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Critical Education / Education is Critical

Critical Education / Education is Critical

SOCIETIES OF CONTROL

New Formations Special Issue  ‘Societies of Control’
Call for Contributions 
Deadline for paper proposals March 31st 2014

Potential contributors: please submit title, full abstract (300 words) and a short c.v. to nfsubmissions@me.com by this date. 
Contributors will be notified of acceptance by April 14th 2014
Submission of papers will be required by  September 30th 2014. 
Journal Info: http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/contents.html

This issue of New Formations will address a complex set of interrelated issues in the theorisation of contemporary societies and power relations. The emergence of distributed systems, network relations and decentralised institutions has been widely observed as a key feature of social, cultural and political change for several decades, across a wide range of domains of practice and discourse. The issue will provide an opportunity to reflect upon this convergence and the diverse positions from which it has been theorised.

A key reference point in these discussions, Deleuze’s ‘Post-Script on the Societies of Control’ remains a enigmatic text on several levels. Easily dismissed as the irrelevant musings of a metaphysician on a fundamentally sociological set of questions, the essay’s theses have nonetheless proven irresistibly suggestive to many commentators. The claim that contemporary mechanisms of government, regulation and administration must be understood as operating according to different logics than the classic ‘normative’ mode of ‘disciplinary’ power seems increasingly relevant in the era of networked communications and official encouragement of cultural, social and sexual ‘diversity’, and yet Deleuze’s delineation of those mechanisms remains frustratingly abstract and cryptically suggestive.

However, Maurizio Lazzarato has persuasively linked Deleuze’s suggestive account with the general thesis that contemporary capitalism is best understood in terms of the shift from ‘Fordism’ to ‘post-Fordism’ in the 1980s. Whilst Fordism relies on a typically ‘disciplinary’ set of institutions and practices (the factory, the centralised nation state, the collectivist and conformist education system, ‘mass’ media), post-Fordism relies on quite different mechanisms and organisational forms (disaggregated networks of corporations, trans-national regulatory bodies, ‘narrowcasting’ and social media) which the notion of ‘control society’ tries to capture at the same level of abstraction as Foucault’s concept of ‘discipline’.

In fact, although Foucault’s studies of ‘disciplinary’ society have influenced understanding of both historical and contemporary societies across a swathe of disciplines and in many spheres of political thought and cultural work, his later lectures seem also to propose that the logic of ‘security’ which emerges in the 20th century is different from the logic of ‘discipline’ and in this regarid is close to Deleuze’s understanding of ‘control’. Reading Foucault’s later lecture sources with care, Lazzarato argues persuasively that it is a common but categorical mistake to believe that Foucault’s studies of disciplinary power are attempts to delineate the basic mechanisms of contemporary forms of power, rather than historical studies of institutional forms and practices which, while they may well persist, are today definitively ‘residual’ in character.

Simultaneous with and subsequent to Deleuze’s and Foucault’s work on these issues the emergence of interest in post-Fordism in the wake of the Regulation School’s theorisation of Fordism and its decline has generated interested in a similar set of issues since the 1980s, particularly on the Anglophone Left. The claim that the shift from ‘Fordism’ to ‘Post-Fordism’ or ‘the New Capitalism’ constitutes the definitive historical process of recent times has been influential on various strands of social and political theory and analysis since the early 1980s. What might be the points of resonance or dissonance between these theses and those proposed by Foucault and Deleuze and their followers?

Another element of much commentary on these issues has been the proposition that ‘the network’ now constitutes the prevalent organisational form for both corporations and political and social movements. The fact that ‘networked’ and ‘horizontal’ organisational forms were pioneered by the radical movements of the 60s and 70s – most notably the women’s movement – is well known. What is the significance of this historical fact, of the agency of the women’s movement and the desires it expresses in shifting the dynamics of advanced capitalist culture? How does the emergence of post- Fordism and the societies of security / control transform gender relations and the politics of sexuality, and how far have those shifts themselves been driven by the multiple refusals of gendered and sexual normativity which have characterised the cultural radicalism of recent decades?

This issue will explore the analytic possibilities generated by this set of issues, questions and theses with reference both to a range of possible objects of study in contemporary politics and culture and to a number of different conceptual and theoretical positions. Should we bother to develop and flesh out Deleuze’s and Foucault’s suggestions at all? If so, how might we do so and what would be the analytic gains? Are there alternative conceptions of phenomena addressed by their work which would allow for better diagnosis and more sophisticated analysis?
What phenomena of contemporary culture and politics might be best analysed in terms of the idea of ‘control society’? How could such analyses inform our broader understanding of such issues as the ‘war on terror’, new modes of sexual regulation, new forms of censorship (especially online) and ‘surveillance’ by corporate or state agencies and debates over intellectual property? What forms of democratic, libertarian or anti-capitalist politics and culture might be possible or necessary in an era of ‘control’?

Confirmed Contributors:
Andrew Goffey
Luciana Parisi
Tiziana Terranova
Angela Mitropoulos
Athina Karatzogianni
Will Davies
Alex Williams 
Tony Sampson 
Yuk Hui
Erich Hörl

 

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

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Aesthetics

Aesthetics

ARTISTIC LIVES

Kirsten Forkert, Birmingham City University

Tuesday February 25th @ University of Essex
3-5PM, Room LTB B
http://www.essex.ac.uk/ebs/news_and_seminars/seminarDetail.aspx?e_id=6277

Kirsten Forkert will talk about her recently published book, Artistic Lives (Ashgate 2013), which is based on interview material with artists and arts professionals in London and Berlin, together with ethnographic descriptions and analyses of social and urban policy. The book examines how artists support themselves within rapidly changing urban environments – and how they contend with the effects of property bubbles, precarious employment, uncertain funding and policies that position cultural workers at the centre of economic development with little concern for they actually make ends meet. The book examines the myth that artists can create something from nothing, and engages with debates surrounding Post-Fordism, gentrification and the nature of authorship, to raise challenging questions about the function of culture and the role of artists within contemporary capitalism.

Kirsten will discuss her motivations for starting the project, share the main findings of the research (which was carried out during the first phase of the recession) and reflect on the implications in the present context.

Kirsten Forkert is a researcher and activist, and lecturer in media theory at Birmingham City University. Prior to working at BCU, she taught at a number of institutions during and after completing her PhD in the department of Media and Communications at Goldsmiths. Her work is based within cultural studies, but draws on other disciplines, including sociology, urban studies and critical theory. It has been published in CITY, Third Text and various edited collections, as well as in Mute and Variant. Prior to academia, she worked in media art, new media and community media in Canada and the US, as a freelance practitioner. She is now developing new research on the cultural politics of austerity, and is involved in a collaborative, ESRC funded project mapping the controversies around Home Office campaigns.

Sponsored by the Centre for Work, Organization, and Society

This seminar is part of an ongoing workshop series on artist collectives.

Further events this spring will include the Nanopolitics group (March 5th), Max Haiven from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (March 19th), Jeremy Gilbert from the University of East London (April 29th), and others.

For more information contact Stevphen Shukaitis: sshuka@essex.ac.uk

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

 

Work

Work

WORK, EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIETY – ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL ISSUE

The BSA journal Work, Employment and Society has just published an Anniversary Special Issue in honour of 25 years of publishing. 

It is freely available to all readers until 31 July 2013:  http://wes.sagepub.com/content/current

 

The issue features articles from the following leaders in the field:

Reflections on work and employment into the 21st century: between equal rights, force decides, by Mark Stuart, Irena Grugulis, Jennifer Tomlinson, Chris Forde and Robert MacKenzie

Unsustainable employment portfolios, by John Buchanan, Gary Dymski, Julie Froud, Sukhdev Johal, Adam Leaver and Karel Williams

Women and recession revisited, by Jill Rubery and Anthony Rafferty

The nature of front-line service work: distinctive features and continuity in the employment relationship, by Jacques Bélanger and Paul Edwards

Postfordism as a dysfunctional accumulation regime: a comparative analysis of the USA, the UK and Germany, by Matt Vidal

Financialization and the workplace: extending and applying the disconnected capitalism thesis, by Paul Thompson

Finance versus Democracy? Theorizing finance in society, by Sylvia Walby

Work, employment and society through the lens of moral economy, by Sharon C Bolton and Knut Laaser

Ethnographic fallacies: reflections on labour studies in the era of market fundamentalism, by Michael Burawoy

Review of Scott Lash & John Urry The End of Organized Capitalism. Cambridge: Polity Press, 1987, £18.00 pbk, (ISBN: 9780745600697), 248pp, Gibson Burrell, Miguel Lucio Martinez, Ian Greer Response to reviews, Scott Lash and John Urry

25 Favourite WES Articles chosen by WES readers, editors and authors

In October 2012, WES held a successful one-day conference exploring key themes for work and employment in honour of 25 years of publishing. Along with the special issue, we are happy to bring you the video from this event.  If you were not able to join us in October or would like to view the presentations again, you can access the videos here: http://wes.sagepub.com/site//video/25th.xhtml

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/work-employment-and-society-special-issue-free-until-31-july

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Educating from Marx

Educating from Marx

POWER AND EDUCATION – Volume 5 Issue 1 (2013)

Just published at: www.wwwords.co.uk/power/content/pdfs/5/issue5_1.asp

POWER AND EDUCATION

Volume 5 Number 1 2013, ISSN 1757-7438

SPECIAL ISSUE

Changing the Discourse of Education
Guest Editors: HEATHER PIPER, JEROME SATTERTHWAITE & PAT SIKES

 

CONTENTS:

Heather Piper, Jerome Satterthwaite & Pat Sikes. Introduction. Changing the Discourse of Education

Gert Biesta. Interrupting the Politics of Learning

James Avis. Post-Fordist Illusions: knowledge-based economies and transformation

Liz Atkins. From Marginal Learning to Marginal Employment? The Real Impact of ‘Learning’ Employability Skills

Kristina Alstam. Ideologies of Mothering in an Internet Forum: hurting narratives and declarative defence

Eugene C. Schaffer, Sam Stringfield, David Reynolds & Justin Schaffer. Opportunity and Justice: building a valuable and sustainable educational experience for disenfranchised and disengaged youth

Michele Moore & Heather Brunskell-Evans. Foucault, Pollyanna and the Iraq Research Fellowship Programme: political grace and the struggle to decolonise research practice

Jennifer Patterson. Punch Drunk on Research Impact: a critical analysis of textual power politics

BOOK REVIEWS
The Assault on Universities: a manifesto for resistance (Michael Bailey & Des Freedman, Eds), reviewed by Celina McEwen
The Evolving Significance of Race: living, learning, and teaching (Sherick Hughes & Theodorea Regina Berry, Eds), reviewed by Joyanne De Four-Babb
Curriculum, Community, and Urban School Reform (Barry M. Franklin), reviewed by Vonzell Agosto

Access to the full texts of current articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription.

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION (single-user access) Subscription to the 2013 volume (including full access to ALL back numbers) is available to individuals at a cost of US$50.00. If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.co.uk/subscribePOWER.asp

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION (institution-wide access) If you are working within an institution that maintains a Library, please urge them to take out a subscription so that we can provide access throughout your institution; details of subscription rates and access control arrangements for libraries can be found at www.symposium-journals.co.uk/prices.html

For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact p&ejournal@mmu.ac.uk

In the event of problems concerning a subscription, or difficulty in gaining access to the journal articles on the website, please email the publishers at support@symposium-journals.co.uk

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Work

THE MEANINGS OF WORK

Now Out!

The Meanings of Work: Essay on the Affirmation and Negation of Work
Ricardo Antunes

The Meanings of Work aims to explore some dimensions of the changes taking place in the labour-world, as well as looking at the consequences, theoretical and empirical, entailed by these transformations, such as the relevance and pertinence of the category of labour in the contemporary world. Billions of men and women depend exclusively on their labour to survive and encounter increasingly unstable, precarious or casual workers and the unemployed. As the contingent of workers has grown, there have been a vast reduction in jobs, rights have been corroded and the gains of the past have been eroded. The Meanings of Work starts with a wider conception of work and seeks to understand this new condition of labour today. 

Biographical note
Ricardo Antunes is Professor of Sociology at University of Campinas (UNICAMP/Brazil). He was Visiting Research Fellow at Sussex University and his books and articles has been published in France, Italy, England, Swiss, Spain, Portugal, Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, among other countries.

Readership
It will be of interest to sociologists, economists, social workers, psychologists and for all those interested in recent changes in the global configuration of work.

Table of Contents

Foreword by István Mészáros
Preface to the English edition
Preface to the second edition
Preface to the first edition

Introduction

1. Capital’s Social-Metabolic Order and its System of Mediations
The system of first-order mediations
The emergence of the system of second-order mediations

2. Dimensions of the Structural Crisis of Capital
The crisis of Fordism and Taylorism as the phenomenal expression of the structural crisis

3. The Responses of Capital to its Structural Crisis: Productive Restructuring and its Repercussions in the Labour-Process
The limits of Taylorism/Fordism and of the social-democratic compromise
The emergence of mass worker-revolts and the crisis of the welfare-state

4. Toyotism and the New Forms of Capital-Accumulation
The fallacy of ‘total quality’ under the diminishing utility-rate of the use-value of commodities
The ‘lyophilisation’ of organisation and labour in the Toyotist factory: new forms of labour-intensification

5. From Thatcher’s Neoliberalism to Tony Blair’s ‘Third Way’: the Recent British Experience
Neoliberalism, the world of work and the crisis of unionism in England
Elements of productive restructuring in Britain: ideas and practice
British strikes in the 1990s: forms of confrontation with neoliberalism and the casualisation of work
New Labour and Tony Blair’s ‘Third Way’

6. The Class-that-Lives-from-Labour: the Working Class Today
Towards a broader notion of the working class
Dimensions of the diversity, heterogeneity and complexity of the working class
The sexual division of labour: transversalities between the dimensions of class and gender
Wage-earners in the service-sector, the ‘third sector’ and new forms of domestic labour
Transnationalisation of capital and the world of work

7. The World of Labour and Value-Theory: Forms of Material and Immaterial Labour
The growing interaction between labour and scientific knowledge: a critique of the thesis of ‘science as primary productive force’
The interaction between material and immaterial labour
Contemporary forms of estrangement

8. Excursus on the Centrality of Labour: the Debate between Lukács and Habermas
1. The centrality of labour in Lukács’s Ontology of Social Being
Labour and teleology
Labour as the model of social practice
Labour and freedom

2. Habermas’s critique of the ‘paradigm of labour’
The paradigm of communicative action and the sphere of intersubjectivity
The uncoupling of system and lifeworld
The colonisation of the lifeworld and Habermas’s critique of the theory of value

3. A critical sketch of Habermas’s critique
Authentic and inauthentic subjectivity

9. Elements towards an Ontology of Everyday Life

10. Working Time and Free Time: towards a Meaningful Life Inside and Outside of Work

11. Foundations of a New Social-Metabolic Order

Appendices

Appendices to the second edition
1. Ten Theses and a Hypothesis on the Present (and Future) of Work
2. Labour and Value: Critical Notes 

Appendices to the first edition
1. The Crisis of the Labour-Movement and the Centrality of Labour Today
2. The New Proletarians at the Turn of the Century
3. The Metamorphoses and Centrality of Labour Today
4. Social Struggles and Socialist Societal Design in Contemporary Brazil

References

See: http://www.brill.com/meanings-work

 

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/now-out-the-meanings-of-work.-essay-on-the-affirmation-and-negation-of-work-ricardo-antunes

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com 

 

Model T Ford

FORDISM AND POST-FORDISM CONFERENCE

International Conference

Fordism and Post-Fordism: Cycles and transformations in contemporary society

New University of Lisbon, Faculty of Social and Human Sciences

10th and 11th February 2012

 

The development of capitalism throughout the 20th century has accelerated the pace of transformations in the field of production, with a far-reaching impact upon several domains of social activity: from school to work, from family ties to state institutions. The existence of economical cycles tied to the development of technical, political and social paradigms has therefore captured the attention of many researchers, who have categorized historical periods according to a series of axes: the predominant forms of relation between labour and capital, the industrial sectors that push economic growth and the technological innovations with the greatest impact on the productive process.

In this context, the term “Fordism” has been put forward to frame the historical period emerging in the first half of the 20th century and characterized by the massification of both production and consumption, highly developed processes of mechanization, rationalization and standardisation embodied in assembly lines, the central role of the automobile and petrochemical industries, sophisticated techniques of regulation of work conditions and growing state intervention in economic activities.

The term “Post-Fordism”, in turn, has been used to define the ensemble of transformations occurring, since the 1970’s, in spheres such as the organization of labour, the nature of state intervention and the 

technological paradigms applied to production. Different notions have emerged, aiming to characterize such transformations. “Neofordism”, “lean production”, “Toyotism”, “Late capitalism”, “Biopolitics” or, 

more recently, “Informationalism” and “finance-dominated accumulation regime” are some of them. The term “Post-Fordism”, however, has been widely accepted in specialized literature because it leaves room for the plasticity of a multidimensional process in permanent evolution.

This conference aims at questioning the logics and dynamics of both paradigms, the historical contexts of their emergence, the shifts they represented and the conflicts they shaped. It is open to researchers looking to present papers dealing with at least one of the following subjects:

–          Technology, Science and organization of labour;

–          State, regulation and economic planning;

–          Labour struggles, social conflict and resistance;

–          Culture, leisure and consumption.

 

These papers (Max. 10 pages/20 minutes) may address specific subjects (such as the introduction of Taylorism in a factory or industrial branch, the settings of a collective bargain, a plan to stabilize wages and prices or a strike, for example) or wider problems (like the characterization and interpretation of the paradigms themselves). Papers that address more than one of these subjects or the transition between both paradigms will be particularly welcomed.

Paper proposals must be sent to coloquio.fordismo@gmail.com and should include: title, abstract (Max. 300 words), study field, institutional affiliation and e-mail address.

The deadline for proposals is October 31st 2011.

The authors of the selected proposals shall not be notified until November 15th 2011, and invited to send the texts of their papers until December 31st 2011. The final program of the conference shall be made public in January 2012.

The conference’s official languages will be Portuguese and English.

Raquel Varela, Postdoctoral Research Fellow FCT, Instituto de História Contemporânea, Universidade Nova de Lisboa Study Group on Labor and Social Conflicts, Av. de Berna, nº 26 -C, 1069-061 Lisboa, + 351 21 794 09 21, Portugal. Honorary Fellow IISG (Amsterdam): http://www.iisg.nl/staff/rva.php and raquel_cardeira_varela@yahoo.co.uk

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Work

WORK AFTER FORDISM

Work after Fordism: A workshop on theorizing organisational diversity and dominant trends in contemporary capitalism

The workshop will have presentations by:

• Professor Benjamin Coriat (Université Paris XIII)

• Professor Rick Delbridge (University of Cardiff)

• Professor Ulrich Jürgens (University of Berlin)

• Professor Paul Thompson (University of Strathclyde)

• Professor Karel Williams (University of Manchester)

• Dr John Buchanan (University of Sydney)

• Dr Sarah Jenkins (University of Cardiff)

• Dr Marco Hauptmeier (University of Cardiff)

• Dr Giuliano Maielli (Queen Mary, University of London)

• Dr Matt Vidal (King’s College London)

Full details and a schedule can also be found at: http://www.busman.qmul.ac.uk/newsandevents/events/items/55041.html

The workshop is free and will provide a light lunch.

To reserve a place, please contact Ade Alele: a.alele@qmul.ac.uk.

Best wishes

Matt Vidal

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ides: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Ghosts

ON HAUNTOLOGY \ CAPITALIST REALISM – TWO TALKS BY MARK FISHER

THE COLLOQUIUM FOR UNPOPULAR CULTURE AND NYU’S ASIAN/ PACIFIC/ AMERICAN STUDIES PROGRAM present:

TWO TALKS BY MARK FISHER

What are grey vampires and how do they retard the insurrectionary potential of digital  discourse?  How does Derrida’s notion of hauntology contribute to an understanding of dubstep artist Burial?  Is ‘Basic Instinct 2’, routinely derided as a cine-atrocity, a Lacanian reworking of Ballard, Baudrillard and Bataille in service of the creation of a ‘phantasmatic, cybergothic London’?  What is interpassivity and in what ways has it come to define the corporatized incarceration of modern academia?

Over the last decade, Mark Fisher has established a reputation as one of the exhilarating cultural theorists in Britain.  A co-founder of the Cybernetic Culture Research Unit (CCRU) at Warwick University ­and described by Simon Reynolds as the academic equivalent of Apocalypse Now’s Colonel Kurtz ­ he brings together psychoanalysis, political analysis and speculative fiction to create an extraordinary body of rogue scholarship, a theory-rush with few parallels.

Fisher is the author of ‘Capitalist Realism’, the editor of ‘The Resistible Demise of Michael Jackson’ (both Zer0 Books, 2009), and writes regularly for Sight and Sound, Film Quarterly, The Wire and Frieze, as well as maintaining a well-known blog at http://k-punk.abstractdynamics.org.  He teaches at the University of East London, Goldsmiths, University of London, and the City Literary Institute.

The Colloquium for Unpopular Culture and NYU’s Asian/ Pacific/ American Studies program are pleased to be hosting Fisher’s first talks inAmerica.

See ‘ The Metaphysics of Crackle’, at: http://pontone.pl/pontones-special-guest-mix-k-punk-the-metaphysics-of-crackle/

***

MARK FISHER, THESE ARE NON-TIMES AS WELL AS NON-PLACES: REFLECTIONS ON HAUNTOLOGY
 
WHEN: Wednesday 4 May 2011, 6:30pm
WHERE: Room 471, 20 Cooper Square [East 5th and Bowery]
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

”Through their generic and transient qualities ­ workstations devoid of personal effects, relations with colleagues as fleeting as those with passengers on a commuter journey ­ many workplaces now resemble non-places, either literally, as in the case of a hotel, corporate coffee chain or out-of-town supermarket, or symbolically, in the form of temporary assignments for faceless employers (dis)located in anonymous buildings, where the worker-commuter then follows the same global timetables, navigates the same software applications and experiences the same sense of placelessness, the feeling of being mere data in the mainframe.”

So writes Ivor Southwood in his analysis of precarious labour, ‘Non-Stop Inertia’ (2011). In the last decade, the proliferation of corporate non-places has been accompanied by the spread of cyberspace-time, or Itime, a distributed or unpunctuated temporality. It’s no coincidence that, as this unmarked time increasingly came to dominate cultural and psychic space, Derrida’s concept hauntology (re)emerged as the name for a paradoxical zeitgeist.  In ‘Specters of Marx’, Derrida argued that the hauntological was characterised by ‘a time out of joint’, and this broken time has been expressed in cultural objects that return to a wounded or distorted version of the past in flight from a waning sense of the present. Sometimes accused of nostalgia, the most powerful examples of hauntological culture actually show that nostalgia is no longer possible.

In conditions where pastiche has become normalised, the question has to be: nostalgia compared to what? James Bridle has recently argued that ‘the opposite of hauntology … [is] to demand the radically new’, but hauntology in fact operates as a kind of thwarted preservation of such demands in conditions where – for the moment at least – they cannot be met. Whereas cyberspace-time tends towards the generation of cultural moments that are as interchangeable as transnational franchise outlets, hauntology involves the staining of particular places with time – albeit a time that is out of joint. In this lecture, Fisher will explore the hauntological culture of the last few years in relation to the question of place, using examples from music (Burial, The Caretaker, Ekoplekz, Richard Skelton), film (Chris Petit, Patrick Keiller) and fiction (Alan Garner, David Peace).

MARK FISHER, DEPACIFICATION PROGRAM: FROM CAPITALIST REALISM TO POST-CAPITALISM

WHEN: Thursday 5 May 2011, 6:30pm
WHERE: Room 471, 20 Cooper Square [East 5th and Bowery]
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

”It would be best, perhaps, to think of an alternate world – better to say the alternate world, our alternate world – as one contiguous with ours but without any connections or access to it. Then, from time to time, like a diseased eyeball in which disturbing flashes of light are perceived or like those baroque sunbursts in which rays from another world suddenly break into this one, we are reminded that Utopia exists and that other systems, other spaces, are still possible” (Fredric Jameson, ‘Valences of the Dialectic’).

In his 2009 book ‘Capitalist Realism’, Mark Fisher started to explore some of the affective, psychological and political consequences of the deeply entrenched belief that there is no alternative to capitalism. After 1989, capital seemed to enjoy full spectrum dominance of both global space and the unconscious. Every imaginable future was capitalist.  What has been mistaken for post-political apathy, Fisher argued, was a pervasive sense of reflexive impotence in the face of a neoliberal ideological program which sought to subordinate all of culture to the imperatives of business. The subject of post-Fordist capitalism is no passive dupe; this subject actively participates in an ‘interpassive’ corporate culture which solicits our involvement and encourages us to ‘join the debate’.

As Fisher argues in the book, education has been at the forefront of this process, with teachers and lecturers locked into managerialist self-surveillance, and students induced into the role of consumers.

In the eighteen months since ‘Capitalist Realism’ was published, the neoliberal program has been seriously compromised, but capitalist realism has intensified – with austerity programs pushed through on the basis that it is unthinkable that capitalism should be allowed to fail. At the same time, this new, more desperate form of capitalist realism has also faced unexpected challenges from a militancy growing in Europe, the Middle East and even in the heartlands of neoliberalism such as the UK and the US. Now that history has started up again, and Jameson’s ‘baroque sunbursts’ flare brighter than they have for a generation, we can begin to pose questions that had receded into the unimaginable during the high pomp of neoliberal triumphalism: what might a post-capitalism look like,
and how can we get there?

Fisher will argue that the Left will only succeed if it can reclaim modernity from a neoliberal Right that has lost control of it. This entails understanding how the current possibilities for agency are contoured and constrained by the machinery of what Deleuze and Foucault called the Control Society, including cyberspace, the media landscape, psychic pathologies and pharmacology – failures to act are not failures of will, and all the will in the world will not eliminate capitalism. It also entails recognising that neoliberalism’s global hegemony arose from capturing desires which it could not satisfy. A genuinely new Left must be shaped by those desires, and not be lulled, once again, by the logics of failed revolts.

Queries: ss162@nyu.edu

***END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Richard Alpert

RADICAL FOUCAULT EXPANDED! AN INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

September 8th – 9th, Universityof East London(Docklands Campus)
Centre for Cultural Studies Research, University of East London
http://culturalstudiesresearch.org/?p=591

Following the  superb international response to our initial call for papers, we have decided to expand the  event into a two-day conference. This has opened up a very limited amount of space for further contributions. Abstracts of no more than 350 words are invited, to arrive no later than Sunday May 8th 201.

The publication of Michel Foucault’s Lectures at the Collège de France, 1983-84 in English will be complete in April 2011 and his first Collège de France lecture course, La Volunté de Savoir will be published for the first time in February. The Centre for Cultural Studies Research at the University of East London is holding a an international conference which will re-assess Foucault’s contribution to radical thought and the application of his ideas to contemporary politics. What does it mean to draw on Foucault as a resource for radical politics, and how are we to understand the politics which implicitly informs his work?

Many commentators today would seem to claim Foucault as  the theorist of a politics which eschews all utopian ambition in favour of a certain governmental pragmatism, while others would claim him for a rigorous but ultimately rather simple libertarianism: can either of these positions ever be adequate to the radicalism of Foucault’s  analyses? Does it matter?

What is the significance of Foucault’s ideas of ‘governmentality’ and ‘biopolitics’ in understanding his later oeuvre and its implications; do either of these terms deserve to carry the weight attributed to them by some commentators? What is the ongoing relevance of Foucault’s account of disciplinarity: is, it, as Lazzarato has claimed, a historical category no longer fully applicable to contemporary forms of power?

How can Foucauldian ideas be brought bear on the analysis of austerity politics? Is there a role for Foucault’s ideas in formulating effective resistance to the increasing erosion of civil liberties that operates both within countries and across state boundaries? Can the notion of bio-power account for contemporary forms of racism? How can Foucauldian epistemology enable an understanding of the biopolitics of contemporary scientific discourse?

Confirmed Keynotes:
Stuart Elden, Professor in the Department of Geography, Durham University.
Mark Kelly, Lecturer in Philosophy, Middlesex University.

Subjects may include, but are not limited to:
Foucauldian thought and contemporary subjectivation
Foucault and other thinkers
Governmentality and everyday life
Strategic discourses of war and terror
New technologies of the self
Foucault and new forms of resistance
Heterotopias  now and in the future
Foucault and the erosion of the state
Disciplinary society and the society of control
Foucault, British politics and the ‘big society’
Foucault, post-Fordism and post-democracy

Email abstracts to Jeremy Gilbert (j.gilbert@uel.ac.uk) and Debra Benita Shaw (d.shaw@uel.ac.uk)

Registration will cost £110.00 per delegate (including lunch, not including accommodation or dinner) for both days. A day-rate of 65.00 will be available, but delegates will be strongly encouraged to attend on both days, and the organisers cannot promise to accommodate requests to present on a particular day.

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski: https://rikowski.wordpress.com

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Midnight

RADICAL FOUCAULT

CALL FOR PAPERS

Radical Foucault: A One Day Conference

Centre for Cultural Studies Research, University of East London

The publication of Michel Foucault’s Lectures at the Collège de France, 1983-84 in English will be complete in April 2011 and his first Collège de France lecture course, La Volunté de Savoir will be published for the first time in February. The Centre for Cultural Studies Research at the University of East London is holding a one-day conference on Friday, September 9th, 2011 which will re-assess Foucault’s contribution to radical thought and the application of his ideas to contemporary politics. What does it mean to draw on Foucault as a resource for radical politics, and how are we to understand the politics which implicitly informs his work?

Many commentators today would seem to claim Foucault as the theorist of a politics which eschews all utopian ambition in favour of a certain governmental pragmatism, while others would claim him for a rigorous but ultimately rather simple libertarianism: can either of these positions ever be adequate to the radicalism of Foucault’s  analyses? Does it matter?

What is the significance of Foucault’s ideas of ‘governmentality’ and ‘biopolitics’ in understanding his later oeuvre and its implications; do either of these terms deserve to carry the weight attributed to them by some commentators? What is the ongoing relevance of Foucault’s account of disciplinarity: is, it, as Lazzarato has claimed, a historical category no longer fully applicable to contemporary forms of power?
How can Foucauldian ideas be brought bear on the analysis of austerity politics? Is there a role for Foucault’s ideas in formulating effective resistance to the increasing erosion of civil liberties that operates both within countries and across state boundaries? Can the notion of bio-power account for contemporary forms of racism? How can Foucauldian epistemology enable an understanding of the biopolitics of contemporary scientific discourse?

Confirmed Keynotes:
Stuart Elden, Professor in the Department of Geography, Durham University.
Mark Kelly, Lecturer in Philosophy, Middlesex University.

Abstracts of no more than 350 words are invited, to arrive no later than Tuesday, 1st March 2011. Subjects may include, but are not limited to:

Foucauldian thought and contemporary subjectivation
Foucault and other thinkers
Governmentality and everyday life
Strategic discourses of war and terror
New technologies of the self
Foucault and new forms of resistance
Heterotopias  now and in the future
Foucault and the erosion of the state
Disciplinary society and the society of control
Foucault, British politics and the ‘big society’
Foucault, post-Fordism and post-democracy

Email abstracts to Jeremy Gilbert (j.gilbert@uel.ac.uk) and Debra Benita Shaw (d.shaw@uel.ac.uk)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

John Locke

POST-FORDISM AND ITS DISCONTENTS

 Dear All

We kindly invite you to a discussion on Art & the New Spirit of Capitalism on the coming Saturday, 30th October, in de Scheijnhelig, Amsterdam.

 The discussion will depart from the freshly released book Postfordism and its discontents (edited by Gal Kirn, Jan van Eyck Academie Maastricht, Peace Institute Ljubljana and B-books Berlin, 2010; designed by Žiga Testen and Nina Støttrup Larsen /former researchers of the JvE Academy/), and puts under the spotlight the complex connections between art, culture and economy in the Postfordist horizon.

The event is organized by Gal Kirn and Ivana Hilj and hosted by the 4-tuned cities festival in Amsterdam (http://www.4tunedcities.org/index.phpoption=com_content&view=article&id=83&Itemid=84). Below the program with soe further details.

Art & the New Spirit of Capitalism

How are art and creativity being embedded in – or better absorbed by – the latest stage of capital accumulation?

Location: De Scheijnheilig, Passeerdersgracht 23, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Program:

18.00 – 18.05

Opening foreword by Ivana Hilj

Ivana Hilj obtained her MA in Preservation and Presentation of the Moving Image at the Universiteit van Amsterdam, and works at the V2_Institute for the Unstable Media (Rotterdam, NL).

18.05 – 18.20

Introduction and book presentation by Gal Kirn.

Gal Kirn is the editor of Postfordism and its discontents. A former researcher of the Jan van Eyck Academie in Maastricht (NL), currently a fellow at the ICI in Berlin (DE)

18.20 – 18.35: ‘Class struggle and Post-Fordism’, Peter Thomas

Peter Thomas is a researcher at the Jan Van Eyck Academy (Maastricht, NL) and Lecturer at Brunel University, London

18.35 – 18.50: ‘To die and leave silk for the capital: further reflections on art, labour and value’, Marina Vishmidt

Marina Vishmidt is a writer and PhD researcher at Queen Mary, University of London

18.50 – 19.00: Q&A with audience

19.00 – 19.10: Break

19.10 – 19.25: ‘From Being an Artist in Post-Fordist Times to Community Art & Beyond ‘, Paul De Bruyne,

Paul De Bruyne is co-editor of Being an artist in Postfordist times and researcher at the Fontys College for the Arts, NL

19.25 – 19.40: ‘The precarious conditions of squatting’, Ernst Van den Hemel

Ernst van den Hemel is part of the artistic collective that runs De Schijnheilig, a squatted, independent cultural center in the heart of Amsterdam

19.40 – 20.10: Wrap-up discussion with speakers and audience

END

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com
Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Global Economy

MARXISM AND WORLD POLITICS

Marxism and World Politics: Contesting Global Capitalism
Edited by Alexander Anievas

This book brings together internationally-distinguished scholars from History, Philosophy, Development Studies, Geography, and International Relations (IR) to examine recent developments in Marxist approaches to world politics.

Offering original and stimulating analyses of subjects traditionally at the forefront of Marxist studies of world politics, the collection also considers issues which have yet to be fully explored within a number of disciplines. Examining a wide array of topics ranging from the imperialism-globalization debate, the connections between social structures and foreign relations, the role of identity and imperialist norms in world politics, to the relationship between Marxist and Realist IR Theory, the contributors seek to further theoretical discussions and their implications for emancipatory radical politics. These contributions are structured around two major themes:

* The relationship between capitalist modernity and the states-system in explaining the changing patterns of inter-state conflict and cooperation;

* The debates within Marxist and IR discourses on the theoretical significance of ‘the international’, covering topics including uneven and combined development and passive revolution.

An impressive collection that seeks to advance dialogue and research, Marxism and World Politics will be of interest to students and scholars of IR, International Political Economy, Political Science, and Historical Sociology.

Table of Contents

The Renaissance Of Historical Materialism In International Relations Theory: An Introduction
Alexander Anievas

Part I: The Geopolitics Of Capitalist Modernity

1. Does Capitalism Need The State-System?
Alex Callinicos
2. The Changing “Logics” Of Capitalist Competition
Benno Teschke and Hannes Lacher
3. Western Hegemony And Transnational Capital: A Dialectical Perspective
Kees Van Der Pijl
4. Beyond The Theory Of Imperialism: Global Capitalism And The Transnational State
William I Robinson
5. Many Capitals, Many States: Logic, Contingency Or Mediation?
Neil Davidson
6. Globalization And Ideology: Post-Fordist Capitalism And The Politics Of Imperial Consent
Mark Rupert
7. To Be Or Not To Be, a Reductionist Marxism: Is That The Question?
John Hobson
8. Industrial Development And International Political Conflict In Contemporary Capitalism
Peter Gowan

Part II: Marxism And “The International”

9. Uneven And Combined Development: The Social-Relational Substratum Of “The International”? An Exchange Of Letters
Alex Callinicos And Justin Rosenberg
10. Non-Synchronicity, Capitalism And Uneven And Combined Development
Sam Ashman
11. The Geopolitics Of Passive Revolution
Adam David Morton
12. Approaching “The International”: Beyond Political Marxism
Jamie C. Allinson and Alexander Anievas
13. Politics And The International
Simon Bromley

Author Biography
Alexander Anievas is a PhD candidate at the Centre of International Studies, University of Cambridge, UK. He is also currently the managing editor of the Cambridge Review of International Affairs and member of the Editorial Board of Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory.

April 2010 | Paperback: 978-0-415-47803-8 (Routledge) £25.99

Read More: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415478038/

Request an e-inspection copy: email michael.king@tandf.co.uk

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski