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NEOLIBERALISM AND ORDOLIBERALISM: ONE OR TWO CRITIQUES?

 

STAMP – Centre for the Study of States, Markets & People
School of Business & Law, University of East London, Annual Research Colloquium
On: “Neoliberalism and Ordoliberalism: One or Two Critiques?”

Tuesday 12 December 2017, 14.30pm – 19.30pm.
Venue: USS G.19/20, University of East London, 1 Salway Road, London, E15 1NF

(5 minutes’ walk from Stratford tube station)

Speakers and participants include: Professor Werner Bonefeld (York University), Dr. Gareth Dale (Brunel University), Professor Bülent Gökay (Keele University) Professor Bob Jessop (Lancaster University) and Dr. Mike Wilkinson (London School of Economics)

As the Euro-zone enters its ninth year of crisis and Britain posits itself for a hard Brexit, it is now widely accepted that German/Austrian ordoliberal policy principles — de-politicisation of central bank, deflationary policy and strong state — have long been institutionalised in the EU. But if the ordoliberal public policy in the Euro-zone and beyond manages EU processes, then what are its points of divergence and convergence with Anglo-American neo-liberalism — which some North American scholars identify as “New Constitutionalism”? If neo-liberal financialisation as a form of public policy could not arrest the slow and protracted decline of American Empire since the late 1960s, can German ordoliberalism re-launch the process of European integration, and on what policy basis? Was ordoliberalism a deliberate, post-war, policy plan to dominate Europe’s various state executives, or did it come about structurally and by way of France’s and Italy’s persistence to engage Germany in a currency union in order to control its superior industrial and monetary might? Under what forms of political governance, law and civic consciousness can neo-liberalism and ordoliberalism best operate? Last but not least, do we need one or two comprehensive critiques for these two separable, but not separate, public policies? These are some of the pertinent questions the STAMP Colloquium is proposing to address, launching a new research programme in the fields of global and European history, public policy, constitutional law and international
relations.

For further information about the workshop, please contact: Mr Seun Alele, e-mail: O.Alele@uel.ac.uk

Programme
14.30 – 14.45 Vassilis K. Fouskas (UEL) “Welcome and Opening Comments”
14.45 – 15.15 Gareth Dale (Brunel) “Ordoliberalism as a German Product: Origins, Evolution, Purposes”
15.15 – 15.45 Werner Bonefeld (York) “Stateless Money and State Power: Ordoliberal Insights and Capitalist Organisation”
15.45 – 16.30 Questions & Answers
16.30 – 17.00 Tea/Coffee
17.00 – 17.30 Bülent Gökay (Keele) “One neo-liberalism or many?”
17.30 – 18.00 Mike Wilkinson (LSE) “Authoritarian Liberalism: Exception or Norm?”
18.00 – 18.30 Questions & Answers
18.30 – 18.45 Bob Jessop (Lancaster) via skype “Financialization, Ordoliberalism, Neo-liberalization and the State of Permanent Austerity”
19.00 – 19.30 Conclusions and ideas about how to take this research programme forward. Bob Jessop to be engaged via skype

 

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Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Neoliberalism

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Capitalism: Concept & Idea

CAPITALISM: CONCEPT & IDEA

 

Friday 13 October – Saturday 14 October 2017

Time: 9.00am – 5.00pm
Price: £5 – £35

Book now > https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/capitalism-concept-idea-tickets-35934618411

Please note changing venues:

The Friday event will be held at Conway Hall, 25 Red Lion Square, WC1R 4RL
The Saturday event will be held at the Old Lecture Theatre, LSE, Houghton Street, WC2A 2AE

 

Capital: Concept & Idea

150 Years of Marx’s /Capital/: The Philosophy and Politics of Capital Today

As a counterpoint to the retreat of the concept of communism from history to ‘idea’, this conference will mark the 150th anniversary of the first volume of Karl Marx’s Capital: A Critique of Political Economy by asking the question of the meanings of ‘capital’ and ‘capitalism’ today as at once (explanatory structural-historical) concepts and (political) ideas.

In particular: What is the current standing of the different philosophical interpretations of Marx’s Capital? What light do they thrown on capitalism today? How have historical developments since Marx’s day changed the concept of capitalism? Has ‘neo-liberal’ capitalism rendered the concept of crisis redundant, for example? Is capitalism governable? Or is capital itself now the main form of governmentality? What is the precise character of Capital as a text – in terms of theory and in terms of literature? What does it mean to be ‘against capitalism’ today?

 

Speakers

Éric Alliez (CRMEP, Kingston University/University of Paris 8)
Cinzia Arruzza (New School for Social Research, NY)
Leigh Claire La Berge (CUNY)
Tithi Bhattacharya (Purdue University)
Werner Bonefeld (University of York)
Boris Buden (Bauhaus-Universität Weimar)
Michael Heinrich (Prokla, Berlin)
Anselm Jappe (Academy of Fine Arts, Sassari)
John Kraniasukas (Birkbeck, University of London)
Elena Louisa Lange (University of Zurich)
Maurizio Lazzarato (Paris)
Jason W. Moore (Binghamton University, NY)
Antonio Negri (Paris)
Peter Osborne (CRMEP, Kingston University)
Judith Revel (University of Paris 10)
Gayatri C. Spivak (Columbia University, NY)
Keston Sutherland (University of Sussex)

Sessions

Capital and Capitalism 1: Value-form and Politics
Capital and Capitalism 2: Capital, Science and Ecology
Capital, Feminism and Social Reproduction
Capitalism and Freedom
Subjectivation and War (Marx and Foucault)
Poetics of Capital/Capital
Capital’s Destinerrance: Event and Task
Marxian Ontology, Today

 

View the programme (subject to change) >
View the paper titles, abstracts and speakers’ biographies >

Booking is essential to attend this event.

The Failure of Capitalism

 

Further Information:

Conference website: http://kingston.ac.uk/cap17

Contact: Eric-John Russell
Email: k1543754@kingston.ac.uk

 

 

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Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Living Fire

Critique of Political Economy

KARL MARX READING GROUP – LONDON – CAPITAL VOLUME 2

 

As many scholars, critical thinkers, activists and interested parties as possible are invited to a new Reading Group in London UK beginning mid-October 2017 which will read Volume 2 of Capital by Karl Marx.

There are 3 founder members of the group: Dr. Pritam Singh – Professor of Political Economy at Oxford Brooks University Business School; Dr. Jon Hackett – Senior Lecturer in Film Studies at St. Mary’s University; and Biswadip Dasgupta, a lay student of Marx with extensive experience of Marx reading groups over the last few years.

Clearly the most suitable readers would be those who have already read Capital Volume 1 at least but others who have read other parts of Marx’s oeuvre or those who simply want a greater critical understanding of the capitalist economy are also welcome.

Looking forward to a great journey through Volume 2 of Marx’s great critique of political economy!

Please email farout.left@gmail.com for an invitation to join the Google group and discuss further details about the reading group.

Please circulate widely

Karl Marx

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Mike Neary

PEDAGOGY OF HATE

 

Cass School of Education and Communities Seminar

Date: Monday 12 June 2017, 16.00-18.00

Venue: Room ED2.03, The Cass School of Education and Communities, University of East London, Stratford Campus, London E16 4LZ

Convenor: Dr. Rhiannon Firth

 

Seminar title: Pedagogy of Hate

Seminar speaker: Professor Mike Neary, Professor of Sociology, School of Social and Political Sciences, The University of Lincoln

 

Abstract

The paper recovers the concept of hate as a critical political category. Not a personal, psychological or pathological hate, but a radical hate for what capitalist civilisation has become. Radical hate is set alongside radical love so the dynamic of negative dialectics can be put in motion. This exposition of radical hate is elaborated through a critical engagement with the work of Peter McLaren, a significant figure in the field of critical pedagogy, whose recent work has called for a pedagogy of resurrection based on the affirmation of holy love, Christian socialism and the life of historical Jesus. The paper provides studies of how negative dialectics can move within higher education, as ‘Student as Producer’, the Social Science Centre, Lincoln and as a co-operative university.

 

Mike Neary is Professor of Sociology at the University of Lincoln in the School of Social and Political Sciences.

 

Readings

Neary, Mike (2017) Pedagogy of Hate. Pre-print of article to appear in Policy Futures in Education: http://eprints.lincoln.ac.uk/26793/3/__network.uni_staff_S2_mneary_Pedagogy%20of%20Hate.pdf

Neary, Mike & Saunders, Gary (2016) Student as Producer and the Politics of Abolition: making a new form of dissident institution. Critical Education http://ices.library.ubc.ca/index.php/criticaled/article/view/186127

 

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Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

 

John Holloway

READING CAPITAL: WEALTH IN-AGAINST-AND BEYOND VALUE – JOHN HOLLOWAY IN LINCOLN

Research in Critical Education Studies (RiCES)

School of Education

University of Lincoln

Brayford Pool

16 June 2017
1:00-4:00pm
Room:
Minerva Building, MB1012

Professor John Holloway will be speaking about his new work, ‘Reading Capital: wealth in-against-and-beyond value’ at the University of Lincoln, on 16th of June.

John’s reading and writings on Marxist social theory are highly influential as a way of rethinking Marx in terms of ‘Change the World Without Taking Power’ (2005) and abolishing the social relations of capitalist production through acts of resistance, as ways to ‘Crack Capitalism’ (2010). In this new work, ‘Reading Capital’ John points out that Capital does not start with the commodity, as Marx and probably all commentators since Marx have claimed. It actually starts with wealth: “The wealth of societies in which the capitalist mode of production prevails appears as an ‘immense collection of commodities’ …” Seeing wealth and not the commodity as the starting point has enormous consequences, both theoretically and politically. To say that Capital starts not with the commodity but with wealth is both revolutionary and self-evident. The challenge is to trace this antagonism through the three volumes of Marx’s Capital. This is the theme of the talk.

Free Buffet lunch is included.

Register for this event: https://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/whatson/eventsconferences/crack-capitalism.html

Research in Critical Education Studies (RiCES): https://criticaleducation.blogs.lincoln.ac.uk/

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Marx’s Grave

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Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Critique of Political Economy

MARX & PHILOSOPHY SOCIETY ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2017

Marx and the Concept of Labour
24th June 2017
Room 822, University College London Institute of Education, 20 Bedford Way, London WC1H 0AL
Conference poster (pdf)
Conference abstracts

 

Main speakers:
Mike Neary (Lincoln)
Critical theory as a critique of labour, featuring academic work; or, how do revolutionary teachers teach?
Sara Farris (Goldsmiths)
A Marxist-feminist approach to the theory of the reserve army of labour

Anselm Jappe (Sassari)
Marx and the ‘two-fold nature’ of labour: the ‘pivot’ of his critique of capitalism

Graduate panel:
Alastair Hemmens (Cardiff)
Labour, a ‘rational abstraction’? Robert Kurz’s substance of capital and resolving the labour aporia in Marx
Sean Winkler (Leuven)
The Hessen-Grossmann-Lukács Thesis: A Marxist Study of the emotions in early modern philosophy’
Michael Lazurus (Monash)
The standpoint of labour and Marx’s method

Directions: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/maps/ioe
Admission is free but please reserve a place in advance by emailing Eric John Russell at johndavid.correspondence@gmail.com

 

Marx & Philosophy Society: http://marxandphilosophy.org.uk/society

 

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Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Marx’s Grave

BOOKS LAUNCH – TWO NEW BOOKS BY PROFESSOR MIKE COLE

 

Critical Race Theory and Education: a Marxist Response (Revised 2nd Edition)

And

New Developments in Critical Race Theory and Education: Revisiting Racialized Capitalism and Socialism in Austerity

Both books are published by Palgrave Macmillan: Marxism and Education Serieshttps://www.palgrave.com/br/series/14811

Professor Mike Cole (ICPuP)

Cass School of Education and Communities

University of East London

Stratford Campus, UEL, ED.2.02

25 May 2017

17:00-19:00

With an introduction from Professor John Preston (University of East London)

The books address the nature of Critical Race Theory, including its origins, its varieties and its major strength. This is accompanied by a Marxist critique. Particular attention is paid to two of CRT’s major tenets, its prioritising of “race” over class and its use of “white supremacy”. Also discussed is the perceived decline of “BritiCrit.” Racialized neoliberal capitalism in the era of austerity and immiseration is also addressed as are CRT and Marxist visions of the future. With respect to educational practice, there is a consideration of multicultural and antiracist education in the UK and the US, and of CRT and Marxist suggestions for classroom practice. Moving to the global perspective, it is argued that the world has become polarised and that while discussion of democratic socialism has become more mainstream, fascistic rhetoric and narratives and neo-fascism are becoming normalised. Anything, it is concluded, is now possible.

The launch will be followed by a beer and wine reception

RVSP: Diane Sharrier @ D.Sharrier@uel.ac.uk

Dr Mike Cole is Professor in Education, University of East London, Emeritus Research Professor in Education and Equality, Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln and Visiting Research Fellow, Centre for Social Sciences, Zaman University, Phnom Penh, Cambodia. His other recent and forthcoming books include Racism: A Critical Analysis (Pluto Press, 2016) and the edited collection, Education, Equality and Human Rights: Issues of Gender, “Race”, Sexuality, Disability and Social Class 4th Edition (Routledge, forthcoming, 2017).

Mike Cole

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

 

 

 

EDUCATION FROM BREXIT TO TRUMP … CORBYN AND BEYOND?

Marxism and Education: Renewing Dialogues (MERD – 19) Seminar

This coming Wednesday 3rd May 2017

10am-4pm

University of East London

Stratford Campus

Cass School of Education

Room ED4.02

At this 19th MERD seminar on Wednesday, we will review the emergent contemporary crises of capitalism. In this context, we will focus on education and educating across the social spectrum of institutional and wider social formation to progress class struggle, critique and action. Our four speakers have provided the following blurbs about their presentations:

 

Tony Green (UCL Institute of Education)

Educating the Educators and the Emergent Secular Crises of Contemporary Capitalism: From Brexit to Trump and Corbyn … to Snap Election … and Beyond?

The introduction aims to draw attention to a collection of issues and themes likely to occupy us during the day.  The broad and open-ended agenda is intended to be suggestive of potentially ‘educative’ contexts about how exchange values dominate use values, and where systemic shifting of value and power upwards in support of structures of global oligarchy and plutocratic elite class hegemony, is concurrent with ongoing secular crises of capitalism.   Is the apparent ever-rising tide of ‘prosperity’ contributing to human emancipation and flourishing?  We need to address the global capitalist system, and metabolism in its, tensions and contradictions, with complex and dynamic ramifications at local, regional, national and international levels.  The aim of these introductory remarks is to remind ourselves of current events and possible underlying dynamics that set analytic, strategic and tactical challenges… not least, the performative … during these ever-interesting times. Huge and urgent questions have to be addressed in specific and local contexts: Are all the cards being thrown into the air?  Are there inbuilt legitimation crises playing out across the institutional forms of politics? What are the prospects for the anthropocene? Time to act … now! What is to be done…?

 

Hillary Wainwright (Red Pepper Magazine Editor)

The importance of practical knowledge to the possibility of a new politics from the left

I’ll draw on themes associated with socialist humanist work of Gramsci, Williams and, Thompson, and against a background of recognising that evocations of the organised working class were thwarted too many times, including by leaderships that did not actually believe in the capacity of the supporters, to convince me. Radical social change is surely more than workplace organisation, radical leadership and a conventional political party of the left.  

 

Terry Wrigley (Visiting Professor at Northumbria University, editor International Journal Improving Schools, and co-coordinator of the Reclaiming Schools network)

England is an epicentre and laboratory for neoliberal education policy in advanced economies, with a unique mix of neoconservative ingredients. It has the tightest accountability framework (tests, league tables, Ofsted, performance pay etc.), extensive privatisation, a curriculum which systematically excludes critical social knowledge, and hegemonic discourses around ‘choice’, ‘standards’, ‘leadership’ and ‘social mobility’. 

For critical educators, the pressing challenges include:

  • Making critical theory and research knowledge available to a teaching profession increasingly restricted to short-term pragmatics;
  • Rethinking curriculum, assessment and pedagogy beyond binaries of ‘academic / vocational’ and ‘knowledge / practice’;
  • Protecting spaces for critical understanding and creativity; 
  • Critiquing the distortions of ‘social mobility’ and ‘closing the gap’ in socially just ways;
  • Finding educative responses to the social futures facing young people (Austerity, precarity, migration, militarism). 

 

Richard Hall (De Montfort University)

On the alienation of academic labour and the possibilities for mass intellectuality

As one response to the secular crisis of capitalism, higher education is being proletarianised. Its academics and students, encumbered by precarious employment, overwhelming debt, and new levels of performance management, are shorn of any autonomy. Increasingly the labour of those academics and students is subsumed and re-engineered for value production, and is prey to the vicissitudes of the twin processes of financialisation and marketization. At the core of understanding the impact of these processes and their relationships to higher education is the alienated labour of the academic, as it defines the sociability of the University. This paper examines the role of alienated labour in academic work, and relates this to feelings of hopelessness, in order to ask what might be done differently. The argument centres on the role of mass intellectuality, or socially-useful knowledge and knowing, as a potential moment for overcoming alienated labour.

Organised by Tony Green and Alpesh Maisuria

The seminar is free and open to all, no registration required. Please circulate widely and feel free to attend as much of the day as you possibly can.

Stratford campus is walkable from the nearest stations: Stratford (TfL line) / Stratford International, and Maryland (TfL line).

More travel information can be found here: https://www.uel.ac.uk/About/Finding-us

 

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Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

 

 

JAPMARXIST THEORY AND THE POLITICS OF HISTORY IN MODERN JAPAN

The Center for Social Theory and Comparative History will host its next event on: Marxist Theory and the Politics of History in Modern Japan

Thursday, June 2nd
4:00pm – 6:00 pm
6275 Bunche Hall
Basing himself on his new book, The Sublime Perversion of Capital (Duke University Press, 2016), Gavin Walker will examine the Japanese debate about capitalism from the 1920s to 1950s, using it as his point of departure to consider current discussions of uneven development and contemporary topics in Marxist theory and historiography. Walker locates the debate’s culmination in the work of Uno Kozo, whose investigations into the development of capitalism and the commodification of labour power are essential for rethinking Marxism today. Walker’s analysis of the Japanese debate shows how Marxist thought was globalized from the start.

Gavin Walker teaches in History and East Asian Studies at McGill University. He has written extensively on modern Japan, on Marxism, and on contemporary questions of political organization.

For more information, contact the Center for Social Theory and Comparative History at (310) 206-5675 or abenanav@ucla.edu.

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cstch-lecture-june-2nd-gavin-walker-on-japanese-marxism

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Mors Mystica

Mors Mystica

DARKMATTER

Announcing the publication of a special issue of Darkmatter Journal, “Reflections on Dispossession: Critical Feminisms” eds. Brenna Bhandar and Davina Bhandar, with contributions from Sara R. Farris, Jonathan Goldberg-Hiller, Alyosha Goldstein, Leticia Sabsay and Rafeef Ziadah.

This collection traces a path for contemporary critiques of neoliberal capitalism and colonial dispossession. The authors show the compelling need for complex strategies and tools to evaluate the interlocking or intersectional practices of dispossession, and their particular effects on racialised, Indigenous, sexualized, and gendered subjects.

 

Darkmatter is an open access journal, and the special issue can be accessed here:

http://www.darkmatter101.org/site/category/issues/14-dispossession/

 

Praise for “Reflections on Dispossession”:

“Crossing centuries, oceans, continents, and disciplines, this ambitious and extraordinary collection shows how the logic of dispossession and its productions of difference reach into a present that avows colorblindness and erases coloniality. In its courtrooms, border checkpoints, intimacies, reform impulses, prisons, refugee camps, and regimes of accumulation, the neoliberal order is shown to draw on and recalibrate histories of gendered colonial oppression as long as they are deep.” – David Roediger (University of Kansas)

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/special-issue-of-the-journal-darkmatter-reflections-on-dispossession-critical-feminisms-out-now

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Andrew Kliman

Andrew Kliman

CRITIQUE OF POLITICAL ECONOMY – (COPE): VOLUME 1 NOW OUT

Editors: Andrew Kliman and Alan Freeman

 

The editors have now made the first volume of Critique of Political Economy accessible to the public online.

 

See Volume 1 (from September 2011) at: http://copejournal.com/critique-of-political-economy-vol-1/

 

You can also see papers from the International Working Group on Value Theory (IWGVT) at the same site, see: http://copejournal.com/iwgvt-papers/

 

The COPE / IWGVT website is currently under construction, and more material will uploaded there in the weeks ahead, see: http://copejournal.com/

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

ICCE 6

ICCE 6

6th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL EDUCATION – 2016

10 – 13 August 2016

Middlesex University

London

 

Extended Call for Papers: 31st May 2016

The Deadline for Abstracts for the upcoming 6th ICCE Conference has been extended to the end of May.

 

Plenary  Speakers include:
Peter McLaren (Chapman University, Orange, California, USA)
Hasan Hüseyin Aksoy (Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey)
Grant Banfield (Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia)
Joyce Canaan (Birmingham City University, Birmingham, UK)
Hana Cervinkova (University of Lower Silesia, Wroclaw, Poland)
Polina Chrysochou (Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, UK)
Agnieszka Dziemianowicz-Bąk (University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw, Poland)
Cassie Earl (Manchester Metropolitan Univesity, Manchester, UK)
Gail Edwards (Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK)
Ramin Farahmandpur (Portland State University, Portland, USA)
Derek Ford (Syracuse University, New York, USA)
Panayota Gounari (University of Massachusetts, Boston, USA)
Tom Griffiths (Newcastle University, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia)
George Grollios (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki,Thessaloniki, Greece)
Dave Hill (Institute for Education Policy Studies & National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece)
Gianna Katsampoura (National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens, Greece)
Leszek Koczanowicz (University of Sosial Sciences and Humanities, Wroclaw, Poland)
Vicky Makris (University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada)
Curry Malott (West Chester University of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania, USA)
Alpesh Maisuria (University of East London, London, UK)
Lilia Monzo (Chapman University, California, USA)
Jayne Osgood (Middlesex University, London, UK)
Periklis Pavlidis (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece)
Leena Helavaara Robertson (Middlesex University, London, UK)
Fevziye Sayilan (Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey)
Kostas Skordoulis (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece)
Juha Suoranta (University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland)
Spyros Themelis (University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK)
Meral Uysal (Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey)
Paolo Vittoria (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)
Ahmet Yildiz (Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey)
The conference website is http://icce-2016.weebly.com/

Speakers are listed at http://icce-2016.weebly.com/program-speakers.html

Abstract Submission Form is at: http://icce-2016.weebly.com/abstract-submission.html

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/