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images (13)12th WORKING CLASS BOOKFAIR

31st October 2015
Saturday at 11:00–17:00

Museum Vaults
Silksworth Row, SR1 3QJ City of Sunderland, UK
Directions: About 11 minutes walk from Sunderland rail station

Sunderland Working Class Bookfair 2015

Books, magazines and pamphlets will cover at least: local and general history, Marxism, environment, football and other sport, culture, railways, mining, fiction, social science, co-operatives, economics, Anarchism, international relations, Socialism, trade unions, sex, drugs & rock n’ roll… smile emoticon
Stalls confirmed so far include Unite Community, Clothing Bank, Active Distribution, PM Press and Mayday Books

What is going on?

Despite the accidental way Jeremy Corbyn has become Labour leader this has opened up new spaces for politics, and we aim to welcome all progressive people.

Immediately, the Tories are in crisis with the defeat in the Lords, but this doesn’t mean we are happy with things as they are, no – we want lots more!

REMEMBER Remember the 5th of November is coming up soon and we hope everybody’s making their Tory dummies to burn. Andrew Lloyd Webber is the latest candidate to add to our list of dummies.

On a wider level the Liberals have collapsed because they’re career opportunists; its class against class now and you have to take sides. Recent media scare stories have proven that the spectre that haunts Europe is no longer that of communism but of anarchism, and on this Halloween we can note the importance of this haunting.

Our side are the poor, workers, unemployed, the NEETS, disabled, the pensioners and those trying to get a decent pension, migrants and the otherwise oppressed such as the trainee workers – THE STUDENTS. We want to spread great literature that is useful for our people.
Words are not enough though and we have to put ideas into practice on a large scale.

Come and plan for the day out in London when the massed ranks of education workers, students and the otherwise pissed off at the TORY government will be making their voices heard for once on the large STUDENT protest on November 4th in London.

A spectre is haunting Europe – the spectre of anarchism

In London a large Anonymous march on November 5th will see Class War dragging an effigy of Zac Goldsmith, the posh Tory boy Mayoral candidate, down Downing Street where it’s going to be burnt.

Hopefully we will be hearing from those who went to the Manchester Tory conference about what a great time they had too.

This is an open invite to all fellow travellers to come on down to the 31st October Bookfair and have a great time; Teesside Solidarity Movement, Steelworkers, Sunderland Welfare Action group, the Industrial Workers of the World, SPGB, Class War, NUM, Mayday books, North East Anarchists, the Black Bloc (if we can find them), UKUNCUT, syndicalists, students, teachers and lecturers, and many more are invited as well.

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/12th-working-class-bookfair.-31st-october-2015.-sunderland

images (11)

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

images (8)

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The Usual Suspects

The Usual Suspects

RADICAL HISTORIES / HISTORIES OF RADICALISM

CALL FOR PAPERS

RADICAL HISTORIES/HISTORIES OF RADICALISM

A MAJOR CONFERENCE AND PUBLIC HISTORY FESTIVAL

1-3 July 2016, Queen Mary University of London

This international event commemorates twenty years since the death of the leftwing social historian Raphael Samuel and forty years since the founding of History Workshop Journal. The event will explore radical approaches to the past and histories of radical ideas and action through lectures, panels, performances, screenings, workshops and exhibitions.

The event is hosted by Queen Mary University of London and organised by the Raphael Samuel History Centre (www.raphael-samuel.org.uk). It is intended to engage a diverse audience, and to bring together practitioners of many varieties of historical research, curatorship, writing and performance, from both inside and outside the academy. Other venues and partners for the event include Bishopsgate Institute, the London Metropolitan Archives and Tower Hamlets Local Studies Library.

The event will open on the evening of Friday 1st July with a plenary session ‘Radical history then and now’ involving radical historians, historians of radical movements and movement activists, past and present. It will close with a panel discussion on ‘Raphael Samuel and his Legacies’. In between these plenary sessions, there will be papers, film screenings, workshops, meetings and performances, all exploring a wide range of themes and ideas in radical history.

We have grouped these themes as follows:

  1. Radical movements:
    History of radical movements and organisations; parties; left-wing activism; working-class radicalisms; national liberation struggles; popular mobilisations, past and present.
  2. Diversity, difference and beyond:
    Histories of feminism, gender and sexuality; histories and activism of race and ethnicity; disability politics.
  3. Local and global histories:
    Radical London; migration/movement of peoples; empire/post-colonial histories; globalisation; internationalism in a global age.
  4. Culture, art and environment:
    Heritage and public history; radical arts; environmental activism; housing politics.
  5. History, policy, and the idea of politics:
    Europe; government; elites; the move to the right; austerity; neo-liberalism; the politics of the academy

How to contribute:
Contributions that reflect on any of these themes in relation to any period of history are invited from academic and non-academic historians, and from those working or practising in the arts, education, heritage and culture, as well as activists campaigning in any of these areas.

The themes are indicative only, and we will consider proposals that fall outside them so long as these relate to the overall conference theme. We welcome offers of traditional academic papers but would particularly like to encourage proposals for other session formats likely to engage a varied audience, for example panel discussions, interactive hands-on workshops (for example, around primary source materials), photo-essays, exhibitions and performances. Contributions that focus on any period of history are welcome, as are contributions that offer reflections on methodologies (whether of the historian or the activist).

Please send a 250 – 500 word proposal, including a description of the format and content of the proposed paper, session, workshop, meeting, screenings, or performance. Include an abstract if appropriate, and the names of any other speakers or participants. AT THE TOP OF YOUR PROPOSAL PLEASE INDICATE THE CONFERENCE STRAND (A –E above) TO WHICH YOU THINK YOUR PROPOSAL RELATES MOST CLOSELY.

Please submit your proposal to Katy Pettit, Raphael Samuel History Centre administrator (k.pettit@uel.ac.uk) by Monday September 14th. Proposers will be notified by November 30th.

***

About the Raphael Samuel History Centre (RSHC)
Originally founded by the historian Raphael Samuel at the University of East London in 1996 as the Centre for East London History, and renamed after him in 2008, the Raphael Samuel History Centre has since expanded into a partnership between UEL, Birkbeck College University of London, Queen Mary University of London and Bishopsgate Institute in the City of London.

An extensive range of events, projects and research activities operates under our umbrella as we seek to stimulate debate about the continuing force of the past in the present. Our dynamic and engaged approach to history goes beyond the limits of the academy to include people of all ages and backgrounds.

The Centre is recognised nationally and internationally as the hub for intelligent debate that links history to present-day concerns and crosses boundaries between academic and public/popular history. We aim to put history in conversation both with other disciplines, and with contemporary activism and politics. In the spirit of Raphael Samuel and more broadly of the History Workshop movement, we are committed to a democratic, non-elitist and inclusive approach to history. We aim to support, nurture and encourage both new-career academic historians and those working in history outside academia. We provide a forum for debate about the place of history in public life, in schools, heritage organizations and the media. We enter into partnership with other organizations – large and small – in order to stimulate interest in and discussion of history.

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-radical-histories-histories-of-radicalism

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

THINGPROTEST AND ACTIVISM WITH(OUT) ORGANISATION

SPECIAL ISSUE CALL FOR PAPERS

The Journal for International Sociology and Social Policy

Guest Editors:

Richard J White – Sheffield Hallam University, UK

Patricia Wood – York University, Canada

The economic, political, social, cultural and environmental crises of our time continue to provoke and inspire a remarkable range of social movements into existence. These multiple forms of protest and activism express and embody a politics of hope – captured both in alternative narratives that envisage new post-crisis possibilities, and through the physicality of collective and popular resistance. In this context, the Special Issue of The International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy is particularly intend on interrogating the socio-spatial forms of ‘organisation’ that underpin protest and activism. When taking a closer look at the organisational nature across these activist landscapes for example, it becomes apparent that resistance led through membership-based, co-ordinated hierarchical organisations (e.g. Trade Unions, NGOs) still retains an important visibility and influence in agitating for change. However, in addition perhaps, and in some meaningful way beyond, these more traditional forms of organised resistance, there exists important diverse and spontaneous forms of everyday activism, one, perhaps, consistent with a more horizontal and anarchistic praxis of self-organisation.

Questioning the relationship between activism with – and without – organisation throws up some interesting and important inter-disciplinary questions. At the most fundamental level it gives us cause to interrogate the very idea of activism: where does activism begin and end? Who gets to be an activist? Seeking to engage a more nuanced understanding of the differences between organized and unorganized forms of activism, provokes the question of how informal experiences of activism, encourage engagement with more organised forms of activism (and vice versa). Is the relationship between the two antagonistic, competitive or complementary to each other? How are organisational forms of activism dictated to by specific social and spatial temporalities, particularly at a time of crisis? Indeed in these (post)modern times is it meaningful to frame the organisation of activism within a binary relationship (either formal or informal)? Rather should we be encouraged to consider them on an organisational spectrum of difference (more formal, less formal and so on)? If desirable, how can a more informed complex understanding of the organisational natures of activism allow us to better recognise, value, strengthen and link up different types of patterns of activism and resistance?

To these ends we welcome papers of up to 8000 words addressing empirical or theoretical aspects focused on organisation of activism and protest, past and present, situated in any part of the world and at any scale.

Timeline

Please send 250-300 word abstracts directly to the Guest Editors, Richard White (richard.white@shu.ac.uk)  and Tricia Wood (pwood@yorku.ca ) by 15 August 2015.

We aim to let authors know as to whether their papers have been accepted for inclusion in the Special Issue within two weeks of this deadline.

Completed papers – between 5,000 to 8,000 words – must be submitted on-line to the IJSSP journal by 01 December 2015.

More information about The Journal for International Sociology and Social Policy can be found here: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=ijssp .

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Social Movments

Social Movments

MOVEMENTS IN POST/SOCIALISMS

CALL FOR PAPERS

Interface: A Journal for and about Social Movements

Issue 7/1 (November 2015), deadline May 1 2015

Theme editors: Jiří Navrátil, Elizabeth Humphrys, Kevin Lin, Anna Szolucha

The November 2015 issue of the open-access, online, copyleft academic/activist journal Interface: a Journal for and about Social Movements (http://www.interfacejournal.net/) invites contributions on the theme of Movements in Post/Socialisms as well as general submissions.

The 20th century saw the establishment of, and experimentation within, socialist states across the globe. These efforts were variously lauded, critiqued, condemned and their ‘socialist’ nature disputed. This call for papers asks about the movements that have come in the wake of the collapse and transformation of these diverse regimes.

A quarter of century ago, a massive wave of political protest shook state socialist regimes in Eastern Europe and Asia. In many countries these events paved the way for far-reaching societal transformation, embedding Western-style capitalist economies and representative democracy. In some locations the existing regimes succeeded in taming the efforts around economic and political liberalisation, in other locations they did not. Social movements were central in these processes and followed different paths, including: they led the transformative events and became part of new elites/regimes/states; they pulled back to the realm of civil society after they initiated regime change; they resisted the efforts for regime change; and they were repressed and demobilised when the regime succeeded in maintaining the status quo.

Not only did movements participate in and resist ‘eventful protests’ in 1989, but they were also influenced by these events in the following decades. Again, different trajectories were observed in different locations. Eastern Europe became dominated by anti-utopian ideologies, which effectively paralysed any attempt for transgressive critiques of the newly established political economic order. Furthermore, the spread of ‘development aid’ for ‘underdeveloped’ post-communist civil societies — provided by United States, European Union and private foundations — contributed to the NGO-isation of civil society organisations and the import and emulation of new forms and agendas of activism. This ‘new’ or ‘proper’ civil society activism started to gain political relevance at the expense of grass-root, radical and other dissident movements.

On the other hand, the rapid economic and political transition of a number of Eastern countries provoked mobilisation — from the episodic global justice and anti-war movements, to mass social solidarity mobilisations that had lasting effects on elites’ strategies for economic and political transformation.

For Asian socialism, the ruling ‘communist’ regimes in Vietnam and China have presided over a transition to capitalist economies while also resisting social movements for political democratisation. Yet the capitalist transition has thrown up social and political contradictions, such as social inequality, abuse of political power, labour exploitation, land dispossession and environmental degradation — all of which have seen the rise of diverse activism and movements. Fearful of autonomous organising, these regimes have kept a tight grip over civil society and independent organisation. Consequently, social movements have to operate under repressive conditions and adopt clandestine and informal organising methods and strategies. Nonetheless, in Vietnam and China, for example, we have seen some of the highest global concentration of autonomous labour organising and strikes in recent years.

Apart from regions where the 1989 events directly took place, their effects spread well beyond. The fall of the Eastern bloc both directly and indirectly affected the political landscape of Western Europe, with old left movements beginning to orient themselves along different ideological principles. Consequences can also be seen in Latin America, with sites of state socialism, such as Cuba, faced with the transformation of the former Eastern bloc as well as internal movements to transform the national political economy — including the repression of those movements. In Venezuela, the new century has seen Hugo Chávez implement a process of socialist reform in the wake of mass social and political movements that brought him to power, a route he called the ‘Bolivarian process’. Related but distinct processes took place in other countries — Ecuador, Argentina and Bolivia. Many have called this the socialism of the 21st century, following and diverging from the socialism of the 20th century in the Eastern Bloc and Asia. However, others have criticised such regimes as authoritarian or ‘neo-extractivist’.

For this special themed section of Interface 7/1 we are interested in articles by researchers and activists on the movements and events of 1989, their impacts and trajectories and other questions of post/socialisms. We are seeking standard refereed articles as well as material in other formats, such as: action notes on organising methods; activist biographies; book reviews; conversational roundtables; analyses of movement events; and more. Submissions should be written in such a way as to be of interest or use also to readers outside Eastern Europe or Asia.

 

Contributions might address such topics as:

– Post/anti/new socialist movements

– New trade unions and labour movements in Asia

– Activism in post/socialist settings

– Memories and visions of socialism/communism in contemporary collective action

– Importing and exporting social movements and activism

– Effects of the fall of state socialisms in Eastern Europe and Asia on other locations

– What is socialism in the 21st century?

– The persistence of social movements during the regime change from state socialism to capitalism

– Movements as regime-builders / movements as regime-breakers

– Comparing Cold War social movements between East and West

– Other questions relevant to the special issue theme

 

As in every issue, we are also very happy to receive contributions that reflect on other questions for social movement research and practice that fit within the journal’s mission statement (http://www.interfacejournal.net/who-we-are/mission-statement/).

Submissions should contribute to the journal’s mission as a tool to help our movements learn from each other’s struggles, by developing analyses from specific movement processes and experiences that can be translated into a form useful for other movements.

In this context, we welcome contributions by movement participants and academics who are developing movement-relevant theory and research. Our goal is to include material that can be used in a range of ways by movements — in terms of its content, its language, its purpose and its form. We thus seek work in a range of different formats, such as conventional (refereed) articles, review essays, facilitated discussions and interviews, action notes, teaching notes, key documents and analysis, book reviews — and beyond. Both activist and academic peers review research contributions, and other material is sympathetically edited by peers. The editorial process generally is geared towards assisting authors to find ways of expressing their understanding, so that we all can be heard across geographical, social and political distances.

We can accept material in Afrikaans, Arabic, Catalan, Czech, Danish, English, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Chinese (Simplified and Traditional), Maltese, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Slovak, Spanish, Swedish and Zulu. Please see our editorial contacts page (http://www.interfacejournal.net/submissions/editorial-contact/) for details of who to submit to.

Deadline and contact details

The deadline for initial submissions to this issue, to be published November 1, 2015, is May 1, 2015. For details of how to submit to Interface, please see the “Guidelines for contributors” on our website. All manuscripts, whether on the special theme or other topics, should be sent to the appropriate regional editor, listed on our contacts page. Submission templates are available online via the guidelines page and should be used to ensure correct formatting.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Match Women

Match Women

EAST LONDON SUFFRAGETTE FESTIVAL

1-10 August, with the main event taking place all day on Saturday 9 August 2014

What?

A festival of talks, workshops and entertainment celebrating Sylvia Pankhurst and the East London Suffragettes and exploring our festival themes:

  • Feminism and other equality campaigns
  • Protest, politics and activism
  • Hidden histories, especially women’s, working class and migrant voices
  • Celebrating East London today

Who?

The festival is being entirely organised by volunteers in partnership with local groups and business and with the support of the Feminist Review Trust and the East End Community Foundation.

The East London Suffragette Festival is an unincorporated voluntary association with a central committee. To contact us please emailwomensmayday@gmail.com

You can also find us on Facebook and Twitter.

Why?

  • Celebrate and raise awareness about the East London Federation of Suffragettes and the work of Sylvia Pankhurst
  • Build awareness and support for contemporary women’s rights and equality causes and campaigns
  • Promote East London’s vibrant history, culture, social business and activism
  • Raise money for and raise the profile of the wonderful Newham Action Against Domestic Violence
  • Bring communities together by celebrating shared local heritage
  • Have fun!

Get involved

We would love to hear from individuals, groups, businesses and venues who want to be involved or support the festival in some way.

Could you help us with:

  • volunteering at our events?
  • promoting the festival?
  • gifts in kind, from craft supplies to advertising space or printing?
  • sponsorship or funding?

If you’d like to be involved in any way please contact Sarah atwomensmayday@gmail.com.

Partners and friends

We’re excited to be working with:

Newham Bookshop

For Books’ Sake

Four Corners Film

The Sylvia Pankhurst Trust

East End Walks

Tower Hamlets Community Housing

Friends of Meath Gardens

Bow Idea Store

G KELLY, Roman Road Market

 

Information: http://eastlondonsuffragettes.tumblr.com/about

Programme: http://eastlondonsuffragettes.tumblr.com/programme

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Protest

Protest

AUSTERITY AND REVOLT

Duke University Press has recently published “Austerity and Revolt,” a special issue of SAQ: South Atlantic Quarterly, volume 113 and issue 2, edited by Werner Bonefeld and John Holloway.

In recent years, we have witnessed massive demonstrations of denial, refusal, and rejection exploding in one country after another. The squares of the world have become organizational focal points for rebellion and repression. What does such collective negation mean, and what comes afterward? This special issue explores the forms of a reinvigorated, experimental communism: councils, assemblies, communes, squares, occupys, horizontalism, recovered factories, and cooperative farms and community gardens. Practitioners of this new model of “communism as communizing” attempt to change fundamental social relations from the bottom up. By combining insider knowledge with sophisticated theoretical scrutiny, the contributors to this issue approach eruptions of rebellion from a variety of historical, economic, and methodological perspectives. Writing not only about but also within such forces of progressive resistance around the world, they investigate the complex, hopeful, and contradictory process of creating new social, economic, and political structures through negation.

To link to the electronic content page click here: http://saq.dukejournals.org/content/113/2.toc. If you find that your library does not subscribe to this journal and you do not have online access, please contact Katie Smart, who can arrange to have a complimentary copy of this issue mailed to you or your library.

John Holloway

John Holloway

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/latest-south-atlantic-quarterly-austerity-and-revolt

Werner Bonefeld

Werner Bonefeld

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Communisation

Communisation

SIC, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR COMMUNISATION – ISSUE 2

The 2nd issue of Sic (International Journal for Communisation) is out, with texts that attempt to develop new concepts and analyse recent struggles (2011-13): including Occupy Oakland, the riots in the UK and events in Greece and France.

Copies can be ordered here: http://sicjournal.org/en/order-online

 

Contents:

Not an Editorial

Woland, The Uneven Dynamics of the Era of Riots

Leon de Mattis, Communist Measures

R.S., The Conjuncture

Woland, Rise of the (Non-)Subject

R.S., The Movement Against the French Pension Reform

Rocamadur, The Feral Underclass Hits the Streets

Rust Bunny Collective, Under the Riot Gear

Research & Destroy, Limit Analysis and its Limits

Agents of Chaos, Without You, Not a Single Cog Turns

 

Excerpts from the non-editorial:

‘Communisation is no longer being perceived as an exotic beast, and it even tends at times to become a fashionable word. Present-day struggles highlight the end of the classical workers’ movement, together with its ambition to take the supposedly good-by-nature core of the economy away from voracious capitalist predators and run it itself. It is almost obvious that the world of our days, matter and soul alike, is the world actually produced by and for capital; that, therefore, workers and their products would have never existed as such if capital had not called them into existence in the first place; that working people’s demands have nowadays become asystemic or, in other words, a scandal akin to high treason; that proletarians are forced to defend their condition against capital but, in this struggle, actions that hurt capital are also actions that tend to call into question the proletarian condition; that communism cannot possibly be conceived as a program to be realised, but only as the historical product of proletariat’s struggle against capital and, at the same token, against its own class belonging; etc., etc. All this is reassuringly easy to show, almost worryingly so in fact.’

‘There is no linear development from present struggles to revolution, but present struggles, even through their limits and impossibilities, are the only anchor of the theory of communisation. The second issue of Sic is decisively focused on a critical appraisal of struggles of varying geographical locations and content; a discussion of communist measures may serve as a theoretical counterpoint; looking into the concept of conjuncture will deal with the necessary leap away from the internal causality chain of capital’s reproduction.’

‘Sic is an international theoretical project, not a homogeneous group. Differences of opinion are welcome and eagerly put to discussion: they should come as no surprise. However, a common ground does exist, and it does differentiate Sic from other currents. For example, a transhistorical and teleological understanding of class struggle, which turns its back on any periodisation of its content, will not be at home here; the conception of ever recurring proletarian assaults, identical to each other and with no actual history in between, belongs to those ready to interpret the possibly good one just like the others, with the only difference that it was successful instead of unsuccessful; the ‘proposal’ (whom to?) of models of society which would be ‘better’ than the existing one is none of our preoccupations; the faith in the demarcation and extension of a communist terrain, in a communist rodent diving into the capitalist cheese and gradually eating it away, is not ours.’

New web address: http://sicjournal.org/ (with texts also available in French)

First published in: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/sic-international-journal-for-communisation-issue-2

Click to enlarge

 

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Karl Marx

Karl Marx

TURKEY’S GEZI PARK PROTESTS, ONE YEAR LATER

SUNDAY, MAY 18, 2014

6:00-8:00 PM

Westside Peace Center

3916 Sepulveda Blvd., near Venice Blvd. (free parking in rear)

Suite 101-102, press #22 at door to get into building

Culver City (LA area)

 

Speaker: ONUR KAPDAN, PhD student, UC-Santa Barbara

 

The 2013 Gezi Park protests constituted a new type of horizontal social struggle that went beyond earlier Turkish politics, whether leftist or nationalist.  This movement, which involved a new generation of youth occupying public space to oppose environmental destruction and commodification of public land, took place in the context of the global upheavals since 2011, especially the Arab revolutions and the Occupy movement.  The repression and demagogy with which the state responded to the nationwide protests set off by Gezi Park have undermined the ideological control mechanisms of Turkish capitalism under Erdogan’s Justice and Development Party (AKP).  Turkey’s international reputation as a democratic “model” for the Muslim world –as touted by the global media — has also been tarnished. Nonetheless, the AKP’s victory in the municipal elections of March 2014 demonstrates the new challenges ahead of the movement.

Suggested reading: Onur Kapdan, “Reflections on Turkey’s Gezi Park Protests,” International Marxist-Humanist, Aug. 13, 2013: http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/articles/reflections-on-turkeys-gezi-park-protests-by-onur-kapdan

Sponsored by the West Coast Chapter, International Marxist-Humanist Organization.

More information: arise@internationalmarxisthumanist.org

http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org

Here is the link to the online announcement of the meeting for posting via email, Facebook, etc.: http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/events/los-angeles-turkeys-gezi-park-protests-one-year-later

Join our new Facebook page: “International Marxist-Humanist Organization” https://www.facebook.com/groups/imhorg/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

 

PROTEST IN A DIGITAL AGE

Wednesday 7th May 2014, 7.30

Bishopsgate Institute

230 Bishopsgate

London EC2M 4QH

See: http://www.bishopsgate.org.uk/event/451/Troublemakers?—Protest-in-a-Digital-Age?&Keyword=troublemakers&TypeID=

This is part of the ‘Troublemakers?’ series of events, see: http://www.bishopsgate.org.uk/Events/Troublemakers

Social media has changed the way people organise and demonstrate creating new types of fast-moving protest groups and challenges for the authorities. From the Arab Spring to the London riots, UK Uncut and Occupy tell us their experience of policing and public responses while experts explain the challenges faced by those who seek to control the movements.

Speakers include Symon Hill (author of Digital Revolutions: Activism in the Internet Age), Jamie Bartlett (Head of the Violence and Extremism Programme and the Centre for the Analysis of Social Media at Demos) plus representatives from Occupy and UK Uncut. The event will be chaired by the Ian Dunt (politics.co.uk).

Cost £9 / £7 concession (*A postage fee of £1 applies for sending out tickets booked online or over the telephone)

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Social Movements

Social Movements

MANCHESTER SOCIAL MOVEMENTS CONFERENCE 2014

Manchester Social Movements Conference – April 2014

SOCIAL MOVEMENTS CONFERENCE – CALL FOR PAPERS

From 1995 to 2013, Manchester Metropolitan University hosted a series of very successful annual international conferences on ‘ALTERNATIVE FUTURES and POPULAR PROTEST’.

We’re very happy to announce that the Nineteenth AF&PP Conference will be held, between Monday 14th April and Wednesday 16th April 2014.

The Conference rubric remains as in previous years. The aim is to explore the dynamics of popular movements, along with the ideas which animate their activists and supporters and which contribute to shaping their fate. Given the significance of the mass movements in numbers of countries during the early years of this decade, we especially welcome papers discussing these – while no less welcoming suggestions on other topics.

Reflecting the inherent cross-disciplinary nature of the issues, previous participants (from over 60 countries) have come from such specialisms as sociology, politics, cultural studies, social psychology, economics,  history and geography.  The Manchester conferences have also been notable for discovering a fruitful and friendly meeting ground between activism and academia.

CALL FOR PAPERS

We invite offers of papers relevant to the conference themes.  Papers should address such matters as:

* Contemporary and historical social movements and popular protests

* Social movement theory

* Utopias and experiments

* Ideologies of collective action

* Etc.

 

To offer a paper, please contact either of the conference convenors with a brief abstract:

EITHER Colin Barker, Dept. of Sociology  

OR Mike Tyldesley, Dept. of Politics and Philosophy

Manchester Metropolitan University

Geoffrey Manton Building, Rosamond Street West

Manchester M15 6LL, England

email: c.barker@mmu.ac.uk

Tel: M. Tyldesley  0161 247 3460

email: m.tyldesley@mmu.ac.uk

Fax: 0161 247 6769 (+44 161 247 6769)

(Wherever possible, please use email, especially as Colin Barker is a retired gent. Surface mail and faxes should only be addressed to Mike Tyldesley)

 

See: http://londonsocialisthistorians.blogspot.co.uk/2013/10/cfp-manchester-social-movements.html

 

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Protest

Protest

PROTEST

Call for Papers: ‘Protest’

Global Discourse: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Current Affairs and Applied Contemporary Thought
Volume 3: Issue 4: January/February 2014
 
Food riots, anti-war protests, anti-government tirades, anti-blasphemy marches, anti-austerity demonstrations, anti-authoritarian movements, and anti-capitalist occupations: the politics of the twenty-first century is marked by dissent, tumult and calls for radical change. Contemporary political protests have emerged as a key tool for the expression of dissent, are born of both the Right and the Left and are staged in both the global North and the global South. In marked contrast to the triumphalism of neoliberal ideology, different instantiations of protest all over the world have drawn attention to the deep fissures that are papered over by the idea of the global market place. Given the diversity of justice claims and political persuasions that are expressed in protests today, a key task of political inquiry is to understand the convergences and divergences between them, and whether these protests are a precursor of profound global social change. There have been numerous theoretical engagements with the questions of global social change in recent years:  Hardt and Negri have engaged directly the notion of inherent crisis in the capitalist system; David Graeber has raised questions about anarchism, debt and democracy in recent work; neo-Gramscians have enquired into the role of hegemony in the global political economy, and postcolonial theorists have explored the enduring legacy of the colonial encounter in the present.

In this issue of Global Discourse, we wish to explore the nature and context of protest, seeking to evaluate the notion of links between different protests. Among others, we welcome submissions examining the following broad topics:

–          locations, sites and spaces of protest

–          forms of resistance, assembly and protest

–          local, national, international and transnational solidarity in protest

–          questions of universality and difference

–          development and modernity in protest

Building upon previous symposia with the likes of Noam Chomsky, Andrew Linklater and Cynthia Weber, the issue will contain review symposium with David Graeber, who will respond to reviews of his recent The Democracy Project: A History, A Crisis, A Movement, and Teivo Teivainen, who will respond to reviews of his forthcoming Democracy in Movement.

Submission deadlines

Abstracts: May 20th 2013

Full articles of around 8,000 words (solicited on the basis of review of abstracts): August 18th 2013

Publication: January 2014

UK REF Considerations: Papers can appear online as soon as they are accepted and processed. However, we will be able to accommodate the wishes of authors to delay publication until the beginning of 2014 because they wish their papers to be included in the 2014- REF.

Instructions for authors:  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=rgld20&page=instructions#.UX-WG8qSJHo

Further details: http://www.tandfonline.com/rgld (previous website: http://global-discourse.com)

Editor contact details: s.suliman@uq.edu.aus.brincat@uq.edu.au and matthew.johnson@york.ac.uk

Journal Aims and Scope
Global Discourse is an interdisciplinary, problem-oriented journal of applied contemporary thought operating at the intersection of politics, international relations, sociology and social policy. The journal’s scope is broad, encouraging interrogation of current affairs with regard to core questions of distributive justice, wellbeing, cultural diversity, autonomy, sovereignty, security and recognition. Rejecting the notion that publication is the final stage in the research process, Global Discourse seeks to foster discussion and debate between often artificially isolated disciplines and paradigms, with responses to articles encouraged and conversations continued across issues. The journal features a mix of full-length articles, each accompanied by one or more replies, shorter essays, rapid replies, discussion pieces and book review symposia, typically consisting of three reviews and a reply by the author/s. With an international advisory editorial board consisting of experienced, highly-cited academics, Global Discourse welcomes submissions from and on any region. Authors are encouraged to explore the international dimensions and implications of their work. With a mix of themed and general issues, symposia are periodically deployed to examine topics as they emerge.

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Protest

Protest

PROTESTS AS EVENTS / EVENTS AS PROTESTS

The International Centre for Research in Events, Tourism and Hospitality (ICRETH) at LeedsMetropolitanUniversity is pleased to announce the following forthcoming symposium:

Protests as Events / Events as Protests: A one day symposium for academics and activists

12th June 2013, Leeds, UK

 

Call for Participation

We take as our starting point Paul Chatterton’s (2006: p.260) argument that: “acknowledging that protest encounters are emotionally laden, relational, hybrid, corporeal and contingent, possibilities open up for breaking the silences that divide us and overcoming ontological divisions such as activist and non-activist.”

This symposium aims to involve conversations between activists and non-activists, as well as academics as activists in order to explore the complex construction of protests as events / events as protests. We propose an innovative coming together of activists and academics to build bridges, initiate debate and develop future research agendas.

The conceptualisation of protests as events and vice versa involves consideration of the temporalities of protests as well as the mobilities that are enacted to bring together an assemblage that may be on the move or fixed at a still point.

Protests as Events/ Events as Protests was inspired by the workshop held at the University of Leicester in June 2012 entitled (Re)thinking Protest Camps: governance, spatiality, affect and media.

 

This call thus seeks papers that focus on one or more of the following topics:

·         Conceptualisations of protests as events          

·         The academic/activist interface

·         Timings and rhythms of protests

·         Discursive constructions of protests

·         Protest and political tourism

·         Mobile assemblages and protests

·         Embodiments of protest events

·         Sustaining protests in the face of cultural changes

·         Protests and sports events

·         Critical hospitality and protests

·         Governance and the governmentalities of protest events

 

We are now seeking proposals for papers for this symposium. Abstracts should be emailed to d.carl@leedsmet.ac.uk and be no more than 300 words. The call is now open and abstracts must be received by 10th March 2013 the very latest.

 

Planned outputs:

It is envisaged that symposium outputs will include a special issue of a journal and an edited book based upon the papers presented.

As well as academic papers we are looking to work with activist groups to integrate, into the symposium programme, a series of activist led workshops; the aim of which will be to produce an eBook based on workshop materials.

 

Conveners:

The symposium conveners are: Dr Ian Lamond; Professor Karl Spracklen and Professor Kevin Hannam.

 

Further information:

For further information please visit the symposium’s blog at protestsandevents.wordpress.com

or contact Daniela Carl on +44 (0) 113 -812 8541 or Dr Ian Lamond on +44 (0)113 -812 3816.

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-protests-as-events-events-as-protests-leeds-12-june

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

The Individuality Pr♥test: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/transcontinental/the-individuality-prtest

I Love Transcontinental: http://ihearttranscontinental.blogspot.co.uk/