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Tag Archives: Bankers

North Atlantic Oscillation

North Atlantic Oscillation

THE DARK ARTS OF FINANCE

The Dark Arts of Finance: Speculation, Collaboration and Artistic Labour

Max Haiven

Wednesday March 19th @ 3-5PM, University of Essex, Room 5B.202

Unlike his contemporaries, and unlike so many of today’s commentators, Marx was unsatisfied with approaches to the financial sector that saw it as merely parasitic (or as any more parasitic than other forms of capitalist accumulation). Rather, he suggested that finance represented one important means by which a key crisis endemic to capitalism might be (temporarily) averted: it provided a forum within which otherwise competitive capitalist actors might pool their wealth in the interests of their class and of the system as a whole. Such an approach to finance, and to the important but often overlooked forms of inadvertent cooperation at the heart of capitalist accumulation, may help us explore the politics and potentialities of artists’ collectives amidst today’s “financialization” of art. What might be gained if we imagined the infiltration of “art” by financial methods, measures and metaphors not as a parasitic imposition, but as new grounds for collaboration? Can we not imagine increasingly individuated and competitive artists as unwittingly enrolled in some form of (re)productive collectivity by the speculative currents of the art market? And, if so, how might this open up new ways to imagine radical collectivities that do not merely seek to return art to its allegedly pre-financialized pedestal, but that seize upon this new situation dialectically?

Max Haiven is an assistant professor in the Division of Art History and Critical Studies at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design in Canada. His book Cultures of Financialization: Fictitious Capital in Popular Culture and Everyday Life is forthcoming from Palgrave MacMillan in 2014. His book Crises of the Imagination, Crises of Power: Capitalism, Creativity and the Commons will be published by Zed Books in March 2014. More information can be found at http://maxhaiven.com.

Sponsored by the Centre for Work, Organization, and Society.
This seminar is part of an ongoing workshop series on artist collectives.
For more information contact Stevphen Shukaitis: sshuka@essex.ac.uk

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

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Merchant Bankers

Merchant Bankers

TAX THE RICH: AN ANIMATED FAIRY TALE

Tax the Rich: An Animated Fairy Tale is narrated by Ed Asner, with animation by Mike Konopacki. Written and directed by Fred Glass for the California Federation of Teachers. An 8- minute video about how we arrived at this moment of poorly funded public services and widening economic inequality.

Things go downhill in a happy and prosperous land after the rich decide they don’t want to pay taxes anymore. They tell the people that there is no alternative, but the people aren’t so sure. This land bears a startling resemblance to our land.

For more info, go to http://www.cft.org

Watch the video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S6ZsXrzF8Cc

 

There is a critique of this video: Tax the Rich: A Critiquehttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RA21fu9Y4uA  

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

The Individuality Pr♥test: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/transcontinental/the-individuality-prtest

I Love Transcontinental: http://ihearttranscontinental.blogspot.co.uk/

Merchant Bankers

STATES, BANKS AND CRISIS: EMERGING FINANCE CAPITALISM IN MEXICO AND TURKEY

States, Banks and Crisis: Emerging Finance Capitalism in Mexico and Turkey.

(2012)

Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing.

By Thomas Marois

 

Monday 29 Oct 2012
17:00 – 18:30

Room 4421

SOAS Main Building, London

 

‘Financialization is as financialization does. It is a mix of the universal characteristics of finance within capitalism, its contemporary powerful hold over, even defining feature of, the neoliberal age, and the myriad of specific global markets and countries into which it has penetrated. In a stunning work of comparative political economy, Marois brilliantly weaves together these aspects of finance drawing on both innovative theoretical insights and primary case study evidence from Turkey and Mexico to furnish what will become a classic and original contribution to the understanding of financialization in the developing world, highlighting both the role of the state in the era of putatively free markets and the possibility, indeed, necessity of alternatives.’ – Ben Fine, SOAS, University of London, UK

Event sponsored by SOAS Development Studies, Neoliberalism, Globalisation, and States Research Cluster and the London International Development Centre

Published first in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/states-banks-and-crisis-emerging-finance-capitalism-in-mexico-and-turkey-by-thomas-marois-book-launch-29-october-soas

 

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Occupy London

TENT CITY UNIVERSITY / OCCUPY LONDON

The Tent City University forms part of Occupy London as is ever on the look out for people to contribute their time and knowledge.

If you’d like to get involved while you’re in town for the Historical Materialism conference, please contact: cos01kd@gold.ac.uk.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Work, work, work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 18th APRIL 2010


EVENTS

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK (CSEW) SEMINAR SERIES – ON UNDERSTANDING HUMAN UNDERSTANDING

with Ken Pankhurst

Wednesday, April 21
12 – 2 pm
Room 12-274
OISE, 252 Bloor St. West

The paper will review the nature of human understanding, and consider the significance of uncertainty and ignorance as prolegomena for a discussion of the scientific method and, in particular, methods of investigating human abilities and the state of research in the social sciences.

Dr. K.V. Pankhurst is Visiting Scholar at the Centre for Studies in Education and Work. He recently retired from a career combining appointments in universities, government departments, and international institutions, and was for many years a senior official of the OECD.

About CSEW: http://www.csew.ca

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ASSISTING LOCAL LEADERS WITH IMMIGRANT EMPLOYMENT STRATEGIES (ALLIES) LEARNING EXCHANGE: PUTTING IDEAS INTO ACTION

May 6-7
Halifax, Nova Scotia

More than 150 participants from over 10 city regions across Canada will meet in Halifax to learn about and discuss issues and strategies on how to promote the employment of skilled immigrants. Building on last year’s success in Vancouver, this year’s ALLIES Learning Exchange will bring together local stakeholders, including businesses, civic leaders, universities and colleges, community agencies, and all levels of government from participating communities such as Halifax, Ottawa, Montreal, Toronto, Kitchener-Waterloo, Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver.

Read more: http://www.maytree.com/integration/allies

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G20 SUMMIT IN TORONTO IN JUNE – JOIN THE PEOPLE’S SUMMIT

Governments are planning for the Summit of the G20 leaders in Toronto. However, more interesting for many will be a People’s Summit on June 18/19/20 which will feature workshops, seminars and teach-ins about
globalization, decent work, social justice and the environment.

On June 26th the labour movement will host a major rally for good jobs and global justice. For more information, go to http://peoplessummit2010.ca/section/2 or contact Mehdi at the Canadian Labour Congress at (416) 441-2731.

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CONVERSATION CAFE – NO MONEY. NO STATUS. NO POWER. MUST BE WOMEN’S WORK!

May 10
6:00-8:00 PM

Seneca College at Yorkgate Mall
1 York Gate Blvd
North York, Ontario
Room 218-219

Historically women have received less pay for the work that they do and any work that is considered nurturing work is left to women.

Is that why we see so much community organizing being done by women? What roles are women taking and being given in community building?

– Light meal will be provided
– Child care available by reservation only

Please RSVP by phone to: (416) 231-5499 or by email to: torontocdi@gmail.com

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CO-OPERATION AND SUSTAINABILITY: THE WAY FORWARD

June 14 – 16
The Westin Bayshore
Vancouver, BC

The Canadian Co-operative Association and British Columbia Co-operative Association invite you to beautiful Vancouver for one of the foremost learning and networking events for the Canadian co-operative sector.  Join leaders from co-operatives and credit unions across the country and around the world in exploring, learning and strategizing on co-operating for environmental, organizational and social sustainability.

Read more: http://www.coopscanada.coop/en/orphan/Congress2010

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NEWS & VIEWS

THE TEMPORARY ARMY THAT BATTLES FOR THE ECONOMY

by Duncan Cameron, rabble.ca

Economists often take the economy for an elevator. Are we going up or going down? With the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) arrow recently pointing up, instead of down, you might think the economy is improving. But output (which is what GDP measures) does not matter to people lives as much as employment and its evil twin unemployment.

Read more: http://rabble.ca/columnists/2010/04/temporary-army

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BREAKING DOWN THE WELFARE WALL IN NEW BRUNSWICK

by The Caledon Institute

New Brunswick recently announced a comprehensive poverty reduction strategy that includes radical reform of its social assistance system. It aims to break down the welfare wall that traps thousands of residents… Far from an exit from poverty, welfare has become a social and economic ghetto that creates incentives for
dependence and disincentives for independence.

Read more: http://www.caledoninst.org/Publications/PDF/868ENG.pdf

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ONTARIO ENGINEER / BANKER DEBUNKS P3S (PRIVATE-PUBLIC PARTNERSHIPS)

by Barry Critchley, Financial Post

John Scheel, who trained as a chemical engineer and ended up as a merchant banker, has developed a new passion in retirement: dispelling the supposed advantages of private public partnerships, the P3 sector.
In a nutshell, he believes they are more expensive than they should be, both from an operational and financing point of view and that they generate excess returns to the consortium that builds and manages them. And they are not transparent.

Read more: http://bit.ly/bdiuYP

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INCOME GAP BETWEEN ABORIGINALS IN CANADA AND OTHER GROUPS: ANALYSIS

The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) has just published an informative analysis on the income gaps between aboriginals in Canada and other groups in the country. At least, there is some positive news for
those aboriginals who have graduated from university, but the overall conclusion is that there is still a dramatic difference between most aboriginal groups and others in Canada.

The report is available at the CCPA’s Growing Gap section of its website at: http://www.policyalternatives.ca

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BRIARPATCH LAUNCHES DEEPER ROOTS CAMPAIGN

Over the past year, Briarpatch has continued to break new ground in our provocative explorations of food politics, crime and punishment, education, global feminism and more.

And we’ve got lots more up our sleeves, with issues in the works on migration & borders, the politics of health and the soul of activism — to name just a few.

But while the content of the magazine has never been stronger, Briarpatch has not been immune to the consequences of the economic crisis. Facing rising costs and falling revenues, we’ve struggled recently with serious funding stability problems — a crisis/opportunity that has led us to rethink our entire funding model and propose something bold and dynamic in its place: the Deeper Roots campaign.

Read more: http://bit.ly/d6R16X

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JOURNAL ARTICLES

The nature of giving time to your child’s school
Laura K. Gee
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly published 13 April 2010
http://nvs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0899764010362116v1

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Building a climate for innovation through transformational leadership and organizational culture
James C. Sarros, Brian K. Cooper and Joseph C. Santora
Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies 2008; 15; 145
http://jlo.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/15/2/145

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Making civil society work: Models of democracy and their impact on civic engagement
Isabelle Stadelmann-Steffen and Markus Freitag
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly published 6 April 2010, 10.1177/0899764010362114
http://nvs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0899764010362114v1

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Can an opportunity to learn at work reduce stress?: A revisitation of the job demand-control model
Chiara Panari, Dina Guglielmi, Silvia Simbula, Marco Depolo
Journal of Workplace Learning, Volume 22, Issue 3, Pages: 166-179
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContentItem.do?contentType=Article&contentId=1852672

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David Dubinsky, the International Ladies’ Garment Workers’ Union and the limits of social democratic trade unionism
Victor G. Devinatz
Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal Volume 22, Number 1 / March, 2010, Page 67 – 78
http://springerlink.com/content/m64744243w323q0v/?p=602e69d356ec441c91726304d75a6b53&pi=6

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OUR MANDATE:

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Dave Hill

STATEMENT AND EDUCATION POLICY MANIFESTO – BY DAVE HILL

Statement and Education Policy Manifesto by Dave Hill

Trade Unionist and Socialist Coalition Parliamentary Candidate for Brighton Kemptown

Details at: http://www.brightontusc.blogspot.com

I have spent my lifetime as a teacher in ‘challenging’ primary and secondary schools, in teacher ‘training’ and in universities trying to tackle inequalities in schooling: inequalities that result in millions of working class children having far less educational opportunities – and subsequently, usually lower paid jobs – than the children of richer parents; especially the 7% who go to private schools – and snap up most of the highest paid, elite, jobs.

The very choice of what and how it should be taught, how and what schooling should be organised, how it should be funded, and where and how the funding should be targeted, and a consideration of ‘who wins and who loses’ through all of the above, are all intensely political. And we want that politics to be in the interests of the millions not the millionaires!

I come from a working class family brought up in some poverty: for example on free School Meals (like a million others!) in St. Martins’ St., off the Lewes Rd., Brighton. I went to Westlain Grammar School, my brothers to under-funded secondary modern schools, such as Queens Park and Moulscoomb. Three times as much was spent on the education of grammar school students than on Secondary Modern students! My children went to local state schools. The inequalities I have witnessed – and lived – as a child, as a teacher and socialist political activist, have led me to spending my life fighting for greater equality in education and society, and against racism, sexism and against homophobia.

What an indictment of our divisive education system that students from private schools are 25 times more likely to get to one of the top British universities than those who come from a lower social class or live in a poor area! And that (in 2008) only 35% of pupils eligible for free school meals obtained five or more A* to C GCSE grades; compared with 63% of pupils from wealthier backgrounds.  This stark education inequality mirrors that in our grossly unequal society.

It is incredible, actually it is only too believable, in Britain today, that the richest section of society has 17 years of healthy life more than the least well-off in society. The minimum wage should be raised by 50%. How can people – decent hard working people like some in my own family, live on take-home pay of less than £200 a week! And there should be a maximum wage, too! Nobody, banker, boss, or buy-out bully, should be on more than £250,000 a year. This figure should reduce progressively so that within 10 years no-one is taking more than four times the average wage, nobody should be creaming off £27 million or £67 million a year for example! Certainly not when there are 4 million children living in poverty! I was once one of them. I was helped by the welfare state. We need our public services.  We need to improve them, not cut them; not attack them.

All three parties, New Labour, Lib Dem, and Tory, dance to the music of big business. All are promising cuts. Whatever they say, those cuts will hit schools, children, and the quality of education in our state schools. Already we are seeing staff cuts and course closures in universities up and down the country. In Brighton, for example, both Brighton and Sussex Universities are promising to cut out the nurseries, and Sussex to chop over 100 jobs. Brighton University is proposing to cut its Adult Ed art courses. Vandalism! Cutting popular and widely used public services!

And don’t believe cuts are necessary. They’re not! Cutting the Trident nuclear submarine replacement programme, bringing troops home from Afghanistan and Iraq, stopping the Identity Card programme, and collecting even some even of the £120 billion in taxes unpaid by the rich… yes, £120 billion!…would mean cuts are not necessary at all!

But you won’t hear that from the other parties, just from Socialists, like the Trade Unionist and Socialist Coalition, and from Respect.

A Socialist Manifesto for Education is:

[1] Cut class sizes (they are currently some of the largest in the rich world- much larger than in private schools for example). According to OECD research Britain is 23rd out of 30 developed countries in terms of large class size. Other countries such as Finland have a maximum class size of 20. Finland is widely seen as providing an extremely high quality of education. For a maximum class size of 20 by 2020 in both primary and secondary schools!

[2] Abolish league tables and abolish SATS (some external testing is necessary, but SATS so very often restricts teaching to ‘teaching to the test’, and results in undue stress (and an increase in bedwetting, compared to the pre-SATS era, for example).

[3] Restore local democratic control of ‘Academies’. They should be run by the democratically elected local councils, and keep to national pay and conditions agreements. Why should rich businessmen and women take control of any of our schools? Let’s keep the added investment- but it’s the government that pays for that added investment anyhow! Let’s keep and enhance the added investment, but distribute it fairly between all schools. Our schools and the children in them are not for sale! Nor, through uneven funding for different types of school (e.g. Academies) should some schools be set up for success at the expense of others being set up (and under-funded) for relative failure.

[4] Private profiteering out of our schools! Bring the education services hived off to private profiteers back into either national or local private ownership! These include Ofsted, Student grants, school meals, cleaning and caretaking.

[5] Free, nutritious, balanced school meals for every child to combat poor diets, obesity, and… yes… for some children… hunger!

[6] Restore free adult education classes in pastime and leisure studies as well as in vocational training/ studies

[7] Restore free, state-funded residential centres and Youth Centres/Youth clubs for our children so they can widen their experiences of life in safe circumstances and enhance their education beyond the confines of the home or city.

[8] For a fully Comprehensive Secondary School system; so that each school has a broad social class mix and mix of ability and attainment levels. 

[9] For the integration of Private schools into the state education system – so that the goodies of the private school system are shared amongst all pupils/ students. All schools to be under democratic locally elected local council control. No to Private Schools. No to religious groups running schools. No to big business / private capital running our schools and children! 

[10] Free up the curriculum so there can be more creativity and cross-subject/ disciplinary work.

[11] Get Ofsted and their flawed tick-box system off the back of teachers. The results of Ofsted are to penalise even the best schools (outstanding in every aspect- other than in SATS attainments) in the poorest areas.

[12] Encourage Critical Thinking across the curriculum. Teach children not ‘what to think’, but ‘how to think’: including how to think critically about the media and politicians.

[13] Teach in schools for ecological literacy and a readiness to act for environmental justice as well as economic and social justice. Encourage children to ‘reach for the stars’ – and to work for a society that lets that happen – a fairer society with much more equal chances, pay packets and power, and about environmental and sustainability issues.  

[14] Proper recognition of all school workers, and no compulsory redundancies. For teachers, secretarial and support staff, teaching assistants, school meals supervisory assistants, caretaking staff, there should be workplace democratic regular school forums in every school. Regarding jobs (for example the threatened job cuts at Sussex University – and the ‘inevitable’ job cuts in every? school after the election – and no compulsory redundancies – any restructuring to be conditional on agreement with the trade unions.

[15] Setting up of school councils – to encourage democratic understanding, citizenship, social responsibility, and a welcoming and valuing of ‘student/pupil voice’.

[16] Ensuring that schools are anti-racist, anti-sexist and anti-homophobic – making sure schools encourage equality, welcoming different home and group cultures. As part of this, anti-bullying practices in every school must be fully implemented, to combat bullying of all sorts, including racism, sexism, homophobia, and bullying based on disabilities. And this should be not just in anti-bullying policies, but also be part of the curriculum too!

[17] An honest sex education curriculum in schools that teaches children not just ‘when to say no’, but also when to say ‘yes’; a programme that is focused on positives and pleasure and personal worth, not on stigmatising sex and sexualities.

[18] No to ‘Faith Schools’ and get organised religion out of schools. If Christians, Jews, Muslims, Hindus, Zoroastrians, or whichever religion wishes to teach religion, let them do it in their own time, places of worship (Saturday/Sunday schools) or in their supplementary or complementary schools. Teach ethics and spirituality by all means, and teach about religions. But no brainwashing. Teach a critical approach to religions.

[19] Broaden teacher education and training so that the negative effects of the ‘technicisation and de-theorising’ of teacher training (that were the result of the 1992/1993 Conservative re-organisation of what was then called teacher education- subsequently retitled teacher training). Bring back the study and awareness of the social and political and psychological contexts of teaching, including an understanding of and commitment to challenge and overturn racism, sexism, homophobia and other forms of underexpectation and discrimination – such as discrimination against working class pupils.

[20] A good, local school for every child. No school closures! “Surplus places” should actually mean lower class sizes! And increased community use of school facilities.

[21] A completely fully funded, publicly owned and democratic education system from pre-school right through to university. Education is a right not a commodity to be bought and sold. So: no fees, like in Scandinavia, Cuba, Venezuela, Bolivia, where education up to PhD level is free. No to university or further education/vocational training fees! And bring in a living grant for students from less well-off backgrounds/ income.

In my jobs, firstly as a teacher, and now as a Professor of Education (and writer/editor of 17 books on education and equality) I have been round hundreds of schools. Many of them are brilliant. Schools in the poorest areas, schools in better off areas! Brilliant. But, with better funding, smaller class sizes, an end to the destructive competition between schools (if every school is a good local school) and with more professional judgement being allowed for teachers- then I look forward to a time when all state schools match the class sizes and results of the currently more lavishly funded private schools’. And working class kids – black, brown, white – get the fair deal currently trumpeted – but in actuality denied – by all three major parties.  

Professor Dave Hill, The Trade Unionist and Socialist Coalition (TUSC) parliamentary candidate for Brighton Kemptown

Professor Dave Hill teaches at Middlesex University and is Visiting Professor of Critical Education Policy and Equality Studies at the University of Limerick, Ireland.

The Brighton Trade Unionist and Socialist Coalition blogspot is at: http://www.brightontusc.blogspot.com

Dave’s Wiki and Publications are at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Hill_(professor)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Work, work, work

Work, work, work

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 9th NOVEMBER 2009

 

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

To change your subscription settings, visit http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

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EVENTS

FALL COLLOQUIUM: DEVELOPING THE VISION OF SOCIAL CHANGE

Wednesday, November 18
6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
OISE Room 5 – 250
252 Bloor St. West, Toronto

With:

Kathryn Church, Associate Professor, School of Disability Studies, Ryerson University. Long-time ally and researcher with disability and mental health communities.

Winnie Ng, OISE doctoral student, well-known Toronto community activist and labour educator. Currently engaged in reimagining anti-racist learning.

What does an agenda for “workplace learning” look like from the perspective of workers with disabilities? From a racial and economic justice perspective?

Join us for these two dynamic presentations, with time for questions. You will also have an opportunity to meet with faculty and students in OISE’s Collaborative Program in Workplace Learning and Social Change.

Light refreshments will be served. For more information on the program, visit: http://aecp.oise.utoronto.ca/ae/programs/collaborative/wlsc.html

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CANADIAN LABOUR INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL (CLIFF) DEBUTS!

November 22-29, 2009

Imagine a world where thousands of films are made about workers and the conditions under which they live, work, fight, and succeed in their daily lives. In just a few days, the Canadian Labour International Film Festival (CLiFF) will debut in Toronto. All screenings are free!

The launch at the Sheraton Centre at 4 pm on Sunday November 22 (site of the Ontario Federation of Labour convention) will be followed by six evenings at the Bloor Cinema in Toronto.

Hope you can join us for the grand opening on the 22nd – great films, music, speakers! And at the Bloor Cinema from Monday through Saturday. Details of the festival country-wide in dozens of locations Saturday-Sunday November 28-29 are available on the CLIFF website: http://www.labourfilms.ca

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TORONTO SOCIALIST ACTION PRESENTS REBEL FILMS: DR. STRANGELOVE

Friday, November 13
7 p.m.
OISE, 252 Bloor St. West, Room 2-212
St. George Subway Station
Everyone welcome. $4 donation requested.

93 minutes, 1964, B&W. An insane general starts a process towards nuclear holocaust that a war room of politicians and generals frantically try to stop. Stanley Kubrick’s iconic spoof on the arms race makes a powerful case for nuclear disarmament. Science for Peace executive board member Jim Deutsch will speak about the current nuclear arms race, followed by an open discussion.

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RESEARCH FORUM: THE PEOPLE’S RECESSION – ONE YEAR LATER

Social Planning Toronto Research and Policy Forum

Wednesday, November 11
9:30 a.m. – Noon
Lillian H. Smith Library,
239 College Street (just east of Spadina) Room BC

Please join us for our November forum with:

* Armine Yalnizyan, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives – Recession and realcovery: what’s community service got to do with it?
* Beth Wilson, Social Planning Toronto and the Social Planning Network of Ontario – SPNO’s hard hit: impact of the economic downturn on nonprofit community social services in Ontario
* Ann Fitzpatrick, Recession Relief Coalition – Taking action on the people’s recession

All are welcome but space is limited. Register at: http://socialplanningtoronto.org/news/research-forum-the-peoples-recession-one-year-later/

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LUNCHBOX SPEAKERS’ SERIES: NOVEMBER SPEAKERS’ PANEL – YOUTH FOR YOUTH INITIATIVES

Wednesday, November 18
Noon – 1:30 pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
University of Toronto
252 Bloor St. West
Toronto, Room 12-199

Speakers:

Hannah Feldberg – will discuss the concept of Me to We as a new kind of social enterprise; one which was first a philosophy and is now a movement carried by dedicated social justice advocates – the youth of today.

Liam O’Doherty – will explore how social media can empower youth organizing and how online, peer-to-peer collaboration is complimentary to traditional methods of activism.

Jeffrey Ma – will talk about why crossing borders can be easier than crossing the street, and the importance of connecting with people of different faiths and values, both internationally and here at home.

Bring your lunch and a mug – coffee, tea and water will be provided.

For more information, contact Lisa White at: secspeaker@oise.utoronto.ca or visit our website at: http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca

This event will also be webcast live on the Internet. Please see our website at: http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca/english/webcast.php for detailed instructions.

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GOOD JOBS, STRONG COMMUNITIES! UNITE-HERE CAMPAIGN 2010

Join hundreds of members of Unite Here Local 75 as we celebrate our victories and launch our 2010 multi-city campaign for good jobs and strong communities!

November 10, 2009

5:30: Gather at City Hall for rally, March to Hyatt Regency Hotel
*Pre-rally activities at City Hall, 100 Queen St. W, Toronto
3:30-4:30 Press conference and welcome, Member’s Lounge, City Hall
4:30-5:30 Briefing: Looking back, moving forward. Council Chambers, City Hall

* Hear what the Hotel Workers Rising movement has won in Toronto and North America.
* Learn about the role of hospitality jobs in the road to economic recovery
* Meet members of the “Hyatt 100,” a group of non-union housekeepers from Boston fighting Hyatt’s efforts to outsource their jobs with low-paid agency work
* Learn about the fight for good hospitality jobs in Toronto, 2010.

Hotel Workers Rising: Standing up for good jobs and strong communities.
RSVP: info@uniteherelocal75.org

Find out more: http://www.uniteherelocal75.org, http://www.uniteherecanada.org, or http://www.unitehere.org.

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NEWS & VIEWS

CITY OF TORONTO’S CAPITAL BUDGET – HAVE YOUR SAY!

The City of Toronto’s proposed 2010 capital budget and 10-year plan were presented at the City’s Budget Committee on Tuesday, November 3. Find more details on how you can make a submission, read the analyst’s notes and more on the city website: http://www.toronto.ca/budget2010/.

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NEW STUDY IDENTIFIES PEAK TIMES FOR BRAIN INJURIES IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

TORONTO, Oct. 6 /CNW/ – August may be the cruellest month for brain injuries in Ontario’s construction industry, but a new study shows October is not far behind.

“We thought it was important to track these injuries month by month,” says Dr. Angela Colantonio, a senior scientist at Toronto Rehabilitation Institute and co-author of the study published this week in the journal Brain Injury.

Few academic studies have looked at brain injury among construction workers. Yet the construction industry – with approximately 400,000 workers in Ontario alone – is known to have a high rate of serious brain injury. The new study used data from the Ontario Workplace Safety and Insurance Board on 218 cases of non-fatal brain injury which resulted in days off work in 2004-2005.

The authors weren’t surprised to find the highest number of brain injuries in the busy construction month of August, while December had the lowest number. But they didn’t expect to find a second peak of injuries in October. This may reflect a surge in work to complete projects prior to the winter months. Contributing factors, they speculate, could be shorter days to work, less light, and more adverse weather conditions. The authors want to do further study to find out if this seasonal pattern holds for other years.

Their study also begins to raise questions about the time of day when many construction-related brain injuries occur. It identifies two peaks during the day: the hour before and the hours after lunch.

“Most of us know that lethargic feeling that hits just before or after lunch at work: our energy dips, it’s hard to focus but we have a job to finish,” says Dr. Colantonio. Other factors may also be distracting workers in anticipation of, or during, their lunch break – and affecting their attention on the job. “For construction workers, this could have devastating consequences.”

Doug McVittie, study co-author and assistant general manager and director of operations for the Construction Safety Association of Ontario (CSAO), says his group will circulate the findings to construction companies across the province, as well as labour and management health and safety committees. The results will also be shared with CSAO staff members who provide training and safety seminars for construction workers.

For further information: Carolyn Lovas, Media Relations Specialist, Toronto Rehab, (416) 597-3422, ext. 3837, Lovas.Carolyn@torontorehab.on.ca.

To read the study: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02699050903036033

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BRIARPATCH MAGAZINE, NOV/DEC 2009: WORK & THE GREEN ECONOMY

The economic crisis has taken a grim toll on working people and on the labour movement. In its wake, can labour activists and environmentalists join forces to build a green economy that works for everyone? This is just one of the many questions we set out to answer in our annual labour issue, which also brings you a report on the sorry state of freelance journalism, a first-hand account of fighting fire in Canada’s Big Wild, an assessment of the prospects for union organizing in tough times, a look at the intersection of neoliberalism and volunteerism in New Orleans, and more.

To subscribe or order a copy of this issue, call 1-866-431-5777 or visit our secure online shop at: http://briarpatchmagazine.com/webstore.

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VIDEO: CF 61 (LOCKED-OUT CADILLAC FAIRVIEW WORKERS) TALK TO THE CROWD AT ST JAMES PARK, TORONTO

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8az_8QpfQtI

CF 61 told the crowd how Cadillac Fairview has attacked the workers to avoid employing older workers. Information sheets being circulated talk about the malls to boycott during the 2009 Christmas Shopping season.

The OCAP TD Centre rally supported the 61 locked out and terminated employees of Cadillac Fairview. The CF 61 are represented by CEP Local 2003. Please visit the story of the workers struggle against the bank and their fight for justice here: ‘Solidarity with Toronto Dominion Centre employees under attack’: http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=104383668872  or visit: http://www.ceplocal2003.org/.

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CANADA/BRAZIL: TELL VALE THAT DIVIDE-AND-CONQUER WON’T WORK

Since being privatized in 1997, the global mining giant Vale has unleashed a vicious attack on workers. The company undermined health and safety standards in Brazil and now it’s set its sights on Canada. In 2009 negotiations with the United Steelworkers (USW), Vale claimed it needed deep concessions – despite making over $13 billion (USD) in 2008 net profits. The company’s strategy is to divide and conquer by undermining seniority and providing lesser benefits to new employees. 3,500 members of the USW rejected Vale’s demands and went on strike in mid-July. Vale has since announced it will hire replacement workers and force other union members to do the work of the striking miners. Meanwhile Vale workers throughout Brazil are struggling to hold on to jobs, earn a living wage, achieve minimum standards for safe working conditions, and guarantee basic labor rights. Vale employees and their unions in Brazil and Canada are fighting back together,
reaching out to workers in a global campaign for fair treatment at Vale.

To read more, click here: http://www.labourstart.org/cgi-bin/solidarityforever/show_campaign.cgi?c=595

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PAY BONANZA CONTINUES FOR BANKERS

By Linda McQuaig – Source: rabble.ca

Some people were outraged last week by a report that a member of the kitchen staff of bailed-out Wall Street firm AIG had received a $7,700 bonus.

Surely that was far less outrageous than the million-dollar bonuses paid to others at AIG who actually carried out the firm’s financial business.

After all, the kitchen helper produced something that at least could be eaten. Apart from perhaps overcooking the Chateaubriand or leaving spots on the champagne glasses, what harm could the kitchen helper have done — compared to driving the world economy over a cliff?

To read more: http://rabble.ca/columnists/2009/10/pay-bonanza-continues-bankers

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JOB POSTINGS

COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER, SOCIAL PLANNING TORONTO (SPT)

Social Planning Toronto (SPT) is a non-profit community organization committed to independent social planning at the local and city-wide levels. We work to improve the quality of life for all people in Toronto through community capacity building, community education and advocacy, policy research and analysis, and social reporting.

SPT has a full-time Communications Officer position available. This position will be of interest to individuals who have a proven track record working in the area of communications focused on community development and action.

This position encompasses the development and implementation of the overall communications, public relations and media strategies of SPT.

Responsibilities include:

* Develop and implement internal and external communication strategies/policies;
* Prepare SPT annual communications plan;
* Design, edit and disseminate all SPT publications, print and promotional materials (e.g. reports, newsletters, journals, periodic publications, brochures, written and electronic bulletins, flyers, press releases, etc.);
* Manage information on the SPT website (using a popular content management platform) including all content both textual and visual;
* Write and develop press releases, articles, speeches, media advisories, media kits, and cultivate media relations;
* Supervise placement students and volunteers as appropriate.

Application deadline is November 22. For a complete copy of the job description and application info visit: http://socialplanningtoronto.org/news/position-opening-communications-officer/

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VOLUNTEER WITH CLIFF- CANADA’S ONLY NATIONAL LABOUR FILM FEST!

The Canadian Labour International Film Festival (CLiFF) is now accepting volunteer applicants to help out with our inaugural festival. Our not-for-profit festival celebrates films about workers, for workers and by workers.

Volunteers can be involved in many aspects of the festival from suggesting recent films for inclusion to helping throw media-related events like the one we are planning for Labour Day! As our festival launch draws closer we will also need people to help distribute leaflets, assemble media kits, as well as helping manage other volunteers. During the festival itself we’ll also need help taking tickets and individuals to act us ushers. There’s a place for everyone.

Upon request, volunteers will receive a letter reflecting their commitment and involvement in the festival. Don’t pass up this unique opportunity to see the inner workings of a festival in its first year!

All volunteers should be: 18 years of age or older willing to attend a mandatory volunteer orientation session, committed, friendly, team players.

The festival launches November 22nd in Toronto and runs until November 29th. It launches country-wide November 28th. We will be holding volunteer orientations sessions in August through the start of November.

Please e-mail us at: festival@labourfilms.ca with the word “Volunteer” in the subject line.

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PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT, CANADA WORLD YOUTH

Type: Definite term contract, part-time: 17.5 hours/week
Organization: Canada World Youth http://www.cwy-jcm.org
Location: Toronto, Montreal or Vancouver, Canada

Main responsibilities: In keeping with Canada World Youth’s policies,

* Plan and support program activities.
* Provide direct administrative and logistical support to the programs.
* Ensure effective communications between the various constituencies of the programs.
* Liaise with volunteers participating in team support activities.
* Perform a number of accounting functions.
* Ensure the layout and production of training and/or information tools.
* Revise and maintain up-dated program-related information systems.
* Write various letters, reports and other documents.

Application deadline is November 10. For the complete job description and application info visit: http://www.planetfriendly.net/gwd.php?id=9594

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JOURNAL ARTICLES

Cities and the making of modern Europe
Friedrich Lenger
Journal of Urban History published 14 October 2009, 10.1177/0096144209349891
http://juh.sagepub.com/cgi/rapidpdf/0096144209349891v1

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Grounding the regime of precarious employment: Homeless day laborers’ negotiation of the job queue
Damian T. Williams
Work and Occupations 2009;36 209-246
http://wox.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/36/3/209

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“The worse you behave, the more you seem to be rewarded”: Bullying in nursing as organizational corruption
Marie Hutchinson, Margaret H. Vickers, Lesley Wilkes, Debra Jackson
Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal, Volume 21, Number 3 / September 2009
http://www.springerlink.com/content/dt2532t401756817/

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Social inequality, lifestyles and health – a non-linear canonical correlation analysis based on the approach of Pierre Bourdieu
Kirstin Grosse Frie, Christian Janssen
International Journal of Public Health
http://www.springerlink.com/content/u5783l3785780r34/

***END***

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Chipsdown

Chipsdown

BROWNDOWN MELTDOWN

 

There is an excellent article by George Monbiot in The Guardian today: ‘One financial meltdown, it seems, is just not enough for Gordon Brown’ (8th September, p.33).

Monbiot indicates Gordon Brown’s degree of responsibility for the current crisis of capital and his dysfunctional reluctance to attempt to place substantial restraints on banks and bankers’ activities – which have been ruinous for millions.

As Monbiot notes:

“So there will be no reckoning. There will be no firm restraint, no punishment, no measure sufficient to prevent a repetition of the crash. The only people who will not be harmed by the banking crisis are the bankers who caused it”.

See the article at: http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2009/sep/07/financial-meltdown-gordon-brown-g20

Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Recession Blues

 

CLICK HERE TO BUY A COPY OF THE SPECIAL ISSUE OF ‘SOUNDINGS’ AT THE SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY PRICE OF £5: http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/soundings/current.html

CONTENTS:
ADAM LEAVER on private equity
TOBY LLOYD on the housing disaster
CARLOTA PEREZ on financial bubbles
KATE CRAWFORD on adulthood
ZYGMUNT BAUMAN on life on credit
RICHARD MURPHY on tax justice
JULIE FROUD on city pay
TOBY DODGE on Iraq’s new ruling elite
ANTHONY JACKSON and EVE MITCHELL on food sovereignty
HEATHER NUNN and ANITA BIRESSI on the undeserving poor
STEPHEN AMIEL, JOHN LAUNER on general practice

To subscribe by standing order at the special price of £20 go to http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/standingorder.html

For Soundings ebook THE CRASH: A VIEW FROM THE LEFT go to: http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/ebooks/crash.html

For details of Soundings 20 JUNE EVENT go to http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/events/seminar5.html

Please pass on this email to friends and colleagues who might be interested

New readers – to sign up to receive regular information on soundings and related events click here http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/newsletter.html

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Why the Crisis isn’t the fault of ‘Greedy Bankers’

 

A Principia Dialectica Meeting

 

Friday 17 April at 7.30pm

The Lucas Arms

Grays Inn Road

London

 

Nearest tube: King’s Cross

 

Is the credit crunch and crisis really the result of greed, stupidity and incompetence, as more or less everyone, from the Right and the Left are telling us, or are there deeper reasons for the mess? The theory of value, which Marx laid out in Capital, does provide us with a way to understand the world we live in, but we need to recognise that capital is a powerful machine or organism, and a highly dysfunctional one at that, following its own mad laws of development, and for whom humanity is no more than an appendage. Nobody actually “runs” the system, certainly not the G20 leaders, or the so-called ‘Masters of the Universe’ on Wall Street. It’s the system that runs them! Come and take part in a discussion on the value-based analysis of capital today and what it means for the future of humanity.

 

More details: http://www.principiadialectica.co.uk

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

G20 Meltdown and Professor Chris Knight

 

Professor Chris Knight, an anthropologist at the University of East London (UEL), was suspended from his duties by UEL yesterday for comments he made in relation to the forthcoming G20 Meltdown protests in London.

 

Newspaper reports on the issue can be viewed at:

 

Fiona Hamilton, ‘Anarchist professor Chris Knight suspended after G20 ‘treat’, The Times, 26rg March, online at:

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/politics/G20/article5982908.ece

 

Emma Jacobs, ‘Batten the hatches for G20 Meltdown’, Financial Times, 27th March, online at: http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/7fb57298-1a70-11de-9f91-0000779fd2ac.html

 

Michael Seamark, “‘If you want violence, you’ll get it,” threatens professor suspended ahead of G20 summit’, Daily Mail, 27th March, online at:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1165168/If-want-violence-youll-threatens-professor-suspended-ahead-G20-summit.html

 

Chris Knight’s we site: http://homepages.uel.ac.uk/C.Knight/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk