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1968

1968

BEFORE ‘68

Conference—”Before ’68: The Left, activism & social movements in the long 1960s”

Conference Dates: 13 and 14 February 2016

Venue: School of History, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ, UK and hosted by UEA School of History in conjunction with the journal Socialist History and the Institute of Working Class History (Chicago).

The events of 1968, particularly those in France, have achieved a mythical status in both the memory and the historiography of the 1960s. For some, 1968 marked the end-point of a realignment of the European ‘New Left’. For others 1968 represented a student generation in revolt, and many of the first accounts which sought to explain the history and meaning of ’68 were written by that generation.

More recently historians have tried to demythologise ’68, looking both at less ‘glamourous’ locales and at the deeper histories of anti-colonial struggles and worker activism prior to the events of that year. The aim of this conference is to explore the diverse histories of social activism and left politics in Britain and elsewhere, and how they prepared the ground for and fed into ‘1968’.

Themes might include, but are not limited to:

  • Anti-nuclear & peace movements
    Civil Rights struggles
    The Black Power movement
    Anti-colonial politics
    The activities of the Labour movement and the ‘traditional’ Left
    The grassroots activism of the ‘New Left’
    Far Left challenges: Trotskyism & Maoism
    Campaigns around housing and the built environment
    Campaigns around race and discrimination in the workplace and housing
    Solidarity movements with struggles abroad (e.g. South Africa, Vietnam)
    Campaigns for Homosexual Equality
    Second Wave Feminism

We are seeking papers of 5,000 to 10,000 words on any aspects of left activism and social movements in the period preceding 1968 to be presented at the conference. Selected papers will be published in a special issue of the journal Socialist History. Attendance at the conference will be free of charge, but we ask that anyone wishing to attend registers in advance.

Proposals for papers and any enquiries should be submitted to Ben Jones.

Email: b.jones5@uea.ac.uk

Deadline for proposals for papers: 31 October 2015

download (3)

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/call-for-papers-before-9268-the-left-activism-social-movements-in-the-long-1960s-1

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

download (4)

UEA

UEA

BEFORE 68: THE LEFT, ACTIVISM AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS IN THE LONG 1960s

Weekend Conference: Before 68: The Left, Activism & Social Movements in the Long 1960s

Call for Papers

Dates: 13 and 14 February 2016

Venue: School of History, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ, UK

Organised and hosted by UEA School of History in conjunction with the journal Socialist History and the Institute of Working Class History, Chicago.

The events of 1968, particularly those in France, have achieved a mythical status in both the memory and the historiography of the 1960s. For some, 1968 marked the end-point of a realignment of the European ‘New Left’. For others 1968 represented a student generation in revolt, and many of the first accounts which sought to explain the history and meaning of ‘68 were written by that generation.

More recently historians have tried to demythologise ‘68, looking both at less ‘glamourous’ locales and at the deeper histories of anti-colonial struggles and worker activism prior to the events of that year. The aim of this conference is to explore the diverse histories of social activism and left politics in Britain and elsewhere, and how they prepared the ground for and fed into ‘1968’. Themes might include, but are not limited to:

  • Anti-nuclear & peace movements
  • Civil Rights struggles
  • The Black Power movement
  • Anti-colonial politics
  • The activities of the Labour movement and the ‘traditional’ Left
  • The grassroots activism of the ‘New Left’
  • Far Left challenges: Trotskyism & Maoism
  • Campaigns around housing and the built environment
  • Campaigns around race and discrimination in the workplace and housing
  • Solidarity movements with struggles abroad (e.g. South Africa, Vietnam)
  • Campaigns for Homosexual Equality
  • Second Wave Feminism

We are seeking papers of 5000 to 10000 words on any aspects of left activism and social movements in the period preceding 1968 to be presented at the conference. Selected papers will be published in a special issue of the journal Socialist History. Attendance at the conference will be free of charge, but we ask that anyone wishing to attend registers in advance. Proposals for papers and any enquiries should be submitted to Ben Jones. Email: b.jones5@uea.ac.uk

Deadline for proposals for papers: 31 October 2015

From UEA website: https://www.uea.ac.uk/history/news-and-events/-/asset_publisher/oAKg6av1Sw6j/blog/weekend-conference-before-68-the-left-activism-social-movements-in-the-long-1960s

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-before-68-the-left-activism-social-movements-in-the-long-1960s

Norwich Cathedral

Norwich Cathedral

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Marx Memorial Library

Marx Memorial Library

MARX MEMORIAL LIBRARY: THE HERITAGE OF RALPH MILIBAND

These lectures at the Marx Memorial Library celebrate the contributions of sociologist and political thinker Ralph Miliband to Marxist thought and politics.

 

The Heritage of Ralph Miliband

Convened and presented by Mike Newman

 

 

Tuesday 17 June – Labour and the New Left: Parliamentary Socialism

Tuesday 24 June – Marxism and Politics: The State in Capitalist Society

 

Dr Laura Miller

Administrator

Marx Memorial Library

37a Clerkenwell Green

London EC1R 0DU

(Tel)  0207 253 1485

(Web site): http://www.marx-memorial-library.org

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

 

Ilana Verdansky

NEW RADICAL PHILOSOPHY WEBSITE

We’re delighted to announce the launch of the new website for Radical Philosophy. The address remains the same – http://www.radicalphilosophy.com – but as well as updating the way the website looks and works, we have added every single item from our back catalogue to the online archive, from the first Radical Philosophy published in Spring 1972 through to the very latest issue.

Subscribers continue to have full access to and unlimited downloads from the archive, including all articles, interviews and reviews now available from RP1 to the present. If you would like full access to the archive and the journal delivered direct to your door, please consider supporting Radical Philosophy by taking out an annual subscription from as little as £24 (full details of subscription rates and information on how to subscribe can be found at: http://www.radicalphilosophy.com/subscriptions

Our non-subscribing readers will enjoy free access to all the commentaries, obituaries, conference and news reports, plus highlights from back issues and new access to hundreds of items from the expanded archive. A new feature of the website will also allow non-subscribers to purchase and download pdfs of individual items from the archive at an affordable price of £3 for any article or interview and £2 for the reviews sections from recent issues.

Articles and interviews, from 1972-2011, include important work by some of the most seminal philosophical writers of the last 40 years, including: Alliez, Badiou, Balibar, Berardi, Bhabha, Bourdieu, Buck-Morss, Butler, Canguilhem, Cassin, Caygill, Connolly, Critchley, Derrida, Didi-Huberman, Feyerabend, Foucault, Groys, Hallward, Harootunian, Haug, Horkheimer, Koolhaas, Lacoue-Labarthe, Laplanche, Lazzarato, Le Doeuff, Macherey, Malabou, Negri, Osborne, Rancière, Segal, Sloterdijk, Sohn-Rethel, Soper, Spivak, Stengers, Virilio, Zizek, and many others.

When the first issue of Radical Philosophy was published in January 1972, it sought – in the wake of the rise of the New Left and the student movements of the 1960s – to challenge the institutional divisions that it saw as contributing to the impoverishment of contemporary philosophical practice: divisions that existed between academic departments, between teachers and their students, and between the university and society. “Our main aim,” the Editorial Collective declared, “is to free ourselves from the restricting institutions and orthodoxies of the academic world, and thereby to encourage important philosophical work to develop: Let a Hundred Flowers Blossom!” In the ensuing forty years much has changed about contemporary philosophy, in the UK and elsewhere.  But as testified by our recent dossiers on transdisciplinarity, our campaign reports on the revitalized student movement, and our regular philosophically-informed commentaries on contemporary social and political issues, those problematic disciplinary, pedagogical and social divisions continue to be challenged by those writing in Radical Philosophy.

To access our expanded archive, subscribe to the journal, check out selected content from our latest issue, or download the current free gift from our back catalogue – Jacques Rancière’s `On the Theory of Ideology’ (originally published in RP7, Spring 1974) – please visit us today: http://www.radicalphilosophy.com

The Radical Philosophy Editorial Collective

 

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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Ghosts

ON HAUNTOLOGY \ CAPITALIST REALISM – TWO TALKS BY MARK FISHER

THE COLLOQUIUM FOR UNPOPULAR CULTURE AND NYU’S ASIAN/ PACIFIC/ AMERICAN STUDIES PROGRAM present:

TWO TALKS BY MARK FISHER

What are grey vampires and how do they retard the insurrectionary potential of digital  discourse?  How does Derrida’s notion of hauntology contribute to an understanding of dubstep artist Burial?  Is ‘Basic Instinct 2’, routinely derided as a cine-atrocity, a Lacanian reworking of Ballard, Baudrillard and Bataille in service of the creation of a ‘phantasmatic, cybergothic London’?  What is interpassivity and in what ways has it come to define the corporatized incarceration of modern academia?

Over the last decade, Mark Fisher has established a reputation as one of the exhilarating cultural theorists in Britain.  A co-founder of the Cybernetic Culture Research Unit (CCRU) at Warwick University ­and described by Simon Reynolds as the academic equivalent of Apocalypse Now’s Colonel Kurtz ­ he brings together psychoanalysis, political analysis and speculative fiction to create an extraordinary body of rogue scholarship, a theory-rush with few parallels.

Fisher is the author of ‘Capitalist Realism’, the editor of ‘The Resistible Demise of Michael Jackson’ (both Zer0 Books, 2009), and writes regularly for Sight and Sound, Film Quarterly, The Wire and Frieze, as well as maintaining a well-known blog at http://k-punk.abstractdynamics.org.  He teaches at the University of East London, Goldsmiths, University of London, and the City Literary Institute.

The Colloquium for Unpopular Culture and NYU’s Asian/ Pacific/ American Studies program are pleased to be hosting Fisher’s first talks inAmerica.

See ‘ The Metaphysics of Crackle’, at: http://pontone.pl/pontones-special-guest-mix-k-punk-the-metaphysics-of-crackle/

***

MARK FISHER, THESE ARE NON-TIMES AS WELL AS NON-PLACES: REFLECTIONS ON HAUNTOLOGY
 
WHEN: Wednesday 4 May 2011, 6:30pm
WHERE: Room 471, 20 Cooper Square [East 5th and Bowery]
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

”Through their generic and transient qualities ­ workstations devoid of personal effects, relations with colleagues as fleeting as those with passengers on a commuter journey ­ many workplaces now resemble non-places, either literally, as in the case of a hotel, corporate coffee chain or out-of-town supermarket, or symbolically, in the form of temporary assignments for faceless employers (dis)located in anonymous buildings, where the worker-commuter then follows the same global timetables, navigates the same software applications and experiences the same sense of placelessness, the feeling of being mere data in the mainframe.”

So writes Ivor Southwood in his analysis of precarious labour, ‘Non-Stop Inertia’ (2011). In the last decade, the proliferation of corporate non-places has been accompanied by the spread of cyberspace-time, or Itime, a distributed or unpunctuated temporality. It’s no coincidence that, as this unmarked time increasingly came to dominate cultural and psychic space, Derrida’s concept hauntology (re)emerged as the name for a paradoxical zeitgeist.  In ‘Specters of Marx’, Derrida argued that the hauntological was characterised by ‘a time out of joint’, and this broken time has been expressed in cultural objects that return to a wounded or distorted version of the past in flight from a waning sense of the present. Sometimes accused of nostalgia, the most powerful examples of hauntological culture actually show that nostalgia is no longer possible.

In conditions where pastiche has become normalised, the question has to be: nostalgia compared to what? James Bridle has recently argued that ‘the opposite of hauntology … [is] to demand the radically new’, but hauntology in fact operates as a kind of thwarted preservation of such demands in conditions where – for the moment at least – they cannot be met. Whereas cyberspace-time tends towards the generation of cultural moments that are as interchangeable as transnational franchise outlets, hauntology involves the staining of particular places with time – albeit a time that is out of joint. In this lecture, Fisher will explore the hauntological culture of the last few years in relation to the question of place, using examples from music (Burial, The Caretaker, Ekoplekz, Richard Skelton), film (Chris Petit, Patrick Keiller) and fiction (Alan Garner, David Peace).

MARK FISHER, DEPACIFICATION PROGRAM: FROM CAPITALIST REALISM TO POST-CAPITALISM

WHEN: Thursday 5 May 2011, 6:30pm
WHERE: Room 471, 20 Cooper Square [East 5th and Bowery]
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

”It would be best, perhaps, to think of an alternate world – better to say the alternate world, our alternate world – as one contiguous with ours but without any connections or access to it. Then, from time to time, like a diseased eyeball in which disturbing flashes of light are perceived or like those baroque sunbursts in which rays from another world suddenly break into this one, we are reminded that Utopia exists and that other systems, other spaces, are still possible” (Fredric Jameson, ‘Valences of the Dialectic’).

In his 2009 book ‘Capitalist Realism’, Mark Fisher started to explore some of the affective, psychological and political consequences of the deeply entrenched belief that there is no alternative to capitalism. After 1989, capital seemed to enjoy full spectrum dominance of both global space and the unconscious. Every imaginable future was capitalist.  What has been mistaken for post-political apathy, Fisher argued, was a pervasive sense of reflexive impotence in the face of a neoliberal ideological program which sought to subordinate all of culture to the imperatives of business. The subject of post-Fordist capitalism is no passive dupe; this subject actively participates in an ‘interpassive’ corporate culture which solicits our involvement and encourages us to ‘join the debate’.

As Fisher argues in the book, education has been at the forefront of this process, with teachers and lecturers locked into managerialist self-surveillance, and students induced into the role of consumers.

In the eighteen months since ‘Capitalist Realism’ was published, the neoliberal program has been seriously compromised, but capitalist realism has intensified – with austerity programs pushed through on the basis that it is unthinkable that capitalism should be allowed to fail. At the same time, this new, more desperate form of capitalist realism has also faced unexpected challenges from a militancy growing in Europe, the Middle East and even in the heartlands of neoliberalism such as the UK and the US. Now that history has started up again, and Jameson’s ‘baroque sunbursts’ flare brighter than they have for a generation, we can begin to pose questions that had receded into the unimaginable during the high pomp of neoliberal triumphalism: what might a post-capitalism look like,
and how can we get there?

Fisher will argue that the Left will only succeed if it can reclaim modernity from a neoliberal Right that has lost control of it. This entails understanding how the current possibilities for agency are contoured and constrained by the machinery of what Deleuze and Foucault called the Control Society, including cyberspace, the media landscape, psychic pathologies and pharmacology – failures to act are not failures of will, and all the will in the world will not eliminate capitalism. It also entails recognising that neoliberalism’s global hegemony arose from capturing desires which it could not satisfy. A genuinely new Left must be shaped by those desires, and not be lulled, once again, by the logics of failed revolts.

Queries: ss162@nyu.edu

***END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The Black Rock

SEMINAR ON THE AVANT-GARDE

KCL EUROPEAN STUDIES RESEARCH STUDENTS SEMINAR presents:

Tuesday 2nd November 2010, 5pm

Chrysi Papaioannou – From New Left Books to the October group: editorial collectives, publishing houses, and the emergence of an avant-garde paradigm

All meetings in room D11, French Department, East Wing, Strand Campus

All welcome!

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Raymond Williams

TENSES OF IMAGINATION: RAYMOND WILLIAMS ON SCIENCE FICTION, UTOPIA AND DYSTOPIA

http://www.peterlang.com/index.cfm?vID=11826&vLang=E&vHR=1&vUR=2&vUUR=1

New from Peter Lang:

TENSES OF IMAGINATION: RAYMOND WILLIAMS ON SCIENCE FICTION,  UTOPIA AND DYSTOPIA

Edited by Andrew Milner

Oxford, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Frankfurt am Main, New York, Wien,
2010. X, 243 pp.
Ralahine Utopian Studies. Vol. 7
Edited by Raffaella Baccolini, Joachim Fischer, Tom Moylan and Michael
J. Griffin
ISBN 978-3-03911-826-7 pb.
sFr. 52.– / €* 35.60 / €** 36.60 / € 33.30 / £ 30.– / US-$ 51.95

Raymond Williams was an enormously influential figure in late twentieth-century intellectual life as a novelist, playwright and critic, ‘the British Sartre’, as The Times put it. He was a central inspiration for the early British New Left and a close intellectual supporter of Plaid Cymru. He is widely acknowledged as one of the ‘founding fathers’ of cultural studies, who established ‘cultural materialism’ as a new paradigm for work in both literary and cultural studies. There is a substantial secondary literature on Williams, which treats his life and work in each of these respects. But none of it makes much of his enduring contribution to utopian studies and science fiction studies. This volume brings together a complete collection of Williams’s critical essays on science fiction and futurology, utopia, and dystopia, in literature, film, television, and politics, and with extracts from his two future novels, The Volunteers (1978) and The Fight for Manod (1979). Both the collection as a whole and the individual readings are accompanied by introductory essays written by Andrew Milner.

Contents: Space Anthropology, Utopia, and Putropia. Left Culturalism: Science Fiction (1956) – William Morris (1958) – George Orwell (1958) – The Future Story as Social Formula Novel (1961) – Terror (1971) – Texts in their Contexts. Cultural Materialism: Nineteen Eighty-Four (1971) – The City and the Future (1973) – On Orwell: An Interview (1977) – On Morris: An Interview (1977) – Learning from Le Guin. (Anti-) Postmodernism: Utopia and Science Fiction (1978) – The Tenses of Imagination (1978) – Beyond Actually Existing Socialism (1980) – Resources for a Journey of Hope (1983) – Nineteen Eighty-Four in 1984 (1984) – The Future Novels: From The Volunteers (1978) – From The Fight for Manod (1979).

‘With the twenty-first-century reader very much in mind, Andrew Milner’s selection of texts offers a new, “alternative” Raymond Williams – the critic and occasional author of science fiction, the futurologist, the wary, self-questioning utopian thinker for whom intellectual pessimism is a lazy response and never the last word.’ – Professor Patrick Parrinder, University of Reading

‘The future was the ultimate stake in all Raymond Williams’s thinking and writing, as Andrew Milner simply and powerfully shows us now, by assembling a volume of writings on science fiction and utopianism that turns out to be a very substantial, wide-ranging reader in Williams’s work as a whole. The defining importance of “the sense of the future”, as he called it, the future as the essential discipline of political and moral imagination, is the lesson of this very welcome collection.’ – Professor Francis Mulhern, Middlesex University.

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Building a New Left for a New Era

Socialism 2009

Chicago – June 18-21

San Francisco – July 2-5

 

A weekend of revolutionary politics, debate, and entertainment

 

Register Online Today!

 

Basic early bird registration is just $75 before May 1.  We know times are tight, but if you can register at a solidarity level of $150, $300 or $500, your contribution will help assure the biggest audience possible for putting radical ideas into action.  Also, please consider making a contribution to the Scholarship Fund which will help cash-strapped workers and students attend.  So, drop what you’re doing and go to: 

http://www.socialismconference.org/

 

 

Why Socialism 2009?

 

The world economic crisis has shattered the free-market consensus that has dominated politics for the last generation. Meanwhile, the end of the conservative era and the election of the first African-American president have raised expectations among working people that long overdue change is at hand. With capitalism in crisis, even some in the corporate media are admitting that Karl Marx was right.

 

There has never been a better time for those who want see fundamental change to get together to debate, discuss and organize for a new society based on the needs of the many instead of on the whims of a few. In other words, there has never been a better time to organize a new socialist left to meet the challenge of this new era.

That’s the purpose that Socialism 2009—expanded to two sites this year—has set for itself. Gather with activists and scholars from all over to take part in dozens of discussions about changing the world: How can we stop the economic madness? How can we end racism? What kind of organization do we need? What would a future socialist society look like?

 

Yes we can organize for socialism in the 21st century!

 

Join Robert Brenner, Dennis Brutus, Anuradha Mittal, Dahr Jamail, David Zirin, Heather Rogers, Claudio Katz, Laura Flanders, Ahmed Shawki, Sherry Wolf, Sharon Smith, Paul LeBlanc, Anthony Arnove, Leo Zeilig, Alan Maass, Christian Parenti,  Marlene Martin, Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, James Green, Paul D’Amato, Jennifer Roesch, Ashley Smith, Lance Selfa, Michael Klare, Brian Jones, John Riddell, Joel Geier, Justin Akers-Chacón, Ian Angus, Adrienne Johnson, Sarah Knopp, Jesse Hagopian, Todd Chretien, Dr. Jess Ghannam and more!  Check back at 

http://www.socialismconference.org/

 for an updated list of speakers. 

 

“The young people at the conference took me back in time to when you were ready to stand for what was right. It lets you know that what you may have planted years ago will come to reality today. I feel great to have become a part of it.” –Dr. John Carlos, 1968 Olympic bronze medalist who raised the Black Power salute

 

“Socialism conferences are exciting gathering places for students and young activists, for revolutionary scholars, and fighters for social justice to share ideas and experiences that can help us understand and change the world. I’ve been to a couple – it’s not enough. I’m coming again.” –Paul LeBlanc, scholar and activist

 

http://www.socialismconference.org/

Sponsored by Center for Economic Research and Social Change, publisher of International Socialist Review and Haymarket Books, and the International Socialist Organization, publisher of Socialist Worker and Obrero Socialista newspapers.

 

For more information and to register, go to: , or call (773) 583-7884.

http://www.socialismconference.org/

 

 

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

http://www.socialismconference.org/