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Tag Archives: Political Economy

 

Andrew Kliman

Andrew Kliman

CRITIQUE OF POLITICAL ECONOMY – (COPE): VOLUME 1 NOW OUT

Editors: Andrew Kliman and Alan Freeman

 

The editors have now made the first volume of Critique of Political Economy accessible to the public online.

 

See Volume 1 (from September 2011) at: http://copejournal.com/critique-of-political-economy-vol-1/

 

You can also see papers from the International Working Group on Value Theory (IWGVT) at the same site, see: http://copejournal.com/iwgvt-papers/

 

The COPE / IWGVT website is currently under construction, and more material will uploaded there in the weeks ahead, see: http://copejournal.com/

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

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Kingston University

Kingston University

PhD SCHOLARSHIPS @ KINGSTON UNIVERSITY LONDON

Kingston University London is advertising ten PhD scholarship across the entire university, these are likely to be highly competitive. The scholarships covers a living allowance and UK/EU fees. Deadline is 18th March 2016

More information of the scholarship and the application can be found here: http://www.kingston.ac.uk/research/research-degrees/funding/phd-studentships-2016/

Kingston University is a centre for non-mainstream economics and Political Economy research and has an active Political Economy Research Group (PERG http://fass.kingston.ac.uk/research/perg/). PERG is encouraging applications in all fields of heterodox economics and Political Economy, with particular interest in Post Keynesian and Marxist approaches, and on issues like financialisation, financial instability, stock flow consistent modelling, distribution and growth, development. Interested applicants are welcome to send draft proposal to potential supervisors for comments.

The Economics’ department guidance of PhD applications (that’s general information, not specific to these scholarships) can be found at http://fass.kingston.ac.uk/downloads/research-guidelines-economics.pdf

 

Political Economy Research Group (PERG)

The Political Economy approach highlights the role of effective demand, institutions and social conflict in economic analysis and thereby builds on Austrian, Institutionalist, Keynesian and Marxist traditions. Economic processes are perceived to be embedded in social relations that must be analysed in the context of historical considerations, power relations and social norms. As a consequence, a broad range of methodological approaches is employed, and cooperation with other disciplines, including history, law, sociology and other social sciences, is necessary. (http://fass.kingston.ac.uk/research/perg and https://www.facebook.com/PERGKingston )

MA Political Economy http://www.kingston.ac.uk/postgraduate-course/political-economy-ma/

MA Economics (Political Economy) http://www.kingston.ac.uk/postgraduate-course/economics-political-economy-ma/

MA International Politics and Economics http://www.kingston.ac.uk/postgraduate-course/international-politics-economics-ma/

MA Philosophy and Political Economy http://www.kingston.ac.uk/postgraduate-course/philosophy-political-economy-ma/

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/phd-scholarships

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Fat Cat Food

Fat Cat Food

THE EXTREME CENTRE: HOW THE NEOLIBERAL PROJECT HAS RESHAPED THE WORLD

Tuesday, 16 February 2016, 5-7PM

Tariq Ali (writer, filmmaker and editor of New Left Review)

The Extreme Centre: How the Neoliberal Project Has Reshaped the World  

BGLT (SOAS, Brunei Gallery), Bloomsbury, London

Discussant: Dr Feyzi Ismail (SOAS)

Abstract: Since 1989, politics has become a contest to see which politicians can best serve the needs of the market. The result is always the same: a victory for the Extreme Centre. The same catastrophe has taken place in the US, Britain, Continental Europe and Australia. In this urgent and wide-ranging case for the prosecution, Tariq Ali looks at the people and the events that have informed this moment of political suicide: corruption in Westminster; the failures of the EU and NATO; the soft power of the American Empire that dominates the world stage uncontested. Despite this inertia, Ali goes in search of alternative futures, finding promise in the Bolivarian revolutions of Latin America and the edges of Europe. Emerging parties in Scotland, Greece and Spain, formed out of the 2008 crisis, as well as Corbynism in Britain, are offering new hope for democracy.

Tariq Ali has been a leading figure on the international left since the 60s, having engaged in debates against the Vietnam War with leading politicians of the time. He has written extensively on world history and politics; his works include The Obama Syndrome, The Clash of Fundamentalisms and his most recent publication, The Extreme Centre: A Warning. Described by the Observer as an ‘intellectual bomb thrower’ his contributions extend to film and theatre scripts, novels and published conversations, such as with Edward Said. He is a regular broadcaster on BBC Radio and contributes to magazines and newspapers including The Guardian and the London Review of Books.

All welcome, no need to book. Seating is available on a first come, first served, basis so please arrive early to be sure of a seat.

On behalf of the seminar organising committee: Alfredo Saad-Filho, Feyzi Ismail, Jo Tomkinson, Carolina Alves, Lorenza Monaco and Jai Bhatia

Further details of all the seminars are available on the SOAS Development Studies Department website: https://www.soas.ac.uk/development/events/devstudseminars/

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/soas-ds-seminar-tariq-ali-on-the-extreme-centre-how-the-neoliberal-project-has-reshaped-the-world

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

downloadTHE ARTS OF LOGISTSICS

Call for Papers

3rd and 4th June 2016

Queen Mary University of London

Keynote Presentations: Deborah Cowen (University of Toronto) and Alberto Toscano (Goldsmiths, University of London)

The so-called “logistics revolution” and its attendant technologies have made possible capitalism’s reproduction and restructuring over the past half century. Among other things, logistics sped up the loading and unloading of ships and helped establish the “global factory,” thereby drastically reducing the labor time required to produce and circulate commodities. This allowed capitalism to expand its economies of scale and relocate manufacturing to wherever worker militancy and the costs of labor were lowest. While the logistics infrastructure has transformed social life the world over, it also has opened up new opportunities for resistance to exploitation. Since the onset of the financial crisis, an array of movements internationally have turned to logistics as a terrain of political struggle, from the work slowdowns of logistics employees to the port and highway blockades of social movements as various as Occupy, the “Boycott, Divest, and Sanction” campaign, and BlackL ivesMatter. Logistics is also increasingly material for art, from representations of global trade in photography and literature to the use of actual shipping containers as performance spaces and pop-up galleries.

“The Arts of Logistics” brings together scholars, activists, and artists from across the humanities and social sciences to interrogate how social movements and the arts respond to a world remade by logistics. Long an important topic for economists, management theorists, and sociologists, logistics is only recently emerging as an object of substantive study by artists and researchers in the humanities. Thus, this conference seeks to further define scholarly, political, and artistic conversations on the nexus of political economy, anti-capitalist struggle, and art.

 

Possible topics participants could engage include the following:

-The politics and aesthetics of mapping logistics or infrastructure – Container art and architecture

-Historical representations of empire, trade, and commodity flows

-The emergence of counter-logistics as an anti-capitalist strategy

-Cultures of surveillance and security

-Labour and consumer activism around the “global factory”

-Data and network visualisation

-Queering logistics

 

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers in a variety of formats. As an interdisciplinary conference, we also welcome practical demonstrations by artists, performances lectures, roundtables, and more.

Please submit an abstract of 300 words (max) and a short bio of 50 words (max) to both conference organisers: Shane Boyle (m.s.boyle@qmul.ac.uk) and Aylwyn Walsh (awalsh@lincoln.ac.uk) by February 22. Please make sure to include your preferred contact information and specify ‘The Arts of Logistics’ in your subject line. If you are interested in making a proposal that involves multiple contributions or lasts longer than 20 minutes (like a roundtable or screening) please be in touch with the organisers as soon as possible.

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-the-arts-of-logistics

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

download (1)RULES FOR THE WORLD MARKET

Professor Paul Cammack

Tuesday, 27 October 2015, 5-7 PM

Room G3 (SOAS Main Building)

Discussant: Dr Alessandra Mezzadri (SOAS)

Abstract: It is too often forgotten that some of the first calls for structural adjustment from the late 1970s on came from the OECD and the World Bank, and were directed towards the advanced Western economies. These organizations urged them to reform their welfare regimes and to open their economies to exports from the newly industrialised countries in particular. This paper characterises them primarily as producers of rules for the world market, and follows the evolution of the ‘world market project’ through to the present, with reference to the successive conjunctures of 1989-91 and 2008-2009. The principal focus is on the promotion of competitiveness, and the reform of labour markets and social protection. It is argued that the project is best understood as centrally concerned with the development of capitalist relations of production on a global scale.

Professor Paul Cammack received his PhD from the University of Oxford. He was until recently a faculty member in the Department of Asian and International Studies at City University of Hong Kong, China where he taught Global Political Economy. Professor Cammack has recently published “World Market Regionalism at the Asian Development Bank” in the Journal of Contemporary Asia and a series of Working Papers on the multilateral development banks and the Global Financial Crisis. Professor Cammack’s research interests include the response of multilateral development banks to the financial crisis, the political economy of Latin America, Marxism, south-south cooperation and the politics of development.

ALL WELCOME, NO NEED TO BOOK.

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/professor-paul-cammack-rules-for-the-world-market-soas-ocober-27

We Are the Crisis

We Are the Crisis

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

NMdownloadNEW MATERIALIST POLITICS AND ECONOMIES OF KNOWLEDGE

2nd – 4th October 2015, MARIBOR, SLOVENIA

Sister-Sixth Conference on the New Materialisms

Organized by the IS1307 COST Action New Materialism: Networking European Scholarship on

“H o w M a t t e r C o m e s t o M a t t e r ”

Hosted by the Faculty of Law of the University of Maribor, Slovenia

Registration … http://www.newmaterialism.si

More … http://www.newmaterialism.eu

The conference addresses as an area of debate the nexus of:

Politics and activism

  • The economy and law
  • Philosophy and the power of knowledge
  • Genealogy and information
  • The role of creativity in political economies through public engagement and pedagogy

What is the new materialist impetus to make situated analyses of the im/material processes in these areas?

Keynote speakers:

Dr Vera Bühlmann

Professor Diana Coole

Dr Anna Hickey-Moody

Professor Katerina Kolozova

Selection of Panels:

  • A Philosophy of the Materialist Sciences
  • Art in a New Materialist Key
  • Ecologies that Matter
  • Information and Political Agency
  • Information Coming to Matter
  • Materiality-Critique-Transformation
  • New Materialist Pedagogies
  • New Materialist Subjectivities and Spatiotemporalities
  • New Media, New Activism
  • Political Intervention, Writing Materiality, and Creativity
  • Toward a New Materialist Theory of Socioeconomic Justice

images

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Work

Work

WORK AND PEER PRODUCTION

CALL FOR PAPERS

Journal of Peer Production

Work and Peer Production
Editors: Phoebe Moore (Middlesex University London), Mathieu O’Neil (University of Canberra), Stefano Zacchiroli (University Paris Diderot)

The rise in the usage and delivery capacity of the Internet in the 1990s has led to the development of massively distributed online projects where self-governing volunteers collaboratively produce public goods. Notable examples include Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) projects such as Debian and GNOME, as well as the Wikipedia encyclopedia. These distributed practices have been characterised as peer production, crowdsourcing, mass customization, social production, co-configurative work, playbour, user-generated content, wikinomics, open innovation, participatory culture, produsage, and the wisdom of the crowd, amongst other terms. In peer production, labour is communal and outputs are orientated towards the further e xpansion of the commons, an ecology of production that aims to defy and resist the hierarchies and rules of ownership that drive productive models within capitalism (Moore, 2011); while the commons, recursively, are the chief resource in this mode of production (Söderberg & O’Neil, 2014).

Peer projects are ‘ethical’ as participation is primarily motivated by self-fulfillment and validated by a community of peers, rather than by earning wages. Their governance is ‘modular’, understood in a design sense (decomposable blocks sharing a common interface), but also in political-economy terms: participants oppose restricted ownership and control by individually socializing their works into commons. Conflicting interpretations of their societal impact have been articulated (O’Neil, 2015). Skeptics view the abjuration of exclusive property rights over the goods they produce as irrelevant, and ethical-modular projects as increasing w orker exploitation: participants’ passionate labour occurs at the expense of less fortunate others, who do not have the disposable income, cultural capital, or family support to engage in unpaid labour (Moore & Taylor, 2009; Huws, 2013). In contrast, reformists, often hailing from a management perspective, suggest that the co-optation of communal labour by firms will improve business practices and society (Arvidsson, 2008; Demil et al., 2015). Finally activists celebrate the abjuration of exclusive property rights, and present ethical-modular projects as key actors in a historical process leading to the supersession of capitalism and hierarchy (Kostakis & Bauwens, 2014).

This last perspective raises a central challenge, which is the avoidance of purely utopian thinking. In other words, how can commons-based peer production reach deeply into daily life? How can ‘already existing non-capitalist economic processes’ be strengthened, ‘new no n-capitalist enterprises’ be built, and ‘communal subjects’ be established (Gibson-Graham, 2003: 157)? An increasingly large free public goods and services sector could well cohabit in a plural economy with employment in cooperatives, paid independent work, and the wage-earning of the commercial sector. However analysis of peer production typically eschews mundane considerations such as living wages, benefits, job security, working conditions, work-induced medical conditions, and debates on labour organization. How can peer production operate as a sustainable practice enabling people to live, if labour and work issues are not formally addressed?

To advance this agenda, the tenth issue of the Journal of Peer Production, titled Peer Production and Work, calls for papers in two linked areas:

*Peer production in a paid work society*
Nowadays firms attempt to monetize crowdsourced labour. The paradigmatic example is Amazon’s Mechanical Turk labourers (popularly known as ‘Turkers’, ‘cloud workers’ or ‘click workers’) who accomplish micro-tasks such as tagging and labeling images, transcribing audio or video recordings, and categorizing products. This extreme modularization of work results in their status being that of independent contractors rather than employees with rights, necessitating novel means of protection and redress (Irani & Silberman, 2013). The so-called ‘sharing economy’ also uses peer production methods, such as the self-selection of modular and granular tasks, to extract ever-more value from the labour of volunteer ‘prosumers’ (Frayssé & O’Neil, 2015). Capitalist firms are also increasingly engaging with ethical-modular organizations, in some cases paying wages to participants. Such labour is thus both ‘alienated’, or sold, and ‘communal’, as workers freely cooperate to produce commons. Do traditional categories such as exploitation and alienation still apply?
Topics may include, but are not limited to:

* Peer production and the global political economy
* Peer production and the rise of precarious work
* Peer workers and possibilities for worker organisation
* Does the autonomy of peer workers cause conflict in firms, and how is it resolved?
* What strategies do firms adopt to co-opt peer production (e.g., ‘hackhathons’)?
* Do tensions around property rights emerge?
* Subjectivity in peer production
* Peer production and intellectual property, coded work

*Paid work in peer production projects*
How does paid labour affect ethical P2P projects? Mansell and Berdou (2010) argue that firms supporting the work of programmers who contribute to volunteer projects, to the commons, will not affect the ‘cooperative spirit’ of projects; nor can this support prevent the results of labour from being socialized into commons. Is this always the case?
Topics may include, but are not limited to:
* How do peer projects deal with the presence of paid or waged labour?
* Is this topic discussed within peer production projects? In what way?
* What benefits do paid or waged workers enjoy in peer projects?
* How does paid labour affect peer production projects?

*Timeline*
300-500 word abstract due: 30 July 2015
Notification to authors: 30 August 2015
Submission of full paper: 31 December 2015
Reviews to authors: 15 February 2016
Revised papers: 30 April 2016
Signals due: 30 May 2016
Issue release: June/⁠July 2016

*Submission guidelines*
Submission abstracts of 300-500 words are due by July 30, 2015 and should be sent to work@peerproduction.net

All peer reviewed papers will be reviewed according to Journal of Peer Production guidelines. See http://peerproduction.net/peer-review/process/
Full papers and materials are due by December 31, 2015 for r eview.
Peer reviewed papers should be around 8,000 words; personal testimonies or ‘tales of toil’ in the Processed World tradition should be up to 4,000 words.

*References*
Arvidsson, A. (2008). The ethical economy of consumer coproduction. Journal of Macromarketing, 8, 326-338.

Demil, B., Lecoq. X. & Warnier, E. (2015). The capabilities of bazaar governance: Investigating the advantage of business models based on open communities. Journal of Organizational Change Management, in press.

Frayssé, O. & O’Neil, M. (2015) Digital labour and prosumer capitalism: The US matrix. Basingstoke: Palgrave, in press.

Gibson-Graham, J.K. (2003). Enabling ethical economies: Cooperativism and class. Critical Sociology, 29, 123-164.

Huws, U. (2013). The underpinnings of class in the digital age: Living, labour and value. Socialist Register, 50, 80-107.

Irani, L. & Silberman, M. (2013). Turkopticon: Interrupting worker invisibility in Amazon Mechanical Turk. Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems.

Kostakis, V. & Bauwens, M. (2014) Network society and future scenarios for a collaborative economy. Basingstoke: Palgrave.

Mansell, R. & Berdou, E. (2010). Political economy, the internet and FL/OSS development. In Hunsinger, J., Allen, M. & Klastrup, L. (Eds.) International handbook of Internet research (pp. 341-362). Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Springer.

Moore, P. (2011). Subjectivity in the ecologies of P2P Production. The Journal of Fibreculture FCJ-119. Online.

Moore, P. & Taylor, P. A. (2009). Exploitation of the self in community-based software production: Workers’ freedoms or firm foundations? Capital & Class, 99-117.

O’Neil, M. (2015). Labour out of control: The political economy of capitalist and ethical organizations. Organization Studies, 1-21.

Söderberg, J. & O’Neil, M. (2014). ‘Introduction’. Book of Peer Production (pp. 2-3). Göteborg: NSU Press.

****

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-journal-of-peer-production-work-and-peer-production

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Critique of Political Economy

Critique of Political Economy

MARX AND PHILOSOPHY REVIEW OF BOOKS

New reviews and an updated list of books for review recently published online in the Marx and Philosophy Review of Books

  • Michael Maidan on FoucaultLectures on the Will to Know
  • Pete Green on books by Dunn and Radice on global capitalism
  • Sean Ledwith on RothGreece What Is to Be Done?
  • Nathan Wood on Naomi KleinThis Changes Everything
  • Alex Cistelecan on Marxism and the Critique of Value
  • Daniel Fraser on Fredric JamesonThe Antinomies of Realism

To receive notification of new reviews and comments when they appear join the Marx and Philosophy Society’s email list or follow us on facebook  or twitter.

Marx and Philosophy Society: http://marxandphilosophy.org.uk/society

Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/marx-and-philosophy-review-of-books-11

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Political Economy

Political Economy

IIPPE CONFERENCE 2015

International Initiative for Promoting Political Economy (IIPPE)

Website: http://iippe.org/wp/

6th Annual Conference in Political Economy (The Call for Papers is now CLOSED)

9–11 September 2015  / University of Leeds, U.K.

Rethinking Economics: Pluralism, Interdisciplinarity and Activism

The Sixth Annual Conference in Political Economy aims at fostering a reflection on positive alternatives to the mainstream by examining political economy from the complementary angles of pluralism, inter-disciplinarity and activism.

The economic crisis that started in 2007, while remaining a crisis for huge parts of the world’s population, has officially morphed into a “recovery” – albeit the slowest and weakest in recent history.

Mainstream economics is broadly discredited, with even some voices from some of its major bastions calling for its rejuvenation. But heterodox economics appears as theoretically and institutionally splintered as before the crisis, with its only solid point of agreement being the rejection of the dominant mainstream. Hence it continues to be unable to offer any positive alternative that can command broad acceptance even among heterodox economists, not to speak of making inroads into the orthodox teaching, researching and popularization of economics. Similarly, heterodox economists have made little new progress since the crisis toward their long held goal of linking to progressive forces in sociology, geography, political science, and other social disciplines.

The Sixth Annual Conference in Political Economy aims at fostering a reflection on positive alternatives to the mainstream by examining political economy from the complementary angles of pluralism, interdisciplinarity and activism. Papers on all aspects of political economy are welcome, while those focused on these topics are especially encouraged, whether relating to the current crisis or otherwise.

 

Conference Registration: http://iippe.org/wp/?page_id=2655

Deadline for Conference Registration: 1st July 2015

download (1)

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Bonuses for Some

Bonuses for Some

IIPPE TRAINING WORKSHOPS (LONDON, ABERDEEN and LEEDS)

International Initiative for Promoting Political Economy

Website: http://iippe.org/wp/

The IIPPE announces three Training Workshops (in London, Aberdeen and Leeds)

 

London: Monday June 22, SOAS (Vernon Square campus)
Simon Mohun and Photis Lysandrou, on The Marxist theory of finance, contemporary accounts of financialization and the causes of the financial crisis of 2007-8
Details at http://iippe.org/wp/?cat=19
Register with Simon Mohun < s.mohun@qmul.ac.uk >

 

Aberdeen: Thursday 25 June and Friday 26 June, University of Aberdeen (Fraser Noble Building), jointly with Aberdeen Political Economy Group (APEG) and IIPPE Financialisation Working Group
Simon Mohun, John Weeks, Joseph Choonara, James Foley, James Meadway and Neil Davidson on Neoliberalism and the political economy of money and finance in Scotland and the UK
Details from and registration with Keith Paterson < keithpaterson@abdn.ac.uk >

 

Leeds: Tuesday 8 September, University of Leeds (room tba)
Simon Mohun, John Weeks and Alfredo Saad-Filho, on Rate of Profit and Crisis
Details at http://iippe.org/wp/?cat=19
Register on the IIPPE Conference Registration Form http://iippe.org/wp/?page_id=2655 or with Simon Mohun < s.mohun@qmul.ac.uk >

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/iippe-announces-three-training-workshops-london-aberdeen-and-leeds

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Inca

Inca

RADICAL AMERICAS SYMPOSIUM 2015

“Washing one’s hands of the conflict between the powerful and the powerless means to side with the powerful, not to be neutral” – Paulo Freire

We are delighted to announce a Call for Papers and Panels for our Third Symposium to be held at the UCL Institute of the Americas, London, on the 14-15 September 2015.

The aim of the event is to bring a range of disciplinary and geographical perspectives to bear on radicalism throughout the Americas. Our definition of “radicalism” is a broad one, encompassing both political radicalism as an object of study, and radical analytical approaches to the societies and cultures of the Americas.

We welcome proposals that deal with any aspect of radicalism, from the democratic and republican radicalisms of the nineteenth century; to the socialist, anarchist, communist, and populist radicalisms of the twentieth century; as well as contemporary identity politics, social movements, and twenty-first century radicalisms.

When arranging panels we will encourage conversation between people working on specific national topics as well as those who follow comparative o r transnational approaches.

We would especially encourage proposals on the following topics, though any subject within our broad remit is welcome:

* Radical theory/approaches
* Intersectional radicalism
* Political violence
* Radical memory and commemoration
* Cultural radicalism
* Political economy/ecology

The symposium seeks to develop the global community of scholars, researchers and activists who have been part of the Radical Americas Network since its creation in 2011. Past events have attracted people at various stages of academic and non-academic life who have presented work from a range of disciplines, including anthropology, politics, history, international relations and cultural studies.

The symposium also marks the launch of the eagerly anticipated Radical Americas journal. The first issue of the e-journal will be availab le in September and will include peer-reviewed articles (some based on work presented at previous network events) as well as interviews and book reviews. We would like to encourage participants at the symposium to submit work to the journal, which is designed to showcase cutting-edge research on radicalisms throughout the Americas.

Guidelines for symposium paper and panel submission
[All communication to radicalamericas@gmail.com]

1. Papers
Please send a proposal of no more than 300 words along with a short bibliographic note to the contact details below. Presentations should be between 15 and 20 minutes in duration depending on the final panel size.
Deadline: 20 June 2015

2. Closed panels
Please list the three or four speakers, provide the titles and abstracts of the individual papers and indicate whether a chair will be required.
Deadline: 30 June 2015

3. Open panels
Please reply with a title and panel abstract which we will then forward to our members and contacts. Please also stipulate whether a chair will be required.
Deadline:  01 June 2015

Conference Website: http://www.community-languages.org.uk/radical-americas/conference.html

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/call-for-papers-radical-americas-symposium-2015

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Grant Banfield

Grant Banfield

CRITICAL REALISM FOR MARXIST SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION

By Grant Banfield

Routledge

Series: New Studies in Critical Realism and Education (Routledge Critical Realism)

September 22nd 2015 | 978-0-415-62906-5 | Hardback (Routledge)

 

This book offers a critical realist intervention into the field of Marxist Sociology of Education. Critical realism, as developed by British philosopher Roy Bhaskar, is known for its capacity to serve as a conceptual underlabourer to applied fields like education. Indeed, its success in clarifying and resolving thorny issues of educational theory and practice is now well established. Given critical realism’s sympathetic Marxist origins, its productive and critical engagement with Marxism has an even longer history. To date there has been little sustained attention given to the application of critical realism to Marxist educational praxis. The book addresses this gap in existing scholarship.

Its conceptual ground clearing of the field of Marxist Sociology of Education centres on two problematics well-known in the social sciences: naturalism and the structure-agency relation. Marxist theory from the days of Marx to the present is shown to also be haunted by these problematics. This has resulted in considerable tension around the meaning and nature of, for example, reform, revolution, class determinism and class struggle. With its emergence in the 1970s as a child of Western Marxism, the field continues to be an expression of these tensions that seriously limit its transformative potential. Addressing these issues and offering conceptual clarification in the interests of revolutionary educational practice, Critical Realism for Marxist Sociology of Education provides a new perspective on education which will be of interest to students, scholars and practitioners alike.

Recommend to a Library: http://www.sponpress.com/resources/librarian_recommendation/9780415629065/

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/