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Category Archives: Seminars / Workshops

images (1)THE LABOUR PARTY, EUROPE AND CIVIC ENGAGEMENT: PEOPLE’S EMPOWERMENT OR MISPLACED IDEALISM?

Half-Day Workshop at THE University of East London

7 March 2015. Venue: UEL / Stratford Campus

Convenors: Centre for the Study of States, Markets & People (School of Business & Law, University of East London); Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence (King’s College London); and the School of Politics & International Relations (SPIRE, Keele University)

The Labour Party, Europe and Civic Engagement: People’s Empowerment or Misplaced Idealism?

Jeremy Corbyn’s ideas of “Peoples Quantitative Easing” (PQE), progressive taxation, a new welfare state in the UK and changing the European Union from a neo-liberal monetarist construction to a civilised, multi-cultural and pro-labour space for good governance are gaining traction amongst informed practitioners of finance, politicians, academics and beyond. But can wider communities and constituencies be engaged, and how? The theme of “civic engagement” would appear to empower people, engaging civil society and local communities with pro-growth and pro-welfare initiatives across Britain and Europe. The workshop aims at exploring the new ideas of the Labour Party examining their appeal and whether or not they further civic engagement empowering the citizen, or whether it is just another form of misplaced idealism with no possibilities to deliver.

Themes to explore include:

What is the relationship between Labour Party and the EU in both historical and contemporary perspectives? What’s the Labour Party stance on the EU today? What are the key ideas and policies of the Labour Party under Jeremy Corbyn and how do they engage with civil society and the key constituencies of the youth and middle classes? Are Labour Party’s new policies an alternative to austerity and how do they impact on current taxation regimes and inflation? Do Labour Party’s new policies augment the distance between Britain the EU? How do local communities can benefit from the Labour Party and vice versa? What would be the likely impact of Labour Party’s policies on education and the University sector from their possible im plementation in the future? Can PQE (People’s Quantitative Easing) lead to a re-industrialisation of Britain and how does it fit with the overall economic policy of the “New Labour” (abolition of tuition fees, re-nationalisation of railways, new taxation regime etc.)?

Contact and further information: Ejike Udeogu, Lecturer in Economics, School of Business & Law, University of East London, e.udeogu@uel.ac.uk

The convenors thank The Political Quarterly for its generous support

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/the-labour-party-europe-and-civic-engagement

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

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LONDON MATERIALISMS READING GROUP MEETINGS

We are very pleased to announce an exciting series of events co-sponsored/co-organised by the Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster:

1) The next London Materialisms Reading Group meeting is:

Thursday 3 December 2015 – Nick Srnicek (co-author of the Verso manifesto Inventing the Future: Postcapitalism and a World Without Work) will be introducing Graham Harman’s Bruno Latour: Reassembling the Political

Future dates for your diary:

21. Thursday 21 January 2016 – Philip Cunliffe (University of Kent) will be introducing Alexander Wendt’s Quantum Mind and Social Science: Unifying Physical and Social Ontology

22. Thursday 25 February 2016 – introduction (tbc) we will be discussing Chapter 1 ‘Introduction: Rhizome’ of Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari’s A Thousand Plateaus

23. Thursday 31 March 2016 – Michiel van Ingen (University of Westminster) will be introducing Kate Soper’s What is Nature: Culture, Politics and the Non-Human

Reading group meetings are open to all and take place Thursdays 6.30-8.00pm, Westminster Forum, Department of Politics and International Relations, 5th Floor, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW (5 minutes from Oxford Circus tube). Wine and nibbles are provided.

 

If you wish to be on the Materialisms Reading Group mailing list please email me at d.chandler@wmin.ac.uk. Further information available here: http://www.davidchandler.org/materialisms/.

2) The next in the Living in the Anthropocene series of workshops is:

Decolonising the Anthropocene
Friday 27 November, 1-5pm, Westminster Forum, Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW (5 minutes walk from Oxford Circus tube station)

Convenors: Olivia Rutazimbwa (University of Portsmouth), Angela Last (Glasgow University), Kathryn Yusoff (Queen Mary)

Speakers and roundtable discussants: Patricia Noxolo (Birmingham), Robbie Shilliam (Queen Mary), Kathryn Yusoff (Queen Mary), Olivia Rutazibwa (Portsmouth), Angela Last (Glasgow).

The concept of the Anthropocene involves the rejection of one of modernity’s most important tenets: the nature/culture divide. Yet from a post-western perspective this can hardly be seen as a ground-breaking discovery. The colonial experience has for long evidenced the destructive nature of this divide while indigenous cosmologies, religious worldviews as well as other (non-western) philosophies have provided alternatives to the nature/culture divide and continue to do so. Does the holistic and relational understanding of reality entailed in the idea of the Anthropocene present an opportunity to rethink the sources of our knowledge production and work towards a more inclusive and sustainable use and distribution of the available planetary resources; or is the ‘discovery’ of the Anthropocene yet another stage of Eurocentric knowledge production?

Who sets the agenda, which voices and topics continue to be silenced and do they consolidate or dissipate existing inequalities? How much space is there for the ‘pluriversality’ Walter Mignolo calls for in the potentially totalising proclamation of the Anthropocene? What does the attention to complexity and non-linearity mean for post- and decolonial understandings and attachment to issues of agency, autonomy and self-determination? This workshop will examine these and other questions, both theoretically and empirically, to explore the merits and challenges of the Anthropocene to decoloniality and vice versa. Understood as a triple invitation to de-mythologise, de-silence and de-colonise, decoloniality combines both a deconstructive toolbox for critique at the epistemological level and a constructive imperative to counter the colonial (material) forms of extreme power inequality.

Information and registration here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/decolonising-the-anthropocene-tickets-19330332545 further information on the series: http://rethinkingtheanthropocene.blogspot.co.uk/

3) Call for papers, Centre for the Study of Democracy and Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment joint University of Westminster workshop:

Design After Planning: Examining the Shift from Epistemology to Topology https://designafterplanning.wordpress.com/

10.00 – 17:30, Friday 5 February 2016, University of Westminster, London

Confirmed keynote speakers:  Filip de Boeck (KU Leuven) & Erik Swyngedouw (University of Manchester)

The question of how different types of ‘planning’ should deal with uncertainty has taken on fresh importance. On the one hand, existential threats such as climate change, overpopulation, and new forms of global conflict expand the temporal and spatial horizons of our sense of responsibility as never before. On the other, the world is constructed increasingly as emergent, complex and non-linear; the ‘wicked’ problems it throws up are not amenable to modernist, top-down solutions. The intelligence required to tackle contemporary problems is understood to be dispersed and enacted, rather than a pre-given object to be gathered by the state. In Mol’s (2002) formulation, epistemological questions (‘how can we be sure?’) are increasingly usurped by pragmatic ones (‘how can we live with doubt?’).

In this embrace of uncertainty, concerns over the limitations of representational ‘modelling’ are being dislodged by an ideal of unmediated, dynamic problem-resolution whereby the ‘topologies’ of complex reality continually reveal themselves. In practical terms, this has entailed a shift towards iterative processes of dispersed governance; policy makers no longer attempt to impose order on a chaotic outside, but rather attempt to ‘see’ through the emergent systems themselves. Thus, goals of international developmental aid are no longer determined from the centre so much as coproduced in specific locations with the aid of the internet of things and the citizen as sensor; top-down planning of the built environment has given way to localised, discursive decision-making alongside an embrace of informality; the residual modernism of sustainable development is increasingly inflected with ‘resilience’.

If the broad project here is to work with emerging, complex systems, rather than against or in spite of them, might it then be productive to conceptualise the role of governing and city-making in terms of ‘design’ rather than planning?  If so, is there value in retheorising design so as more explicitly to capture contemporary interactive logics of emergent causality and agency?  Or, alternatively, does linear planning have a newly important role to play? Might it function as a type of normative resistance to the ‘market logic’ with which these new forms of governance are perhaps aligned?

We plan to include three panels on: • disaster and risk design – examining the rise of topological approaches to international aid and disaster relief, digital humanitarianism, crowd-sourcing and citizens as sensors • designing with emergent urban systems – exploring the potential for iterative and decentred modes of governance and urban design to overcome the shortcomings of liberal-modernist planning • resilience versus sustainability – investigating the theoretical and practical purchase of resilience and sustainability in relation to the ‘topologies’ of complex reality, and the problematic theoretical interface between the two concepts.

Submitting abstracts: We invite papers relating to any of the panels above, which contribute to a theorisation of spatial planning and urban, national, or international governance as processes of design, as well as those which question this endeavour. Speakers from all academic disciplines are welcome to participate (and there will be no registration fee).Please send your abstract (c.350 words) to: Isis Nunez Ferrera (i.nunez-ferrera@psi.org.uk), Tudor Vilcan (tudorvilcan@gmail.com), and Rob Cowley (robert.cowley@kcl.ac.uk) by 1 December 2015.

Best wishes,
David Chandler, Professor of International Relations, Director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW. Tel: ++44 (0)776 525 3073.
Journal Editor, Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/resi20

Amazon books page: http://www.amazon.co.uk/David-Chandler/e/B001HCXV7Y/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Personal website: http://www.davidchandler.org/
Twitter: @DavidCh27992090

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

313111_coverSEMINARS ON CONTEMPORARY MARXIST THEORY

 

 

 

 

Wednesday 21 October

Stathis Kouvelakis

Lessons of the Greek Crisis

6pm

S-1.04 Strand Building (NB in basement), King’s College London, Strand WC2R 2LS

 

Monday 9 November

Riccardo Bellofiore & Alex Callinicos

A Dialogue on Alex Callinicos’s book Deciphering Capital: Marx’s Capital and Its Destiny

5pm

K0.20, King’s Building, King’s College London, Strand WC2R 2LS

 

Wednesday 25 November

Nicholas De Genova

Theorising the ‘Crisis’ of the European Border Regime

6pm

342N Norfolk Building, King’s College London, Strand WC2R 2LS

 

Karl Marx

Karl Marx

The Seminar in Contemporary Marxist Theory is a collaboration among scholars in the departments of European & International Studies, Geography, and Management at King’s College London.

For further information contact Stathis Kouvelakisstathis.kouvelakis@kcl.ac.uk

 

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/london-seminar-on-contemporary-marxist-theory

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Hegel

Hegel

HEGEL’S PHENOMENOLOGY OF SPIRIT AND ITS AFTERLIVES

CPCT Research Seminar 2015-2016: Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit and its Afterlives
Centre for Philosophy and Critical Thought

Goldsmiths, University of London

New Cross

London SE14 6NW
Wednesdays, 4-6pm @ RHB 352
[Autumn] Oct 14, 28, Nov 11, 25, Dec 9
[Spring] Jan 20, Feb 3, 17, Mar 2, 16
[Summer] May 4, 18, Jun 1, 15, 29

The research seminar, which will meet on a bi-weekly basis, is open to staff and graduate students affiliated with CPCT, and aims to serve as a forum for philosophical work and dialogue at Goldsmiths. Though the seminar is organised by the co-directors of the CPCT, Julia Ng and Alberto Toscano, we hope different members and affiliates of the CPCT will volunteer to lead the discussions each week.

 

Main text: Hegel, Phenomenology of Spirit, trans. A.V. Miller (OUP 1977); see also Terry Pinkard’s online translation, with facing German text

 

Structure

  1. Intro meeting; Phenomenology, Preface (pp.1-45, §72)
  2. Derrida, “Outwork, prefacing,” in Dissemination
  3. Phenomenology, Introduction to Force and Understanding (pp. 46-103, §165)
  4. Heidegger, ‘Hegel’s Concept of Understanding’; Charles Taylor, ‘The Opening Arguments of the Phenomenology’; Hans-Georg Gadamer, ‘Hegel’s “Inverted World”’
  5. Phenomenology, Self-Consciousness (pp. 104-138, §230)
  6. Hyppolite, Genesis and Structure of Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit (Part III)
  7. Phenomenology, Observing Reason (pp. 105-210, §346)
  8. Phenomenology, the rest of Reason (pp. 211-262, §437)
  9. Phenomenology, The Ethical Order (pp. 263-294, §483)
  10. Phenomenology, Culture (pp. 294-363, §595)
  11. Comay, Mourning Sickness
  12. Phenomenology, Morality (pp. 364-409, §671)
  13. Phenomenology, Religion (pp. 410-478, §787)
  14. Hamacher, ‘(The End of Art with the Mask)’
  15. Phenomenology, Absolute Knowing (pp. 479-493, §808) ​

 

Texts on the Phenomenology

Hyppolite, Genesis and Structure of Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit

Jameson, The Hegel Variations

Pinkard, Hegel’s Phenomenology: The Sociality of Reason

Kojève, Introduction to the Reading of Hegel

Heidegger, Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit

Houlgate, Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit: A Reader’s Guide

Yovel, Hegel’s Preface to the “Phenomenology of Spirit” (translation and commentary)

 

Further Information, see: http://www.gold.ac.uk/sociology/research-centres/cpct/res-seminar/

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cpct-goldsmiths-2015-16-research-seminar-hegels-phenomenology

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Cyborg

Cyborg

CYBORGS, KNOWLEDGE AND CREDIT FOR LEARNING

Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain

London Branch

Cyborgs, knowledge and credit for learning
Ben Kotzee (Birmingham University)
Wednesday 7 October
Institute of Education, UCL, 20 Bedford Way
Room 828
5:30 – 7:15
All are welcome.
Enquiries: sun.yun.14@ucl.ac.uk

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

imagesHIGH NOON SHOWDOWN ON BLACK METAL THEORY

TOPICS IN THE AESTHETICS OF MUSIC AND SOUND

SEMINAR SERIES

Thursday, October 1, 2015

3:15-5 p.m. in U67

Institute for the Study of Culture (IKV) University of Southern Denmark (SDU) Campusvej 55, Odense

Panel discussion (Via Skype):

High Noon Showdown on Black Metal Theory

With …

Karl Spracklen is Professor of Leisure Studies at Leeds Beckett University, UK. He is the Editor of Metal Music Studies and the Secretary of the International Society for Metal Music Studies. He has extensive research interests relating to leisure spaces and leisure identities, and has contributed to debates regarding leisure theory. He has over seventy publications, including three research monographs, the most recent of which is Whiteness and Leisure (2013), published by Palgrave Macmillan.

Niall Scott is Senior Lecturer in Ethics at the University of Central Lancashire. He is editor of Helvete: A Journal of Black Metal Theory and Co-Editor of Metal Music Studies. He is one of the founders and Chair of the Society for Metal Music Studies, and has published over 40 pieces in the fields of metal studies, black metal theory, political philosophy, cultural theory, ethics and bioethics.

Edia Connole is co-author with Nicola Masciandaro of Floating Tomb: Black Metal Theory (Mimesis, 2015), and co-editor with Gary J. Shipley of Serial Killing: A Philosophical Anthology (Schism, 2015). With Scott Wilson, Edia Connole is also the co-founder of MOUTH, an actionist art project in culinary divinomics. mmmouth.wordpress.com

Black Metal Theory

Black Metal Theory

Abstract: In this seminar defenders and critics will debate the epistemic value of black metal theory (BMT). An amorphous “metallectual” movement initiated in 2009 with the symposium Hideous Gnosis, BMT has developed in the form of a distributed and vexed forum for trans-disciplinary intellectual work committed to thinking “with” rather than “about” black metal. For defenders of the discipline, its value lies in its ability to destroy creatively the boundary between black metal and theory—constituting itself in the space of their shared negativity, as stated on its inaugural website: “Not black metal. Not Theory. Not not black metal. Not not theory. Black metal theory. Theoretical blackening of metal. Metallic blackening of theory. Mutual blackening. Nigredo in the intoxological crucible of symposia.” For critics of the discipline, this trans-disciplinary approach is devoid of purpose and meaning, and makes the work of critically exploring black metal more difficult.

 

All are welcome – also via Skype

Outland

Outland

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

images (2)DE-NATURALISING DISASTERS

A WORKSHOP

The ‘De-Naturalising Disasters’ workshop, is part of the ‘Living in the Anthropocene: Rethinking the Nature/Culture Divide’ series.

The event is convened by David Chandler (University of Westminster) and Camilla Royle (King’s College, London).

Further information is available here: http://rethinkingtheanthropocene.blogspot.co.uk/
Date: Friday 18th September, 2015
Venue: Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster, Westminster Forum, 5th floor, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW (5 minutes walk from Oxford Circus tube station)
Time: 4.00pm-8.00pm

Programme: De-Naturalising Disasters

Introduction: Bruno Latour argues that we should love our ‘monsters’. Nothing illustrates this demand better than how disasters are becoming increasingly central to the political imagination. From the late Ulrich Beck’s views of ’emancipatory catastrophism’ to the UN Post-2015 Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, disasters are becoming a subject of ethical care. Disasters are no longer excluded from politics and seen as external or natural events but are instead seen as enabling agents of political change. The United Nations, for example, is forwarding a new paradigm suggesting that disaster risk should be embedded within everyday governance and development processes and managed through taking responsibility for social and environmental outcomes. In this way, disasters – as outcomes of social processes – enable learning, reflection and potentially emancipatory outcomes. This workshop seeks to discuss how disasters have overcome the nature/culture divide and what is at stake in learning how to love them.

4.00-5.30 “Grand Strategies for Anthropocene Challenges: Can we Learn in Time?” Speaker: Jamie MacIntosh (Professorial Venture Research Fellow & Director of the Institute for Security & Resilience Studies, University College, London) Chair: David Chandler (University of Westminster)

The UK’s recently elected government has now revved up the Whitehall policy machine to distil the 2015 batch of strategies. Ministerial speeches and fanfares are not far off. The UK Government is one among many major and minor bodies that drafts strategies. There were 51 state signatories to the UN Charter in 1945; there are now 193 sovereign bodies. The financial power of several non-state bodies far exceeds that of many UN Leviathans. Nevertheless, after the post-Cold War unipolar moment and Washington Consensus, we are all – for better or worse – immersed in a multipolar world. Moreover, it’s a multipolar world that within a few years and decades will have to face up to the challenges of the Anthropocene with our productivity still flat and inequality growing. There is little evidence that we are developing healthy appetites for the systemic risks and radical uncertainties that abound. Whether you look to elites or the multitudes, the competencies, capabilities and capacity necessary for the species to make it to the 22nd Century cannot be taken for granted. Can we learn in time how to make grand strategies work or are they myths to numb the hapless? Do universities have anything pragmatic to offer?

5.30-6.00 break

6.00-7.30 “Can Disaster Risk Management be Emancipatory?” Speaker: Mark Pelling (Professor of Geography, Centre for Integrated Research on Risk and Resilience, King’s College, London) Chair: Camilla Royle (King’s College, London)

Disaster risk management science has a long critical tradition including work by Hewitt, Wisner and Watts. The advent of climate change adaptation has opened new policy relevance for disaster risk management, but without taking on board this critical viewpoint. The result has been an adaptation science framed around stability seeking. Resilience has come to symbolise this conservative vision for risk management. One response has been to call for Transformative Adaptation. The paper will examine the advent and rise of transformation and its current positioning in the emerging post-2015 development agenda.

7.30 wine reception

Many thanks,
David Chandler and Camilla Royle

David Chandler, Professor of International Relations, Director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW. Tel: ++44 (0)776 525 3073.
Journal Editor, Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/resi20
Amazon books page: http://www.amazon.co.uk/David-Chandler/e/B001HCXV7Y/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0
Personal website: http://www.davidchandler.org/
Twitter: @DavidCh27992090

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Materialisms

Materialisms

MATERIALISMS READING GROUP

16. Thursday 23 July 2015, we will be discussing McKenzie Wark’s ‘Molecular Red: Theory for the Anthropocene’ which will be introduced by Paul Rekret (Richmond University). For those interested, here is Zizek’s short review of the book: http://www.versobooks.com/blogs/2007-ecology-against-mother-nature-slavoj-zizek-on-molecular-redand Wark’s reply: http://www.publicseminar.org/2015/06/zizek3/#.VXLTrzY4nTa

17. Thursday 10 September 2015 – Miriam Tedeschi (University IUAV, Venice) will be introducing Gilles Deleuze’s ‘Spinoza: Practical Philosophy’

18. Thursday 8 October 2015 – Elisabetta Brighi (University of Westminster) will be introducing Deborah Cowen’s ‘The Deadly Life of Logistics: Mapping Violence in Global Trade’

19. Thursday 5 November 2015 – Graham Jones will be introducing John Protevi’s ‘Political Affect: Connecting the Social and the Somatic’

20. Thursday 3 December 2015 – Nick Srnicek will be introducing Graham Harman’s ‘Bruno Latour: Reassembling the Political’

Meetings are open to all and take place Thursdays 6.30-8.00pm, Westminster Forum, Department of Politics and International Relations, 5th Floor, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW (5 minutes from Oxford Circus tube).

Wine and nibbles will be provided, sponsored by the Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster and the Centre for Media & Culture Research, London South Bank University.

Suggestions for meetings after Xmas that we have on the table:

Michiel van Ingen (University of Westminster) introducing Kate Soper’s ‘What is Nature: Culture, Politics and the Non-Human’

Philip Cunliffe (University of Kent) introducing Alexander Wendt’s ‘Quantum Mind and Social Science: Unifying Physical and Social Ontology’

David Chandler (University of Westminster) introducing Louise Amoore’s ‘The Politics of Possibility: Risk and Security beyond Probability’

 

If you wish to be added to the Materialisms Reading Group mailing list please contact me at d.chandler@wmin.ac.uk

Best wishes,
David

 

David Chandler, Professor of International Relations, Director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW. Tel: ++44 (0)776 525 3073.
Journal Editor, Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/resi20

Amazon books page: http://www.amazon.co.uk/David-Chandler/e/B001HCXV7Y/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Personal website: http://www.davidchandler.org/
Twitter: @DavidCh27992090

STUFF

STUFF

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

EDITORIAL_Student-loans_Devin-BeauregardPOSTGRADUATE ETHICS: ISSUES, DILEMMAS, SOLUTIONS

Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE)

Date – Wednesday, 15 July 2015: 13.00 – 16.15

Venue – SRHE, 73 Collier St, London N1 9BE

Network – Postgraduate Issues

Ethical integrity is an important term that concerns not only the research process but many practical situations. As one of the speakers highlights, the scope of this notion encompasses amongst many ethical scenarios,  ‘… the relationship between policy and governance, practice, and institutional support and administration.’ The aim of today is to provide an environment where postgraduate ethical issues can be discussed and debated. The speakers will highlight different ethical issues and allow participants to respond underling their own ethical dilemmas. As Brooks et al (2014:3) argue, ‘Ethical thinking is intimately connected to practical research sills, which need to be developed and reflected upon.’ ‘The more you think about postgraduate research ethics …’, another speaker will suggest, ‘ … the more important ethics becomes.’ What we hope participants will gain from the Seminar is increased understandings of their own ethical situations and potential ethical solutions.

 

Programme

 

12.00: Registration and Lunch.

 

1.00-2.00: Doctoral Supervisor Training – Supporting Supervisors and Students in Understanding Research IntegrityFiona Denney

 

2.00-3.00: Current issues in research integrityAndrew Rawnsley

 

3.00-3.15: Tea and Coffee break

 

3.15-3.45: Postgraduate ethical Issues in Education Research – Richard Race

 

3.45-4.15: General Discussion and close.

 

Biographies
Fiona Denney

Fiona Denney is currently the Director of the Brunel Educational Excellence Centre at Brunel University, London, which is aimed at enhancing support for both staff and students in order to improve the quality of teaching and learning at all levels throughout the University. Fiona has worked in UK universities for 18 years – both as an academic and as a senior professional member of staff. Prior to working at Brunel, Fiona was the Assistant Director of the Graduate School at King’s College London, where she developed training for researchers, senior staff and doctoral supervisors, provided strategic direction for the development of academics and researchers and hosed the London Hub for the national research development organisation, VITAE. E mail: Fiona.Deeney@Brunel.ac.uk

 

Andrew Rawnsley

Andrew’s expertise lies principally in research ethics and integrity, with a focus on the relationship between policy and governance, practice, and institutional support and administration. He has designed and delivered training across the sector and undertakes frequent consultancy projects on research integrity for a range of universities, as well international speaking engagements. He is a co-author of Epigeum’s “Research Integrity” international online training programme, along with four US-based authors; and Associate Editor for the Biomed Central journal “Research Integrity and Peer Review.” E Mail: A.Rawnsley@tees.ac.uk

 

Richard Race

Richard Race is Senior Lecturer in Education at Roehampton University. Richard has sat on ethics committees at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. He has been Programme Convener on MA Education for the last five years, as well as Programme Convener for MA (Education Sciences) in ASPETE, Athens, Greece. The second edition of his monograph, Multiculturalism and Education (Bloomsbury, London) was recently published. He is working on his second monograph, Integration and Education Policy-Making (Palgrave Macmillan, London).  He has also published a co-edited collection with Vini Lander in 2014: Advancing Race and Ethnicity in Education (Palgrave Macmillan, Houndsmills) E Mail: r.race@roehampton.ac.uk

 

Registration: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Bonuses for Some

Bonuses for Some

IIPPE TRAINING WORKSHOPS (LONDON, ABERDEEN and LEEDS)

International Initiative for Promoting Political Economy

Website: http://iippe.org/wp/

The IIPPE announces three Training Workshops (in London, Aberdeen and Leeds)

 

London: Monday June 22, SOAS (Vernon Square campus)
Simon Mohun and Photis Lysandrou, on The Marxist theory of finance, contemporary accounts of financialization and the causes of the financial crisis of 2007-8
Details at http://iippe.org/wp/?cat=19
Register with Simon Mohun < s.mohun@qmul.ac.uk >

 

Aberdeen: Thursday 25 June and Friday 26 June, University of Aberdeen (Fraser Noble Building), jointly with Aberdeen Political Economy Group (APEG) and IIPPE Financialisation Working Group
Simon Mohun, John Weeks, Joseph Choonara, James Foley, James Meadway and Neil Davidson on Neoliberalism and the political economy of money and finance in Scotland and the UK
Details from and registration with Keith Paterson < keithpaterson@abdn.ac.uk >

 

Leeds: Tuesday 8 September, University of Leeds (room tba)
Simon Mohun, John Weeks and Alfredo Saad-Filho, on Rate of Profit and Crisis
Details at http://iippe.org/wp/?cat=19
Register on the IIPPE Conference Registration Form http://iippe.org/wp/?page_id=2655 or with Simon Mohun < s.mohun@qmul.ac.uk >

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/iippe-announces-three-training-workshops-london-aberdeen-and-leeds

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

imagesUNPACKING THE ‘TRANSNATIONAL ASSOCIATIONS OF CAPITALS’ IN GLOBAL HIGHER EDUCATION: RANKINGS AND THE SUBSUMPTION OF ACADEMIC LABOUR UNDER ACADEMIC PUBLISHING CAPITAL

KRYSTIAN SZADKOWSKI

The Research in Critical Education (RiCES) research group at the University of Lincoln is holding a lunchtime seminar next week. You are very welcome.

Unpacking the ‘transnational associations of capitals’ in global higher education: rankings and the subsumption of academic labour under academic publishing capital (Krystian Szadkowski, Adam Mickiewicz University)
3 June | 12:30–2:00pm | Minerva Building 3202

This presentation explores the concept of ‘transnational association of capitals’ in the context of higher education (Hall, 2014; Ball, 2012). The focus will be on the conditions and consequences of the expansion of
merchant capital (or capital involved in circulation), limited to large and quasi-monopolistic academic publishers. The claim behind this talk is that in order to grasp the specificity of the process of subsumption
of academic labour under academic publishing capital, it is not enough to focus exclusively on proprietary relations (i.e. expropriation, enclosures, primitive accumulation, alienation). Such an analysis, although providing extremely rich material, has its limitations: capital may opt out from the private property form and ownership, but will never give up domination. The tool of capitalist domination and control, in all sectors of production, even immaterial and biopolitical, is measure. For this reason, this presentation will focus on the functionality of the capitalist mechanisms of establishing measures for the expansion of academic publishers’ capital based on the subsumption of global academic labour.

Krystian Szadkowski (1986), is an assistant professor at the Institute of Philosophy and a researcher at the UNESCO Chair for Institutional Research and Higher Education Policy of Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland. His research interests cover Marxian political economy, autonomist Marxism and transformation of higher education systems in Europe. In 2014 he defended his PhD thesis entitled Towards the University as an Institution of the Common: Philosophical Foundations of the Critical Higher Education Studies [in Polish]. Recently, he co-edited a collected volume Joy Forever: The Political Economy of Social Creativity (MayFly 2014). He is also an editor-in-chief of peer-reviewed journal Praktyka Teoretyczna/Theoretical Practice.

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

imagesPOST-SOCIALIST ECONOMIES, NATIONALISTIC CONFLICTS AND LABOUR IN CENTRAL-EASTERN EUROPE AND THE FORMER SOVIET UNION

One Day Workshop at Middlesex University, Hendon, London NW4 4BT

Hosted by the Business School and the Post-Socialist Labour Studies Group.
Friday May 29 2015, from 9.30am to 6pm

For further information, and to register at the workshop, please contact:
Claudio Morrison (c.morrison@mdx.ac.uk) or Elena Karoullas (E.Karoullas@mdx.ac.uk)

A workshop is jointly sponsored by the Royal Economic Society and the London Region of BUIRA (British Universities Industrial Relations Association) will be held under the auspices of the Post Socialist Labour Studies Group at Middlesex University on Friday May 29th 2015. The workshop focuses on ethno-national conflicts in post-socialist and post-soviet states and the political economy of the region, explorin g links between emergent neoliberal forms of capitalism and the rise of radical nationalism. Guest speakers will include practitioners in labour and industrial relations and economic policy from the region as well as academic specialists and labour representatives from countries gravely affected by present and past conflicts such as Ukraine, Russia, Serbia and Bosnia-Herzegovina.

Confirmed participant speakers include:
Dr Claudio Morrison (LWO, Middlesex University); Professor Martin Upchurch (LWO, Middlesex University); Professor John Grahl (Economics, Middlesex University); Dr Daryna Grechyna (Economics, Middlesex University); Kiril Buketov (IUF Uniting Food, Farm and Hotel Workers Worldwide); Volodymyr Ishenko (Center for Social and Labour Research, Kiev); Goran Markovic (East Sarajevo University, Sarajevo Plenum); Filip Ilkowski (Institute of Political Science, Warsaw) Petr Bizyukov (Centre for Social and Labour Rights, Moscow); Veronika Biziukova (Levada analy tical centre, Moscow); Professor Vera Trappmann (University of Leeds) Dr. Jelena Timotijevic (University of Brighton); Dr Jan Fidrmuc (Economics, Brunel University).

Directions to the Hendon Campus
http://www.mdx.ac.uk/get-in-touch/directions-london
Facebook Event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1577293192531879/

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/post-socialist-economies-nationalistic-conflicts-and-labour

Modernism

Modernism

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/