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Social Movments

Social Movments

MOVEMENTS IN POST/SOCIALISMS

CALL FOR PAPERS

Interface: A Journal for and about Social Movements

Issue 7/1 (November 2015), deadline May 1 2015

Theme editors: Jiří Navrátil, Elizabeth Humphrys, Kevin Lin, Anna Szolucha

The November 2015 issue of the open-access, online, copyleft academic/activist journal Interface: a Journal for and about Social Movements (http://www.interfacejournal.net/) invites contributions on the theme of Movements in Post/Socialisms as well as general submissions.

The 20th century saw the establishment of, and experimentation within, socialist states across the globe. These efforts were variously lauded, critiqued, condemned and their ‘socialist’ nature disputed. This call for papers asks about the movements that have come in the wake of the collapse and transformation of these diverse regimes.

A quarter of century ago, a massive wave of political protest shook state socialist regimes in Eastern Europe and Asia. In many countries these events paved the way for far-reaching societal transformation, embedding Western-style capitalist economies and representative democracy. In some locations the existing regimes succeeded in taming the efforts around economic and political liberalisation, in other locations they did not. Social movements were central in these processes and followed different paths, including: they led the transformative events and became part of new elites/regimes/states; they pulled back to the realm of civil society after they initiated regime change; they resisted the efforts for regime change; and they were repressed and demobilised when the regime succeeded in maintaining the status quo.

Not only did movements participate in and resist ‘eventful protests’ in 1989, but they were also influenced by these events in the following decades. Again, different trajectories were observed in different locations. Eastern Europe became dominated by anti-utopian ideologies, which effectively paralysed any attempt for transgressive critiques of the newly established political economic order. Furthermore, the spread of ‘development aid’ for ‘underdeveloped’ post-communist civil societies — provided by United States, European Union and private foundations — contributed to the NGO-isation of civil society organisations and the import and emulation of new forms and agendas of activism. This ‘new’ or ‘proper’ civil society activism started to gain political relevance at the expense of grass-root, radical and other dissident movements.

On the other hand, the rapid economic and political transition of a number of Eastern countries provoked mobilisation — from the episodic global justice and anti-war movements, to mass social solidarity mobilisations that had lasting effects on elites’ strategies for economic and political transformation.

For Asian socialism, the ruling ‘communist’ regimes in Vietnam and China have presided over a transition to capitalist economies while also resisting social movements for political democratisation. Yet the capitalist transition has thrown up social and political contradictions, such as social inequality, abuse of political power, labour exploitation, land dispossession and environmental degradation — all of which have seen the rise of diverse activism and movements. Fearful of autonomous organising, these regimes have kept a tight grip over civil society and independent organisation. Consequently, social movements have to operate under repressive conditions and adopt clandestine and informal organising methods and strategies. Nonetheless, in Vietnam and China, for example, we have seen some of the highest global concentration of autonomous labour organising and strikes in recent years.

Apart from regions where the 1989 events directly took place, their effects spread well beyond. The fall of the Eastern bloc both directly and indirectly affected the political landscape of Western Europe, with old left movements beginning to orient themselves along different ideological principles. Consequences can also be seen in Latin America, with sites of state socialism, such as Cuba, faced with the transformation of the former Eastern bloc as well as internal movements to transform the national political economy — including the repression of those movements. In Venezuela, the new century has seen Hugo Chávez implement a process of socialist reform in the wake of mass social and political movements that brought him to power, a route he called the ‘Bolivarian process’. Related but distinct processes took place in other countries — Ecuador, Argentina and Bolivia. Many have called this the socialism of the 21st century, following and diverging from the socialism of the 20th century in the Eastern Bloc and Asia. However, others have criticised such regimes as authoritarian or ‘neo-extractivist’.

For this special themed section of Interface 7/1 we are interested in articles by researchers and activists on the movements and events of 1989, their impacts and trajectories and other questions of post/socialisms. We are seeking standard refereed articles as well as material in other formats, such as: action notes on organising methods; activist biographies; book reviews; conversational roundtables; analyses of movement events; and more. Submissions should be written in such a way as to be of interest or use also to readers outside Eastern Europe or Asia.

 

Contributions might address such topics as:

– Post/anti/new socialist movements

– New trade unions and labour movements in Asia

– Activism in post/socialist settings

– Memories and visions of socialism/communism in contemporary collective action

– Importing and exporting social movements and activism

– Effects of the fall of state socialisms in Eastern Europe and Asia on other locations

– What is socialism in the 21st century?

– The persistence of social movements during the regime change from state socialism to capitalism

– Movements as regime-builders / movements as regime-breakers

– Comparing Cold War social movements between East and West

– Other questions relevant to the special issue theme

 

As in every issue, we are also very happy to receive contributions that reflect on other questions for social movement research and practice that fit within the journal’s mission statement (http://www.interfacejournal.net/who-we-are/mission-statement/).

Submissions should contribute to the journal’s mission as a tool to help our movements learn from each other’s struggles, by developing analyses from specific movement processes and experiences that can be translated into a form useful for other movements.

In this context, we welcome contributions by movement participants and academics who are developing movement-relevant theory and research. Our goal is to include material that can be used in a range of ways by movements — in terms of its content, its language, its purpose and its form. We thus seek work in a range of different formats, such as conventional (refereed) articles, review essays, facilitated discussions and interviews, action notes, teaching notes, key documents and analysis, book reviews — and beyond. Both activist and academic peers review research contributions, and other material is sympathetically edited by peers. The editorial process generally is geared towards assisting authors to find ways of expressing their understanding, so that we all can be heard across geographical, social and political distances.

We can accept material in Afrikaans, Arabic, Catalan, Czech, Danish, English, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Chinese (Simplified and Traditional), Maltese, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Slovak, Spanish, Swedish and Zulu. Please see our editorial contacts page (http://www.interfacejournal.net/submissions/editorial-contact/) for details of who to submit to.

Deadline and contact details

The deadline for initial submissions to this issue, to be published November 1, 2015, is May 1, 2015. For details of how to submit to Interface, please see the “Guidelines for contributors” on our website. All manuscripts, whether on the special theme or other topics, should be sent to the appropriate regional editor, listed on our contacts page. Submission templates are available online via the guidelines page and should be used to ensure correct formatting.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

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Crisis

Crisis

CAPITALISM’S WORLD OF ENDLESS CRISIS AND UPHEAVAL: IS THERE A WAY OUT?

SUNDAY, JUNE 15, 2014

6:00-8:00 PM

Westside Peace Center

3916 Sepulveda Blvd., near Venice Blvd. (Free parking in rear)

Suite 101-102, press #22 at door to get into building

Culver City (LA area)

 

SPEAKERS:

Kevin Anderson, author of MARX AT THE MARGINS and LENIN, HEGEL, AND WESTERN MARXISM

Robert “Gabe” Gabrielsky, longtime socialist and labor activist

 

The six-year-long global economic crisis has placed in stark relief the fact that capitalism serves as a constraint on the development of the vast majority of the world’s population, while enriching the few at an unprecedented level. At the same time, we have also witnessed in this period the rise of revolutionary and protest movements on a scale unprecedented since the 1960s and 1970s.

This meeting will explore issues such as:

(1) whether the present crisis is an outgrowth of neoliberal policies or of long-term economic stagnation in the major capitalist economies;

(2) the added impact of the crisis on Blacks, Latino/as and women and the new forms of opposition this has engendered, from the Trayvon Martin protests to the abortion rights movement;

(3) the contradictory legacy of global forms of protest and revolution over the past several years, from the Arab revolutions and the Occupy movement to the more recent upsurges in Turkey, Bosnia, and Ukraine;

(4) the specific historical contribution of Marxist-Humanism as illustrated most recently by A DREADFUL DECEIT: THE MYTH OF RACE FROM THE COLONIAL ERA TO OBAMA’S AMERICA, which contains Jacqueline Jones’s widely read exploration of the life and work of Charles Denby (Simon Owens), the Black autoworker who was, along with Raya Dunayevskaya, the co-founder of Marxist-Humanism in the U.S.

 

Sponsored by the West Coast Chapter, International Marxist-Humanist Organization

More information: arise@internationalmarxisthumanist.org

Website: http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org

Here is the link to the online announcement of the meeting for posting via email, Facebook, etc.: http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/events/los-angeles-capitalisms-world-endless-crisis-upheaval-way

Join our new Facebook page: “International Marxist-Humanist Organization” https://www.facebook.com/groups/imhorg/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Heathwood Institute & Press

Heathwood Institute & Press

BEYOND CAPITALISM: CRITICAL THEORY FOR RADICAL DEMOCRACY

Open Call for Papers

Heathwood Press: An Independent Critical Organisation for Social Progress

Call for Papers: We are seeking contributions from a diversity of authors and researchers concerning discussions on post-capitalist society and the development of radical (participatory) democratic alternatives. This project is broad in scope, and we welcome papers and articles from across all disciplines: from economics and law to education, social sciences and the environment. We prefer works that directly emphasize an interdisciplinary approach and express an understanding of the aims of our critical theoretical project. One example of a proposal already received is a paper on 21st Century critical theory and radical (participatory) grassroots politics. Another example is a project that aims to establish a fundamental critique of violence in education, with a mind toward a foundational alternative philosophy of education.

Papers will be published online.

Before contacting us, please familiarize yourself with our project and past publications: http://www.heathwoodpress.com/advancing-frankfurt-school-critical-theory/

To contact us about this open call, please write to: enquiries[at]heathwoodpress.com

‘Beyond Capitalism’ Call: http://www.heathwoodpress.com/open-call-for-papers-beyond-capitalism-critical-theory-for-radical-democracy/

Heathwood Institute & Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Marx's Concept of the Alternative to Capitalism

Marx’s Concept of the Alternative to Capitalism

TRANSCENDING CAPITALISM, IN THEORY AND IN PRACTICE

SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 2014

6:00-8:00 PM

Westside Peace Center

3916 Sepulveda Blvd., near Venice Blvd. (free parking in rear)

Suite 101-102, press #22 at door to get into building

Culver City (LA area)

 

Speaker:

PETER HUDIS, author of MARX’S CONCEPT OF THE ALTERNATIVE TO CAPITALISM

Commentator:

SARAH MASON, former Occupy LA activist

In contrast to the traditional view that Marx’s work is restricted to a critique of capitalism and does not contain a detailed or coherent conception of its alternative, this presentation will show, through an analysis of his published and unpublished writings, that Marx was committed to a specific concept of a post-capitalist society that informed his critique of value production, alienated labor and capitalist accumulation. Instead of focusing on the present with only a passing reference to the future, Marx’s emphasis on capitalism’s tendency towards dissolution is rooted in a specific conception of what should replace it. In critically re-examining that conception, this book addresses the quest for an alternative to capitalism that has taken on increased importance today.

In addition to MARX’S CONCEPT OF THE ALTERNATIVE TO CAPITALISM (Haymarket Books, 2013), PETER HUDIS is the General Editor of the COMPLETE WORKS OF ROSA LUXEMBURG and the co-editor of THE POWER OF NEGATIVITY: SELECTED WRITINGS ON THE DIALECTIC IN HEGEL AND MARX, by RAYA DUNAYEVSKAYA

Sponsored by the West Coast Chapter, International Marxist-Humanist Organization

More information: arise@internationalmarxisthumanist.org

IM-HO: http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org

Join our new Facebook page: “International Marxist-Humanist Organization” https://www.facebook.com/groups/imhorg/

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Books

Books

THE NEW LEFT BOOK CLUB

CALL FOR PAPERS

The New Left Book Club invites unpublished essays that address aspects of leftism, internationally and interpersonally. We welcome all submissions from undergraduates and postgraduates, and are particularly interested in the following themes:

* Leftism and Islam

* Socialism in Practice (housing cooperatives, etc)

* Gender and the Left

* Post-capitalist policy

* The Economics of Austerity

* Leftism in the Eurozone

* Critical theory and the UK general election 2015

* Health politics

SUBMISSION OF PAPERS

We are accepting long form essays of up to 5000 words. Prospective authors are invited to submit an abstract or outline of ideas to newleftbookclub@gmail.com

Authors will be invited to discuss their work and ideas at New Left Book Club events following publication.

WHAT WAS THE LEFT BOOK CLUB?

The Left Book Club was founded in 1936 by Cripps, Strachey, and Gollancz with the aim of creating a well informed and dynamic left in Britain. The Club grew explosively, and within a few years had some 57000 members and 1500 monthly discussion groups. The Club was hugely influential in the Labour victory of 1945 and the great socialist efforts that followed.

WHAT IS THE NEW LEFT BOOK CLUB?

We aim to recreate this phenomenon, publishing volumes of essays covering the entire spectrum of leftist thought. It’s not 1945 but we believe there is still a role for a print book club to play in generating progressive discussion, particularly amongst those who feel marginalised or voiceless with respect to the current state of leftist publications.

WHY WE EXIST

1. We want to replicate the achievements of the original Left Book Club, namely a unified group of people reading and discussing leftist ideology in preparation for a period of social change.

2. We want to provide a platform for leftist thought and discussion outside of the mainstream publications.

3. We want to create an editorially transparent publication, exposing readers to ideology and perspectives they might not otherwise encounter.

4. We welcome radical and experimental thought from anyone – not only those with formal academic training

5. We want to create a culture antithetical to the immediate response / counter-response whirlwind of Twitter and other online channels.

6. We want to provide a place for discussion of pure ideology and analysis, free from the potentially off-putting nature of leftist political action groups.

7. We want to hold events where leftists can meet up and share their thoughts. To this end we will be holding bi-monthly events in Manchester and London (initially).

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Peter Hudis

‘MARX’S CONCEPT OF THE ALTERNATIVE TO CAPITALISM’ – BY PETER HUDIS

Peter Hudis, Oakton Community College and Loyola University

In contrast to the traditional view that Marx’s work is restricted to a critique of capitalism and does not contain a detailed or coherent conception of its alternative, this book shows, through an analysis of his published and unpublished writings, that Marx was committed to a specific concept of a post-capitalist society that informed his critique of value production, alienated labor and capitalist accumulation. Instead of focusing on the present with only a passing reference to the future, Marx’s emphasis on capitalism’s tendency towards dissolution is rooted in a specific conception of what should replace it. In critically re-examining that conception, this book addresses the quest for an alternative to capitalism that has taken on increased importance today.

ISSN: 1570-1522

ISBN13: 9789004221970

Planned Publication Date: June 2012

Version: Hardback 

Pages, Illustrations: approx. 272 pp.

Historical Materialism 36

Imprint: BRILL

 

Table of contents

Acknowledgements

Introduction: Why Explore Marx’s Concept of the Transcendence of Value Production? Why Now?
The object and purpose of this study
Objectivist and subjectivist approaches to Marx’s philosophical contribution

1. The Transcendence of Alienation in the Writings of the Young Marx
Marx’s beginnings, 1837–41
Marx’s critique of politics and philosophy, 1842–3
Marx’s critique of economics and philosophy, 1843–4
Discerning the ideal within the real, 1845–8
Evaluating the young Marx’s concept of a postcapitalist society

2. The Conception of a Postcapitalist Society in the Drafts of Capital
The ‘first draft’ of Capital: The Poverty of Philosophy (1847)
The ‘second draft’ of Capital: the Grundrisse (1858)
The ‘third draft’ of Capital: the manuscript of 1861–3

3. The Vision of the New Society in Marx’s Capital
Volume I of Capital
Volumes II and III of Capital

4. Marx’s Late Writings on Postcapitalist Society
The impact of the Paris Commune on Marx
The Critique of the Gotha Programme and ‘Notes on Wagner’

Conclusion: Evaluating Marx’s Concept of a Postcapitalist Society

Appendix: Translation of Marx’s Excerpt-Notes on the Chapter ‘Absolute Knowledge’ in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit

Bibliography
Index

 

Biographical note:

Peter Hudis, Ph.D. (2011) in Philosophy, Loyola University Chicago, is Lecturer in Philosophy and the Humanities at OaktonCommunity Collegeand LoyolaUniversity. He has published extensively on Marxist theory and is General Editor of The Complete Works of Rosa Luxemburg.

Book details and ordering at: http://www.brill.nl/marxs-concept-alternative-capitalism

I am really looking forward to reading this book: Glenn Rikowski

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Critical Pedagogy

CRITICAL PEDAGOGIES IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY: A CONFERENCE ON TRANSFORMATIVE PEDAGOGIES

Call for Papers

Critical Theories in the Twenty First Century: A Conference of Transformative Pedagogies

West Chester University of Pennsylvania

Conference Founders: Curry Malott, John Elmore, and Brad Porfilio

November 18th and 19th 2011

Proposals for papers, panels, performances, workshops, and other multimedia presentations should include title(s) and names and contact information for presenter(s). The deadline for sending prooposals is August 31, 2011. The Steering Committee will email acceptance or rejection notices by September 8, 2011. The proposal formats available to the presenters are as follows:

The general purpose of the West Chester Critical Theory Conference is to promote and support critical scholarship within students, and to advance critical theory and pedagogy more generally. By “advance” we mean to expose more people to critical practices and understandings as part of the process of the development of theory.

Through this focus we hope to work toward unifying and strengthening the sub-genres of critical pedagogy from Marxism, critical race theory, to critical neo-colonial studies. This goal is approached through the conferences internal pedagogy and therefore through a horizontal rather than a vertical organizing structure; by including students and classroom teachers in the critical pedagogical work dominated by professors; and by attempting to create a space where criticalists who do not usually work together can create meaningful unity, respect, and common goals. Since the dominant form of power in the twenty first century—neoliberal capitalist power—is both multicultural and global, critical pedagogy must too become more multicultural and global if it is to pose a significant challenge to it for a more democratic life after capitalism.

Because critical theory is concerned with not only understanding the world, but with transforming it, the conference is focused on not only understanding the consequences of an unjust social and economic system (i.e. corporate take-over of schools, high stakes testing and behaviorist pedagogy, micro classroom aggressions and bullying, poverty, racism, sexism, white supremacy, homophobia, perpetual war, ableism, etc.), but with transforming or dissolving their root causes (i.e. neoliberal capitalism and settler-state, Euro-centric oppression and their patriarchal, homophobic, racist, etc. hegemonies). As part of this goal the conference will hopefully provide introductory discussions and presentations on critical pedagogy and critical theory.

SUBMISSIONS
Proposal Formats

Individual Proposal: (45 minutes)
The conference committee welcomes individual paper proposals, with the understanding that those accepted will be grouped together around common or overlapping themes, Presenters will have approximately 45 minutes to present or summarize their individual papers. Individual paper submissions will be considered for panels with the same topic/theme. If you would prefer to present your paper/research individually you should consider the alternative format proposal. A 300-500 word abstract of the paper will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Symposium Proposal: (90 minutes)
Presenters are also welcomed to submit proposals for a symposium. A symposium is typically composed of a chair and discussant and three to five participants who present or summarize their papers. Each symposium is organized around a common theme. Each participant will have between 15 and 45 minutes to present their papers, depending upon the number of participants involved in the symposium. A 300-500 word abstract of the symposium will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Panel Proposal: (90 minutes)
A panel discussion is another venue available presenters. A panel discussion is typically composed of three to six participants who discuss their scholarly work within the context of a dialogue or conversation on a topic or theme related to the conference theme. Typically, each panelist is given 10-15 minutes to discuss the topic, present theoretical ideas, and/or point to relevant research. A chair should be identified who introduces the panel and frames the issues and questions being addressed. In addition to the chair, we encourage (but do not require) organizers of panels to include a discussant who responds to the comments of the panelists. Individual proposal submissions will be combined into panels with the same theme/topic. A 300-500 word abstract of the panel discussion will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Alternative Format and Special Interest Groups (90 minutes)
Alternative proposals that do not fit into the above categories, such as workshops, performances, video and multimedia presentations, and round-table dialogues, are encouraged. We also welcome proposals for the organization of special interest groups. A 150-250 word abstract of the panel discussion will be peer reviewed for acceptance to the conference.

Email proposals to conference coordinators Brad Porfilio (porfilio16@aol.com) and Curry Malott (currymalott@hotmail.com) by August 31, 2011.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Ghosts

ON HAUNTOLOGY \ CAPITALIST REALISM – TWO TALKS BY MARK FISHER

THE COLLOQUIUM FOR UNPOPULAR CULTURE AND NYU’S ASIAN/ PACIFIC/ AMERICAN STUDIES PROGRAM present:

TWO TALKS BY MARK FISHER

What are grey vampires and how do they retard the insurrectionary potential of digital  discourse?  How does Derrida’s notion of hauntology contribute to an understanding of dubstep artist Burial?  Is ‘Basic Instinct 2’, routinely derided as a cine-atrocity, a Lacanian reworking of Ballard, Baudrillard and Bataille in service of the creation of a ‘phantasmatic, cybergothic London’?  What is interpassivity and in what ways has it come to define the corporatized incarceration of modern academia?

Over the last decade, Mark Fisher has established a reputation as one of the exhilarating cultural theorists in Britain.  A co-founder of the Cybernetic Culture Research Unit (CCRU) at Warwick University ­and described by Simon Reynolds as the academic equivalent of Apocalypse Now’s Colonel Kurtz ­ he brings together psychoanalysis, political analysis and speculative fiction to create an extraordinary body of rogue scholarship, a theory-rush with few parallels.

Fisher is the author of ‘Capitalist Realism’, the editor of ‘The Resistible Demise of Michael Jackson’ (both Zer0 Books, 2009), and writes regularly for Sight and Sound, Film Quarterly, The Wire and Frieze, as well as maintaining a well-known blog at http://k-punk.abstractdynamics.org.  He teaches at the University of East London, Goldsmiths, University of London, and the City Literary Institute.

The Colloquium for Unpopular Culture and NYU’s Asian/ Pacific/ American Studies program are pleased to be hosting Fisher’s first talks inAmerica.

See ‘ The Metaphysics of Crackle’, at: http://pontone.pl/pontones-special-guest-mix-k-punk-the-metaphysics-of-crackle/

***

MARK FISHER, THESE ARE NON-TIMES AS WELL AS NON-PLACES: REFLECTIONS ON HAUNTOLOGY
 
WHEN: Wednesday 4 May 2011, 6:30pm
WHERE: Room 471, 20 Cooper Square [East 5th and Bowery]
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

”Through their generic and transient qualities ­ workstations devoid of personal effects, relations with colleagues as fleeting as those with passengers on a commuter journey ­ many workplaces now resemble non-places, either literally, as in the case of a hotel, corporate coffee chain or out-of-town supermarket, or symbolically, in the form of temporary assignments for faceless employers (dis)located in anonymous buildings, where the worker-commuter then follows the same global timetables, navigates the same software applications and experiences the same sense of placelessness, the feeling of being mere data in the mainframe.”

So writes Ivor Southwood in his analysis of precarious labour, ‘Non-Stop Inertia’ (2011). In the last decade, the proliferation of corporate non-places has been accompanied by the spread of cyberspace-time, or Itime, a distributed or unpunctuated temporality. It’s no coincidence that, as this unmarked time increasingly came to dominate cultural and psychic space, Derrida’s concept hauntology (re)emerged as the name for a paradoxical zeitgeist.  In ‘Specters of Marx’, Derrida argued that the hauntological was characterised by ‘a time out of joint’, and this broken time has been expressed in cultural objects that return to a wounded or distorted version of the past in flight from a waning sense of the present. Sometimes accused of nostalgia, the most powerful examples of hauntological culture actually show that nostalgia is no longer possible.

In conditions where pastiche has become normalised, the question has to be: nostalgia compared to what? James Bridle has recently argued that ‘the opposite of hauntology … [is] to demand the radically new’, but hauntology in fact operates as a kind of thwarted preservation of such demands in conditions where – for the moment at least – they cannot be met. Whereas cyberspace-time tends towards the generation of cultural moments that are as interchangeable as transnational franchise outlets, hauntology involves the staining of particular places with time – albeit a time that is out of joint. In this lecture, Fisher will explore the hauntological culture of the last few years in relation to the question of place, using examples from music (Burial, The Caretaker, Ekoplekz, Richard Skelton), film (Chris Petit, Patrick Keiller) and fiction (Alan Garner, David Peace).

MARK FISHER, DEPACIFICATION PROGRAM: FROM CAPITALIST REALISM TO POST-CAPITALISM

WHEN: Thursday 5 May 2011, 6:30pm
WHERE: Room 471, 20 Cooper Square [East 5th and Bowery]
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

”It would be best, perhaps, to think of an alternate world – better to say the alternate world, our alternate world – as one contiguous with ours but without any connections or access to it. Then, from time to time, like a diseased eyeball in which disturbing flashes of light are perceived or like those baroque sunbursts in which rays from another world suddenly break into this one, we are reminded that Utopia exists and that other systems, other spaces, are still possible” (Fredric Jameson, ‘Valences of the Dialectic’).

In his 2009 book ‘Capitalist Realism’, Mark Fisher started to explore some of the affective, psychological and political consequences of the deeply entrenched belief that there is no alternative to capitalism. After 1989, capital seemed to enjoy full spectrum dominance of both global space and the unconscious. Every imaginable future was capitalist.  What has been mistaken for post-political apathy, Fisher argued, was a pervasive sense of reflexive impotence in the face of a neoliberal ideological program which sought to subordinate all of culture to the imperatives of business. The subject of post-Fordist capitalism is no passive dupe; this subject actively participates in an ‘interpassive’ corporate culture which solicits our involvement and encourages us to ‘join the debate’.

As Fisher argues in the book, education has been at the forefront of this process, with teachers and lecturers locked into managerialist self-surveillance, and students induced into the role of consumers.

In the eighteen months since ‘Capitalist Realism’ was published, the neoliberal program has been seriously compromised, but capitalist realism has intensified – with austerity programs pushed through on the basis that it is unthinkable that capitalism should be allowed to fail. At the same time, this new, more desperate form of capitalist realism has also faced unexpected challenges from a militancy growing in Europe, the Middle East and even in the heartlands of neoliberalism such as the UK and the US. Now that history has started up again, and Jameson’s ‘baroque sunbursts’ flare brighter than they have for a generation, we can begin to pose questions that had receded into the unimaginable during the high pomp of neoliberal triumphalism: what might a post-capitalism look like,
and how can we get there?

Fisher will argue that the Left will only succeed if it can reclaim modernity from a neoliberal Right that has lost control of it. This entails understanding how the current possibilities for agency are contoured and constrained by the machinery of what Deleuze and Foucault called the Control Society, including cyberspace, the media landscape, psychic pathologies and pharmacology – failures to act are not failures of will, and all the will in the world will not eliminate capitalism. It also entails recognising that neoliberalism’s global hegemony arose from capturing desires which it could not satisfy. A genuinely new Left must be shaped by those desires, and not be lulled, once again, by the logics of failed revolts.

Queries: ss162@nyu.edu

***END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Capitalist Crisis

CAPITALISM IN CRISIS AND POLITICAL ALTERNATIVES

The Critical Studies Graduate Research Group at the Universityof Brighton is pleased to invite you to a day of workshops on ‘Capitalism in Crisis and Political Alternatives’ on Friday 20th of May with Mary Mellor, Alberto Toscano, Mark Fisher and Mark Devenney.

You can find a link with more information on our webpage: http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/csrg.

The event is free, but registration is essential. There are only a few places remaining which will distributed on a ‘first come, first serve’ basis. If you would like to attend, please send an email to B.A.Hofstaetter@brighton.ac.uk

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Books

DEMOCRACY AND ECONOMIC PLANNING

Now Available in paperback!

Democracy and Economic Planning
Pat Devine
University of Manchester

http://www.polity.co.uk/book.asp?ref=9780745634791

“A democratically planned socialist economy – perhaps along the lines of Pat Devine’s model of negotiated coordination – offers the best hope of realizing the values of the anti-capitalist movement.” Alex Callinicos, King’s College, London

“In this fascinating book, which deserves to be widely read, Pat Devine raises numerous important and interesting questions about the management of the economy.” Times Higher Education

An excerpt from the new preface:
This book was first published in 1988, the year before the Berlin wall came down and three years before the Soviet Union collapsed. The short-lived era of free-market capitalist triumphalism that followed was not an auspicious time for a book on economic planning. Since then, growing awareness of the depth of the ecological and social crisis facing us, together with the most severe economic crisis since the 1930s, has rekindled belief that ‘another world is possible’, a post-capitalist world. But what would such a world look like, in particular, how would economic activity in such a world be organised? The model of democratic planning through negotiated coordination set out in Part IV of the book offers an answer to this question by outlining a possible architecture for the institutions and processes through which a self-governing society might operate.

Publication details:
Publication date: August 2010
978-0-7456-3479-1 paperback £19.99 20% discount price £15.99
ORDER FORM – 20% discount!
Discount valid until 31 December 2010

Queries
Free phone (UK Only) 0800 243407 or (for overseas orders, charged at normal rates) +44 1243 843294, fax +44 (0)1243 843303 or email cs-books@wiley.co.uk Discount code: PY170

http://www.politybooks.com

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski 

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Capitalism in Crisis

WORLD ASSOCIATION FOR POLITICAL ECONOMY

Call for Papers

Responses to Capitalist Crisis: Neoliberalism and Beyond

The Sixth Forum of the World Association for Political Economy
May 27-29, 2011, at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA, USA

Topics for the Sixth WAPE Forum
1. Class analysis of the responses to the financial and economic crisis.
2. Is neoliberalism on the way out or will it survive the economic crisis? What might replace it?
3. What are the strengths and weaknesses of the revived Keynesian economics?
4. What problems are posed by the rising national debt in many countries?
5. The prospects for major institutional and regulatory reform in the global economy and in various countries.
6. Class analysis of the growth of right-wing movements in response to the economic crisis.
7. Lessons from the history of past capitalist crises for the current situation.
8. The problems of, and opportunities for, building socialism in the midst of capitalist crisis.
9. Can the euro survive the current economic crisis?
10. The danger that tensions among states due to the economic crisis may lead to serious conflict.

Proposals for both individual papers and complete sessions are welcome.

Please send your application, including curriculum vitae and a paper abstract of 500 words (in Chinese or English), to Professor Xiaoqin Ding at wape2006@gmail.com.

Deadline for applications: January 15, 2011.
Applicants will be notified about acceptance of their paper by February 15, 2011.
Papers (in Chinese or English), of up to 6,000 words, will be due by March 31, 2011.

· Official Languages of the Forum: Chinese and English
At registration each participant will receive copies of all accepted papers that were submitted by March 31, either in Chinese or in English.

· Schedule
1. Registration on May 27, 2011.
2. Official program on May 28 through May 29, 2011.
· Hotel Accommodations
Individuals will be able to reserve hotel rooms at the University of Massachusetts Campus Center Hotel or at nearby hotels. Information about reserving a hotel room will be available later.

Marxian economists from all over the world are welcome to attend the forum whether or not they will present a paper. The WAPE Forums aim to encourage cooperation among Marxian economists and to enlarge and strengthen the influence of Marxian economics in the world.

· WAPE. The World Association for Political Economy, registered in Hong Kong, China, is an international academic organization founded in 2006 by Marxian economists and related groups around the world. The mission of WAPE is to utilize modern Marxian economics to analyze and study the world economy, reveal its laws of development, and offer policies to promote economic and social progress on the national and global level. The first five WAPE forums were held in Shanghai, Shimane (Japan), Beijing, Paris, and Suzhou (China) during 2006-2010. Participants in past WAPE forums have come from X countries in Asia, Australia, Africa, Europe, and North and South America.

· WRPE. The World Review of Political Economy is a new peer-reviewed quarterly journal of Marxian Political Economy sponsored by WAPE and published by Pluto Press. For more information about WRPE, including types of submissions that will be considered, go to http://www.wrpe.org
· WAPE Award. The Distinguished Achievement Award of World Political Economy of the 21st Century, established by WAPE, has been granted annually since 2009. It is intended to promote research in modern political economy around the world by granting the award to economists who have made important innovations in the theory or methodology of political economy since the year of 2001. The 2011 WAPE Award will be granted at the opening ceremony of the Sixth WAPE Forum. Nominations and applications can be sent to wape2006@gmail.com.

More information can be found on the WAPE website at http://www.wrpe.org

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Andew Kliman

WHAT MUST BE CHANGED IN ORDER TO TRANSCEND CAPITALISM?

Joint Forum organized by The Commune and Marxist-Humanist Initiative

Speakers:

Andrew Kliman is author of Reclaiming Marx’s “Capital”: A refutation of the myth of inconsistency. 

Anne Jaclard is National Secretary of Marxist-Humanist Initiative and a long-time activist and writer in support of women’s movements and international solidarity movements. 

How exactly must the economic forces and social relations that dominate our lives today be changed so as to establish a real and sustainable alternative?

Kliman and Jaclard will argue that Marx was not only a theorist of capitalism, but a theorist of a new society, and that the time has come to develop his theory, instead of repeating abstractions about an imagined future.  They will employ Marx’s theory of a future communist society in order to analyze what features of present-day society are specific to capitalism and what must therefore be uprooted and transcended in order to lay the foundation for a world that no longer operates for the sake of producing “value.”

Monday 5th July, 7:00

At the Workers Educational Association,

96-100 Clifton St, London EC2

Five minutes from Old Street or Liverpool Street tube

www.thecommune.co.uk and www.marxist-humanist-initiative.org

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic