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Monthly Archives: June 2014

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

BECOMING ECOFEMINISMS

CALL FOR PAPERS

PhaenEx: Journal of Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture

Vol.11-1 (2016)

PhaenEx: http://phaenex.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/phaenex/index

PhaenEx is seeking contributions for its next special topics issue on Becoming Ecofeminisms. Ecofeminism has many versions and genealogies. In the context of new kinds of environmental crises, imaginaries, and discourses, how might we rethink and reinvigorate ecofeminisms— telling alternative genealogies of this movement (sometimes considered outdated and essentialist), highlighting current practices, and envisioning its bold futures. We are interested in ecofeminisms in both theory and practice.

Proposals and papers related (but not limited) to the following are welcome:

  • Ecofeminist intersections with current discourse and practice in queer, anti-colonial, anti-racist, critical disability, and critical animal studies
  • Genealogies of and differences within ecofeminisms
  • Critiques of ecofeminism / Ecofeminist critique
  • Contemporary revival of ecofeminist approaches
  • Links or tension between ecofeminism and posthumanism, new materialism, object-oriented ontologies, speculative realism, etc.
  • Ecofeminist reappraisal of relationships, affects, and communities (anarchist praxis, solidarity-based movements, grassroots initiatives, transformative justice, etc.)
  • Ecofeminism in relation to creative practices including eco-art, bio-art,ecopoetics, cli-fi, etc.
  • Ecofeminist engagements with the anthropocene, deep time, resilience, the geological turn, the oceanic turn, re-wilding, green futures, or other salient contemporary concepts.

Deadline for submissions: 1st August 2015.

All papers will be peer-reviewed.

Contact: Astrida Neimanis (astrida.neimanis@gmail.com) and Christiane Bailey (christianebailey@gmail.com)

 

PhaenEx: http://www.phaenex.uwindsor.ca

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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Philosophy

Philosophy

PHILOSOPHY IN EDUCATION

CALL FOR PAPERS

PhaenEx: Journal of Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture

PhaenEx:   http://phaenex.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/phaenex/index

Special Topics Section: Philosophy in Education (2015)

Lead Editors: Marc Lamontagne & Éric Martin

This issue will focus on the way philosophy operates within educational practice. A guiding question is: can we conceive of education as the very manifestation of philosophy insofar as both relate to culture? Recent criticisms of educational practice have underlined the hijacking of education by utilitarian priorities. These denunciations, albeit necessary, often create an impasse in the debate between those in favor of such transformations and those against. We thus invite authors to go beyond the limited framework of negative critique so that the question of the status and role of philosophy in education can be explicitly and positively addressed. This issue of PhænEx seeks contributions that go beyond simply noting how educational institutions are currently adrift: we encourage articles that could make a case for the rehabilitation of the place of philosophy in all branches of knowledge, and especially in the field of social sciences. Authors can tackle such issues as these: Can philosophy really see itself as part of the general curriculum while behaving as a specific discipline? What is the relation between philosophy, education, and culture? Are not philosophy, education, and culture synonyms for the way humans are constituted into a common world? What is a proper philosophical pedagogy?

Submission Deadline: Dec. 1st, 2014. For more information contact the Lead Editors: Marc Lamontagne (marc.lamontagne@cegepmontpetit.ca) or Éric Martin (eric.martin@cegepmontpetit.ca).

 
*GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR AUTHORS*

*French style guidelines are available here.

1. Submissions should represent original work not previously published.

2. It is the author’s responsibility to obtain appropriate written copyright permissions for the reproduction of any copyrighted material, including images.

3. Authors should adhere to gender-inclusive language in their manuscripts.

4. Generally, PhaenEx will not consider publication of the same author’s work in two consecutive Open issues, although authors may submit their work to consecutive Open and Special Topics issues.

5. Generally, scholarly articles are between 6000-9000 words in length, although exceptions can be made. Submissions that are clearly unrevised conference presentations, or which are excessively long without clear reason, will not be sent out for peer review. Authors should contact the Lead Editor(s) in advance of submission if they have questions or concerns about this requirement.

Authors are asked to comply fully with these requirements, as well as with the style requirements outlined below, and to follow the generally accepted norms of academic writing, including the provision of complete and accurate references. Failure to do so may constitute grounds for the rejection of a submission at any time during the editorial process. (PhaenEx recognizes the creative and other needs of its authors. Please write directly to the Lead Editor for permission to exceed these guidelines or the below style sheet.)

*STYLE REQUIREMENTS*

[voir lien ci- dessous pour les règles de mise en forme des textes en français]
Texts are to be saved in MS Word (.doc) or Rich Text Format (.rft).

The style requirements of PhaenEx are modeled on: Gibaldi, Joseph. MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing. 2nd ed. New York: The Modern Language Association of America, 1998.

*Format:

1) Use font Times New Roman size 12 throughout, including all entries in both Notes (to come at the end of the text, not at the bottom of the page) and Works Cited (to come after Notes).

2) Full justification, both left and right.

3) Double-space the main text.

4) Indent the first line of each new paragraph. (Do not leave a blank space between paragraphs.)

5) Use one space (not two) after sentence punctuation.

6) Single-space notes, but place a single blank line between each separate note.

7) Single-space all items in Works Cited, but place a single blank line between each separate entry.

8) To indicate emphasis, titles, and terms in a foreign language use italics (not underlining).

*Basic Layout:

1) The title should appear at the top of the first page, centred and boldface, and be followed by one blank double-spaced line.

2) If numbered, each section heading should use Roman numerals. Whether numbered or not, each section heading should be preceded by two blank double- spaced lines, centred, and boldface.

3) If numbered, each subheading should use lower case Arabic letters enclosed in parentheses, left-justified, boldface and italicized. Leave one double-spaced return between Section heading and sub-heading, and the same between sub-heading and text (i.e. please do not leave any
extra blank lines between heading and subheading, or between subheading and text).

4) Notes should be assembled at the end of the text (not the bottom of each page). They should be headed by the unnumbered section heading
“Notes,” which should be centred, boldface, set off from the preceding paragraph by one blank double-spaced line (i.e. two strokes of the “return” key should follow the punctuation of the final paragraph).

5) A list of works cited in the text should come after the final note. It should be headed by the unnumbered section heading “Works Cited,” which should be centred, boldface, set off from the last line of the last note by one blank double-spaced line (i.e. two strokes of the “return” key should follow the punctuation of the final note).

6) If using an epigraph, each line of the epigraph text should be indented to one tab, left-justified and italicized. Attribution of the epigraph should follow standard MLA parenthetical citation.

*Quotations:

1) Quotations longer than three lines should appear without quotation marks, be single- spaced, and be block- indented once from the left margin. Enter one blank double- spaced line immediately before and after the block-indented quotation (i.e. block- indented quotations should use standard double-spacing to separate the quote from the main text.)

2) Indicate all interpolations with square brackets.

3) All ellipses should be indicated with a group of three immediately consecutive dots, preceded and followed by a single space. Ellipses indicating excluded text should not be placed in brackets.

*Quotation marks and punctuation:

1) Use double quotation marks for first order quotations of less than three lines and integrate them in the text. Use single quotation marks for quotations within quotations.

2) Final punctuation goes inside quotation marks except when followed by a parenthetical citation. Exception: Block quotations should be punctuated as if they were normal sentences and parenthetical citation should follow one space after the punctuation.

3) When quotation marks are followed by a parenthetical citation, final punctuation is placed after the parentheses. Exception: when the quoted text ends with a question or exclamation mark, place the question or exclamation mark inside the quotation marks and place a period after the closing parenthesis.

4) Semicolons, exclamation marks, and question marks that are not part of the quoted material should be placed outside quotation marks.

5) “Scare quotes” should be avoided if possible, although may be appropriate to denote contested terminology. When used, please use double quote marks (unless they appear within quotations as second-order quotes, where single quote marks should then be used.)

6) In text em-dashes should be long, with no space between the dashes and the words on either side. (Most word processors automatically convert to this format if you type a word followed immediately by two dashes followed immediately by the next word and then a space.)

7) Please use serial commas (e.g. “peace, order, and good governance”).

8) Leave one space (not two) following punctuation between sentences.

*Use of foreign language words and quotations:

1) Quotations should be, where possible, translated into the language of the article using an official translation (and thus appropriately cited). Where no official translation is available, the author’s translation should be followed by a parenthetical note: (author’s trans.). This should be accompanied by an endnote that presents the translated text in its original language.

2) Where, for good reason, the original language of the quotation or word is kept in the main body of the article, single words or phrases should be italicized. Sentences and quotes should use format and punctuation guidelines of the article’s main language, rather than those of the foreign language.

*Parenthetical Citations:

1) MLA style uses in-text, parenthetical citations together with a Works Cited list at the end. The goal of parenthetical citation is (a) to provide immediate citation upon reading each specific passage in need of citation, (b) to indicate precisely the relevant item in Works Cited, and (c) to be as brief as possible.

2) When only one of the works of a particular author needs to be cited, citation appears as (last name page number), with no comma between the name and the page number. If more than one of the works of a particular author needs to be cited, citation appears as (last name, shortened book title in italics page number) OR (last name, “shortened article title within quotation marks” page number), with a comma between name and shortened title only. However, if (a) the author’s name and/or specific work is mentioned explicitly in leading sentences such that it is clear which text is being referred to in Works Cited, or if (b) it is clearly understood that the citation is the same as the immediately preceding citation, then the citation should be reduced to (page number). This replaces the need for ibid., an abbreviation which should not be used.

3) Parenthetical citations may also be used for merely supporting material, e.g., (see Smith). Full references are to be provided in Works Cited.

*Notes:

1) Notes appear in the body of the text in superscript and as consecutive, Arabic numerals.

2) Numbers appear in the Notes section also in superscript.

3) In the body of the text, superscript notes appear:
(a) outside punctuation, when no quotation marks or parenthetical citations are used, e.g., … lovers seek solitude.
(b) outside closing quotation marks, when no parenthetical citation appears, e.g., “… lovers seek solitude.”
(c) outside punctuation that follows the parenthetical citation, e.g., “… lovers seek solitude” (Sartre 273).

4) Follow MLA, parenthetical citation style for all quotations and references in the notes themselves. Full citations should appear only in the Works Cited list. For example: For a further discussion of this point, see Detmer (21-22).

*Works Cited:

1) Book paradigm:
Sartre, Jean-Paul. Being and Nothingness: A Phenomenological Essay on Ontology. Trans. Hazel Barnes. New York: Washington Square Press, 1956.

2) Article paradigm:
Simons, Margaret. “Two Interviews with Simone de Beauvoir.” Hypatia 3, no. 3 (1989): 11-27.

3) Chapter/Article in Book paradigm:
Gyllenhammer, Paul. “The Question of (In)Tolerance in Heidegger’s Notion of World- Disclosure.” Issues in Interpretation Theory. Ed. Pol Vandevelde. Milwaukee: Marquette University Press, 2006. 167-198.

4) Film paradigm:
Macbeth. Dir. Roman Polanski. Perf. Jon Finch, Francesca Annis, and Nicholas Selby. 1971. Columbia, 2002. DVD.

Please note: (a) When more than one work is used by the same author, subsequent references in Works Cited should include three combined dashes (an “em-dash”), followed by a period, in place of the name. (b) Inclusive page numbers must follow journal and chapter entries in the Works Cited list.

*Citing Online Sources (adapted from www.dianahacker.com):

1) MLA does not require a Web address (URL) in citations for online sources.

2) In general, citations should end by indicating the medium (i.e. Web) and the date the material was accessed (date Month year)

3) MLA style calls for a publisher or sponsor for most online sources. If a source has no publisher, use the abbreviation “N.p.” (no publisher). If there is no date of publication or update, use the abbreviation “N.d” (for no date), after the publisher/sponsor position. For an article in an online scholarly journal or an article from a database, give page numbers if they are available; if they are not, use the abbreviation “n. pag.”

4) If an author or editor is unknown, begin the citation with the title.

Examples and Paradigms:

(a) Entire Website with author or editor:
Peterson, Susan Lynn. The Life of Martin Luther. Susan Lynn Peterson, 2005. Web. 24 Jan. 2009.
Halsall, Paul, ed. Internet Modern History Sourcebook. Fordham U, 22 Sept. 2001. Web. 19 Jan. 2009.

(b) Entire Website with corporate (group) author:
United States. Environmental Protection Agency. Drinking Water Standards. EPA, 8 July 2004. Web. 24 Jan. 2005.

(c) Entire Website with unknown author:
Margaret Sanger Papers Project. History Dept., New York U, 18 Oct. 2000. Web. 6 Jan. 2009.

(d) Entire Website with no title:
Yoon, Mina. Home page. Oak Ridge Natl. Laboratory, 28 Dec. 2006. Web. 12 Jan. 2009.

(e) Short works from websites including articles, poems, and other documents that are not book length or that appear as internal pages on a Website: Shiva, Vandana. “Bioethics: A Third World Issue.” NativeWeb. NativeWeb, n.d. Web. 15 Sept. 2004.

(f) Online Book:
Milton, John. Paradise Lost: Book I. Poetryfoundation.org. Poetry Foundation, 2008. Web. 14 Dec. 2008.

(g) Article in an on-line journal:
Belau, Linda. “Trauma and the Material Signifier.” Postmodern Culture 11.2 (2001): n. pag. Web. 20 Feb. 2009.

(h) Article in an Online magazine or newspaper:
Paulson, Steve. “Buddha on the Brain.” Salon.com. Salon Media Group, 27 Nov. 2006. Web. 18 Jan. 2009.

(i) E-mail. Begin with the writer’s name and the subject line, followed by “Message to” and name of the recipient. End with the date of the message and the medium.
Wilde, Lisa. “Review Questions.” Message to the author. 15 Mar. 2009. E-mail. &am p;nb sp;

For all other examples see www.dianahacker.com.

*Standardized Spelling Guidelines:

Please standardize spelling to the Oxford Canadian English dictionary. Please note the following preferred spellings and guidelines:- post-structuralism, post-humanism, postmodernism, postcolonial- the Far East, the West (not west), Western[e.g. media, thought, intellectuals, culture, etc.], but western [Canada, parts of the city, etc.].- insofar>- naturally-ordered, largest-ever, etc.- avoid “&” in favour of “and”- towards rather than toward- farther denotes physical advancement in distance while further denotes advancement to greater degree, as in time<*On all other matters of style, please consult the MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing (2nd edition).
To Submit: Register or log-in if already registered.
Select author and then follow the step-by-step instructions.

 

http://phaenex.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/phaenex/about/submissions/callforpapers

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Match Women

Match Women

MATCHWOMEN’S FESTIVAL

Saturday 5th July 2014

Mander Hall

Hamilton House, Mabledon Place

London

WC1H 9BD

11AM to 9PM

Nearest stations: Euston and King’s Cross

Website: http://www.matchfest.co.uk/

Facebook: www.facebook.com/matchwomen

 

The Legacy of the Matchwomen

In the summer of 1888, 1400 women walked out on strike over management bullying and appalling, hazardous working conditions. The women and girls working at Bryant & May’s match factory in London’s East End shocked the world, and ultimately changed it.

Working-class women at this time were supposed to be seen and not heard, especially if, like many matchwomen, they were of Irish heritage. Instead, the matchwomen paraded the streets of the East End, singing songs and telling the truth about their starvation wages and mistreatment by the firm.

They marched to Parliament, and their strength and solidarity won them better pay, safer conditions, and the right to form the largest union of women and girls in Britain.

They were an inspiration to other groups of workers up and down the country and throughout the world. The modern movement for workers’ rights had begun, and the matchwomen were at the forefront of it.

Last year’s first Matchwomen’s Festival marked the 125th anniversary of the Matchwomen’s Strike.

It was a brilliant day with around 700 visitors, including the late Bob Crow, and was one of Tony Benn’s last public engagements.

Since then, the importance of the matchwomen to British history has been acknowledged in Parliament with a debate devoted to them, and Labour MPs recommending that the book about them, Striking a Light, should be on the school syllabus. Minister Ed Vaizey replied that Michael Gove would read it: so far, no word on whether Mr Gove enjoyed it, but we wait with baited breath.

MPs also wanted to see a properly-worded blue plaque acknowledging the women’s courage at the old factory site, which Vaizey supported. Watch this space, or indeed, that space if you live nearby.

This year’s festival is smaller, but still perfectly formed. We have some wonderful speakers, songs from Tina McKevitt, and spoken word from Faisal Ali.

We’re excited to have the inspiring Sara Khan on the importance of making links with Muslim women, Sukhwant Dhaliwal on the work and history of Women Against Fundamentalism, eminent trade union and human rights barrister John Hendy QC, and the TUC’s Scarlet Harris.

Kate Connelly will speak on her book about the astonishing life of Sylvia Pankhurst,

Terry McCarthy will speak about the matchwomen-inspired London Dock Strike of 1889, on which he is an authority. Actor and director Kate Hardie will talk about her film Shoot Me, and Alex Wall will talk about working with people with eating disorders, and how they can affect us all.

Heather Wakefield and Caroline Raine have excellent records on organising trade union women, and will update us on the latest issues and disputes and how we can support them.

Louise Raw is the author of Striking a Light and speaks and writes on the Matchwomen, women, unions and history.  Diana Johnson MP was instrumental in bringing the Matchwomen’s legacy to the attention of parliament.

 

Special Guest:

Eam Rin

We welcome to the festival a very special guest. Eam is at the forefront of the dangerous struggle for workers’ rights in Cambodia, which has left 5 people dead this year alone. A garment sewer for 14 years and secretary of the Cambodian Democratic Union, Eam is visiting the UK to talk about the current brutal government crackdown on freedom of association.

 

The Line-up: http://www.matchfest.co.uk/matchfest-line-up.html

Tickets are £2 each for the whole day through Eventbrite, plus a small booking fee.

Booking: http://www.matchfest.co.uk/tickets.html

Bryant & May

Bryant & May

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Andrew Kliman

Andrew Kliman

THE POLITICS OF INEQUALITY DISCOURSE

DISCUSSION

23rd June 2014

19.00 in EDT

500 8th Avenue Room 403, New York, NY 10018

 

The economy remains very sluggish, five years after the official end of the Great Recession. Leading economists warn about the prospect of long-term stagnation. Mass unemployment has led to stagnant wages and income and to rising poverty, and more than 5 million homes have been lost to foreclosure. Yet in much liberal and left discourse, these problems are increasingly ignored, crowded out by concern over inequality. Why is this happening?

This meeting will explore the politics behind the inequality rage. In his opening talk, Andrew Kliman will suggest that this phenomenon is rooted in acceptance of the permanence of capitalism, and in a failure to listen to the renewed aspirations for a different future that opinion polls and grassroots struggles have brought to light. He will also ask why so many liberals and leftists resist accepting facts that challenge their preconceptions about the extent and causes of increasing inequality, and suggest that lack of concern for truth is a main factor.

Donation requested, but no one will be turned away for inequality of funds.

Andrew Kliman is the author of The Failure of Capitalist Production: Underlying Causes of the Great Recession (Pluto Books, 2012) and Reclaiming Marx’s “Capital”: A Refutation of the Myth of Inconsistency (Lexington Books, 2007).

 

Details: https://www.facebook.com/events/238510589690288/?ref_newsfeed_story_type=regular&source=1

Marxist-Humanist Initiative: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Marxist-Humanist-Initiative/128331074623

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Occupy London

Occupy London

CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES ON INTERSECTIONALITY

CHICAGO EVENT WITH INTERNATIONAL PARTICIPATION
Critical Perspectives on Intersectionality: Addressing Struggles over Race, Gender, Class, and Ecology
The social theory of intersectionality has gained prominence among and activists and academics as a way to address the question of inclusion and social solidarity that was often overlooked by the traditional Left focus on the working class. Does “intersectionality” deliver on its promise to theorize radical social change in an inclusive way? Does it offer a real alternative to capitalism?  How might intersectionality be understood in the context of contemporary struggles?
In this discussion, panelists will be engaging these questions from various critical perspectives focused on race, gender, class, and ecological struggles.

Speakers:
Lenore Daniels, “The Marginalization of Black Radicalism in the Obama Era” (activist and writer on Cultural Theory, Race and Gender)
Sarah Mason, “From Occupy to Marx: Ecology, Labor, and the New Society” (former activist, Occupy Los Angeles)
Kevin Anderson, “Karl Marx and Intersectionality” (author Marx at the Margins)
Sandra Rein, “The Gendered Subject at the Crossroads” (author Reading Raya Dunayevskaya)
David Black, “Philosophy, Ecology, and Anti-Capitalism” (author, Philosophical Roots of Anti-Capitalism)

Friday, July 25, 6:30 p.m.
Corboy Law Center
25 East Pearson St. Chicago
Room 208
Sponsored by the Loyola University Department of Philosophy
Co-sponsored by the International Marxist-Humanist Organization

See: http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rosa Luxemburg

Rosa Luxemburg

RECENT ARTICLES AND FEATURES IN THE INTERNATIONAL MARXIST-HUMANIST WEBZINE (June 2014)
See: http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/

INDIA VEERS RIGHT, AS ASIA’S RULERS JOSTLE FOR HEGEMONY — by Richard Abernethy
The election of the anti-Muslim Hindu nationalist Narendra Modi in India is viewed in terms of the regional ascendancy of right-wing parties, and of the danger of war — Editors

THE DIALECTIC OF THE SPATIAL DETERMINATION OF CAPITAL: ROSA LUXEMBURG’S ACCUMULATION OF CAPITAL RECONSIDERED — by Peter Hudis
Luxemburg argued that the accumulation of capital hinges not only on the internal temporal dynamics of particular capitalist societies but most of all on capitalism’s spatial penetration and destruction of the non-capitalist world.

THE ALTHUSSERIAN CUL-DE-SAC – by Kevin Anderson
Althusser’s structuralist Marxism is critiqued both in terms of his theory of ideological superstructures and his interpretation of Marx as an anti-humanist, anti-Hegelian.

See our LANGUAGES PAGES for recent Marxist-Humanist articles and books in Persian, Turkish, and other languages.
On our PERSIAN LANGUAGE PAGE we would like to single out:
PETER HUDIS’S INTRODUCTION TO MARX’S CAPITAL, VOL. 2, for Hassan Mortazavi’s forthcoming translation into Persian
[VIDEO] ON THE POSSIBILITY OF SOCIALISM IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
Alireza Kia interviewed by Siamiac Ghobadi on the possibility of socialism in developing countries, especially the Arab world and Iran, with a focus on whether we can reach socialism without going through capitalist economic development as in western countries.

***RECENT BOOKS OF INTEREST:
THE PHILOSOPHICAL ROOTS OF ANTI-CAPITALISM: ESSAYS ON HISTORY, CULTURE AND DIALECTICAL THOUGHT — by David Black, Studies in Marxism and Humanism Series, Lexington Books, hardcover, with subsequent paperback

THE COMPLETE WORKS OF ROSA LUXEMBURG, VOL. I: ECONOMIC WRITINGS 1, edited by Peter Hudis, Verso Books, paperback

MARX’S CONCEPT OF THE ALTERNATIVE TO CAPITALISM – by Peter Hudis
Historical Materialism Series, now in paperback with Haymarket Books

MARX ON GENDER AND THE FAMILY: A CRITICAL STUDY – by Heather Brown
Historical Materialism Series, now in paperback with Haymarket Books

THE DUNAYEVSKAYA-MARCUSE-FROMM CORRESPONDENCE, 1954-1978: DIALOGUES ON HEGEL, MARX, AND CRITICAL THEORY — edited by Kevin B. Anderson and Russell Rockwell, Lexington Books

We have also posted reviews of these and other of our books in a variety of journals, among them AGAINST THE CURRENT, POLITICAL STUDIES REVIEW, and MEDIATIONS.

THE INTERNATIONAL MARXIST-HUMANIST is the webzine of the INTERNATIONAL MARXIST-HUMANIST ORGANIZATION (IMHO): http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/
Contact: arise@internationalmarxisthumanist.org

We would love to hear your thoughts on our website or our organization, either through the “arise” email account above or as a comment in our (moderated) comments pages.

Follow us on Twitter (upper right on IMHO homepage) for immediate notice of new posts.

Join our new Facebook page: “International Marxist-Humanist Organization” https://www.facebook.com/groups/imhorg/

Althusser

Althusser

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

 

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

LOOKING FOR THE PROLETARIAT

Looking for the Proletariat : Socialisme ou Barbarie and the Problem of Worker Writing

By Stephen Hastings-King

Looking for the Proletariat is a contribution to understanding the implosion of the Marxist Imaginary. The implosion is staged in terms of the first English-language history of the French revolutionary group Socialisme ou Barbarie from 1949 to 1957. It explains why Socialisme ou Barbarie was the only Marxist organization interested by worker experience and how the group’s anti-Leninist position on organization led it to privilege first-person worker narratives in order to understand worker experience and its revolutionary possibilities. Using the only first-person accounts of working-class experience in French industry of the 1950s, the book explores the disintegration of collective investment in the Marxist Imaginary that unfolded at Renault’s Billancourt factory in the aftermath of the Hungarian Revolution and the contexts that shaped it.

See: http://www.brill.com/products/book/looking-proletariat

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-from-brills-historical-materialism-book-series-looking-for-the-proletariat-by-stephen-hastings-king

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Forest Gate Hotel

Forest Gate Hotel

FOREST ROOTS: 27the June 2014

Dear Forest Roots Folk

This month we have Paul Kerr and the Boneshakers. They will be playing vintage jazz and singing songs from the 1920s/30s so if you liked the music from ‘The Great Gatsby’, this is the band for you. The Boneshakers are Chris Haigh on fiddle, Andy Dewar on percussion, Bernard O’Neil on double bass and Stuart Curtis on sax.  Paul Kerr will be on guitar and singing: http://www.wholesomemusic.co.uk/wholesomemusic.co.uk/The_Boneshaker.html

This will be our last night before the summer and it would be really nice to see you all after such a long break. If you’d like to perform please get in touch. So that’s Paul Kerr and the Boneshakers on Friday, 27th June at the Forest Gate Hotel, 105 Godwin Road, Forest Gate, E7 0LW.

 

Starts at 8.30pm

BR Forest Gate, Wanstead Park; Busses: 86, 25, 330, 58, 308

If you would like to perform or for more information: forestroots@gmail.com

 

Stay forever young

Jenny and Caroline

 

PARISH NOTICES

Forest Gate Festival this saturday, 21st June in Osborne Road featuring all sorts of interesting stuff. Starts 11am

More information at: www.woodgrange.org.uk/forestgatefestival

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Strike!

Strike!

REVOLUTIONARY TEAMSTERS: THE MINNEAPOLIS TEAMSTERS STRIKE OF 1934

BRYAN PALMER

NOW AVAILABLE IN PAPERBACK FROM HAYMARKET BOOKS

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“Palmer’s superb micro-history of the Minneapolis General Strike provides readers with an unprecedented view of a Depression-era class struggle from the inside out. Revolutionary Teamsters offers invaluable ‘dancing lessons’ — still relevant today — for labor radicals and protest organizers.” — MIKE DAVIS, author of Ecology of Fear, Planet of Slums, and Buda’s Wagon

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Minneapolis in the early 1930s was anything but a union stronghold. An employers’ association known as the Citizens’ Alliance kept labor organizations in check, at the same time as it cultivated opposition to radicalism in all forms. This all changed in 1934. The year saw three strikes, violent picket-line confrontations, and tens of thousands of workers protesting in the streets.

Bryan D. Palmer tells the compelling story of how a handful of revolutionary Trotskyists, working in the largely non-union trucking sector, led the drive to organize the unorganized, to build one large industrial union. What emerges is a compelling narrative of class struggle, a reminder of what can indeed be accomplished, even in the worst of circumstances, with a principled and far-seeing leadership.

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PRAISE FOR REVOLUTIONARY TEAMSTERS

“A stirring study worthy of the epic struggles it describes. Palmer’s account situates the creativity, seriousness, and heroism of revolutionaries and rank-and-filers in an historical moment while trusting that they speak to our moment as well.”

—David R. Roediger, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and co-author of The Production of Difference

“Revolutionary Teamsters … is not only a fresh look at a critical set of historical events in the history of both the left and the labor movement, but also an invitation to engage in a creative reconsideration of the relationship between the past and the present. Like any really good historian, Palmer reveals himself to be more interested in the future than in the past.”

—Peter Rachleff, Macalester College, St. Paul, Minnesota

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BRYAN D. PALMER, Ph.D. (1977), SUNY-Binghamton, is Canada Research Chair in the Department of Canadian Studies, Trent University. His prize-winning monographs, edited collections, and articles on the history of labour and the Left, historiography and theory, have been translated and published in Greek, Korean, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, and other languages.

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ISBN: 9781608463794 / $28 / Paperback / 352 pages

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For more information or to buy the book visit: www.haymarketbooks.org

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/paperback-from-haymarket-books-revolutionary-teamsters-the-minneapolis-teamsters-strike-of-1934-by-bryan-palmer

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Books

Books

HOMELAND SECURITY, ITS LAW AND ITS STATE

By Christos Boukalas (Routledge 2014)

This book employs Marxist state theory (esp. Nicos Poulantzas and Bob Jessop) to assess US counterterrorism law and policy, and its impact on the US polity.

(More details: http://www.taylorandfrancis.com/books/details/9780415526319/)

This book assesses the impact of post-9/11 domestic counterterrorism policy on US political life. It examines political discourse, law, institutional architecture, and state-population relations, and shows that ‘homeland security’ is a project with wide-ranging implications for democratic institutions and culture. These implications are addressed through a novel approach that treats law and the state as social relations, and relates developments in law to those in the state and in social dynamics. On this basis, the book examines the new political representations in counterterrorism discourse, especially regarding the relation between the state and the population. It examines the form and content of counterterrorism law, the powers it provides, and the structure and functions it prescribes for the state.

By focusing on the new Department of Homeland Security and the restructuring of the intelligence apparatus, the book assesses the new, intelligence-led, policing model. Finally, it examines forms of popular support and resistance to homeland security, to discuss citizenship and state-population relations.

The author concludes that homeland security has turned the US into a hybrid polity; the legal and political institutions of democracy remain intact, but their content and practices become authoritarian and exclude the population from politics. These legal and political forms remain operative beyond counterterrorism, in the context of the present economic crisis. They are a permanent configuration of power.

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-from-routledge-homeland-security-its-law-and-its-state-by-christos-boukalas

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Crisis in Ukraine

Crisis in Ukraine

CRISES AND RESISTANCE IN CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

Debatte Conference

November 2014

Call for Papers

The year 2014 marks twenty-five years since the end of Communism in Central-Eastern Europe (CEE) and ten years after the enlargement of the European Union into the region. To mark this event Debatte: Journal of Contemporary Central and Eastern Europe is planning to hold a conference on 22-23 November at Warsaw University entitled ‘Crises and Resistance in Central and Eastern Europe’.

These anniversaries are significant landmarks in the history of Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) and the continent as a whole. However, even more importantly, they occur during a time of intense economic and political difficulties in Europe. The economic crisis has brought a prolonged economic downturn that has worsened the living standards of its populations and brought political uncertainty and instability. The crisis has hit CEE particularly hard, shaking the neo-liberal economic model that has dominated over the past quarter of a century, and s parking a wave of instability as well as resistance that has spread throughout the region. The most notable events have taken place in Ukraine from November 2013 onwards but we have also seen significant unrest in countries like Bulgaria, Romania, Slovenia and Bosnia-Herzegovina among others. On the other hand, in some countries such as Poland and the Baltic States neo-liberal commentators have claimed that a relatively strong economic recovery has taken place which shows the strength of the region’s economic model

It is in this context that we have planned this conference and invite anyone interested in participating to submit a paper or a proposal for a session. Debatte is a journal published by Taylor and Francis that seeks a radical critical analysis that is sympathetic to democratic, labour, feminist and ecologist movements in CEE.  In 2009 we organised a successful conference in London on the twentieth anniversary of the fall of Communism. We ho pe our 2014 event will provide a forum for bringing academics and activists together to discuss the current economic and political climate in the region, look at how progressive social and political movements are responding to it and map out alternatives to the neo-liberal order.

Among the areas that we plan to discuss at the conference are:

  • Economic crisis and alternatives
  • The role of social movements in the region
  • Gender and feminism
  • Historical politics
  • Migration, multi-culturalism and the struggle against racism and the far-right
  • The nature of left parties in the region
  • Ecology and the environment
  • Welfare and poverty
  • Education
  • Health
  • Ten years of European Union membership
  • The balance sheet of the transition from Communism
  • Culture
    The geo-political context of Central and Eastern Europe.

 

The conference will consist of two plenary sessions together with a series of workshops held in parallel. If you would like to propose a panel or offer a paper for a workshop then please contact debatteconference@yahoo.co.uk as soon as possible.

Proposals for panels and abstracts of proposed papers must be received by 1 July 2014. Abstracts should be 300 words or less. When sending an abstract or proposal please include an e-mail address for correspondence.

We plan to publish at least one special issue of Debatte based on papers presented at the conference. If you would like your paper to be considered for publication in the journal please submit a full draft by 1 October 2014

The languages of the conference will be English and Polish and we will be arranging translation between these two languages at the conference. Abstracts and papers should be submitted in one of these two languages.

We want the conference to be accessible to as many scholars and activists as possible from the region. The Rosa Luxemburg Foundation, which is supporting the conference, has provided funds to help with travel and accommodation costs specifically for those coming to the conference from Central and Eastern Europe (including Poland apart from Warsaw itself). These funds are limited and will be allocated on the basis of need. If you would like to apply for help with such costs then please do let us know at the address above.

Admission to the conference will be free but we will be asking those with institutional support to pay a fee of £80

Further information about the conference can be found on the Debatte web-site at http://explore.tandfonline.com/cfp/pgas/debatte-conference-cfp

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/call-for-papers-debatte-conference-on-crises-and-resistance-in-central-and-eastern-europe2019-warsaw-november-2014

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Black Rock

The Black Rock

PIRATES AND PRIVATEERS

Krisis: Journal of Contemporary Philosophy

**Call for Papers: Extended Deadline**

Krisis presents a special issue in December 2014 on Pirates and Privateers. Contributions may be up to 7000 words (including references). If you would like to contribute, please send us a proposal of about 500 words. Abstracts are due 29 June 2014, and will be send to info@krisis.eu. We will notify you before 1 July about acceptance of your proposal. The deadline for final contributions is 15 September.

 

Pirates & Privateers

When the King asked him what he meant by infesting the sea, the pirate defiantly replied: ‘The same as you do when you infest the whole world; but because I do it with a little ship I am called a robber, and because you do it with a great fleet, you are an emperor’ (St. Augustine)

We see these government agencies as among the most skilled players in this game (Eric Grosse, Google VP of security engineering)

The idea that in an ever globalising world the sovereignty and centrality of the nation state is declining is so well established that it has become a truism. Yet state agencies such as the NSA are in the process of reestablishing their grip on today’s network societies. So perhaps the proclaiming of the end of the state (not in terms of its national scope but as to the essence of its function) was premature. This raises the following questions: What is or will be the role of the state-function (national or international) in this globalised social-economic landscape? Will it be able to secure its de jure and de facto sovereignty by enforcing the distinction between pirates and privateers through law, i.e. by authorising neoliberal but restricting alternative appropriations of the commons? And is this state power a necessary condition for, or instead a limit to, the implementation of neoliberal principles? These questions are important because the distinction between pirate and privateer has substantial practical consequences in terms of the distribution of power.

Neoliberal privatisation – e.g. the exodus of financial capital from the welfare state system – is sanctioned by state. It is in the process of realising its particular solutions to the crises of the nation state, creating the conditions of its own legitimacy, in the form of gated communities, tax havens and special economic zones protected by private security firms. Seemingly bypassing state sovereignty, whilst simultaneously sanctioned by it, they are contemporary privateers.

Is this type of privatisation the destiny of this historical junction or are there alternatives? The institutionalised left does not seem to think so as it continues to defend the welfare system as a place of last resort against the powers of neoliberal globalisation. However, in the margins of the neoliberal project various different solutions are being experimented with. Insofar as these are not sanctioned by state, these are today’s pirates. Think of: torrent sites (The Pirate Bay comes to mind), hacker communities tied to international criminal syndicates, new local and digital currencies (Bristol Pound, Bitcoin, Litecoin), new forms of digital activism (Anonymous), counter-banking (OccupyBank, Timebank), anonymising networks (TOR’s Hidden Wiki and Silk Road), freestates and micronations (Principality of Sealand), eco-communities or hacker colonies (calafou.org) and alternative internets (GNUnet).

How can or should we think about and critically evaluate the distinction between privateers and pirates in political-philosophical terms? What is the utility, in this particular context, of the conceptual and normative schemas still operative in political philosophy today? If not a return to a Hobbesian state of nature, yet also short of being a Commonwealth; if not the emergence of a post-state, anarchist or libertarian utopia, nor a technologically updated 1984 in which the state function has become absolute; how to understand and conceptualise the ambiguous in-between?

Krisis welcomes interdisciplinary answers to such questions, and encourages approaches that engage political-philosophical reflections on issues of state sovereignty, law and justice, to the above mentioned case-studies (or others). We also invite speculative approaches to future scenarios: will the conflict between neoliberal and ‘alternative’ solutions take place in ever more deterritorialised, technocratic networks beyond state control? Will we witness the proliferation of large self-regulative parallel systems, of password-protected enclaves, local communication ecologies and gated communities? Will the state be reduced to ‘one of the players in this game’, or will strategic shifts in its constitution as an apparatus in conjunction with neoliberalism secure its function as a sovereign mediator?

**

The first issue of Krisis in 2014 is online, and we start off with a wide variety of articles, essays, letters and reviews. What does it mean that gender and race are socially constructed? And how are we to understand the reality of the social relations of oppression with which sexism and racism go hand in hand? In a dossier on Sally Haslanger’s important book Resisting Reality: Social Construction and Social Critique (2012) these and other related questions are discussed in the form of three critical commentaries by Titus Stahl, Arianna Betti and Mari Mikkola and an extensive reply by Haslanger herself.

In addition, this issue contains articles on the relation between science, politics and society by Huub Dijstelbloem, and on the possibilities and meanings of emancipation in Jacques Rancière’s political thought by Ruth Sonderegger. An essay by Daniël de Zeeuw looks back at the political theory and strategy of Occupy, and Jan-Willem Duyvendak and Merijn Oudenampsen enter into a discussion about the sociological significance of recent political and cultural changes in the Netherlands.

Last but not least, the book reviews of this issue cover recent publications on climate skepticism (in the review essay by Chunglin Kwa), migration (Rogier van Reekum discusses Mezzadra & Neilson’s Border as Method, 2013) Rancière’s aesthetics (Aukje van Rooden reviews his latest publication Aisthesis. Scenes from the aesthetic regime of art, 2013), and the practical role of standards (a review of Laurence Bush’ Standards. Recipes for reality, 2011, by Koen Beumer).

In order to keep the reading of this journal free of charge, we would appreciate your support.

 

Krisis: Journal for Contemporary Philosophy: http://www.krisis.eu/index_en.php

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk