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Tag Archives: Critical Realism

Speculative Realism

Speculative Realism

REALISM BITES

Eighth Biannual Graduate Student Conference of the German Program

Department of German and Romance Languages and Literature at the Johns Hopkins University

Realism Bites: Disruptive Realisms in Modernity

Keynote speakers:

Prof. Elisabeth Strowick, Johns Hopkins University

Prof. Timothy Brennan, University of Minnesota

November 6- 7, 2015
The Johns Hopkins University

 

All the fissures and rents which are inherent in the historical situation must be drawn into the form-giving process and cannot nor should be disguised by compositional means.

(György Lukács, The Theory of the Novel)

 

The term realism has been associated with multiple artistic practices, styles and movements from nineteenth-century bourgeois realism to socialist realism, surrealism, Italian neorealism, magical realism, and postmodern hyperrealism. Its repetitions and invocations express a commitment to and a struggle for reality, rearticulating the political, social and epistemological functions and meanings of art. As a form of “Darstellung der Wirklichkeit,” it carries the tension of a set of oppositions: the reality that is and the reality that ought to be; an objective and verisimilar reproduction and a poetic constitution of reality; a conventional mode and personal expression of reality.

György Lukács emphasized the necessity for a “critical realism,” one that is determined by a critical perception and mediation of social contradictions, rather than their naïve reproduction. The notion of unity, so important for the Lukácsian concept of ‘critical realism,’ refers not only to the realist novel’s capacity to reveal the totality of social relations, but also to its depiction of the individual’s striving to reach totality as a mode of being. Even though, Lukács considered the novel as the primary form for the critical depiction of the modern conditio humana, the question can be raised whether “critical realism” functions more as an epistemo-critical concept than as a rigid genre definition. Since Lukács, many scholars and artists have called into question his notion of totality and human agency, and contested h is definition of art as a representational medium that reveals a social totality. Should we, as Fredric Jameson has suggested, hold on to a concept of totality, when discussing current “problems of realism?” How do the various forms of realism relate to what Lukács – justifiably or not – has identified as the pseudo-objectivity of Naturalism, on the one hand, and extreme subjectivism, on the other? Can one actualize critical realisms for a critique of representation? And in what way do contemporary reassessments and actualizations of realisms repeat or reverse traditional dichotomies, such as those between idealism and realism, nominalism and realism, realism and modernism?

 

This call for paper invites submissions from a wide variety of disciplines that discuss competing aesthetic strategies. Presentations should not exceed 20 minutes.

Please submit abstracts (300-500 words) with your name and affiliation to Esther Edelmann and Christiane Ketteler at realismbitesgermangrads@gmail.com by August 13, 2015.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Realism repeated: Realism after Modernism
  • Avant-garde “realities”
  • Antinomies and instabilities within classical realisms
  • The reception of realisms and its historical conditions
  • Realisms, political movements and alliances
  • Speculative Realism and the constitution and emergence of objects
  • Excessive Realism or new possibilities of perceptions of objects
  • Productive realisms or the emergence of new orders
  • Realisms (false) friends: Reportage, Travelogue, and Documentary
  • The Real and the Reality Principle
  • Capitalist Realism and the limits and problems in representing global capitalism and its alternatives
  • Theories and Projects of Mapping
  • Hyperrealism and the Desert of the Real / The Spectacle of Reality
  • Abject Realisms and the abjected within Realism
  • Realism and the Dissolutions of boundaries between the arts
  • Realism, Nominalism, Idealism, (New) Materialism
  • Realism, Romanticism, Symbolism
  • Post/Colonial Realisms
  • Feminist Realism
  • Realism and the Problem of Exemplarity
  • “Wirklichkeit als das Wirkende”

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-german-graduate-conference-realism-bites-nov-6-7-2015-jhu-baltimore

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Grant Banfield

Grant Banfield

CRITICAL REALISM FOR MARXIST SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION

By Grant Banfield

Routledge

Series: New Studies in Critical Realism and Education (Routledge Critical Realism)

September 22nd 2015 | 978-0-415-62906-5 | Hardback (Routledge)

 

This book offers a critical realist intervention into the field of Marxist Sociology of Education. Critical realism, as developed by British philosopher Roy Bhaskar, is known for its capacity to serve as a conceptual underlabourer to applied fields like education. Indeed, its success in clarifying and resolving thorny issues of educational theory and practice is now well established. Given critical realism’s sympathetic Marxist origins, its productive and critical engagement with Marxism has an even longer history. To date there has been little sustained attention given to the application of critical realism to Marxist educational praxis. The book addresses this gap in existing scholarship.

Its conceptual ground clearing of the field of Marxist Sociology of Education centres on two problematics well-known in the social sciences: naturalism and the structure-agency relation. Marxist theory from the days of Marx to the present is shown to also be haunted by these problematics. This has resulted in considerable tension around the meaning and nature of, for example, reform, revolution, class determinism and class struggle. With its emergence in the 1970s as a child of Western Marxism, the field continues to be an expression of these tensions that seriously limit its transformative potential. Addressing these issues and offering conceptual clarification in the interests of revolutionary educational practice, Critical Realism for Marxist Sociology of Education provides a new perspective on education which will be of interest to students, scholars and practitioners alike.

Recommend to a Library: http://www.sponpress.com/resources/librarian_recommendation/9780415629065/

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Walter Benjamin

THE PHILOSOPHY OF WALTER BENJAMIN CONFERENCE

Call for Papers:

‘The Philosophy of Walter Benjamin’

One-Day Conference, December 14th, 2012 – Goldsmiths College, University of London

InC – Goldsmiths Continental Philosophy Research Group

The work of the German-Jewish critic and philosopher Walter Benjamin (1892-1940) spans a vast array of themes, ranging from the metaphysics of youth to the Paris arcades. His writings on Goethe and Scheerbart; Kafka and Baudelaire, as well as his work on the relationship between art and technology continue to fascinate and polarize in equal measure. His singular intersection of Marxian and Jewish thought is amply evidenced in the extensive correspondence with Ernst Bloch, Theodor Adorno, Bertold Brecht and Hannah Arendt, amongst others. Undoubtedly it is the sheer breadth of Benjamin’s interests that accounts for the enduring concern with his often fragmentary work across academic disciplines. That is to say, Benjamin is no longer a stranger at the Academy. Nevertheless, a central aspect of Benjamin’s work is all-too-often overlooked when his aesthetic and literary works are treated in isolation. The manifest content of Benjamin’s writing is never merely incidental: rather, it is shot through with a burgeoning philosophical project – from the ‘Programme of the Coming Philosophy’ (1917) to the ‘Theses on the Concept of History’ (1940). In this regard it appears that recent anniversary of Benjamin’s birth in 1892 warrants a re-appraisal of this legacy by asking the question: how can the various strands of Benjamin’s work be engaged to illuminate the unfolding of his philosophical position, and – vice versa – how does Benjamin’s philosophy illuminate other aspects of his thought?

This conference aims, then – on the one hand – to explore Benjamin’s thought in relation to the various philosophical traditions that inform his project (Leibniz, Kant, Schlegel, Lukács etc.), and – on the other hand – to ask how these influences continue to operate between the lines even where Benjamin is not explicitly concerned with the philosophical canon? In short: how are we to understand the philosophy of Walter Benjamin?

We ask potential speakers to submit abstracts of no more than 200 words to: sebastian.truskolaski@gmail.com by September 30th. The full programme will be announced in due course.

Originally published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-the-philosophy-of-walter-benjamin-goldsmiths-london-14-december-2012

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‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Global Capitalism

SPECTRUM JOURNAL OF GLOBAL STUDIES CONFERENCE

Reminder:  CALL FOR PAPERS

First Spectrum Journal of Global Studies Conference: ‘Historical Sociology, Historical Materialism and International Relations’

This is a reminder that the deadline to propose a paper or panel for the November 2012 Spectrum Journal of Global Studies Conference is 1 July, 2012.

The Spectrum Conference will be held in Ankara, Turkeyat the Middle East Technical University from 2-3 November 2012.

Proposals are invited on the conference theme Historical Sociology, Historical Materialism and International Relations.

Featured speakers at the conference will include in alphabetical order:

Adam Morton, University of Nottingham, U.K.

Bastiaan van Apeldoorn, VU University of Amsterdam, Netherland

Benno Teschke, University of Sussex, U.K.

Gonzalo Pozo, University College, London, U.K.

Hannes Lacher, York University, Canada

Jonathan Joseph, Rutherford College, University of Kent, U.K.

Kamran Matin, University of Sussex, U.K.

Neil Davidson, University of Strathclyde, U.K.

Stephen Hobden, Universityof East London, U.K.

Please see the conference website for application and information:

www.spectrumjournalofglobalstudies.net/conf

Guidelines for Participants:

The discipline of International Relations (IR) known as an ‘American’ social science has in the last decade or so been discovering the importance of alternative forms of explaining international relations. More so than any other field of social science, IR has been dominated by positivist conceptions of scientific inquiry. However recent approaches in the philosophy of sciences as well as the sociological turn in IR has changed the boundaries, assumptions and methodologies of our discipline.  Critical realism as an alternative to positivist as well as post-positivist understandings of social science is increasingly becoming the dominant form of philosophyzing about IR. Historical sociological approaches are taking over the static, ahistorical forms of theorizing. Marxist social theory has become more and more relevant to explain the current of changes in the international system. Internationalisation of capitalism has made the concerns of Marxism increasingly relevant to understand and explain the ‘international’. Recent controversies on the relation between the state system and capitalist mode of production have made important contributions to understand the link between what is traditionally understood from international relations and capitalist relations of production. These efforts have to go on as there are yet many other untouched aspects of international relations that require desconstruction and dereification. This conference attempts to further our understanding of the links between historical sociology, critical realism and Marxism. Empirical works combining the insights of Marxist historical sociology and historical materialism with that of international relations is particularly wellcome. We are extending an invitation to all researchers to present research that adress the following issues and similar topics.

How does a historical materialist geopolitics adress the traditional issues of IR?

1.    Geopolitics of state formations

2.    What is the relation between the state system and capitalism?

3.    In what ways does critical realism help Marxism to analyse the international?

4.    What are the limits and the potentials of the theory of combined and uneven development to explain the international?

5.    Historical matarialist analysis of international law

6.    Contemporary forms of imperialism

7.    International state apparatuses and their role in the reproduction of capital

8.    Marx’s method and the world market

9.    Global protest movements and the Arab Spring

10.  Gramscian analysis of global transformations

11.  Historical Sociology of the Middle East and the Balkans

We hope to see both individual papers and panels discussing these themes from different disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives.

We encourage scholars from all around the world to participate in this exciting attempt to link our conceptions of praxis and change with that of what constitutes the ‘international’.

Most papers presented in the conference will later be published in a special issue of the Spectrum or in a separate book.

We look forward to welcoming you all at METU in Ankara.

Check back often for updates through out the coming months!

Inquiries to the program chairs should be directed to: spectrumconference@spectrumjournal.net

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Sociology

HISTORICAL SOCIOLOGY, HISTORICAL MATERIALISM AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

CALL FOR PAPERS
Spectrum Journal of Global Studies
Conference on:
Historical Sociology, Historical Materialism and International Relations

November 1-3, 2012
Middle East Technical University
Department of International Relations
Ankara – Turkey

The discipline of International Relations (IR) known as an “ American” social science has in the last decade or so been discovering the importance of alternative forms of explaining international relations. More so than any other field of social science, IR has been dominated by positivist conceptions of scientific inquiry. However recent approaches in the philosophy of sciences as well as the sociological turn in IR has changed the boundaries, assumptions and methodologies of our discipline.  Critical realism as an alternative to positivist as well as post-positivist understandings of social science is increasingly becoming the dominant form of philosophyzing about IR.

Historical sociological approaches are taking over the static, a-historical forms of theorizing. Marxist social theory has become more and more relevant to explain the current of changes in the international system. Internationalisation of capitalism has made the concerns of Marxism increasingly relevant to understand and explain the “international”. Recent controversies on the relation between the state system and capitalist mode of production have made important contributions to understand the link between what is traditionally understood from international relations and capitalist relations of production. These efforts have to go on as there are yet many other untouched aspects of international relations that require deconstruction and de-reification. This conference attempts to further our understanding of the links between historical sociology, critical realism and Marxism. Empirical works combining the insights of Marxist historical sociology and historical materialism with that of international relations is particularly welcome. We are extending an invitation to all researchers to present research that address the following issues and similar topics:

    • How does a historical materialist geopolitics address the traditional issues of IR?
    • Geopolitics of state formations
    • What is the relation between the state system and capitalism?
    • In what ways does critical realism help Marxism to analyse the international?
    • What are the limits and the potentials of he theory of combined and uneven development to explain the international?
    • Historical materialist analysis of international law
    • Contemporary forms of imperialism
    • International State Apparatuses and their role in the reproduction of capital
    • Marx’s method and the world market

We hope to see both individual papers and panels discussing these themes from different disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives.

We encourage scholars from all around the world to participate in this exciting attempt to link our conceptions of praxis and change with that of what constitutes the “international”.

Most papers presented in the conference will later be published in a special issue of the Spectrum journal or in a separate book.

We look forward to welcoming you all at METU in Ankara.
Key note speakers for the conference will later be announced.

For more information and to submit your papers and panel proposals, please contact spectrumconference@spectrumjournal.net

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Karl Marx

MARXIST STUDIES OF ORGANIZATION

EGOS Colloquium
July 5-7, 2012, Helsinki
Sub-theme on Marxist Studies of Organization: The Challenges of Design

Convenors:
Paul Adler, University of Southern California, USA, padler@usc.edu
Rick Delbridge, Cardiff Business School, UK, delbridger@CARDIFF.AC.UK
Matt Vidal, King’s College London, UK, mgvidal@gmail.com

The goal of this sub-theme is to build on the success of the first two EGOS Marxist studies sub-themes in 2010 and 2011 in bringing together people who share an interest in building on Marx’s ideas to advance organization studies, and in particular to advance our understanding of design. We are not dogmatic in an attachment to any specific kind of Marxism — all kinds are welcome. We come together to advance organizational scholarship inspired by Marx’s historical, materialist, dialectical, and critical-realist writing. Papers in this stream have examined a range of organizational issues, deploying and building on concepts such as forces and relations of production, managerial control and worker resistance, valorization and socialization, ideology and hegemony, contradiction and fetishism, absolute and relative surplus value, and regulation and crisis.

The theme of the 2012 Colloquium is “Design!?” This theme is particularly congenial to Marxist approaches, since Marx offers a fruitful starting point for understanding the distinctive features of tacit-knowledge-intensive product/process design activities, for critiquing the currently dominant organization designs, and for proposing alternative designs for social institutions at both micro and macro levels. In this context, we invite papers that address debates among different varieties of Marxist theory and between Marxist and other theoretical currents.

The 2012 Colloquium organizers have highlighted several topics under the broad theme of “Design!?” and we encourage submissions to our sub-theme that offer a Marxist approach to any of them:

– Institutions, industries and organizations: Marx and other writers in the tradition he inspired offer fruitful starting points for analyzing the distinctive features of design activities and how they are or could be organized. We encourage papers that explore the nature of use-value/exchange-value relations in the creative industries and papers that explore the relations between private accumulation and public policies in shaping the evolution of those industries.

– Organizing and managing: Marxist theory offers a powerful theoretical framework for understanding the tensions between the creative labor process and the exploitative valorization process. We welcome papers that build on that theoretical base and use it to study what is happening today in the organization and management of design activities, and more generally in the domain of what is called ‘knowledge work.’ Some of that creative design labor happens outside the capitalist firm (unpaid networks, NGOs, artistic communities): we welcome Marxist studies of these other settings and on the interrelations between them and the capitalist sector.

– Power and identities: Marxist social theory is a fruitful starting point for understanding some key forms of power and for characterizing both cooperation and conflict within and between capitalist enterprises as well between these enterprises and other social actors. And Marxist social psychology is a fruitful starting point for understanding the introjection of social structures and the formation of social identities. We welcome papers that build on or contribute to Marxist theory of power and identity in the context of design activities both within and beyond capitalist firms.

Over the previous two years, this EGOS sub-theme has become a gathering point for organizational scholars working with Marxist ideas. So we invite Marxist submissions on any of these topics, and we also encourage contributions on any of the other dimensions of organization studies where a Marxist approach might be fruitful.

In selecting papers, the conveners will give priority to those that either (a) enrich our understanding of the empirical world of organizations based on strong Marxist theoretical foundations, or (b) enrich Marxist theory in a way that promises deeper understanding of that world.

The deadline for “short paper submission” is January 16, 2012. While the overall EGOS call asks for short papers under 3000 words, this sub-theme encourages longer submissions so we can better assess the fit with our program. If the “short paper” is accepted by the conveners, the full paper will need to be posted on the Colloquium website by May 31.

Paul Adler: http://www-bcf.usc.edu/~padler/
Rick Delbridge: http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/carbs/faculty/delbridger/index.html
Matt Vidal: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/management/people/academic/vidal.aspx

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Ghosts

ON HAUNTOLOGY \ CAPITALIST REALISM – TWO TALKS BY MARK FISHER

THE COLLOQUIUM FOR UNPOPULAR CULTURE AND NYU’S ASIAN/ PACIFIC/ AMERICAN STUDIES PROGRAM present:

TWO TALKS BY MARK FISHER

What are grey vampires and how do they retard the insurrectionary potential of digital  discourse?  How does Derrida’s notion of hauntology contribute to an understanding of dubstep artist Burial?  Is ‘Basic Instinct 2’, routinely derided as a cine-atrocity, a Lacanian reworking of Ballard, Baudrillard and Bataille in service of the creation of a ‘phantasmatic, cybergothic London’?  What is interpassivity and in what ways has it come to define the corporatized incarceration of modern academia?

Over the last decade, Mark Fisher has established a reputation as one of the exhilarating cultural theorists in Britain.  A co-founder of the Cybernetic Culture Research Unit (CCRU) at Warwick University ­and described by Simon Reynolds as the academic equivalent of Apocalypse Now’s Colonel Kurtz ­ he brings together psychoanalysis, political analysis and speculative fiction to create an extraordinary body of rogue scholarship, a theory-rush with few parallels.

Fisher is the author of ‘Capitalist Realism’, the editor of ‘The Resistible Demise of Michael Jackson’ (both Zer0 Books, 2009), and writes regularly for Sight and Sound, Film Quarterly, The Wire and Frieze, as well as maintaining a well-known blog at http://k-punk.abstractdynamics.org.  He teaches at the University of East London, Goldsmiths, University of London, and the City Literary Institute.

The Colloquium for Unpopular Culture and NYU’s Asian/ Pacific/ American Studies program are pleased to be hosting Fisher’s first talks inAmerica.

See ‘ The Metaphysics of Crackle’, at: http://pontone.pl/pontones-special-guest-mix-k-punk-the-metaphysics-of-crackle/

***

MARK FISHER, THESE ARE NON-TIMES AS WELL AS NON-PLACES: REFLECTIONS ON HAUNTOLOGY
 
WHEN: Wednesday 4 May 2011, 6:30pm
WHERE: Room 471, 20 Cooper Square [East 5th and Bowery]
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

”Through their generic and transient qualities ­ workstations devoid of personal effects, relations with colleagues as fleeting as those with passengers on a commuter journey ­ many workplaces now resemble non-places, either literally, as in the case of a hotel, corporate coffee chain or out-of-town supermarket, or symbolically, in the form of temporary assignments for faceless employers (dis)located in anonymous buildings, where the worker-commuter then follows the same global timetables, navigates the same software applications and experiences the same sense of placelessness, the feeling of being mere data in the mainframe.”

So writes Ivor Southwood in his analysis of precarious labour, ‘Non-Stop Inertia’ (2011). In the last decade, the proliferation of corporate non-places has been accompanied by the spread of cyberspace-time, or Itime, a distributed or unpunctuated temporality. It’s no coincidence that, as this unmarked time increasingly came to dominate cultural and psychic space, Derrida’s concept hauntology (re)emerged as the name for a paradoxical zeitgeist.  In ‘Specters of Marx’, Derrida argued that the hauntological was characterised by ‘a time out of joint’, and this broken time has been expressed in cultural objects that return to a wounded or distorted version of the past in flight from a waning sense of the present. Sometimes accused of nostalgia, the most powerful examples of hauntological culture actually show that nostalgia is no longer possible.

In conditions where pastiche has become normalised, the question has to be: nostalgia compared to what? James Bridle has recently argued that ‘the opposite of hauntology … [is] to demand the radically new’, but hauntology in fact operates as a kind of thwarted preservation of such demands in conditions where – for the moment at least – they cannot be met. Whereas cyberspace-time tends towards the generation of cultural moments that are as interchangeable as transnational franchise outlets, hauntology involves the staining of particular places with time – albeit a time that is out of joint. In this lecture, Fisher will explore the hauntological culture of the last few years in relation to the question of place, using examples from music (Burial, The Caretaker, Ekoplekz, Richard Skelton), film (Chris Petit, Patrick Keiller) and fiction (Alan Garner, David Peace).

MARK FISHER, DEPACIFICATION PROGRAM: FROM CAPITALIST REALISM TO POST-CAPITALISM

WHEN: Thursday 5 May 2011, 6:30pm
WHERE: Room 471, 20 Cooper Square [East 5th and Bowery]
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

”It would be best, perhaps, to think of an alternate world – better to say the alternate world, our alternate world – as one contiguous with ours but without any connections or access to it. Then, from time to time, like a diseased eyeball in which disturbing flashes of light are perceived or like those baroque sunbursts in which rays from another world suddenly break into this one, we are reminded that Utopia exists and that other systems, other spaces, are still possible” (Fredric Jameson, ‘Valences of the Dialectic’).

In his 2009 book ‘Capitalist Realism’, Mark Fisher started to explore some of the affective, psychological and political consequences of the deeply entrenched belief that there is no alternative to capitalism. After 1989, capital seemed to enjoy full spectrum dominance of both global space and the unconscious. Every imaginable future was capitalist.  What has been mistaken for post-political apathy, Fisher argued, was a pervasive sense of reflexive impotence in the face of a neoliberal ideological program which sought to subordinate all of culture to the imperatives of business. The subject of post-Fordist capitalism is no passive dupe; this subject actively participates in an ‘interpassive’ corporate culture which solicits our involvement and encourages us to ‘join the debate’.

As Fisher argues in the book, education has been at the forefront of this process, with teachers and lecturers locked into managerialist self-surveillance, and students induced into the role of consumers.

In the eighteen months since ‘Capitalist Realism’ was published, the neoliberal program has been seriously compromised, but capitalist realism has intensified – with austerity programs pushed through on the basis that it is unthinkable that capitalism should be allowed to fail. At the same time, this new, more desperate form of capitalist realism has also faced unexpected challenges from a militancy growing in Europe, the Middle East and even in the heartlands of neoliberalism such as the UK and the US. Now that history has started up again, and Jameson’s ‘baroque sunbursts’ flare brighter than they have for a generation, we can begin to pose questions that had receded into the unimaginable during the high pomp of neoliberal triumphalism: what might a post-capitalism look like,
and how can we get there?

Fisher will argue that the Left will only succeed if it can reclaim modernity from a neoliberal Right that has lost control of it. This entails understanding how the current possibilities for agency are contoured and constrained by the machinery of what Deleuze and Foucault called the Control Society, including cyberspace, the media landscape, psychic pathologies and pharmacology – failures to act are not failures of will, and all the will in the world will not eliminate capitalism. It also entails recognising that neoliberalism’s global hegemony arose from capturing desires which it could not satisfy. A genuinely new Left must be shaped by those desires, and not be lulled, once again, by the logics of failed revolts.

Queries: ss162@nyu.edu

***END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Roy Bhaskar

THE LAW OF LAW

The Westminster International Law & Theory Centre cordially invite you to
a one-day workshop on:

THE LAW OF LAW: Dialectics and Research

Organisers:
Pravin Jeyaraj, School of Law, University of Westminster
Prof Andreas Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos, School of Law, University of Westminster

Friday, 1 April, 2011
10:00-18:00

A one-day workshop to examine how different dialectical traditions have been applied to research in different legal and related non-legal disciplines. We aim to assert the relevance of various dialectical traditions – from its origin in ancient philosophies to its subsequent interpretation and reformulation by theorists such as Hegel, Marx, Luhmann and Bhaskar – to contemporary socio-legal and critical research and sketch potential future developments either confirming or moving away from this tradition.

Speakers:
Dr Brenna Bhandar (University of Kent)
Dr Alejandro Colás (Birkbeck University)
Dr Alex Fischer (SOAS)
Ms Kay Lalor (University of Westminster)
Professor Alan Norrie (University of Warwick)
Professor Andreas Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos (University of Westminster)
Dr Joseph Tanega (University of Westminster)
Dr Alberto Toscano (Goldsmiths College)

University of Westminster
The Boardroom, 309 Regent Street
London
W1B 2UW

Attendance is free, but places are limited
RSVP to Pravin Jeyaraj pravin.jeyaraj@my.westminster.ac.uk

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Roy Bhaskar

CRITICAL REALISM RESEARCH SEMINARS

Critical Realism Research Seminars: An interdisciplinary critical realist research seminar series in legal, political and educational theory and practice in its social context.

Spring Term 2011

14th Feb, Alex Callinicos, ‘Marxism and Critical Realism’

21st March, Kathryn Dean, ‘Capitalism and Analytical Thinking: A Dialectical Account’

Seminars take place in London, Institute of Education Committee Room 1, at 5:30pm

Institute of Education, 20 Bedford Way, London WC1H 0AL

Contacts:
Professor Roy Bhaskar, R.bhaskar@ioe.ac.uk
Craig Reeves, Craig.reeves@brunel.ac.uk
Professor Alan Norrie, A.W.Norrie@warwick.ac.uk

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LONDON SEMINAR ON CONTEMPORARY MARXIST THEORY – UPDATE 9th FEBRUARY 2011
 
 
9th February, 5pm
King’s College London, Strand Campus, S2.28
 
Alberto Toscano (Goldsmiths, University of London)
Marxism: A Realism of the Abstract?
The global economic and financial crisis has witnessed a deepening of interest in different forms of critical and radical thought and practice. This seminar will explore the new perspectives that have been opened up by interventions of contemporary Marxist theory in this political and theoretical conjuncture. It involves collaboration among Marxist scholars based in several London universities, including Brunel University, King’s College London, and the School of Oriental and African Studies. Guest speakers – from both Britain and abroad – will include a wide range of thinkers engaging with many different elements of the various Marxist traditions, as well as with diverse problems and topics. The aim of the seminar is to promote fruitful debate and to contribute to the development of more robust Marxist analysis. It is open to all.

 

2010/11 Seminar Series
  
9th November, 5pm
King’s College London, Strand Campus, S-1.04, Raked Lecture Theatre
Massimiliano Tomba (University of Padua)
The Historical Materialist at work: Re-reading “The Eighteenth Brumaire”
 
15th December, 5pm
King’s College London, Strand Campus, K.3.11 Raked Lecture Theatre
Peter D. Thomas (Brunel University)
Contours of Contemporary Western Marxism
  
19th January, 5pm
King’s College London, Strand Campus, S2.28
David Leopold (University of Oxford)
Stathis Kouvelakis (King’s College, London)
In Search of the Young Marx’s Politics
 
9th February, 5pm
King’s College London, Strand Campus, S2.28
Alberto Toscano (Goldsmiths, University of London)
Marxism: A Realism of the Abstract?
 
2nd March, 5pm
King’s College London, Strand Campus, room TBA
Gérard Duménil (Université de Paris X Nanterre)
Explaining the crisis of neoliberalism: Neither the falling profit rate nor mere financial craze
23rd March, 5pm
King’s College London, Strand Campus, room TBA
Esther Leslie (Birkbeck College)
Flat Screens and Liquid Crystals: On the Politics of Aesthetics and Vice Versa
4th May, 5pm
King’s College London, Strand Campus, room TBA
Costas Lapavitsas (SOAS)
Three Cheers for Marxist Monetary Theory: The Eurozone through the Prism of World Money
18th May, 5pm
King’s College London, Strand Campus, K.3.11 Raked Lecture Theatre
Gail Day (University of Leeds)
Dialectical Passions: Art Theory, Art History and Marxism

For further information, please contact:
Alex Callinicos, European Studies, King’s: alex.callinicos@kcl.ac.uk
Stathis Kouvelakis, European Studies, King’s:
stathis.kouvelakis@kcl.ac.uk
Costas Lapavitsas, Economics, SOAS:
cl5@soas.ac.uk
Peter Thomas, Politics and History, Brunel:
PeterD.Thomas@brunel.ac.uk

 

 

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Global Economy

MARXISM AND WORLD POLITICS

Marxism and World Politics: Contesting Global Capitalism
Edited by Alexander Anievas

This book brings together internationally-distinguished scholars from History, Philosophy, Development Studies, Geography, and International Relations (IR) to examine recent developments in Marxist approaches to world politics.

Offering original and stimulating analyses of subjects traditionally at the forefront of Marxist studies of world politics, the collection also considers issues which have yet to be fully explored within a number of disciplines. Examining a wide array of topics ranging from the imperialism-globalization debate, the connections between social structures and foreign relations, the role of identity and imperialist norms in world politics, to the relationship between Marxist and Realist IR Theory, the contributors seek to further theoretical discussions and their implications for emancipatory radical politics. These contributions are structured around two major themes:

* The relationship between capitalist modernity and the states-system in explaining the changing patterns of inter-state conflict and cooperation;

* The debates within Marxist and IR discourses on the theoretical significance of ‘the international’, covering topics including uneven and combined development and passive revolution.

An impressive collection that seeks to advance dialogue and research, Marxism and World Politics will be of interest to students and scholars of IR, International Political Economy, Political Science, and Historical Sociology.

Table of Contents

The Renaissance Of Historical Materialism In International Relations Theory: An Introduction
Alexander Anievas

Part I: The Geopolitics Of Capitalist Modernity

1. Does Capitalism Need The State-System?
Alex Callinicos
2. The Changing “Logics” Of Capitalist Competition
Benno Teschke and Hannes Lacher
3. Western Hegemony And Transnational Capital: A Dialectical Perspective
Kees Van Der Pijl
4. Beyond The Theory Of Imperialism: Global Capitalism And The Transnational State
William I Robinson
5. Many Capitals, Many States: Logic, Contingency Or Mediation?
Neil Davidson
6. Globalization And Ideology: Post-Fordist Capitalism And The Politics Of Imperial Consent
Mark Rupert
7. To Be Or Not To Be, a Reductionist Marxism: Is That The Question?
John Hobson
8. Industrial Development And International Political Conflict In Contemporary Capitalism
Peter Gowan

Part II: Marxism And “The International”

9. Uneven And Combined Development: The Social-Relational Substratum Of “The International”? An Exchange Of Letters
Alex Callinicos And Justin Rosenberg
10. Non-Synchronicity, Capitalism And Uneven And Combined Development
Sam Ashman
11. The Geopolitics Of Passive Revolution
Adam David Morton
12. Approaching “The International”: Beyond Political Marxism
Jamie C. Allinson and Alexander Anievas
13. Politics And The International
Simon Bromley

Author Biography
Alexander Anievas is a PhD candidate at the Centre of International Studies, University of Cambridge, UK. He is also currently the managing editor of the Cambridge Review of International Affairs and member of the Editorial Board of Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory.

April 2010 | Paperback: 978-0-415-47803-8 (Routledge) £25.99

Read More: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415478038/

Request an e-inspection copy: email michael.king@tandf.co.uk

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Class in Education

Class in Education

CLASS IN EDUCATION

 

I looked at a copy of Class in Education: Knowledge, pedagogy, subjectivity edited by Deborah Kelsh, Dave Hill and Sheila Macrine yesterday. This is an excellent book in my view, and I urge to buy it and/or get your library to stock it!

Glenn Rikowski

Class in Education: Knowledge, pedagogy, subjectivity

Edited by Deborah Kelsh, Dave Hill and Sheila Macrine

Routledge, London & New York, 2010

ISBN 10: 0-415-45027-6 (hbk); ISBN 10: 0-203-87903-X (ebk)

CONTENTS:

Foreword: E. SAN JUAN JR.

Introduction: SHEILA MACRINE, DAVE HILL AND DEBORAH KELSH

1. Cultureclass – DEBORAH KELSH

2. Hypohumanities – TERESA L. EBERT AND MAS’UD ZAVARZADEH

3. Persistent inequities, obfuscating explanations: reinforcing the lost centrality of class in Indian education debates – RAVI KUMAR

4. Class, “race” and state in post-apartheid education – ENVER MOTALA AND SALIM VALLY

5. Racism and Islamophobia in post 7/7 Britain: Critical Race Theory, (xeno-)racialization, empire and education – a Marxist analysis – MIKE COLE AND ALPESH MAISURIA

6. Marxism, critical realism and class: implications for a socialist pedagogy – GRANT BANFIELD

7. Globalization, class, and the social studies curriculum – E. WAYNE ROSS AND GREG QUEEN

8. Class: the base of all reading – ROBERT FAIVRE

Afterword: the contradictions of class and the praxis of becoming – PETER McLAREN

Further details: http://www.routledge.com/books/Class-in-Education-isbn9780415450270

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