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Education 2POLICY REVIEWS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

A NEW JOURNAL IS LAUNCHED

CALL FOR PAPERS

SOCIETY FOR RESEARCH INTO HIGHER EDUCATION ANNOUNCES LAUNCH OF NEW POLICY JOURNAL IN HIGHER EDUCATION

With demands for a more skilled and qualified workforce, and growing calls to increase social mobility, higher education has firmly established its place on the political agenda in developed and developing countries. To provide a forum for the debates and reports that these trends are generating, the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE) is launching its latest journal, Policy Reviews in Higher Education, with the first edition to be published in December 2016.

This journal is offering an entirely different space for the discussion of policy issues impacting on HE. It is to be international and interdisciplinary in scope and will publish articles of much greater depth and analysis than the usual academic journal pieces, inviting contributions of between 8,000 to 12,000 words.

This is an important and exciting new venture both for policy debate in HE globally and for SRHE. In putting our energies and resources behind this Society initiative, SRHE is signalling our responsibility as the relevant and best placed learned Society to bring more robust and considered evidence and a wider discourse to the policy debate.

This is a global call for contributions to the journal.

The first issue of Policy Reviews will be published in December 2016.

See the link below to the press release which gives more background on the journal, the details of the editors, and the journal aims and objectives.

Please do also circulate this call for contributions widely amongst your relevant networks and contacts. 

 

About Policy Reviews in Higher Education (Press Release):  http://www.srhe.ac.uk/downloads/PRIHEPressRelease.pdf

 

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Education Crisis

Education Crisis

THE ABOLITION OF THE UNIVERSITY

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Open Library of Humanities (OLM)

CFP: The Abolition of the University: Deadline: Nov 1st, 2015

Deadline: 1st November 2015

In 1968, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o and his colleagues at the University of Nairobi called for the abolition of the English department. They attacked an enduring colonial legacy and envisioned an intellectual renaissance in Africa. In 2012, at the University of Glasgow: “Forty years after Ngũgĩ and his colleagues argued for it in Nairobi, the abolition of the Scottish Department was achieved by managerial diktat in Glasgow.” Two institutional interventions: the first driven by the desire to liberate education from epistemological and pedagogical domination; the second, by the neoliberal business model. This special edition seeks to consider the chequered history of the westernised university, to diagnose its embattled present, and to imagine its future.

In recent months, academics, non-academic staff, students and their allies across the UK, Canada, the Netherlands, Ireland, Albania, Finland, Colombia, Mexico and elsewhere, have staged protests against neoliberal reform of universities. Wendy Brown argues that the evolution of neoliberalism from a set of economic policies into mode of reason imperils not just liberal institutions but democracy itself. Education across the board is jeopardised by the corporate university model. The liberal arts face multidirectional threats, of extinction and irrelevance. Yet as Gayatri Spivak suggests, if the humanities is the ethical healthcare of society, what resources can we summon to reform, destroy, transform, or re-create the university? Or less innocently, as Bill Readings suggests, simply foster a space where academics (and students) can “work without alibis” in acknowledgement that radical possibilities are constrained by the societies in which universities are situated.

This special edition calls for a cross-disciplinary response, from the humanities and social sciences to all critical, creative and deviant positionalities. Diverse submissions are encouraged from policy reform to short stories. In particular, the edition reaches out to those who traditionally or purposefully find themselves outside the ivory towers: those not included and unassimilated.

Contributions will be considered around (but not limited to) these themes:

  • The western / imperial history of the university
  • Literary / creative representations of the university
  • Epistemologies / pedagogies of possibility
  • Western imperial humanism and the humanities
  • The co-option of postcolonial / Black / queer studies and ‘minority’ / transnational / diasporic literatures
  • Education in an age of neoliberalism / neo-colonialism
  • New models for higher education, including cooperatives, free schools etc.
  • The pedagogy of debt
  • The ‘Student As Producer’
  • Accelerationism and competition in the university
  • Activism: Strike / Occupy / Transform (In / Against / Beyond)
  • Resistance through radical poetics / humanisms

The special collection, edited by Lou Dear (University of Glasgow, l.dear.1@research.gla.ac.uk) and Martin Eve (Birkbeck, University of London, martin.eve@bbk.ac.uk), is to be published in the Open Library of Humanities (ISSN 2056-6700). The OLH is an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation-funded open-access journal with a strong emphasis on quality peer review and a prestigious academic steering board. Unlike some open-access publications, the OLH has no author-facing charges and is instead financially supported by an international consortium of libraries.

Submissions should be made online at: https://submit.openlibhums.org/ in accordance with the author guidelines and clearly marking the entry as [“The Abolition of the University,” SPECIAL COLLECTION]. Innovative submissions that do not clearly fit the submission guidelines are welcome and we encourage authors to contact the editors to discuss this. Submissions will then undergo a double-blind peer-review process. Authors will be notified of the outcome as soon as reports are received.

See: https://www.openlibhums.org/2015/05/14/cfp-the-abolition-of-the-university-deadline-nov-1st-2015/

HEdownload

OPEN LIBRARY OF HUMANITIES: https://www.openlibhums.org/

 

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Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

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law-on-trial-flyerTHE UNIVERSITY ON TRIAL

The End(s) of the Legal Academy

The obituaries of academic freedom, the humanities, and indeed the university itself are coming to focus not just on the end of an erstwhile academy but also on what the ends, the purport, of the academy should and could now be. This workshop brings this concern to bear on the role of the legal academy, a role that is distinctive yet shared with other faculties in the university. It explores what that role imports for the character of being-together within the legal academy.

Organiser: Professor Peter Fitzpatrick

 

Wellbeing in the Legal Profession: Law Firms, Law Schools and the (Un)Happy Lawyer (or, what do we talk about, when we talk about wellbeing in law?)

Richard Collier, Law School, Newcastle University
Discussant: Fiona Macmillan, School of Law, Birkbeck, University of London

 

The Law School and the Force of Law

Patricia Tuitt, School of Law, Birkbeck, University of London
Discussant: Eddie Bruce-Jones,, School of Law, Birkbeck, University of London

 

The Structure of a University: Instrumentalism, Idealism and Forms of Life

Soo Tian Lee, School of Law, Birkbeck, University of London

Discussant: Matthew Charles, English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies, University of Westminster

 

Venue: Malet Street Building, Council Room

BOOK HERE

Flyer: https://hetheory.files.wordpress.com/2015/06/law-on-trial-flyer.jpg

Part of Law on Trial 2015: The University on Trial, Birkbeck College, University of London, June 15-19 2015.

Website: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/law/about-us/events/law-on-trial-2015

Education for Debt

Education for Debt

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imagesUNPACKING THE ‘TRANSNATIONAL ASSOCIATIONS OF CAPITALS’ IN GLOBAL HIGHER EDUCATION: RANKINGS AND THE SUBSUMPTION OF ACADEMIC LABOUR UNDER ACADEMIC PUBLISHING CAPITAL

KRYSTIAN SZADKOWSKI

The Research in Critical Education (RiCES) research group at the University of Lincoln is holding a lunchtime seminar next week. You are very welcome.

Unpacking the ‘transnational associations of capitals’ in global higher education: rankings and the subsumption of academic labour under academic publishing capital (Krystian Szadkowski, Adam Mickiewicz University)
3 June | 12:30–2:00pm | Minerva Building 3202

This presentation explores the concept of ‘transnational association of capitals’ in the context of higher education (Hall, 2014; Ball, 2012). The focus will be on the conditions and consequences of the expansion of
merchant capital (or capital involved in circulation), limited to large and quasi-monopolistic academic publishers. The claim behind this talk is that in order to grasp the specificity of the process of subsumption
of academic labour under academic publishing capital, it is not enough to focus exclusively on proprietary relations (i.e. expropriation, enclosures, primitive accumulation, alienation). Such an analysis, although providing extremely rich material, has its limitations: capital may opt out from the private property form and ownership, but will never give up domination. The tool of capitalist domination and control, in all sectors of production, even immaterial and biopolitical, is measure. For this reason, this presentation will focus on the functionality of the capitalist mechanisms of establishing measures for the expansion of academic publishers’ capital based on the subsumption of global academic labour.

Krystian Szadkowski (1986), is an assistant professor at the Institute of Philosophy and a researcher at the UNESCO Chair for Institutional Research and Higher Education Policy of Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland. His research interests cover Marxian political economy, autonomist Marxism and transformation of higher education systems in Europe. In 2014 he defended his PhD thesis entitled Towards the University as an Institution of the Common: Philosophical Foundations of the Critical Higher Education Studies [in Polish]. Recently, he co-edited a collected volume Joy Forever: The Political Economy of Social Creativity (MayFly 2014). He is also an editor-in-chief of peer-reviewed journal Praktyka Teoretyczna/Theoretical Practice.

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Living Fire

Living Fire

AN EFFECTIVE RESPONSE TO A DYSTOPIAN VISION

(The Higher, 21 May 2015)

What does the recent election result presage for UK higher education (‘Sector stands by for battles …’ (THE, 14 May)? Evidently, a continuation of recent course and speed, namely:

  • removing the fee cap, thus further stratifying the sector;
  • more deregulation and further pickings for the private providers;
  • breaking up national bargaining on employment terms and conditions;
  • intensifying REF pressure through performance management, thus skewing research to serve a political agenda;
  • further encroachment of income-generating activities; and
  • entrenching the consumerist distortion of the academy through more NSS-style ‘assessments’.

We may expect more commercial and political attacks on academic freedoms; the elimination of academic governance in favour of corporate interests and ‘brand identity’; and further differentiation between colleagues in stable employment and those on casual contracts. The overall effect will be to undermine the universities’ capacity for genuine critical engagement.

In accelerating the end of the idea of a public university, these changes will fundamentally alter the nature of university education in the UK, and what it means to be a scholar and a student. As such, they represent the demise of the UK’s position, whatever its faults, in the world of higher education, learning, scholarship and research

At present, as scholars and academics, we are not in a good position to resist the implementation of this dystopian vision. Our initiatives in the academy (the Council for the Defence of British Universities and the Campaign for the Public University) have done important work to inform staff and students, as well as the general public, of what’s been going on since 2010 but without significant policy effects. Our trade union, the UCU, has impressive policies against the commercialisation of the sector and performance management but has been unable to turn the tide, and it has been weakened by successive defeats on pensions and pay.

There is a clear paradox here since the large majority of us is opposed to this destruction. We have a duty, therefore, to identify what is under threat, and what an effective response might be.

The future of HE in the UK is in the balance. Now is the time to convene to diagnose the problem, to develop a strategy to defend the sector, and to explain this to the wider society. We urge colleagues to plan a London conference in the autumn to resist this impending disaster.

Signed

Tom Hickey (Brighton UCU)
Professor John Holmwood (Nottingham, and Campaign for the Public University, CPU)
Sean Wallis (UCL, and UCU NEC & London Region)
Professor Thomas Docherty (Warwick, and Council for the Defence of British Universities, CDBU)
Professor Martin McQuillan (Kingston, and CDBU)
Professor Howard Hotson (Oxford, and CDBU)
Professor Miriam David (IoE)
Priyamvada Gopal (Cambridge)
Professor Bob Brecher (Brighton)
Adrian Budd (South Bank UCU)
Professor Dennis Leech (Warwick)
Saladin Meckled-Garcia (UCL UCU)
Professor Kate Chedgzoy (Newcastle)
Professor Des Freedman (Goldsmiths UCU)
Professor Jeff Duckett (QMUL)
Professor Lucie Clapp (UCL)
Professor Jane Rendell (UCL)
Professor Melissa Terras (UCL)
Jim Wolfreys (Kings UCU)
Professor Mike Otsuka (LSE)
Professor Richard Farndale (Cambridge)
Professor Patricia Waugh (Durham)
Professor Jane Hardy (Hertfordshire)
Carlo Morelli (Dundee, and UCU NEC)
Professor Malcolm Povey (Leeds)

See: https://heconvention2.wordpress.com/statement

 

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EDUCATION

EDUCATION

UNIVERSITY GOVERNANCE AND MANAGEMENT: CRITICAL ENGAGEMENTS WITH THEORY, POLICY AND PRACTICE

 

Society for Research into Higher Education

Date – 13 May, 16:00-18:30

Venue – London Metropolitan University, Room GCG-08

Network – Higher Education Policy

This seminar provides an opportunity to critically examine changing modes of university governance and management in the context of global trends in higher education policy.

Two papers will stimulate the debate:

 

‘Ruling knowledge: Universities and the governance of knowledge creation’ Professor Rebecca Boden, University of Roehampton

Governance can be broadly defined as systems for or approaches to decision-making. The governance of universities is therefore the means by which decisions are made within them. Any form of governing involves the exercise of some form of power, and in this paper I explore the shifting and complex landscape of governing power in UK universities and ramifications that has for the nature of the knowledges produced and what they are used for. I will also suggest how governing regimes might be beneficially reformed to aid the further development of the social role of the university.

 

‘Appointing university executives: a case of managerialism in action?’ Dr Sue Shepherd, University of Kent

The prevailing academic narrative asserts that managerialism is all pervasive in today’s universities. But what exactly is managerialism and how does it differ from new public management and neoliberalism, terms with which it is often confused or conflated? In an attempt to gain greater conceptual clarity, this paper presents an ideal-type model of managerialism as ideology. This is then utilised to explore the extent to which recent changes to the appointment of deputy and pro vice chancellors might be considered symptomatic of ideal-type managerialism.  Thus, the academic narrative itself is subjected to critical examination.

Tea and coffee will be available at 4pm and the event will start at 4.15. After each paper there will be time for questions and discussion, followed by an opportunity to discuss issues raised in both papers over a glass of wine or juice.

 

For further details about the Higher Education Policy Network, please contact the network convenor, Prof. Carole Leathwood, Institute for Policy Studies in Education, London Metropolitan University: c.leathwood@londonmet.ac.uk.

To reserve a place: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

Note: Unless otherwise stated SRHE events are free to members, there is a charge of £60 for non-members

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Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

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Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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Student Debt

Student Debt

STUDENT DEBT

Berkeley Journal of Sociology

Call for Submissions on Student Debt

In collaboration with Debt and Society, the Berkeley Journal of Sociology is seeking submissions about student debt. Submissions will be considered for the 2015 print edition of the BJS as well as an online series that will launch in September 2015.

In addition to short essays (less than 3,500 words), we are also seeking photo essays, illustrations, reviews, and critical replies to published content.

Submissions must be received by June 1, 2015 and should be emailed to both submissions@berkeleyjournal.org and charlie.eaton@berkeley.edu.

Full BJS submission guidelines can be found here.

The goals of the series are described further here.

Berkley Journal of Sociology: http://berkeleyjournal.org/

Debt& Society: http://debtandsociety.org/a-call-for-submissions-on-student-debt/

Call for Submissions: http://berkeleyjournal.org/2015/04/a-call-for-submissions-on-student-debt/

Submission Guidelines: http://berkeleyjournal.org/submissions/

EDITORIAL_Student-loans_Devin-Beauregard

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Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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EDUCATION

EDUCATION

PERSPECTIVES FOR THE NEW UNIVERSITY

Call for Papers

Extended deadline: April 15: Perspectives for the New University

Krisis: Journal for Contemporary Philosophy

The occupation and appropriation of university buildings in Amsterdam and the protests of students and staff there and at other universities in the Netherlands triggered a wide-ranging debate about the future of higher education and research.

Krisis – Journal for Contemporary Philosophy – aims at bringing together challenging perspectives from, on and for what during the protests has been coined the ‘new university’.

We invite contributions and short essays (max. 3000 words) that reflect on what is happening, how to move forward and envision alternative educational institutes.

We specifically also invite contributions by students and non-academics for this interdisciplinary publication aimed at supporting debates on the future of knowledge institutions.

Krisis is also looking for artistic and visual contribution that envision the new university.

The special issue will initially appear open-access in pdf-format and, possibly, in print at a later stage.

Deadline: April 15

KRISIS

KRISIS

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

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Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

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Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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Herbert Marcuse

Herbert Marcuse

PRAXIS AND CRITIQUE: LIBERATION, PEDAGOGY, AND THE UNIVERSITY

International Herbert Marcuse Society Sixth Biennial Conference

Praxis and Critique: Liberation, Pedagogy, and the University

12-15 November 2015, Salisbury University (Salisbury, Maryland, USA)

 

CALL FOR PAPERS: Abstracts due May 20, 2015

 

In recent years, the problems and contradictions intrinsic to capitalist society have resulted in a number of manifest, seemingly permanent, crises. Many researchers, academics, and activists have seized on the urgency of recent coalescing crises—from environmental degradation to economic inequality, political instability to social unraveling, and beyond—in an attempt to ameliorate and analyze the consequences of these dilapidated social relations. The work of Herbert Marcuse aims to radically re-envision social relations via critical theory as a way to formulate a praxis of liberation. However, if we live in a society, as Marcuse puts it, “without negation,” how shall this critical rationality be cultivated?

The International Herbert Marcuse Society seeks papers for the 2015 biennial conference, “Praxis and Critique: Liberation, Pedagogy, and the University,” that address the broad pedagogical concerns of cultivating emancipatory rationality. Faculty, independent scholars, activists, artists, and others are invited to submit papers. Papers may want to address, but are certainly not limited to, the following problematics:

  • What role can and should critical pedagogy play in today’s institutions of higher education? Given Marcuse’s emphasis on praxis, critical pedagogy cannot be limited to classroom space in universities – how can a critical rationality translate into programs of activism, agitation, and organization?
  • How is the work of Marcuse, the Frankfurt School, and/or critical theory generally relevant to the current context of political, social, economic, and cultural struggles?
  • What is the meaning of praxis and critique today? Do Marcuse’s contemporary interlocutors help us refine, understand, recast, or critique visions of a critical rationality?
  • What can we learn from activists and scholars from a wide range of critical theories, dealing with liberation in areas such as critical race theory, intersectionality, LGBTQIA studies, disability studies, and postcolonial theory?
  • How does Marcuse’s critical theory provide a lens through which to assess the current condition of advanced industrial society?

Student participation is also encouraged. The conference organizers are particularly interested in encouraging undergraduate and graduate student participation. To this end, we encourage faculty to teach related or special topics classes in fall 2015 and to bring students of all levels to the conference. Undergraduate students are invited to present papers in special concurrent sessions. Undergraduate and graduate students will also have the opportunity to submit conference papers for publication to special conference editions.

This conference is an interdisciplinary, multimedia engagement with the many dimensions of Herbert Marcuse’s work. So, in addition to the presentation of papers, the conference will also present artistic work.

Artistic Presentations:

The Salisbury University Gallery will present two related exhibitions.

The first is “Versprechen, dass es anders sein kann” (Promises that it can be different) by painter Antje Wichtrey.
Salisbury University Gallery Director, Elizabeth Kauffman, will curate the second exhibition.

For more information, contact the conference organizers:

Dr. Sarah Surak (smsurak@salisbury.edu) and Dr. Robert Kirsch (rekirsch@salisbury.edu)

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

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Education Crisis

Education Crisis

UNICONFLICTS

UNICONFLICTS In Spaces of Crisis: Critical Approaches In, Against and Beyond the University

International Open Gathering

11–14 June 2015

At the Department of Architecture, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

Encounters and Conflicts in the City

Details: http://urbanconflicts.wordpress.com/

 

Calling

The group “Encounters and Conflicts in the City” calls radical research groups, critical workshops and researchers, students and collectives that are placed in, against and beyond the neoliberal university in an open gathering on the 11-14th June 2015 at the Department of Architecture at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki.

Through this gathering, we aim to create a public space of dialogue transcending divisions among academic and scientific disciplines and to critically approach the urban issues of the era of crisis, through a dialectic, intersectional and postcolonial approach.

The central questions that we wish to raise are two:

  1. What is the role of knowledge, of the university and of researchers in the era of crisis?
  2. What are the critical epistemological and methodological tools for studying the spatial expressions of the ongoing crisis at multiple scales?

Within this context, we seek to examine the ongoing crisis not just as an over-accumulation crisis but also as a crisis of social disobedience and of the inability of the circulation of capital, patriarchy and nationalism. Moving against the mystification of the crisis, we are interested in critical approaches that focus on the spatialization of social relations and examine the spaces of dissent. Particularly, we wish to examine the articulations, the limits, the contradictions and the dialectic relation of commons, enclosures, inclusion, exclusion, insurgency and counter-insurgency as well as their hybrid intermediate forms, which emerge in and through physical space, modes of communication and the constitution of communities. Overall, we aim to break the North/South or East/West dichotomies and to focus on the fields of gender, race, class and culture.

Building on the critical evaluation of social relations, the circulation of social struggles and subjects and communities in motion, we search for their contentious spaces and their spatial transformations, limits, possibilities and contradictions in the era of crisis. Moreover, understanding education as a unity of theory and practice, we seek these epistemological and methodological tools that emerge from and aim to the deepening and the circulation of social struggles and social movements. In the context of today’s global and local crisis, we note that while a plethora of social struggles and insurgencies emerge, the academic research often appropriates and commercializes their ideas. It is exactly here that we identify the dead-end.

Hence, we seek to surpass the so called academic activism and to set as a main target of this open gathering the critical examination of the following:

A. The role of knowledge and of researchers in the university and in social movements

The neoliberal University and the educational system constitute strategic mechanisms for the production and reproduction of social relations. In particular, within a dynamic process of neoliberalization, the university studies are intensified and are linked more and more to the labour market. Within this context, we wish to examine issues such as the production of knowledge, knowledge as a common, the neoliberalization of the University, the new educational enclosures and the concept of Anti-university.

The transformation of knowledge into private property and consequently into a commodity creates new enclosures in the field of knowledge. These new enclosures in neoliberal education are expressed both through the commodification of the physical space of the universities and through the objectification of human abilities. Some indicative examples are the increase of studying costs, the studying loans, the control of access to information, the commercialization of academic papers and books, the securitization of the University space, the criminalization and the rhetoric against student mobilizations, the suppression of the struggles of university employees and the restriction of the freedom of speech.

However, since 1960s and 1970s, the universities are spaces of collective emancipatory movements, of social struggles and of radical experiments of self-organization for the production of knowledge. As a response to these movements, since 1980s, a number of educational reforms have been introduced. These reforms seek to promote the marketization of the university, aiming to produce the appropriate competitive workforce and to supress student movements.

Yet, during the last decade, many dynamic student movements have emerged in France (2006), Greece (2006-2007), the USA (2009-2010), the UK (2010), Italy (2010-2011) and so on, which targeted the enclosure of knowledge and were connected and inspired many other urban social movements.

 

Axes of Discussion

A.1 Social education and emancipatory movements in the universities

-Student movements: limits and contradictions, connection with other urban movements, confrontation of their suppression and criminalization

-Perspectives of a radical pedagogy towards the knowledge as common

-Ideas and practices of free–‐autonomous universities beyond the education of the neoliberal university

A.2 Control and commodification of knowledge

-Public, state and private education in the neoliberal era

-Politics of knowledge enclosures and copyrights

-The suppression of academic freedom and of the freedom of speech

-Knowledge as private property and commodity for the production of value and surplus value

-Student loans and study costs as mechanisms of disciplining

-The cultural politics of the neoliberal university

-Paid and unpaid work at the University

A.3 The role of the researcher

-Lifelong education, competitiveness and the precarious status of the researcher

-The researcher as producer of dominant discourses and her/his role in the reproduction of power

-Competitiveness, academic carrie and academic divisions and hierarchies

-The biopolitical character of the neoliberal education and the construction of new identities

-Education as praxis, understood as a unity of theory and practice

-Researchers, networks and groups against and beyond the neoliberal university

 

B. Critical epistemological and methodological tools for the study of the crisis’s spatial expressions at multiple scales

Against the privatization and commodification of the academic knowledge and the intended hegemony of the neoliberal perspectives, we seek those critical epistemological tools of knowledge production that encourage social emancipation.

During the last years, urban movements and a plethora of visible and invisible practices of resistance and emancipation offer a variety of tools for the destabilization of the dominant ideologies, ways of disaggregation of power, negotiation of contradictions and visibility of differences. In parallel, today there is the urgent need for the promotion, circulation and deepening of these critical perspectives and their linking to social struggles. Thus, we aim to discuss epistemological and methodological tools, such as the following:

B1. Dialectic critical urban theory

Which are those critical approaches that assist us to perceive and examine the multiple dimensions of urban space? How do dialectic approaches and critical urban theory contribute to the understanding of the spaces of social movements and the spaces of capital, racism and patriarchy?

B2. Intersectionality and urban space in the era of crisis

How does intersectionality contribute to the study of the urban space? Which are the intersectional crossings of the multiple systems of domination, oppression and discrimination such as race, class, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, religion, dis/ability, age, cast, language, culture, body size, education level or citizenship?

B3. Cultural and postcolonial approaches

How do cultural and postcolonial studies contribute to the understanding of urban space and the conceptualization of body, identity and modes of communication. How does the criminalization and the suppression of alternative modes of culture, information and lifestyle operate as mechanisms of control, disciplining and normalization? What is the role of social media in the communication of social struggles? We seek the expression of the ongoing crisis through the spaces of architecture, art, media, and internet.

 

Within the above context, we call critical research groups, workshops, collectives and individuals to participate in a gathering during 11-14 June 2015. If you would like to participate, please provide us with your abstract (300 words) by 1 March 2015 at the latest, to the following e-mail: urbanconflicts@gmail.com

Participation is free and we will try to provide accommodation for as many participants as possible.

 

“Encounters and conflicts in the city” group

Costas Athanasiou, Eleni Vasdeki, Elina Kapetanaki, Maria Karagianni, Matina Kapsali, Vaso

Makrygianni, Foteini Mamali, Orestis Pangalos, Haris Tsavdaroglou

Thessaloniki

Thessaloniki

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Crisis

Crisis

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

THE ACADEMIC MANIFESTO: FROM AN OCCUPIED TO A PUBLIC UNIVERSITY

Willem Halffman and Hans Radder

 

First published in Krisis: Journal of Contemporary Philosophy, 2013, Issue 3 (in Dutch)

Now available in English: translated by Jan Evertse

 

Willem Halffman and Hans Radder

The academic manifesto: From an occupied to a public university

 

1 The occupied university

The university has been occupied – not by students demanding a say (as in the 1960s), but this time by the many-headed Wolf of management.1 The Wolf has colonised academia with a mercenary army of professional administrators, armed with spreadsheets, output indicators and audit procedures, loudly accompanied by the Efficiency and Excellence March. Management has proclaimed academics the enemy within: academics have to be distrusted, tested and monitored, under the permanent threat of reorganisation, discontinuance and dismissal. The academics allow themselves to be meekly played off against one another, like frightened, obedient sheep, hoping to make it by staying just ahead of their colleagues. The Wolf uses the most absurd means to

remain in control, such as money-squandering semi- and full mergers, increasingly detailed, and thus costly, accountability systems and extremely expensive prestige projects.

This conquest seems to work and the export of knowledge from the newly conquered colony can be ever increased, but inland the troubles fester. Thus, while all the glossed-up indicators constantly point to the stars, the mood on the academic shop floor steadily drops. The Wolf pops champagne after each new score in the Shanghai Competition, while the university sheep desperately work until they drop2 and the quality of the knowledge plantations is starting to falter, as is demonstrated by a large number of comprehensive and thorough analyses.3 Meanwhile, the sheep endeavour to bring the absurd anomalies of the occupation to the Wolf’s attention by means of an endless stream of opinion articles, lamentations, pressing letters and appeals. In turn, the Wolf reduces these to mere incidents, brushes them aside as inevitable side effects of progress, or simply ignores them.

Although our description and evaluation were written from the perspective of Dutch universities, the gist of our account (and quite a few details) applies to other countries as well, especially in Europe.4 While management’s occupation may not be as advanced in the Netherlands as it is in England (Holmwood 2011), it has already established a powerful continental bridgehead (De Boer, Enders and Schimank 2007). To show how these developments are more than just incidents, we list six critical processes and their excesses below. We will then proceed to analyse causes and suggest remedies.

 

Notes:

This article is a slightly updated and edited translation of the Dutch original, which appeared in Krisis: Tijdschrift voor actuele filosofie 2013 (3), pp. 2-18. We are grateful for helpful commentary on that version by the Krisis editorial team, in particular René Gabriëls. We would also like to thank Ilse and Jan Evertse for translating the Dutch text into English.

2 According to accepted clinical norms, a quarter of Dutch professors of medical science (especially the younger ones) suffer from burn-out (Tijdink, Vergouwen en Smulders 2012).

3 See, e.g., Ritzer (1998); Graham (2002); Hayes and Wynyard (2002); Bok (2003); Washburn (2003); Evans (2005); Shimank (2005); Boomkens (2008); Gill (2009); Tuchman (2009); Radder (2010); Krijnen, Lorenz and Umlauf (2011); Collini (2012); Sanders and Van der Zweerde (2012); Dijstelbloem et al. (2013); Verbrugge and Van Baardewijk (2014).

4 See Lorenz (2006 and 2012); Krücken (2014). In line with the situation in most European

 

See the full article in English at: https://www.academia.edu/9923660/The_academic_manifesto_From_an_occupied_to_a_public_unversity

Krisis: Tijdschrift voor actuele filosofie: http://www.krisis.eu

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Workplace

Workplace

MARX, ENGELS AND THE CRITIQUE OF ACADEMIC LABOR

Call for Papers

Marx, Engels and the Critique of Academic Labor

Special Issue of Workplace: A journal for academic labor

Guest Editors: Karen Gregory & Joss Winn

Articles in Workplace have repeatedly called for increased collective organisation in opposition to a disturbing trajectory: individual autonomy is decreasing, contractual conditions are worsening, individual mental health issues are rising, and academic work is being intensified. Despite our theoretical advances and concerted practical efforts to resist these conditions, the gains of the 20th century labor movement are diminishing and the history of the university appears to be on a determinate course.

To date, this course is often spoken of in the language of “crisis.” While crisis may indeed point us toward the contemporary social experience of work and study within the university, we suggest that there is one response to the transformation of the university that has yet to be adequately explored: A thoroughgoing and reflexive critique of academic labor and its ensuing forms of value. By this, we mean a negative critique of academic labor and its role in the political economy of capitalism; one which focuses on understanding the basic character of ‘labor’ in capitalism as a historically specific social form. Beyond the framework of crisis, what productive, definite social relations are actively resituating the university and its labor within the demands, proliferations, and contradictions of capital?

We aim to produce a negative critique of academic labor that not only makes transparent these social relations, but repositions academic labor within a new conversation of possibility.

We are calling for papers that acknowledge the foundational work of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels for labor theory and engage closely and critically with the critique of political economy. Marx regarded his discovery of the dual character of labor in capitalism (i.e. concrete and abstract) as one of his most important achievements and “the pivot on which a clear comprehension of political economy turns.” With this in mind, we seek contributions that employ Marx’s and Engels’ critical categories of labor, value, the commodity, capital, etc. in reflexive ways which illuminate the role and character of academic labor today and how its existing form might be, according to Marx, abolished, transcended and overcome (aufheben).

 

Contributions:

  1. A variety of forms and approaches, demonstrating a close engagement with Marx’s theory and

method: Theoretical critiques, case studies, historical analyses, (auto-)ethnographies, essays, and

narratives are all welcome. Contributors from all academic disciplines are encouraged.

  1. Any reasonable length will be considered. Where appropriate they should adopt a consistent style

(e.g. Chicago, Harvard, MLA, APA).

  1. Will be Refereed.
  2. Contributions and questions should be sent to:

Joss Winn (jwinn@lincoln.ac.uk) and Karen Gregory (kgregory@ccny.cuny.edu)

Publication timetable

  • Fully referenced ABSTRACTS by 1st February 2015
  • Authors notified by 1st March 2015
  • Deadline for full contributions: 1st September 2015
  • Authors notified of initial reviews by 1st November 2015
  • Revised papers due: 10th January 2016
  • Publication date: March 2016.

Possible themes that contributions may address include, but are not limited to:

The Promise of Autonomy and The Nature of Academic “Time”

The Laboring “Academic” Body

Technology and Circuits of Value Production

Managerial Labor and Productions of Surplus

Markets of Value: Debt, Data, and Student Production

The Emotional Labor of Restructuring: Alt-Ac Careers and Contingent Labor

The Labor of Solidarity and the Future of Organization

Learning to Labor: Structures of Academic Authority and Reproduction

Teaching, Learning, and the Commodity-Form

The Business of Higher Education and Fictitious Capital

The Pedagogical Labor of Anti-Racism

Production and Consumption: The Academic Labor of Students

The Division of Labor In Higher Education

Hidden Abodes of Academic Production

The Formal and Real Subsumption of the University

Alienation, Abstraction and Labor Inside the University

Gender, Race, and Academic Wages

New Geographies of Academic Labor and Academic Markets

The University, the State and Money: Forms of the Capital Relation

New Critical Historical Approaches to the Study of Academic Labor

About the Editors:

 

Karen Gregory

kgregory@ccny.cuny.edu @claudikincaid

Karen Gregory is lecturer in Sociology at the Center for Worker Education/Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at the City College of New York, where she heads the CCNY City Lab. She is an ethnographer and theory-building scholar whose research focuses on the entanglement of contemporary spirituality, labor precarity, and entrepreneurialism, with an emphasis on the role of the laboring body. Karen cofounded the CUNY Digital Labor Working Group and her work has been published in Women’s Studies Quarterly, Women and Performance, The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy, and Contexts.

Joss Winn

jwinn@lincoln.ac.uk @josswinn

Joss Winn is a senior lecturer in the School of Education at the University of Lincoln, UK. His research extends broadly to a critique of the political economy of higher education. Currently, his writing and teaching is focused on the history and political economy of science and technology in higher education, its affordances for and impact on academic labor, and the way by which academics can control the means of knowledge production through co-operative and ultimately post-capitalist forms of work and democracy. His article, “Writing About Academic Labor,” is published in Workplace 25, 1-15.

Details at: http://josswinn.org/2014/12/call-for-papers-marx-engels-and-the-critique-of-academic-labor/

See also: http://blogs.ubc.ca/ices/2014/11/30/cfp-marx-engels-and-the-critique-of-academic-labor-ices-criticaltheory-criticalpedagogy-frankfurtschool/

Karl Marx

Karl Marx

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski