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downloadWHY STUDY THE RICH?

Public Programme

April 23, 2016: 12.30-5.30pm, Free

Rabbits Roads Institute

Old Manor Park Library

835 Romford Road

Manor Park

London

E12 5JY
Map

An afternoon of talks and discussion

Refreshments served. Older children and young adults welcome.

Book via eventbrite.co.uk or email info@rabbitsroadinstitute.org

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‘Why study the Rich?’ is an event that brings together cross-disciplinary approaches to studying wealth in society. Come and listen to talks by activists, writers and artists whose scrutiny, investigation and differing perspectives attempt to challenge cultural narratives and societal structures that are intrinsically linked to the maintenance of power.

Open discussion with the audience is encouraged throughout the afternoon, as together we discuss how studies of ‘the rich’ might reveal a deeper understanding of the conditions of contemporary life and contribute to the debate about inequality in society.

 

Confirmed Speakers:

Roger Burrows, Professor of Cities at Newcastle University

Aditya Chakrabortty, senior economics commentator for The Guardian

Jeremy Gilbert, writer, researcher and activist & Professor of Cultural and Political Theory at UEL

Katharina Hecht, PhD student at LSE, on Economic Inequality

Jo Littler, Reader in Cultural Industries at City University London

Laure Provost, Artist, screening film ‘How to make money religiously

 

‘Why study the Rich?’ culminates a project called The Rich as a Minority Group by artists Ruth Beale and Amy Feneck in collaboration with GCSE Sociology students from Little Ilford School in Newham.

Rabbits Road Institute: http://createlondon.org/event/rabbits-road-institute/ and http://oldmanorparklibrary.org/rri/

Sign up to the Rabbits Road newsletter

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

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Ernesto Laclau

Ernesto Laclau

HEGEMONY, POPULISM AND EMANICIPATION: REMEMBERING ERNESTO LACLAU

Birkbeck College, University of London

Birkbeck Institute for Humanities

Malet Street

London WC1E 7HX

Friday, December 4th and Saturday, December 5th, 2915

This conference will celebrate the life and work of Ernesto Laclau, who died last year. Originally from Argentina, his ideas about radical democracy and populism influenced grassroots activists, thinkers and politicians from Latin America’s new left to Greece, Spain and Great Britain. His highly original essays and books “drew on the work of Antonio Gramsci to probe the assumptions of Marxism, and to illuminate the modern history of Latin America”, as Robin Blackburn wrote in his obituary, as well as Europe. As he says, “with collaborators including his wife, Chantal Mouffe, and the cultural theorist Stuart Hall, Laclau played a key role in reformulating Marxist theory in the light of the collapse of communism and failure of social democracy. His “post-Marxist” manifesto Hegemony and Socialist Strategy (1985), written with Mouffe, was translated into 30 languages, and sales ran into six figures.” Indeed, as Blackburn points out “Laclau believed that the European left had much to learn from Latin America, with its spirit of self-criticism and innovation. He argued that the left should not be embarrassed by charges of populism, whether directed at Chávez or at the Greek left wing party Syriza. It was crucial to distinguish between right wing populism masquerading wholesale privatization and scapegoating from left-wing programmes of “urbanisation” that introduce or defend social and economic justice combining self-government with the transformation of the relation between the state and the people at its base.

All sessions are 90 minutes. Presentations should be no longer than 30 minutes each.

 

Friday, December 4th

Embassy of Argentina 65 Brook Street, W1 K4AH

12.00-14.00:        Registration and Coffee,

14.00 -14.30:       Opening Comments

Ambassador Alicia Castro

Oscar Guardiola (Birkbeck Institute for Humanities)

14.30 – 16.00:

Oliver Marchart (Kunstakademie, Dusseldorf) Laclau’s Political Ontology

Nancy Fraser (New School) Thinking Antagonism: On the Political Contradictions of Financial Capital (BY SKYPE)

16.30 – 18.00

Letitia Sabsay (LSE) The Rhetorical Foundations of Society

Lasse Thomassen (Birkbeck) Hegemony and Socialist Strategy 30 years after: three research agendas

18.30:         Vin d´honneur

 

Saturday, December 5th,

Birkbeck Institute for Humanities

9.00: Coffee

9.30 – 11:00:

Jean-Claude Monod (CNRS) The part and the whole: metaphor and metonymy in the rhetorical construction of the People

Yannis Stavrakakis (Thessaloniki) Theorising populism in light of the Greek Financial Crisis

11:30-13:00:

Rada Iveković (Paris) Around the somewhat meditative rhetoric of Ernesto Laclau

Ricardo Camargo (Universidad de Chile) Articulation and Assault in Laclau’s Politics

13.00-14.00:        LUNCH

14.00-15.30:

Paula Biglieri (University of Buenos Aires) Populism and Emancipation

Mark Devenney (University of Brighton) The New Hegemony: Resisting Financial and Actuarial Capital

16.00-17.30:

Fabienne Brugère (Université Paris 8) Is Feminism Populism?

Jeremy Gilbert (Uni. of East London) What is a demand? The subject of politics in the later Laclau

17.30 – 18.00:     CLOSING COMMENTS

Website: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/events-calendar/celebrating-the-work-of-ernesto-laclau/

 

Ernesto Laclau

Ernesto Laclau

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

download (4)CONTRADICTIONS: A JOURNAL FOR CRITICAL THOUGHT

Call for Papers
A New Journal
Kontradikce /Contradictions: A Journal for Critical Thought

We are seeking submissions of scholarly articles and theoretical essays that skirt the disciplinary boundaries of political philosophy, social theory, and cultural critique. This peer-reviewed journal, based in Prague, aims to critically revive and update Central and Eastern European traditions of radical thought, bringing them to bear on the historical present and bringing them into international discussions of the theoretical problems involved in emancipatory social change.

The journal is therefore especially interested in 1) articles that delve into the often overlooked or forgotten history of radical left thought in our part of the world and assess this legacy’s contemporary significance; 2) articles that describe and develop related and parallel traditions of thought originating in other regions, bringing these traditions into conversation with the traditions of Central and Eastern Europe; 3) articles that analyze Soviet-type societies and their troubled relationship to historical and contemporary movements for social emancipation; and 4) articles that critically engage with the ideological assumptions and social conditions of “post-communism,” that is, of the discursive association of the communist project with Soviet-type societies and, thus, with a “failed” and irretrievable past.

With these thematic problems in mind, we ask what specific contributions to critical social theory can arise out of the post-Communist experience—that is, out of the historical conflation of communism (the idea and project) with Communism (the party and party-run states) and the subsequent de-legitimation of the former along with the latter. Our focus is thus both geographically specific and global, as we aim to bring together the specific intellectual legacy of those parts of Europe formerly under Communist Party rule with w orldwide reflections of the “fall” of communism as a leading political and intellectual force. Out of this situation, we ask what new visions can emerge.

The journal will be published once a year as a double issue in multilingual format, with one part in English and one part in Czech and Slovak. Submissions are welcome in any of these three languages (English, Czech, or Slovak).

The first issue, with a submission deadline of October 31, 2015, will focus thematically on assessing the current moment and the state of critical social—and in particular Marxist—thought a quarter century after the fall of governments in Central and Eastern Europe that officially sanctioned Marxism while also constraining its development as a tradition of social critique. Submissions are encouraged, but not required, to take this focus into account.

Articles are welcome in the following categories:

· “Studies” and “essays”: These may be articles of a more or less traditional academic character, but with an emphasis on the social significance of the material presented and on original and provocative argumentation. But we also welcome more essayistic contributions that break with some of the conventions of scholarly form. We are interested in rigorously theoretical essays, works of high scholarly value but which might not find a place in other scholarly journals. In this kind of writing, insightful generalization and shrewd observation will be given more weight than an exhaustive accounting for “existing literature” or a detailed description of research methodology. In other words, we have in mind essays that continue in the genre of most classic works in the modern history of ideas, from Rousseau’s Discourses through Benjamin’s “Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction” and Karel Kosík’s Dialectics of the Concrete. More traditionally scholarly articles should be about 4000-9000 words long. Essays can range from 3000 to 10,000 words.

· “Translations” and “materials”: Here we include important contributions to Central/Eastern European social thought that can be brought to international attention in English translation; internationally important works in new Czech or Slovak translations; and previously unpublished or long-unavailable “materials,” accompanied by annotation that presents the materials’ significance to contemporary readers (these may be submitted in English, Czech, or Slovak). 3000-10,000 words.

· “Reviews” of recent publications in critical social thought. Reviews may be brief (500-2000 words) or may constitute longer “review studies” (2000-5000 words).

Send all submissions to jgrimfeinberg@gmail.com.
Further information available on www.facebook.com/kontradikce.
First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-journal-contradictions

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism

THE MONT PELERIN PLAGUE? REVISITING AND RETHINKING NEOLIBERALISM

Call for Papers

Association of American Geographers Conference

2016

San Francisco, 29 March – 2 April 2016

 

The Mont Pelerin Plague? Revisiting and Rethinking Neoliberalism

Organizers

Kean Birch (York University, Canada)

Simon Springer (University of Victoria, Canada)

 

Outline

From its initial conceptualization in Mont Pelerin in 1947, neoliberalism has now become a ubiquitous term. In geography, and elsewhere, it is used to theorize everything from the development of ecosystem services through urban regeneration to financialization (Springer, Birch & MacLeavy 2016). Across a range of disciplines it is conceptualized in various ways as, for example, a geographical process; a form of governmentality; the restoration of elite class power; a discourse; a political project of institutional change; a set of transformative ideas; a development policy paradigm; a radical political slogan; an epistemic community or thought collective; an economic ideology or doctrine; a particular form of violence; and so on. Such variety and diversity in intellectual analysis (i.e. an explanatory framework) and substantive topic (i.e. a thing to explain) have produced a glut of concepts, theories, and analyses. While this medley might be seen as a necessary – and fruitful – outcome of such a hybrid and heterogeneous process, it also has the potential side-effect of leaving us more confused than enlightened. It is increasingly difficult, on the one hand, to parse or synthesize this intellectual (yet often contradictory) abundance and, on the other hand, to apply it to policy or practical issues facing diverse communities, societies, organizations and individuals around the world. It also risk becoming a self-fulfilling prophecy, where despite our hesitancies, we come to believe that there really is no alternative. A body of literature is emerging that is critical of current conceptions and understandings of neoliberalism, highlighting these issues (e.g. Boas & Gans-Morse 2009; Barnett 2009; Weller and O’Neill 2014; Flew 2014; Birch 2015; Venugopal 2015).

 

Questions

It is time to take stock of what we are left with by adopting neoliberalism as a key spanner in our analytical toolkit. Consequently, the aim of this session is to revisit and rethink neoliberalism as an abstract concept and as an empirical object. We invite contributors to critically revisit dominant conceptions of neoliberalism, to rethink how we use neoliberalism as an analytical and methodological framework, and to offer new ideas about how to productively (re)conceptualize neoliberalism. Below we outline some broad questions that contributors might like to consider engaging, although others are welcome:

  1. How conceptually useful has neoliberalism been in geography?
  2. How has the concept of neoliberalism evolved over the last two decades?
  3. How are we plagued by neoliberalism, or are we plagued by its ongoing prioritization?
  4. Does neoliberalism represent the most useful or critical way of understanding the current state of the world?
  5. Does neoliberalism need updating as a critical concept in ways that take us beyond hybridity and variegation?
  6. What is missing from debates on neoliberalism in contemporary geographical scholarship?
  7. What makes neoliberalism such a popular analytical framework in geography?
  8. Are there alternative ways to conceptualize neoliberalism?
  9. Are we in need of finding alternative conceptions that break with the language of ‘neoliberalism’ altogether?
  10. What might new visions beyond neoliberalism yield in terms of our collective political future?

 

Abstract Submission

If you would like to participate in the session, please submit an abstract (250 words max) by 19 October 2015 to bothkean@yorku.ca and springer@uvic.ca. If you would like to participate in other ways (e.g. discussant) then please feel free to contact us as well.

Please note: once you have submitted an abstract to us, you will also need to register AND submit an abstract on the AAG website. The AAG abstract deadline is 29 October 2015 to: http://www.aag.org/cs/http://www.aag.org/cs/annualmeeting/how_to_submit_an_abstract

 

See: http://www.politicalgeography.org/2015/09/24/cfp-aag-2016-the-mont-pelerin-plague-revisiting-and-rethinking-neoliberalism/

 

Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Raya Dunayevskaya

Raya Dunayevskaya

THE RAYA DUNAYEVSKAYA COLLECTION

The Raya Dunayevskaya Collection — Marxist-Humanist Archives is now online.

At: http://rayadunayevskaya.org/

News and Letters Committees is proud to announce that the Archives of the Marxist-Humanist philosopher/revolutionary, Raya Dunayevskaya (1910-1987), are now available online.

The Collection encompasses the body of ideas of Marxist-Humanism developed by Dunayevskaya during a lifetime in the revolutionary movement. Its over 17,000 pages are a resource for students, researchers and activists in fields as diverse as philosophy, women’s studies, social theory, intellectual history and Black studies.

Among the writings, many unavailable in printed form, are pioneering studies on the theory of state-capitalism, English-language translations of the young Marx and Lenin’s Hegel Notebooks, extensive notes on Hegel’s major philosophic works, writings on Black struggles in the U.S. from the 1940s to the 1980s, Political-Philosophic Letters on events spanning the world as they were occurring—from the Cuban Missile Crisis through the Iranian Revolution to the coup in Grenada. A far-reaching Battle of Ideas with other Marxists is found in the comprehensive collection of her columns, which first appeared in the newspaper she founded, News & Letters.

The vast preparatory materials for her three major books Marxism and FreedomPhilosophy and Revolution, and Rosa Luxemburg, Women’s Liberation, and Marx’s Philosophy of Revolution are included, as are her extensive preliminary writings for her unfinished book on “Dialectics of Organization and Philosophy.”

There is a wide-ranging collection of correspondence, including with: Herbert Marcuse, Erich Fromm, Leon Trotsky, Natalia Trotsky, Adrienne Rich, Grace Lee Boggs, C.L.R. James, Cornelius Castoriadis, Meridel LeSueur, Nnamdi Azikwe, Tadayuki Tsushima, Zagorka Golubovic, Louis Dupré, Sekou Toure and Maria Barreno.

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/the-raya-dunayevskaya-collection2014marxist-humanist-archives-is-now-online

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

images (3)POLITICS AND POETICS

Call for Papers, Presentations and Performances:

Politics and Poetics

The third symposium of the Leverhulme International Research Network ‘Imaginaries of the Future’

Queen’s University, Belfast, 19-21 January 2016.

Website: https://imaginariesofthefuture.wordpress.com/2015/09/17/cfp-politics-and-poetics-3rd-symposium-of-the-leverhulme-research-network/

What does it mean to think of politics as a poetics, and to do so through the prism of the expectant, the anticipatory, the Not-Yet, and the futural? The third symposium of the ‘Imaginaries of the Future’ International Research Network seeks to investigate the ways in which futures are both imagined and governed, projected, deferred and deterred, through different disciplinary formations, and to explore the effects of competing ways of conceiving futurity.

The ‘hope project’ at the heart of utopianism pursues a future transformed through collective agency, and develops an anticipatory register in which visions of competing futures are mobilized to orient such collective political agency. Conversely, in what ways are creative practices of agency obstructed, and how are visions of ‘the future’ deployed in reactive, prohibitory ways? How does the utopian anticipatory compare with other categories of futurity, such as precaution or pre-emption, risk or threat? How, then, can we theorize the ambivalence of the anticipatory, modes of capture and recuperation?

Symposium participants may interrogate utopianism itself, exploring the poetics of utopian desire, affect, and agency vis-à-vis the politics of contestation, challenge, and transformation. We may also consider the specificity of politics and poetics, and the relations of connectivity between these approaches. Is politics necessarily reducible to calculative and instrumental modes of grasping the future? Is poetics more attuned to the epistemological and ontological uncertainty of the future, to what has not and might not happen? Or, is there a politics to poetics, and a poetics to politics? How can engagement with poetics help map forms of relationality and connection, and what is the role of affect, emotion, memory in creating connections and preconditions for political agency? What might be the political valence of aesthetic and sensual categories of experience — touch, proximity, intimacy, harmony and dissonance? How might technological and cybernetic invention advance both human agential capacity, as well as contribute to a critique of the anthropocentrism of both politics and poetics? And can we think of ethics (say, the Levinasian encounter with the Other, or perhaps the Spinozist endeavour to enhance capacity, agency, connectivity, and joy) as a missing third term between poetics and politics?

We welcome proposals of 250-300 words in length from across the arts and humanities (and beyond) for papers, presentations or performances of up to 20 minutes in length. Please send all proposals to both s.mcmanus@qub.ac.uk and nathaniel.coleman@ncl.ac.uk

Utopia

Utopia

Bursaries

Five travel bursaries, two of up to £1000, and three of up to £350, will be awarded through open competition to individuals who promise to make a significant contribution to the work of the Network. The larger bursaries are intended for applicants traveling a significant distance to attend the symposium. We welcome submissions from all career stages including PhD researchers. Bursary recipients will be expected to contribute a piece of writing and/or embedded media to the Network blog, and will be invited to submit work to be considered for publication opportunities arising from the symposium.

To apply for a bursary, please send a CV along with your proposal to both s.mcmanus@qub.ac.uk and nathaniel.coleman@ncl.ac.uk by 30 October 2015

 

Dr Susan McManus

Lecturer in Political Theory

Politics, International Studies and Philosophy QUB.

Even Bigger Data

Even Bigger Data

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

London Anarchist Bookfair 2015

London Anarchist Bookfair 2015

LONDON ANARCHIST BOOKFAIR 2015

Saturday 24th October 10am to 7pm

Central Saint Martins, Granary Building, 1 Granary Square, King’s Cross, London, N1C 4AA

Books, pamphlets, magazines, meetings, films, discussions, crèche and older kids space, food and much more…

We have finally found a venue suitable for this year’s Bookfair. Central St. Martin’s is a huge building behind Kings Cross train station. It is a fantastic space for us all to display why anarchism is just such a bloody good idea. In these days of hyper capitalism an alternative is needed. That alternative can only be anarchism. Come and find out why.

If you want to book a stall or meeting or want an advert in the bookfair programme go to the bookings page.

What is anarchism?

Like all really good ideas, anarchy is pretty simple when you get down to it – human beings are at their very best when they are living free of authority, deciding things among themselves, rather than being ordered about. That’s what the word means: without government. Read on…

Anarchism and the bookfair

Bookfairs provide a space where like-minded people can come together to re-affirm old friendships, make new ones, discuss all things anarchist and anticapitalist and start planning the future revolution. They’re also one of the public faces of anarchism. Anyone unfamiliar with the ideas or wanting to know more about the politics can come along, look through books, sit in or get involved in meetings, workshops and discussions or just chat to the groups and organisations having stalls there.

It is also a space where we counter the rubbish talked about anarchism by sections of the media and our opponents. Bookfairs are one small element of making anarchism a threat to the present political system.

We need people to help us publicise the event to every nook and cranny in London. If you are new to anarchism, check out the pages websitesand bookfairs. There are links to anarchist and campaigning groups around the country and anarchist bookfairs throughout the world.

Access issues

If you have any access requirements, please let us know so we can try and meet your needs. If you are Deaf and require BSL interpreting and/or speech-to-text provision, please give us as much notice as possible and we will do our best to organise these. To discuss any specific access needs, please contact us at access at anarchistbookfair.org.uk.

Dogs

To make the bookfair a safe environment for children and adults alike, we ask people do not bring dogs to the event, except guide dogs. Thanks.

Cameras

Please don’t take photographs – it’s not necessary and it can annoy or concern some people.

 

See: http://anarchistbookfair.org.uk/

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

law-on-trial-flyerTHE UNIVERSITY ON TRIAL

The End(s) of the Legal Academy

The obituaries of academic freedom, the humanities, and indeed the university itself are coming to focus not just on the end of an erstwhile academy but also on what the ends, the purport, of the academy should and could now be. This workshop brings this concern to bear on the role of the legal academy, a role that is distinctive yet shared with other faculties in the university. It explores what that role imports for the character of being-together within the legal academy.

Organiser: Professor Peter Fitzpatrick

 

Wellbeing in the Legal Profession: Law Firms, Law Schools and the (Un)Happy Lawyer (or, what do we talk about, when we talk about wellbeing in law?)

Richard Collier, Law School, Newcastle University
Discussant: Fiona Macmillan, School of Law, Birkbeck, University of London

 

The Law School and the Force of Law

Patricia Tuitt, School of Law, Birkbeck, University of London
Discussant: Eddie Bruce-Jones,, School of Law, Birkbeck, University of London

 

The Structure of a University: Instrumentalism, Idealism and Forms of Life

Soo Tian Lee, School of Law, Birkbeck, University of London

Discussant: Matthew Charles, English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies, University of Westminster

 

Venue: Malet Street Building, Council Room

BOOK HERE

Flyer: https://hetheory.files.wordpress.com/2015/06/law-on-trial-flyer.jpg

Part of Law on Trial 2015: The University on Trial, Birkbeck College, University of London, June 15-19 2015.

Website: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/law/about-us/events/law-on-trial-2015

Education for Debt

Education for Debt

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Antonio Negri

Antonio Negri

NEGRITUDE, DECOLONIZATION AND THE FUTURE OF THE WORLD

Website: http://www.lse.ac.uk/humanRights/events/2015/Wilder.aspx

Public Lecture Presented by the  Internationalism, Cosmopolitanism and the Politics of Solidarity Research Group

Tuesday 26 May 2015, 6pm -7.30pm

Thai Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE

Speaker: Dr Gary Wilder

Chair: Dr Ayça Çubukçu

Dr Wilder reconsiders decolonization from the perspectives of Aimé Césaire (Martinique) and Léopold Sédar Senghor (Senegal) who, beginning in 1945, promoted self-determination without state sovereignty. As politicians, public intellectuals, and poets, Césaire and Senghor struggled to transform imperial France into a democratic federation, with former colonies as autonomous members of a transcontinental polity. Wilder invites scholars to decolonize intellectual history and globalize critical theory, to analyze the temporal dimensions of political life, and to question the territorialist assumptions of contemporary historiography.

Gary Wilder is Director of the Mellon Committee on Globalization and Social Change, and Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology and the Department of History at The Graduate Center, City University of New York. His latest book is Freedom Time: Negritude, Decolonization and the Future of the World (Duke University Press, 2015)

Ayça Çubukçu (chair) is Assistant Professor in the Centre for the Study of Human Rights and Department of Sociology at LSE. She convenes the Internationalism, Cosmopolitanism and the Politics of Solidarity Research Group

This event is co-hosted by the Centre for the Study of Human Rights, the Department of Sociology, and the Centre for International Studies at LSE (London School of Economics).

This event is open to all with no ticket or pre-registration required. Entry is on a first come, first served.

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

INTERNATIONAL POLITICS THROUGH ART AND PERFORMANCE
Date: Wednesday 22 April 2015
Time: 4.00pm – 8.00pm
Location: The Westminster Forum, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW
http://www.westminster.ac.uk/csd/events/the-international-politics-of-art-and-performance

4-6pm
Collage Methodology for Studying Visual World Politics
Saara Särmä, University of Tampere, Finland

6.30-8pm
Politics in Drag: Sipping Toffee with Hamas in Brussels
Catherine Charrett, University of Aberystwyth

Chaired by David Chandler and Thomas Moore, Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster

Collage Methodology for Studying Visual World Politics
Visual collaging is a playful and creative methodological approach which can be used in the study of everyday images of global politics, for example internet parody images and memes. It is an art-based intervention that disrupts the text-based modes of doing and writing up research which are dominant even in research which focuses on visuality and images. Collaging allows the use of images not only as decorative or as illustrations of an argument. Collages can also function as more than objects of analysis. In this presentation I present an overview of collage-making, describing the “data-collection”, composition, and the techniques I use. Different compositional techniques, e.g. repetition and exaggeration or unexpected juxtapositions, may produce different effects, aesthetically, emotionally, and politically. I explore collage as a mode of thinking, which can be aesthetic, analytical, and/or political. As a creative and artistic mode of studying global politics, collaging aims to unleash imaginations in order to gently deconstruct global and local hierarchies.
Saara Särmä is a feminist, an artist, and a scholar. Saara’s doctoral dissertation Junk Feminism and Nuclear Wannabe –Collaging Parodies of Iran and North Korea (2014, University of Tampere, Finland) focused on internet parody images and memes and developed a unique art-based collage methodology for studying world politics. She is interested in politics of visuality, feminist academic activism, and laughter in world politics. Currently she is working on developing the visual collage methodology further as both a research and a pedagogical tool and experimenting with collective possibilities of collaging. Her artwork can be seen at http://www.huippumisukka.fi

Politics in Drag: Sipping Toffee with Hamas in Brussels
Politics in Drag: Sipping Toffee with Hamas in Brussels is a 45 minute performance which attempts to re-envision the EU’s response to Hamas’s electoral success in the Palestinian legislative elections through a hyperbolic, melancholic and parodic telling of conversations that never took place. Hamas is a movement listed on the EU’s terrorist list and in 2006 the movement won elections that the EU had monitored and declared to be free and fair. The EU’s response was to diplomatically, financially and politically sanction the democratically elected body, which analysts argue was an opportunity missed to engage politically with Hamas. This live performance stages alternative encounters between the EU and Hamas by performatively addressing the vulnerabilities, intimacies and subjugations of their ritualised being not-together. It presents interviews with Hamas leaders and EU representatives conducted between 2012-2013 through the theoretical and aesthetic mode of the drag performance. By re-fictionalising the response to the 2006 elections, this performance imagines politics anew, allowing for different conversations to arise from performing what normally remains hidden in political encounters.
Catherine Charrett has a PhD in International Politics from Aberystwyth University and a MSc from the London School of Economics. Catherine researches EU-Palestinian relations and engages with theories of gender and performance studies to explore questions of ritualised subjectivity, agency and the possibility for creativity in diplomacy and foreign policy making.

Refreshments will be provided.

David Chandler, Professor of International Relations, Director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW. Tel: ++44 (0)776 525 3073.

Journal Editor, Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/resi20

Amazon books page: http://www.amazon.co.uk/David-Chandler/e/B001HCXV7Y/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Personal website: http://www.davidchandler.org/
Twitter: @DavidCh27992090

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Social Imaginaries

Social Imaginaries

SOCIAL IMAGINARIES

A NEW JOURNAL AT: http://www.zetabooks.com/journals/social-imaginaries.html

Issue 1 (May, 2015)

 

Table of Contents (with Abstracts)

 

1. Editorial by the Social Imaginaries Editorial Collective

 

2Social Imaginaries in Debate by Suzi Adams, Paul Blokker, Natalie J Doyle, John Krummel, and Jeremy C A Smith

Investigations into social imaginaries have burgeoned in recent years. From ‘the capitalist imaginary’ to the ‘democratic imaginary’, from the ‘ecological imaginary’ to ‘the global imaginary’ – and beyond – the social imaginaries field has expanded across disciplines and beyond the academy. The recent debates on social imaginaries and potential new imaginaries reveal a recognisable field and paradigm-in-the-making. We argue that Castoriadis, Ricoeur, and Taylor have articulated the most important theoretical frameworks for understanding social imaginaries, although the field as a whole remains heterogeneous. We further argue that the notion of social imaginaries draws on the modern understanding of the imagination as authentically creative (as opposed to imitative). We contend that an elaboration of social imaginaries involves a significant, qualitative shift in the understanding of societies as collectively and politically-(auto)instituted formations that are irreducible to inter-subjectivity or systemic logics. After marking out the contours of the field and recounting a philosophical history of the imagination (including deliberations on the reproductive and creative imaginations, as well as consideration of contemporary Japanese contributions), the essay turns to debates on social imaginaries in more concrete contexts, specifically political-economic imaginaries, the ecological imaginary, multiple modernities and their inter-civilisational encounters. The social imaginaries field imparts powerful messages for the human sciences and wider publics. In particular, social imaginaries hold significant implications for ontological, phenomenological and philosophical anthropological questions; for the cultural, social, and political horizons of contemporary worlds; and for ecological and economic phenomena (including their manifest crises). The essay concludes with the argument that social imaginaries as a paradigm-in-the-making offers valuable  means by which movements towards social change can be elucidated as well providing  an open horizon for the critiques of existing social practices.

 

3. Introduction to Castoriadis’s “The Imaginary As Such” by Johann P Arnason

 

4. The Imaginary As Such by Cornelius Castoriadis (translated by Johann P Arnason)

This text is a draft introduction to a planned work on imagination in society and history. It begins with reflections on the abilities and activities that set human subjects apart from other living beings and thus at the same time enable the ongoing creation of society and history. This is to be understood as an exploration within the “order of facts”, on the level of anthropological preconditions. The most elementary precondition is the human capacity to add an “unreal extension” to reality, and thus to put the latter at a distance; considered as an activity, this is what defines the imagination, but considered as a dimension of human existence, it is the realm of the imaginary. The two concepts are strictly complementary. To clarify their role in the proposed rethinking of social-historical being, we must link them to closer analysis of the latter’s two main components, representing and doing. On both sides, Castoriadis emphasizes the imaginary element as a decisive point against empiricist and rationalist reductions. Representing is as irreducible to perception as it is to thinking, and taking the argument one step further, both perception and thinking can be shown to be dependent on the imaginary. Similarly, on the level of doing, human action can neither be understood as a response to given needs nor as an application of pre-given representations; its creative potential presupposes an imaginary horizon. Finally it is argued that language – closely related to both representing and doing- has an imaginary dimension, central to the emergence and the enduring innovative capacity of meaning. The basic flaw of structural linguistics was its refusal to take the imaginary source into account.

 

5. Introduction to Nakamura Yūjirō and his Work by John Krummel

 

6. “The Logic of Place” and Common Sense by Nakamura Yujiro (translated by John Krummel)

The essay is a written version of a talk Nakamura Yūjirō gave at the Collège International de Philosophie in Paris in 1983.  In the talk Nakamura connects the issue of common sense in his own work to that of place in Nishida Kitarō and the creative imagination in Miki Kiyoshi. He presents this connection between the notions of common sense, imagination, and place as constituting one important thread in contemporary Japanese philosophy. He begins by discussing the significance of place (basho) that is being rediscovered today in response to the shortcomings of the modern Western paradigm, and discusses it in its various senses, such as ontological ground or substratum, the body, symbolic space, and linguistic or discursive topos in ancient rhetoric. He then relates this issue to the philosophy of place Nishida developed in the late 1920s, and after providing an explication of Nishida’s theory, discusses it further in light of some linguistic and psychological theories. Nakamura goes on to discuss his own interest in the notion of common sense traceable to Aristotle and its connection to the rhetorical concept of topos, and Miki’s development of the notion of the imagination in the 1930s in response to Nishida’s theory.  And in doing so he ties all three—common sense, place, and imagination—together as suggestive of an alternative to the modern Cartesian standpoint of the rational subject that has constituted the traditional paradigm of the modern West.

 

7. Interpreting the Present – a Research Programme by Peter Wagner

Sociologists have increasingly adopted the insight that “modern societies” undergo major historical transformations; they are not stable or undergoing only smooth social change once their basic institutional structure has been established. There is even some broad agreement that the late twentieth century witnessed the most recent one of those major transformations leading into the present time – variously characterized by adding adjectives such as “reflexive”, “global” or simply “new” to modernity. However, neither the dynamics of the recent social transformation nor the characteristic features of the present social constellation have been adequately grasped yet. Rather than assuming a socio-structural or politico-institutional perspective, as they dominate in sociology and political science respectively, this article concentrates on the way in which current social practices are experienced and interpreted by the human beings who enact them as parts of a common world that they inhabit together. It will be suggested that current interpretations are shaped by the experience of the dismantling of “organized modernity” from the 1970s onwards and of the subsequent rise of a view of the world as shaped by parallel processes of “globalization” and “individualization”, signalling the erasure of historical time and lived space, during the 1990s and early 2000s. In response to these experiences, we witness today a variety of interconnected attempts at re-interpretation of modernity, aiming at re-constituting spatiality and temporality. The re-constitution of meaningful time concerns most strongly questions of historical injustice, in terms of the present significance of past oppression and exclusion and in terms of the unequal effects of the instrumental transformation of the earth in the techno-industrial trajectory of modernity. The re-constitution of meaningful space focuses on the relation between the political form of a spatially circumscribed democracy and the economic practices of expansionist capitalism as well as on the spatial co-existence of a plurality of ways of world-interpretation.

 

8. Introduction to Johann P Arnason’s “The Imaginary Dimensions of Modernity” by Suzi Adams

 

9. The Imaginary Dimensions of Modernity by Johann P Arnason (translated by Suzi Adams)

This paper discusses the formation of Castoriadis’s concept of imaginary significations and relates it to his changing readings of Marx and Weber. Castoriadis’s reflections on modern capitalism took off from the Marxian understanding of its internal contradictions, but he always had reservations about the orthodox version of this idea. His writings in the late 1950s, already critical of basic assumptions in Marx’s work, located the central contradiction in the very relationship between capital and wage labour: Labour power was not simply transformed into a commodity, as Marx had argued; rather, the instituted attempt to treat it as a commodity was a contradiction in itself, between the subjectivity and the objectification of labour. Castoriadis then moved on to link this claim to Weber’s analysis of  the interconnections between capitalism and bureaucracy. The main contradiction of modern capitalism, whether wholly bureaucratized as in the Soviet model or increasingly bureaucratized as in the West, now seemed to be a matter of  incompatible systemic imperatives: the need to control and to mobilize the workforce. Finally, difficulties with this model – and with the revolutionary expectations based on it – led to a more decisive break with classical theories and to the formulation of a bipolar image of modernity, where the vision of an autonomous society is opposed to the logic of calculation and domination, embodied in capitalist development. On both sides there is an imaginary component, irreducible to empirical givens or systemic principles. In this regard, Castoriadis remained closer to Weber than to Marx, but he also anticipated, in a distinctive way, later emphasis on the cultural dimension of modernity, and more specifically the notion of modernity as a new civilization.

 

10. Introduction to Marcel Gauchet’s “Democracy: From One Crisis to Another” by Natalie J Doyle

 

11. Democracy: From One Crisis to Another by Marcel Gauchet (translated by Natalie J Doyle)

Democracy is in crisis. This crisis is the paradoxical outcome of its triumph over its erstwhile rivals. Having prevailed over the totalitarian projects of the first half of the 20th Century it has developed in such a way that it is now undermining its original goals of individual and collective autonomy. Modern liberal democracy – the outcome of an inversion of the values of tradition, hierarchy and political incorporation – is a mixed regime. It involves three different dimensions of social existence, political, legal, historical/economic, and organizes power around these. A balance was achieved after the upheaval of World War II in the form of liberal democracy, on the basis of reforms which injected democratic political power into liberalism and controlled the new economic dynamics it had unleashed. This balance has now been lost. Political autonomy, which accompanied modern historicity and its orientation towards the future, has been overshadowed by economic activity and its pursuit of innovation. As a result, the very meaning of democracy has become impoverished. The term used to refer to the goal of self-government, it is now taken to be fully synonymous with personal freedom and the cause of human rights. The legal dimension having come to prevail over the political one, democratic societies see themselves as “political market societies”, societies that can only conceive of their existence with reference to a functional language borrowed from economics. This depoliticisation of democracy has facilitated the rise to dominance of a new form of oligarchy.

 

12. Modern Social Imaginaries: A Conversation by Craig Calhoun, Dilip Gaonkar, Benjamin Lee, Charles Taylor and Michael Warner (edited by Dilip Gaonkar)

The conversation seeks to extend and complicate Charles Taylor’s (2004) account of three constitutive formations of modern social imaginaries: market, the public sphere, and the nation-state based on popular sovereignty in two critical respects. First, it seeks to show how these key imaginaries, especially the market imaginary, are not contained and sealed within autonomous spheres. They are portable and they often leak into domains beyond the ones in which they originate. Second, it seeks to identify and explore the new incipient and/or emergent imaginaries vying for recognition and demanding consideration in the constitution (as well as analysis) of contemporary social life, such as the risk-reward entrepreneurial culture.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THOUGHT CONFERENCE 2015

FEMINISM & CRITICAL THEORY

SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THOUGHT CONFERENCE

UNIVERSITY OF SUSSEX, JUNE 20-21, 2015

In the face of enforced austerity, rampant and increasing inequality, systemic crises of political, economic and environmental organisation, and violence and injustice on a global scale, there has been a resurgence of interest in both feminism and critical theory, as ways of understanding and criticising the world as it is. That such disasters disproportionately affect women is not, of course, new, nor are they differentiated solely through gender – race, sexuality, dis/ability, class and nationality also come into play. Yet many have detected an increase in violence, both (and often simultaneously) material and symbolic, directed against women and gender non-conformists across the world. Examples range from the ‘pornification’ of an increasingly misogynist popular culture (and equally misogynist ‘moral panics’ about the threat posed to society by deviant sexualities), to brutal cuts to already embattled women’s services, to continued institutional discrimination and institutionalised abuse (Yarl’s Wood is just one site).

This has been met with resistance in a variety of forms, on the ground in social movements and protests, and in many recent theoretical developments both scholarly and popular, including: the republication of many classic Marxist and socialist feminist texts of the 1970s and 80s; important contemporary debates, situated within both analytic and continental philosophy, on how to challenge the patriarchal nature of philosophy as a discipline and as disciplinary ideology; the emergence of innovative new journals such as the materialist feminist LIES; and scholarly reappraisals of radical twentieth-century figures like Shulamith Firestone, Claudia Jones and Rosa Luxemburg.

This year’s Social and Political Thought conference will investigate ? the relationship between feminism and other critical social theories in light of these developments. We begin by recognising that the different schools (and historical ‘waves’) of feminist thought are themselves often divergent and opposed. Furthermore, we recognise that there is a certain level of ambivalence attached to the term ‘critical theory’. In the narrow sense, it can refer to theory influenced by the Frankfurt School and the work of Adorno, Horkheimer, and Marcuse (and, on some interpretations, Habermas and Honneth). In the broad sense, on the other hand, it can refer to a group of interrelated, sometimes competing, social theories directed against the status quo, of which feminist thought is one strand. We view this ambivalence and its relationship to feminist theory and practice as potentially productive, and encourage submissions that deal with all kinds of feminism and their relationship to critical theory in both the narrow and broad senses of the term, including feminism as critical theory.

Possible approaches include but are not limited to: Marxist feminism or feminist thought engaging with Marxism; feminism, materiality, and ‘new materialisms’; feminist social movements and the politics of popular protest; feminism, police, and prisons; feminism and problems of universality; feminism and psychoanalysis; feminism and autonomism; anarchist feminism; post-crisis masculinities and feminism; postcolonialism and feminism; black British feminism; sexual, racial and social contracts; feminism and the politics and theory of intersectionality; feminism and nationalism; feminism and orientalism in the war on terror; ‘third wave’ feminism; feminism and new forms of slavery; feminism in the global South; feminism and poststructuralism;  feminism and communisation theory; feminism and LGBTQI struggles; feminism and sex-work; feminism and social reproduction; feminism and revolution.

 

Keynote Speakers:

Stella Sandford (Kingston University)

Lorna Finlayson (University of Cambridge)

 

We encourage submissions for both individual and full-panel presentations. Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be sent to ssptreviews@sussex.ac.uk by March 15 2015. In order to facilitate a double-blind review process, please send two separate attachments, one containing a short biographical note, and another containing your abstract with no identifying information.

See: https://ssptjournal.wordpress.com/social-and-political-thought-conference-june-20-21-2015/

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

 

Time and Space in the Social Universe of Capital’ – by Michael Neary and Glenn Rikowski, now at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/10545768/Time_and_Speed_in_the_Social_Universe_of_Capital