith-based positions and contemporary human rights discourse. The political enterprise of multiculturalism appears limited and presumptive in its solutions and where multiculturalism has been embraced it has been criticized in respect of class divisions, deficiencies in recognitions and redistributions and the amelioration of tensions and conflicts through rhetoric and temporary solutions to symptoms and not causes.

This conference seeks to explore the fertile grounds within and between idealistic, cosmopolitan and ‘radical’ strategies to the more pragmatic attempts to provide solutions to particular, immanent and conjunctural problems of building solidarity with difference, and to explore the intersections between different political approaches to posing solidarity with difference and the practices that constitute everyday experience for communities of difference seeking terms of solidarity.

This conference provides a space for scholars to take stock of the present context and share knowledge – specific or general, empirical or theoretical, with a view to develop and explore the possible ways forward to minimizing violence, discrimination, exclusion and oppression as the means by which difference is managed by political structures. It is hoped that the conference will facilitate the development of more constructive, democratic, participative and inclusive means of promoting solidarity without negating difference and diversity. The conference is intended to be interdisciplinary and welcomes papers from scholars whose research crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries. Papers and panels are sought for presentation at parallel sessions where each paper will have a strict maximum of 20 minutes presentation time on panels of 2 papers with 25 minutes per paper discussion time.

The main themes for which papers are sought are:
•    Applying and critiquing theories of difference
•    Dissembling and re-presenting gender: constructions of difference and/or solidarity
•    Making solidarities in the context of difference
•    Refugees, difference, law and media representations
•    Culture and politics in representations of identity and difference
•    Digital media and the making/dissembling of social movements
•    Representing multilingualism in the linguistic landscape
•    States, sectional interests and regulatory regimes: managing difference
•    Culture, art, literature, film and the performance of difference
•    The role of technologies in making representations of difference and solidarity
•    Representations of difference or re-presentations of difference: The problem of representation
•    Language hierarchies in social space
•    Cultural products and the reinforcement or dissolution of differences – the problem of consumption
•    Difference and the construction and deterioration of communities
•    Difference and technology: the changing representation of identity and difference

These themes are not exhaustive and the organizers will consider other papers relevant to the conference subject. We expect to publish a post-conference edited book, derived from the papers presented and organized around themes that reveal themselves during the conference.

There will be two keynote plenary sessions with speakers to be announced. Reflecting the conference theme in the context of the conference venue, one of these sessions will focus on aspects of these themes in Cyprus.

•    Deadline for submission of Abstracts by: March 31, 2015
•    Notification of abstract acceptances and rejections is on a rolling basis (within 3 weeks of submission)
•    Online conference registration open from March 15, 2015 to May 15, 2015
•    Conference Fees to be paid by May 15, 2015

The conference language is English and all papers and presentations should be in English.

The conference fee is 395 Euros (295 Euros for students and non-participants).
This includes:
•    Registration
•    Transport to and from Ercan Airport in the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus to METU-NCC Campus
•    4 nights at Campus Guest House with breakfast
•    4 lunches
•    2 Sunset Dinners (all drinks included)
•    1 Dinner Banquet (non-alcoholic drinks included)
•    Guided Historic/Cultural Excursion

Abstracts of no more than 350 words may be submitted online only at:  http://www.differenceandsolidarity.org
For any questions or concerns please see our website, including the FAQ page, or contact the conference organizers at the email address below.

Conference Organisers:
Scott H. Boyd: Middle East Technical University – Northern Cyprus Campus
Paul Reynolds: Edge Hill University
info@differenceandsolidarity.org

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Some Additions to Academia: February 2015: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2015/02/27/some-additions-to-academia-february-2015/

Mors Mystica

Mors Mystica

STUDYING ANCIENT MAGIC

Categorisation – Comparison – Materiality

10th-11th June 2015

MF Norwegian School of Theology

Oslo

 

PROGRAMME

 

Wednesday 10th June

Workshop

08.30 Coffee and welcome, Nils H. Korsvoll and Liv Ingeborg Lied

09.00-09.40 Nils H. Korsvoll (MF)

Cruciform Motifs in Syriac Incantation Bowls

09.40-10.20 Victor Ghica (MF)

Voces Magicae and Nomina Barbara in Egyptian Gnostic and Magical Texts: Dynamics of Development

10.30-11.30 Short papers

12.00 Lunch

Lectures

13.00-14.00 David Frankfurter (Boston University)

From Magic to Materiality: Refining an Exotic Discipline

14.00-15.00 Marco Moriggi (Università di Catania)

Jewish Divorce Formulae in Syriac Incantation Bowls

 

Thursday 11th June

Workshop

08.30 Coffee

09.00-09.45 Marco Moriggi

The Relationship between Magic and ‘Official Religion’ in Sasanian Mesopotamia

09.45-10.30 David Frankfurter

Magical Charms from Late Antique Egypt

10.45-11.45 Short papers

12.00 Lunch

13.00-15.00 Excursion: Oslo University Papyri Collection

 

CALL FOR SHORT PAPERS

We invite proposals for short papers (15 mins + 15 mins Q&A) on the workshop theme from PhD-students and Post-docs.

Please send proposals to nils.h.korsvoll@mf.no by May 1st 2015.

 

PARTICIPANTS

David Frankfurter (Boston University)

Frankfurter’s particular interests revolve around theoretical issues addressing the place of magic in religion, the relationship of religion and violence, the nature of Christianisation, and the representation of evil in culture. He teaches on Christian apocalyptic literature, and the documents of early Christianity, including extra-canonical sources, magical texts, and saints’ lives.

Marco Moriggi (Università di Catania)

Moriggi has published extensively on Syriac amulets, as well as Aramaic philology and epigraphy more generally. He also works with Semitics and linguistic theory, and has recently produced a corpus of Syriac incantation bowls.

Victor Ghica (MF Norwegian School of Theology)

Ghica is a trained archaeologist and philologist and works on Christian archaeology, coptology, papyrology and epigraphy. He is a member of the French Institute of Oriental Archaeology and has published on gnostic texts and Coptic and Manichean epigraphy.

The workshop is organised by Liv Ingeborg Lied and Nils H. Korsvoll

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Some Additions to Academia: February 2015: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2015/02/27/some-additions-to-academia-february-2015/