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NEOLIBERALISM AND ORDOLIBERALISM: ONE OR TWO CRITIQUES?

 

STAMP – Centre for the Study of States, Markets & People
School of Business & Law, University of East London, Annual Research Colloquium
On: “Neoliberalism and Ordoliberalism: One or Two Critiques?”

Tuesday 12 December 2017, 14.30pm – 19.30pm.
Venue: USS G.19/20, University of East London, 1 Salway Road, London, E15 1NF

(5 minutes’ walk from Stratford tube station)

Speakers and participants include: Professor Werner Bonefeld (York University), Dr. Gareth Dale (Brunel University), Professor Bülent Gökay (Keele University) Professor Bob Jessop (Lancaster University) and Dr. Mike Wilkinson (London School of Economics)

As the Euro-zone enters its ninth year of crisis and Britain posits itself for a hard Brexit, it is now widely accepted that German/Austrian ordoliberal policy principles — de-politicisation of central bank, deflationary policy and strong state — have long been institutionalised in the EU. But if the ordoliberal public policy in the Euro-zone and beyond manages EU processes, then what are its points of divergence and convergence with Anglo-American neo-liberalism — which some North American scholars identify as “New Constitutionalism”? If neo-liberal financialisation as a form of public policy could not arrest the slow and protracted decline of American Empire since the late 1960s, can German ordoliberalism re-launch the process of European integration, and on what policy basis? Was ordoliberalism a deliberate, post-war, policy plan to dominate Europe’s various state executives, or did it come about structurally and by way of France’s and Italy’s persistence to engage Germany in a currency union in order to control its superior industrial and monetary might? Under what forms of political governance, law and civic consciousness can neo-liberalism and ordoliberalism best operate? Last but not least, do we need one or two comprehensive critiques for these two separable, but not separate, public policies? These are some of the pertinent questions the STAMP Colloquium is proposing to address, launching a new research programme in the fields of global and European history, public policy, constitutional law and international
relations.

For further information about the workshop, please contact: Mr Seun Alele, e-mail: O.Alele@uel.ac.uk

Programme
14.30 – 14.45 Vassilis K. Fouskas (UEL) “Welcome and Opening Comments”
14.45 – 15.15 Gareth Dale (Brunel) “Ordoliberalism as a German Product: Origins, Evolution, Purposes”
15.15 – 15.45 Werner Bonefeld (York) “Stateless Money and State Power: Ordoliberal Insights and Capitalist Organisation”
15.45 – 16.30 Questions & Answers
16.30 – 17.00 Tea/Coffee
17.00 – 17.30 Bülent Gökay (Keele) “One neo-liberalism or many?”
17.30 – 18.00 Mike Wilkinson (LSE) “Authoritarian Liberalism: Exception or Norm?”
18.00 – 18.30 Questions & Answers
18.30 – 18.45 Bob Jessop (Lancaster) via skype “Financialization, Ordoliberalism, Neo-liberalization and the State of Permanent Austerity”
19.00 – 19.30 Conclusions and ideas about how to take this research programme forward. Bob Jessop to be engaged via skype

 

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Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

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Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Neoliberalism

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Mors Mystica

Mors Mystica

DARKMATTER

Announcing the publication of a special issue of Darkmatter Journal, “Reflections on Dispossession: Critical Feminisms” eds. Brenna Bhandar and Davina Bhandar, with contributions from Sara R. Farris, Jonathan Goldberg-Hiller, Alyosha Goldstein, Leticia Sabsay and Rafeef Ziadah.

This collection traces a path for contemporary critiques of neoliberal capitalism and colonial dispossession. The authors show the compelling need for complex strategies and tools to evaluate the interlocking or intersectional practices of dispossession, and their particular effects on racialised, Indigenous, sexualized, and gendered subjects.

 

Darkmatter is an open access journal, and the special issue can be accessed here:

http://www.darkmatter101.org/site/category/issues/14-dispossession/

 

Praise for “Reflections on Dispossession”:

“Crossing centuries, oceans, continents, and disciplines, this ambitious and extraordinary collection shows how the logic of dispossession and its productions of difference reach into a present that avows colorblindness and erases coloniality. In its courtrooms, border checkpoints, intimacies, reform impulses, prisons, refugee camps, and regimes of accumulation, the neoliberal order is shown to draw on and recalibrate histories of gendered colonial oppression as long as they are deep.” – David Roediger (University of Kansas)

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/special-issue-of-the-journal-darkmatter-reflections-on-dispossession-critical-feminisms-out-now

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

downloadRIGHTS TO NATURE

Conference & Call for Papers

Rights to Nature: tracing alternative political ecologies to the neoliberal environmental agenda”.

This is a hybrid academic-activist event that aims to encourage a closer collaboration between scholars and activists working on the neoliberalisation of nature. The conference is sponsored by the GEOFORUM journal.

23rd and 24th June 2016

Keynes Hall, King’s College, University of Cambridge, UK

 

We are looking for activists and scholars engaged in environmental movements in Europe. We are interested in a wide variety of topics, including -but not limited- the privatization of natural resources and public assets, land grabbing, the dismantling of traditional forms of using natural resources, the neoliberalisation of nature (including biodiversity conservation), and expropriation of green spaces in both urban and rural areas. Instances of these movements include anti-fracking and anti-mining movements, housing struggles, anti-biodiversity offsetting initiatives, movements against the privatization of public nature assets, including forests and water, and struggles against gentrification, regeneration, urban redevelopment and/or large infrastructure projects with significant environmental impacts.

We would like to invite you to participate in the conference and also if possible to help us reaching people from outside academia that engage in this kind of work. We have some funding available to pay for travel and accommodation. We would be extremely grateful if you could pass them this information and the preliminary program and call for papers, please.

You can find the call for papers here: http://conservationandtransformation.com/2016/01/27/conference-rights-to-nature-tracing-alternative-political-ecologies-to-the-neoliberal-environmental-agenda/ and here (in the Facebook page you can also find the program): https://www.facebook.com/groups/985735908164832/

Deadline for Abstracts: 27th March 2016

We would also like to let you know that our goal is to enable an in-depth discussion between scholars and activists and, therefore, this would be a rather small event with a limited number of participants.

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/conference-rights-to-nature-tracing-alternative-political-ecologies-to-the-neoliberal-environmental-agenda

Old Nature

Old Nature

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Fat Cat Food

Fat Cat Food

THE EXTREME CENTRE: HOW THE NEOLIBERAL PROJECT HAS RESHAPED THE WORLD

Tuesday, 16 February 2016, 5-7PM

Tariq Ali (writer, filmmaker and editor of New Left Review)

The Extreme Centre: How the Neoliberal Project Has Reshaped the World  

BGLT (SOAS, Brunei Gallery), Bloomsbury, London

Discussant: Dr Feyzi Ismail (SOAS)

Abstract: Since 1989, politics has become a contest to see which politicians can best serve the needs of the market. The result is always the same: a victory for the Extreme Centre. The same catastrophe has taken place in the US, Britain, Continental Europe and Australia. In this urgent and wide-ranging case for the prosecution, Tariq Ali looks at the people and the events that have informed this moment of political suicide: corruption in Westminster; the failures of the EU and NATO; the soft power of the American Empire that dominates the world stage uncontested. Despite this inertia, Ali goes in search of alternative futures, finding promise in the Bolivarian revolutions of Latin America and the edges of Europe. Emerging parties in Scotland, Greece and Spain, formed out of the 2008 crisis, as well as Corbynism in Britain, are offering new hope for democracy.

Tariq Ali has been a leading figure on the international left since the 60s, having engaged in debates against the Vietnam War with leading politicians of the time. He has written extensively on world history and politics; his works include The Obama Syndrome, The Clash of Fundamentalisms and his most recent publication, The Extreme Centre: A Warning. Described by the Observer as an ‘intellectual bomb thrower’ his contributions extend to film and theatre scripts, novels and published conversations, such as with Edward Said. He is a regular broadcaster on BBC Radio and contributes to magazines and newspapers including The Guardian and the London Review of Books.

All welcome, no need to book. Seating is available on a first come, first served, basis so please arrive early to be sure of a seat.

On behalf of the seminar organising committee: Alfredo Saad-Filho, Feyzi Ismail, Jo Tomkinson, Carolina Alves, Lorenza Monaco and Jai Bhatia

Further details of all the seminars are available on the SOAS Development Studies Department website: https://www.soas.ac.uk/development/events/devstudseminars/

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/soas-ds-seminar-tariq-ali-on-the-extreme-centre-how-the-neoliberal-project-has-reshaped-the-world

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

images (1)THE LABOUR PARTY, EUROPE AND CIVIC ENGAGEMENT: PEOPLE’S EMPOWERMENT OR MISPLACED IDEALISM?

Half-Day Workshop at THE University of East London

7 March 2015. Venue: UEL / Stratford Campus

Convenors: Centre for the Study of States, Markets & People (School of Business & Law, University of East London); Jean Monnet Centre of Excellence (King’s College London); and the School of Politics & International Relations (SPIRE, Keele University)

The Labour Party, Europe and Civic Engagement: People’s Empowerment or Misplaced Idealism?

Jeremy Corbyn’s ideas of “Peoples Quantitative Easing” (PQE), progressive taxation, a new welfare state in the UK and changing the European Union from a neo-liberal monetarist construction to a civilised, multi-cultural and pro-labour space for good governance are gaining traction amongst informed practitioners of finance, politicians, academics and beyond. But can wider communities and constituencies be engaged, and how? The theme of “civic engagement” would appear to empower people, engaging civil society and local communities with pro-growth and pro-welfare initiatives across Britain and Europe. The workshop aims at exploring the new ideas of the Labour Party examining their appeal and whether or not they further civic engagement empowering the citizen, or whether it is just another form of misplaced idealism with no possibilities to deliver.

Themes to explore include:

What is the relationship between Labour Party and the EU in both historical and contemporary perspectives? What’s the Labour Party stance on the EU today? What are the key ideas and policies of the Labour Party under Jeremy Corbyn and how do they engage with civil society and the key constituencies of the youth and middle classes? Are Labour Party’s new policies an alternative to austerity and how do they impact on current taxation regimes and inflation? Do Labour Party’s new policies augment the distance between Britain the EU? How do local communities can benefit from the Labour Party and vice versa? What would be the likely impact of Labour Party’s policies on education and the University sector from their possible im plementation in the future? Can PQE (People’s Quantitative Easing) lead to a re-industrialisation of Britain and how does it fit with the overall economic policy of the “New Labour” (abolition of tuition fees, re-nationalisation of railways, new taxation regime etc.)?

Contact and further information: Ejike Udeogu, Lecturer in Economics, School of Business & Law, University of East London, e.udeogu@uel.ac.uk

The convenors thank The Political Quarterly for its generous support

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/the-labour-party-europe-and-civic-engagement

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

images (8)AN ALTERNATIVE TO NEO-LIBERAL EDUCATION – VENUE CHANGE

NOW AT THE MAYDAY ROOMS

Apologies for the short notice but unfortunately it has been necessary to change the venue for the meeting on Saturday 28 November.  This will now be held in the MAYDAY ROOMS, 88 Fleet Street, London EC4Y 1DH, 2.00pm – 4.30pm. 

NEW ANARCHIST RESEARCH GROUP

JOINT MEETING WITH THE SOCIAL SCIENCE CENTRE (LINCOLN)

Saturday 28 November 2015

Mayday Rooms

88 Fleet Street

London, EC4Y 1DH

2.00pm – 4.30pm

The Social Science Centre (SSC) in Lincoln is a self-organised co-operative higher learning provider that is democratic at all levels of its organisation. The scholars who are members of the Centre work and study together whether they are traditionally students or teachers. One of the aims of the Centre is to analyse and dissolve the tensions in the relationships between research and teaching, and students and academics. Set up by academics from the University of Lincoln, the Centre has no relationship with the University, although it is a critique of the formal institution as a dysfunctional neoliberal arrangement in many ways. The SSC aims to ‘reinvent’ the University and transform the scholars’ relationship to knowledge in order to insert their own experiences into theoretical knowledges that aim to emancipate them as active change agents. The SSC engenders provocations, conversations and discussions that enliven the notion that all those who are involved in active knowledge work should become (co-) producers of knowledge. Two of the (student) scholars and an academic from Lincoln will be visiting the Anarchist Research Group to talk about the centre and their experiences studying there.

In this session, we would like to tell you a little about our experiences with the SSC and then invite a discussion on the SSC, self-organised education and the relationships between education, learning, and social change.
The Social Science Centre provides free public higher education in the city of Lincoln and emphasises the collective and collaborative nature of education. The Centre was opened in 2011 by academics and students and Lincoln residents who feel passionately that those wishing to study higher education should not have to take on the burden of debt. There is no fee to pay when joining the Centre, only what you can afford. Free also means freedom to study outside of the current disciplinary structures of higher education around topics and issues that are of direct concern to you and your local community.

Anarchist Research Group Website: http://torrianomeetinghouse.wordpress.com/where-we-are/ 

images (1)

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

 

Biopolitics

Biopolitics

BIOPOLITICS

Call for Papers

Journal Pléyade

ISSN 0718-655x / Online ISSN 0719-3696

Nº 17 January-June, 2016

Special Edition on Biopolitics

Since Foucault’s initial work on “biopolitics”, the relation between life and politics has become of increasing significance in the contemporary debate in philosophy and in the social sciences. As an area of research and as a concept, biopolitics has received diverse and at times opposed applications in the works of Antonio Negri, Roberto Esposito, Giorgio Agamben, Nikolas Rose, among others. This year the journal Pléyade intends to dedicate a dossier on biopolitics with the aim of analyzing both the exploitation and administration of biological life as a form of power, and of proposing alternative conceptions of politics that allow biological life to escape or resist its domination. We are interested in receiving contributions that address both modalities of biopolitics from a variety of disciplinary points of view.

 

This dossier invites authors to make contributions in the different areas on biopolitics and biopower in the contemporary thought. Along these lines, the proposed themes could include:

– Debates in contemporary thought on life and politics

– New perspectives on Michel Foucault and biopolitics

– Italian Theory and biopolitics

– Biopolitics and neoliberalism

– Biopolitics and totalitarianism

– Origines of biopolitics in the history of philosophy

– Affirmative biopolitics

– Biopolitics and new materialism

 

Guest Editor:

Vanessa Lemm, Head of the School of Humanities and Languages, University of New

South Wales UNSW, Australia.

Reception until: December 30, 2015

Languages: English or Spanish

Publication date: June 2016

Send articles to: revistapleyade@caip.cl

Manuscripts will be evaluated by double blind refereeing

bIOdownload

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

images (2)

313111_coverTHE JOURNAL FOR CRITICAL EDUCATION POLICY STUDIES – VOL.13 NO.2 (OCTOBER 2015)

LATEST ISSUE NOW ONLINE

 

 

 

CONTENTS

 

Periklis Pavlidis

Social consciousness, education and transformative activity

 

Dave Hill, Christine Lewis, Alpesh Maisuria, Patrick Yarker and  Julia Carr

Neoliberal and Neoconservative Immiseration Capitalism in England: Policies and Impacts on Society and on Education

 

Curry Malott and Derek R. Ford

Contributions to a Marxist Critical Pedagogy of Becoming: Centering the Critique of the Gotha Programme: Part Two

 

Philippa Hall

Labour Subjectivities for the new world of work: A critique of government policy on the integration of entrepreneurialism in the university curriculum

 

Elisabeth Simbuerger and Mike Neary

Free Education! A “Live” Report on the Chilean Student Movement 2011-2014 – reform or revolution? [A Political Sociology for Action]

 

Amanda Oliveira Rabelo, Graziela Raupp Pereira and Maria Amélia Reis

Sex Education as a Transversal Subject

 

Lois Weiner

Democracy, critical education, and teachers unions: Connections and contradictions in the neoliberal epoch

 

Melanie Lawrence

Beyond the Neoliberal Imaginary: Investigating the Role of Critical Pedagogy in Higher Education

 

Conor Heaney

What is the University today?

 

Shawgi Tell

Can a Charter School Not be a Charter School?

 

Ş. Erhan Bagci

Decline of Meritocracy: Neo-feudal Segregation in Turkey

 

Declan McKenna

Policy over Procedure: A look at the School Completion Programme in Ireland. Is this State led educational intervention for disadvantaged children merely philanthropic and can current Global and National Neo Liberal Policy trends in Education be overcome?

 

Daniel B. Saunders

Resisting Excellence: Challenging Neoliberal Ideology in Postsecondary Education

 

Latest edition of The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies is now online at: http://www.jceps.com

 

download (1)

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Education Not for Sale

Education Not for Sale

CRITICAL PEDAGOGY VS. CAPITAL: REIGNITING THE CONVERSATION

CRITICAL THEORIES IN THE 21st CENTURY: A CONFERENCE OF TRANSFORMATIVE PEDAGOGIES

4th Annual Conference 2015, November 6th & 7th 

Location: West Chester University, 700 South High Street, West Chester, PA 19383, USA

Two Days of Discussion and Music!

Bill Ayers

Bill Ayers

Opening Conference Keynote:  Bill Ayers
Professor Ayers is a Distinguished Professor of Education and Senior University Scholar at the University of Illinois at Chicago (retired). He is a member of the executive committee of the Faculty Senate and founder of both the Small Schools Workshop and the Center for Youth and Society. Dr. Ayers has taught courses in interpretive and qualitative research, oral history, creative non-fiction, urban school change, and teaching and the modern predicament. To learn more about Dr. Ayers and his work please visit his webpage at: http://billayers.org/biographyhistory/

 

Dave Hill

Dave Hill

Closing Conference Keynote: Dave Hill
Dave Hill is Research Professor of Education at Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, England, and Visiting Professor of Education at the Universities of Athens, Greece, Middlesex, London.  Dave is a Marxist academic and political activist in different countries, in particular with trade unions and left / socialist / Marxist groups in Greece, Turkey and Ireland as well as England. His academic work focuses on issues of neoliberalism, capitalism, class, `race’, resistance and socialist education/ education for equality; critical pedagogy/critical education. He founded in 2003 and chief edits the free online peer-juried journal, the Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies, www.jceps.com, a free online, scholarly, peer-juried international journal that has had nearly a million downloads in 10 years.

Musical Artists: Marcel Cartier, Magik, and Squid Brothers Inc.

Call For Papers
The 4th Annual Conference on Critical Theories in the 21st Century aims to reinvigorate the field of critical pedagogy. The primary question driving this conference is: What is to be done to make critical pedagogy an effective educational weapon in the current struggle against capitalism and imperialism?

There is no doubt that we are at a critical juncture in history in terms of the limits of nature’s vital ecosystems, the physical limits of the progressive accumulation of capital, and the deepening reactionary ideology and scapegoating that exacerbates the oppression of youth of color. If critical pedagogy is to play a significant role in intervening in the current context, then a sharpened sense of purpose and direction is needed.

Squid Brothers Inc.

Squid Brothers Inc.

Some examples of possible topics include:

  • Marxism
  • Post-structuralism/post-modernism
  • Anarchism
  • Challenging the unholy trinity of state, capital, and religion
  • Class and the capital-labor dialectic
  • Identity and economics
  • Hierarchical and vertical forms of organization (i.e., vanguards versus networks)
  • Reform versus revolution
  • Socialism, communism, & democracy
  • Affect theory and the new materialisms
  • The knowledge economy, post-Fordism, and “cognitive capitalism”
  • Critical geography

While this conference will include important presentations and debates in critical pedagogy, it will not be limited to this focus. In other words, as critical theory becomes more inclusive, global, and all encompassing, this conference welcomes more than just academics as important contributors. That is, we recognize students and youth groups as possessing authentic voices based on their unique relationship to capitalism and will therefore be open to them as presenters and discussion leaders.

While this conference will include important presentations and challenging discussions based in critical pedagogy, it will not be limited to this focus. In other words, as critical theory becomes more inclusive, global, and all encompassing, this conference welcomes more than just academics as important contributors.

Please submit abstract proposals (500-1000 words) to: Curry Malott (cmalott@wcupa.edu)

Proposal due date: September 27th, 2015

 

Conference website: http://ct21st.org/

Curry Malott

Curry Malott

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Living Fire

Living Fire

ROSA LUXEMBURG AND THE CONTEMPORARY: IMPERIALISM, NEOLIBERALISM, REVOLUTION

Call for Papers

This issue of New Formations will propose a rethinking of the legacy of revolutionary socialist Rosa Luxemburg in the twenty-first century. In particular, essays included in the issue will draw on Luxemburg’s writings in order to address pressing issues of the contemporary world. At a time when neoliberal policies strengthen the smooth running of imperialist dispossession and continue to break the oppressed classes through new forms of precariat, debt, marginalisation, militarism and impoverishment, Luxemburg’s inheritance seems to acquire an unexpected poignancy. Luxemburg’s uncompromising commitment to socialism as only alternative to the violence of capitalism can inspire engaged movements fighting social justice in many contexts of the globe. In particular, the issue will focus on Luxemburg’s reflections on imperialism as the forcing of trade relations with non-capitalist surroundings as antidote to the ‘standstill of accumulation’ inherent to the unfolding of capitalism’s history.

Theories of imperialism through the twentieth and twenty-first centuries have contended with Luxemburg’s proposition by emphasising its limitations, errors and blind-spots. Yet, do Luxemburg’s theories on imperialism retain any meaning or validity in a postcolonial era? Can Luxemburg’s legacy help redefine the struggle against contemporary forms of neoliberalism, imperialism and accumulation? Can a debate on Luxemburg shed light on the meaning of the postcolonial as historical category and its political and social implications? Can Luxemburg’s thought help to redefine the meaning of social engagement today? The twenty-first century seems to confirm Rosa Luxemburg’s prediction that capitalism would be incapable of becoming universal without damaging the environments, societies and forms of life that are necessary for its reproduction. Contemporary wars, ecological crises, social unrest and the violence of neoliberal economy testify to the paradox that Luxemburg examined in her work: the full domination of capitalism on the planet would correspond to a scenario verging on total destruction and hence the breakdown of capitalism itself. According to Rosa Luxemburg, this ‘barbaric’ aspect of capitalism requires the re-opening of history through active revolutionary intervention.

 

Confirmed contributors

Stephen Morton

Paul LeBlanc

Peter Hudis

Helen Scott

Rory Castle

Filippo Menozzi

Kanishka Chowdhury

Rosa Luxemburg

Rosa Luxemburg

We welcome contributions from all disciplines. Final essays will be expected to be 7,000-9,000 words in length.

For more information about New Formations see http://www.newformations.co.uk

 

Deadline for abstracts 30 September 2015

Contributors will be told if their abstracts have been accepted by October 30th 2015

Deadline for full essays: May Day 2016

Please submit all abstracts to: nfsubmissions@me.com

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Postanarchism

Postanarchism

POSTANARCHISM

A new book by Saul Newman

Published by Polity

October 2015 | 160 Pages

Hardback: 9780745688732 | £50.00/€68.97

Paperback: 9780745688749| £12.99/€17.91

 

 

 

Praise For Postanarchism:

“For those on the left who despair about the ongoing power of neoliberalism, Saul Newman offers a powerful insight. Whereas older models of resistance are based on revolution and opposition to the state, Newman notes that the state is no longer the key problem of our time. Postanarchism is his response; it is based on autonomy, insurrection and the recuperation of politics. This book is critical for those who wish to think and act beyond our contemporary condition.” — James Martel, San Francisco State University

“Beautifully written, Newman’s book is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the dynamics of contemporary capitalism, the nature of political contestation and the choices we can exercise as political actors. It’s a fearless and provocative work, unafraid not only to challenge cherished nostrums of both left and right but to work creatively with “dangerous” concepts: insurrection, violence, servitude. In sum, this is a thoughtful and invigorating text for understanding our times.” — Simon Tormey, University of Sydney

 

In this book, Newman develops an original political theory of postanarchism; a form of anti-authoritarian politics which starts, rather than finishes, with anarchy. He does this by asking four central questions: who are we as subjects; how do we resist; what is our relationship to violence; and, why do we obey? By drawing on a range of heterodox thinkers including La Boétie, Sorel, Benjamin, Stirner and Foucault, the author not only investigates the current conditions for radical political thought and action, but proposes a new form of politics based on what he calls ontological anarchy and the desire for autonomous life. Rather than seeking revolutionary emancipation or political hegemony, we should affirm instead the non-existence of power and the ever-present possibilities of freedom.

As the tectonic plates of our time are shifting, revealing the nihilism and emptiness of our political and economic order, postanarchism’s disdain for power in all its forms offers us genuine emancipatory potential.

 

Book Details at Polity: http://www.polity.co.uk/book.asp?ref=9780745688732

The Politics of Postanarchism: http://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/saul-newman-the-politics-of-postanarchism

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

RESIRESILIENCE AND THE ANTHROPOCENE: THE POLITICAL ECOLOGIES OF COMPLEXITY

Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses

Call for Special Issue Abstracts

Deadline: 1 March 2016

The Anthropocene signals a new geological epoch in which humans have become a geophysical force. The possibility that human activity now produces the environments on which it depends destabilizes the image of a stable Earth that has grounded Western philosophy and politics for two millennia. Critical scholars assert that Anthropocene thinking can provoke new understandings of spatiality, temporality, ethics, responsibility and politics. As Simon Dalby (2013) suggests, a new kind of politics becomes possible when we begin to consider that the stakes include (de)forming the world we inhabit. However, Brad Evans and Julian Reid (2014) argue that the Anthropocene just as easily presents a dangerous, vengeful Earth teetering on the brink of systemic collapse – a catastrophic discourse that creates fearful subjects who desire resilience in order to survive a calamitous future. The Anthropocene’s world-deforming vision leads into a reactionary bio-politics of resilience that fashions adaptive neoliberal subjects capable of surviving whatever surprises complexity has in store.

Thus two concepts have been central to the shifting dynamics of power and agency under the political ecology of complexity: the Anthropocene and resilience. And yet, resilience techniques do not produce uniform effects. The deployment of resilience always occurs within particular socio-ecological contexts striated by multiple conflicts and tensions. Resilience intervenes in, and is inflected by, these contextually-specific relations. Ben Anderson’s (2015: 62) call to recognize that ‘‘resilience’ names a fractured, multiple, empirical field rather than a series of generic characteristics’ means that not only will resilience be something different in different times and places, it will also produce uneven and potentially unintended effects as well. Thus, there is no guarantee that resilience interventions will necessarily reinforce neoliberal order; they could just as well catalyze new ways of harnessing complex life’s potentiality. The bio-politics of resilience may attempt to constrain and regulate adaptability, but these constraints are plastic, malleable, and can thus be broken, cast aside or even re-molded into weapons.

This special issue of Resilience: Policies, Practices and Discourses will explore the indeterminate political ecologies opened by the Anthropocene and resilience. It takes seriously the call from Dalby, Evans and Reid, Anderson and others to think through the different ways politics might be thought, practiced, and analyzed through the malleable worlds of the Anthropocene and the complex life of resilience thinking. We invite abstracts from across the disciplines that offer empirically driven, theoretically informed papers that engage with the Anthropocene and resilience to explore the shifting forms of geo-politics and bio-politics that reinforce and challenge neoliberal political ecologies. Abstracts may touch on these themes in any number of fields, including but not limited to climate change adaptation, disaster management and development, international relations, environmental security, or urban development and security.

 

References

Anderson B (2015) What kind of thing is resilience? Politics 35(1): 60-66.

Dalby S (2013) Biopolitics and climate security in the Anthropocene. Geoforum 49: 184-192.

Evans B and Reid J (2014) Resilient Life: The Art of Living Dangerously. Cambridge: Polity Press.

 

Submission Instructions

Abstracts of no more than 500 words should be submitted to Kevin Grove (Aberystwyth University, kevinjgrove@gmail.com) and David Chandler (University of Westminster, D.Chandler@westminster.ac.uk) by 12 October 2015.

Deadline for invited full submissions will be 1 March 2016.

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/