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Monthly Archives: November 2015

imagesTRANSHUMANIST EDUCATION, POLITICS, AND DESIGN

Call for Papers

“Transhumanist Education, Politics, and Design”

Confero: Essays on Education, Philosophy and Politics

For this special issue on ‘Transhumanist Education, Politics, and Design’, we welcome contributions from scholars with various disciplinary backgrounds to debate transhumanistic issues in relation to education, politics, and design.

In the soon to come future, technological revolutions are likely to change future societies, bodies and minds in more far-reaching ways than ever before history.

Transhumanism can be described as ‘a new paradigm for thinking about humankind’s future’ (World Transhumanist Association). Transhumanism is a philosophy, a cultural movement and a growing field of study. More specifically, transhumanism is the belief in morphological freedom and the aspiration to enhance human abilities and attributes and thereby transcend human biological limits.

This special issue of Confero encourages contributions that approach and analyse transhumanism transhumanism in relation to education, politics, and design.

 

Topics suitable for this special issue could include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Transhumanism, corporeality and (un)learning
  • Transhumanism and disease(s)
  • Transhumanism and monstrosity
  • Transhumanism and citizenship
  • Transhumanism and surveillance
  • Transhumanism and cognitive science
  • Transhumanism and values (social, economical, ethical, juridical, environmental, moral, instrumental, utilitarian, hedonic etc.)
  • Transhumanism and intersectionality (e.g. race, sexuality, gender, ethnicity, able-bodied, crip)
  • Human enhancement, prosthesis and extension
  • Morphological freedom
  • Educating the transhuman
  • Queering transhumanism
  • Transhumanism and speed
  • Transhumanist design
  • Definitions, practices and consequences of transhumanism (e.g. bio-hacking and DIY citizenship)
  • A battle for/of the anthropocene? Posthumanism vs. transhumanism
  • Transhumanism as subversive power

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Notes for Contributors

We encourage authors to use the Oxford referencing system. To give the essay form and improve its readability, we ask that the essay has a clearly defined topic or theme that is laid out in the introduction of the piece. We also encourage the writer to divide the text into sections, using headings to promote its readability. Authors are encouraged to refrain from selfreferences. The text should be proofread before submission. The journal applies double-blind peer review. Authors will also be invited to review papers for this special issue. Guest editors for this special issue are Mattias Arvola (Linköping University), Lina Rahm (Linköping University), and Jörgen Skågeby (Stockholm university).

The editorial group can be reached at confero@liu.se. A first full draft of the essay should be sent toconfero@liu.se on or before 1 April 2016. The subject line of the submission should read “Submission for SI on transhumanism”.

For further information and instructions, please visit our homepage: http://www.confero.ep.liu.se

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

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images (8)AN ALTERNATIVE TO NEO-LIBERAL EDUCATION – VENUE CHANGE

NOW AT THE MAYDAY ROOMS

Apologies for the short notice but unfortunately it has been necessary to change the venue for the meeting on Saturday 28 November.  This will now be held in the MAYDAY ROOMS, 88 Fleet Street, London EC4Y 1DH, 2.00pm – 4.30pm. 

NEW ANARCHIST RESEARCH GROUP

JOINT MEETING WITH THE SOCIAL SCIENCE CENTRE (LINCOLN)

Saturday 28 November 2015

Mayday Rooms

88 Fleet Street

London, EC4Y 1DH

2.00pm – 4.30pm

The Social Science Centre (SSC) in Lincoln is a self-organised co-operative higher learning provider that is democratic at all levels of its organisation. The scholars who are members of the Centre work and study together whether they are traditionally students or teachers. One of the aims of the Centre is to analyse and dissolve the tensions in the relationships between research and teaching, and students and academics. Set up by academics from the University of Lincoln, the Centre has no relationship with the University, although it is a critique of the formal institution as a dysfunctional neoliberal arrangement in many ways. The SSC aims to ‘reinvent’ the University and transform the scholars’ relationship to knowledge in order to insert their own experiences into theoretical knowledges that aim to emancipate them as active change agents. The SSC engenders provocations, conversations and discussions that enliven the notion that all those who are involved in active knowledge work should become (co-) producers of knowledge. Two of the (student) scholars and an academic from Lincoln will be visiting the Anarchist Research Group to talk about the centre and their experiences studying there.

In this session, we would like to tell you a little about our experiences with the SSC and then invite a discussion on the SSC, self-organised education and the relationships between education, learning, and social change.
The Social Science Centre provides free public higher education in the city of Lincoln and emphasises the collective and collaborative nature of education. The Centre was opened in 2011 by academics and students and Lincoln residents who feel passionately that those wishing to study higher education should not have to take on the burden of debt. There is no fee to pay when joining the Centre, only what you can afford. Free also means freedom to study outside of the current disciplinary structures of higher education around topics and issues that are of direct concern to you and your local community.

Anarchist Research Group Website: http://torrianomeetinghouse.wordpress.com/where-we-are/ 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

 

Rosa Luxemburg

Rosa Luxemburg

SOCIALISM IN ASIA AND EUROPE

International Rosa Luxemburg Conference 2015

Seoul, Korea
“Socialism in Asia and Europe”

27-28 November 2015
Venue: Pittsburgh Hall, Sungkonghoe University, Seoul, Korea

Organizing Committee:
International Rosa Luxemburg Society
Institute for East Asian Studies, Sungkonghoe University, Korea
Institute for Social Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Korea

Sponsor: National Research Foundation of Korea
Language: English/Korean Spontaneous interpretation

For more detailed information: http://ieas21.or.kr/rosa2015/

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/international-rosa-luxemburg-conference-2015-in-seoul-korea

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

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LONDON MATERIALISMS READING GROUP MEETINGS

We are very pleased to announce an exciting series of events co-sponsored/co-organised by the Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster:

1) The next London Materialisms Reading Group meeting is:

Thursday 3 December 2015 – Nick Srnicek (co-author of the Verso manifesto Inventing the Future: Postcapitalism and a World Without Work) will be introducing Graham Harman’s Bruno Latour: Reassembling the Political

Future dates for your diary:

21. Thursday 21 January 2016 – Philip Cunliffe (University of Kent) will be introducing Alexander Wendt’s Quantum Mind and Social Science: Unifying Physical and Social Ontology

22. Thursday 25 February 2016 – introduction (tbc) we will be discussing Chapter 1 ‘Introduction: Rhizome’ of Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari’s A Thousand Plateaus

23. Thursday 31 March 2016 – Michiel van Ingen (University of Westminster) will be introducing Kate Soper’s What is Nature: Culture, Politics and the Non-Human

Reading group meetings are open to all and take place Thursdays 6.30-8.00pm, Westminster Forum, Department of Politics and International Relations, 5th Floor, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW (5 minutes from Oxford Circus tube). Wine and nibbles are provided.

 

If you wish to be on the Materialisms Reading Group mailing list please email me at d.chandler@wmin.ac.uk. Further information available here: http://www.davidchandler.org/materialisms/.

2) The next in the Living in the Anthropocene series of workshops is:

Decolonising the Anthropocene
Friday 27 November, 1-5pm, Westminster Forum, Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW (5 minutes walk from Oxford Circus tube station)

Convenors: Olivia Rutazimbwa (University of Portsmouth), Angela Last (Glasgow University), Kathryn Yusoff (Queen Mary)

Speakers and roundtable discussants: Patricia Noxolo (Birmingham), Robbie Shilliam (Queen Mary), Kathryn Yusoff (Queen Mary), Olivia Rutazibwa (Portsmouth), Angela Last (Glasgow).

The concept of the Anthropocene involves the rejection of one of modernity’s most important tenets: the nature/culture divide. Yet from a post-western perspective this can hardly be seen as a ground-breaking discovery. The colonial experience has for long evidenced the destructive nature of this divide while indigenous cosmologies, religious worldviews as well as other (non-western) philosophies have provided alternatives to the nature/culture divide and continue to do so. Does the holistic and relational understanding of reality entailed in the idea of the Anthropocene present an opportunity to rethink the sources of our knowledge production and work towards a more inclusive and sustainable use and distribution of the available planetary resources; or is the ‘discovery’ of the Anthropocene yet another stage of Eurocentric knowledge production?

Who sets the agenda, which voices and topics continue to be silenced and do they consolidate or dissipate existing inequalities? How much space is there for the ‘pluriversality’ Walter Mignolo calls for in the potentially totalising proclamation of the Anthropocene? What does the attention to complexity and non-linearity mean for post- and decolonial understandings and attachment to issues of agency, autonomy and self-determination? This workshop will examine these and other questions, both theoretically and empirically, to explore the merits and challenges of the Anthropocene to decoloniality and vice versa. Understood as a triple invitation to de-mythologise, de-silence and de-colonise, decoloniality combines both a deconstructive toolbox for critique at the epistemological level and a constructive imperative to counter the colonial (material) forms of extreme power inequality.

Information and registration here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/decolonising-the-anthropocene-tickets-19330332545 further information on the series: http://rethinkingtheanthropocene.blogspot.co.uk/

3) Call for papers, Centre for the Study of Democracy and Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment joint University of Westminster workshop:

Design After Planning: Examining the Shift from Epistemology to Topology https://designafterplanning.wordpress.com/

10.00 – 17:30, Friday 5 February 2016, University of Westminster, London

Confirmed keynote speakers:  Filip de Boeck (KU Leuven) & Erik Swyngedouw (University of Manchester)

The question of how different types of ‘planning’ should deal with uncertainty has taken on fresh importance. On the one hand, existential threats such as climate change, overpopulation, and new forms of global conflict expand the temporal and spatial horizons of our sense of responsibility as never before. On the other, the world is constructed increasingly as emergent, complex and non-linear; the ‘wicked’ problems it throws up are not amenable to modernist, top-down solutions. The intelligence required to tackle contemporary problems is understood to be dispersed and enacted, rather than a pre-given object to be gathered by the state. In Mol’s (2002) formulation, epistemological questions (‘how can we be sure?’) are increasingly usurped by pragmatic ones (‘how can we live with doubt?’).

In this embrace of uncertainty, concerns over the limitations of representational ‘modelling’ are being dislodged by an ideal of unmediated, dynamic problem-resolution whereby the ‘topologies’ of complex reality continually reveal themselves. In practical terms, this has entailed a shift towards iterative processes of dispersed governance; policy makers no longer attempt to impose order on a chaotic outside, but rather attempt to ‘see’ through the emergent systems themselves. Thus, goals of international developmental aid are no longer determined from the centre so much as coproduced in specific locations with the aid of the internet of things and the citizen as sensor; top-down planning of the built environment has given way to localised, discursive decision-making alongside an embrace of informality; the residual modernism of sustainable development is increasingly inflected with ‘resilience’.

If the broad project here is to work with emerging, complex systems, rather than against or in spite of them, might it then be productive to conceptualise the role of governing and city-making in terms of ‘design’ rather than planning?  If so, is there value in retheorising design so as more explicitly to capture contemporary interactive logics of emergent causality and agency?  Or, alternatively, does linear planning have a newly important role to play? Might it function as a type of normative resistance to the ‘market logic’ with which these new forms of governance are perhaps aligned?

We plan to include three panels on: • disaster and risk design – examining the rise of topological approaches to international aid and disaster relief, digital humanitarianism, crowd-sourcing and citizens as sensors • designing with emergent urban systems – exploring the potential for iterative and decentred modes of governance and urban design to overcome the shortcomings of liberal-modernist planning • resilience versus sustainability – investigating the theoretical and practical purchase of resilience and sustainability in relation to the ‘topologies’ of complex reality, and the problematic theoretical interface between the two concepts.

Submitting abstracts: We invite papers relating to any of the panels above, which contribute to a theorisation of spatial planning and urban, national, or international governance as processes of design, as well as those which question this endeavour. Speakers from all academic disciplines are welcome to participate (and there will be no registration fee).Please send your abstract (c.350 words) to: Isis Nunez Ferrera (i.nunez-ferrera@psi.org.uk), Tudor Vilcan (tudorvilcan@gmail.com), and Rob Cowley (robert.cowley@kcl.ac.uk) by 1 December 2015.

Best wishes,
David Chandler, Professor of International Relations, Director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW. Tel: ++44 (0)776 525 3073.
Journal Editor, Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/resi20

Amazon books page: http://www.amazon.co.uk/David-Chandler/e/B001HCXV7Y/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Personal website: http://www.davidchandler.org/
Twitter: @DavidCh27992090

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Stuart Hood

Stuart Hood

STUART HOOD (1915-2011)

CENTENARY DAY CONFERENCE

Open University in London and the South-East

1-11 Hawley Crescent

London NW1 8NP

(Near Camden Town tube on the Northern Line)

Saturday November 28

10.30 a.m. – 5.30 p.m.

We hope to provide coffee and tea and there will be a social space for discussion over lunch (not provided). There are takeway catering facilities nearby.

There is no conference fee.  But please register your attendance with Hilary Horrocks at: hilaryhorrocks@btinternet.com as the venue has a limited capacity.

*

Stuart Hood, born in small-town NE Scotland in 1915, volunteered for army service in 1940 and was captured in the North African desert while stationed in Cairo with British Intelligence. He was released from an Italian prisoner of war camp at the time of the Armistice in September 1943 and, during an almost-year-long journey to meet the Allied advance, fought with Tuscan partisans, participating in the now semi-mythologised Battle of Valibona (January 1944). His memoir Pebbles from My Skull (1963), often republished, mainly as Carlino, is a classic reflection on his time in war-torn Italy. He worked for 17 years at the BBC, resigning in frustration from the position of Controller of Programmes, Television, in 1963, having been responsible for programmes such as Z-Cars and That Was the Week That Was. He made important documentaries including The Trial of [Soviet dissidents] Daniel and Sinyavsky; and was briefly Professor of Media Studies at the Royal College until asked to resign following his support for student protests. He latterly taught at the University of Sussex. He was a distinguished translator, particularly from German (including the poems of his great friend, Erich Fried) and Italian (including work by Dario Fo and Pier Paolo Pasolini). Returning to an earlier career as a fiction writer, he published a series of novels – A Storm from Paradise (1985), The Upper Hand (1987), The Brutal Heart (1989), A Den of Foxes (1991), and The Book of Judith (1995) – which draw on his Scottish childhood, his wartime experiences and his encounters with, amongst others, members of the Baader-Meinhof group. He joined the Communist Party as a student in Edinburgh but after the war was an anti-Stalinist socialist and briefly, in the 1970s, a member of the Workers Revolutionary Party. Influenced by the class-conscious trade unionists he had met in his university days, he was, also in the 1970s, an active Vice-President of the film and TV technicians’ union, ACTT.

Provisional conference programme follows …

 

PROVISIONAL PROGRAMME (subject to amendment)

10.30 Arrival and Registration

10.45 Welcome, Terry Brotherstone and David Johnson

 

10.50-11.50 Session One

10.50 Showing of extracts from Stuart Hood’s documentary return to his childhood home, A View from Caterthun, with commentary by filmmakers Don Coutts and Christeen Winford.

11.20 Hilary Horrocks (freelance editor and independent researcher), ‘Stuart Hood, Partigiano – finding traces today in Emilio-Romagna and Tuscany’.

 

11.55-12.45 Session Two

11.55 Phil Cooke (University of Strathclyde), ‘The Italian Resistance: recent work on the historical context of Carlino’.

12.20 Karla Benske (Glasgow Caledonian University), ‘Showcasing the “compexity of human reactions”: an appreciation of Stuart Hood’s novels’.

 

12.45 Lunch

 

2.00-3.15 Session Three

2.00 Robert Lumley (University College, London), ‘Keeping Faith: revisiting interviews with Stuart Hood’.

2.25 Brian Winston (University of Lincoln) and Tony Garnett (film and TV director and producer), ‘Stuart Hood and the Media’.

3.15-3.30 Break

 

3.30-4.45 Session Four

3.30 David Johnson (Open University), ‘Stuart Hood, Scottish Literature and Scottish Nationalism’.

3.55 Haim Bresheeth (London School of Economics), ‘Working with Stuart on the Holocaust’.

4.20 Terry Brotherstone (University of Aberdeen) will lead a discussion on Stuart Hood’s politics, including his involvement in the 1970s with the Workers Revolutionary Party.

 

4.45-5.30 Session Five

4.45 Final reflections and future proposals.

5.15 Close.

5.30 Social gathering nearby.

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/stuart-hood-1915-2011-centenary-day-conference-28-november

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

clip_image008MAPPING ALTERNATIVE ROUTES OUT OF CAPITALISM

See below a call for panels and papers for a section in the European International Studies Association conference, Izmir, Turkey, 7-10 September 2016.

The section seeks panels and papers on alternatives to capitalism, and how we might achieve them, both within the capitalist present and on the route to a post-capitalist society.

The deadline for proposals is 8 January 2016 and must be done online through the EISA conference tool website – https://www.conftool.pro/paneuropean2016/

Please feel free to contact us first to discuss informally ahead of submitting proposals: David Bailey (d.j.bailey@bham.ac.uk) and Phoebe Moore (p.moore@mdx.ac.uk)

Section title: Mapping Alternative Routes Out of Capitalism

Section abstract: The critical study of global capitalism and the hegemony of neoliberalism are both central to the study of international relations and international political economy. International studies has focused less, however, on questioning how (if at all) we might go beyond capitalism. This is despite global capitalism remaining dangerously unstable, not least because the global economic crisis that began in 2008 continues to linger without any obvious resolution to it. The aim of this section, therefore, is to bring together those with an interest in the rise of alternatives at varied positions along the ideological spectrum; mapping, studying, theorising, highlighting, judging and assessing practices which form contemporary alternatives to, and problems for, global capitalism. This includes pathways in local, regional and global contexts.  In particular, we note two emerging types of response, each of which expose the ever-present possibility and presence of sometimes surprising and contradictory routes outside of capitalism, as well as raising the question of technology in contemporary social change. On the one hand, we see various modified projects seeking alternative routes to social justice and rights: futurist, anti-proprietary or gift culture movements, survivalism, cooperatives, DIY culture, permaculture, experimentation with cybernetics and post-humanist ideals, as well as revived institutional interests in wellbeing. On the other hand, we see the explicit contestation of capitalism through varyingly autonomous forms of struggle: Occupy, the indignados, the Greek grassroots projects, Rojava, and, then, the electoral manifestation of some of these trends within Syriza, Podemos, Barcelona en Comú, and Jeremy Corbyn.

 

Section convenors: David Bailey (d.j.bailey@bham.ac.uk) and Phoebe Moore (p.moore@mdx.ac.uk).

Submissions to be made here: https://www.conftool.pro/paneuropean2016/

Deadline for submissions: 8 January 2016

Conference website and more details: http://www.paneuropeanconference.org/2016/

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-alternatives-to-capitalism

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Forest Gate Hotel

Forest Gate Hotel

FOREST ROOTS: VENUE CHANGE – NOW AT THE FOREST GATE HOTEL!

Change of Venue: THE FOREST GATE HOTEL (Function Room)

Change of Start Time: Now starts at 8.00pm

 

 

Dear Forest Roots Folk

Thanks to everyone who turned up last month to see the amazing Acoustica. It was a great night and a real pleasure to see so many familiar faces.

This month we welcome back The Hot Strings Review featuring Martin Wheatley on guitar and ukulele and Mike Piggott www.mikepiggott.com on fiddle. They are both incredible musicians and gave us a fantastic evening last time they were at Forest Roots. If you saw them last time you will remember Martin’s mesmerizing performance of The Dambusters on the ukulele (check him out on YouTube) and Mike’s amazing jazz fiddle playing. These two are definitely not to be missed.

The Flats Family Band will be there as well as surprise guests and local performers. These include the Forest Voices Choir.

If you’d like to be one of them email us @ forestroots@googlemail.com.

So that’s The Hot Strings Review at Forest Roots, The Forest Gate Hotel. Godwin Road, Forest Gate, London E7 0LW

Friday 27th November.

Starts 8.00pm sharp – due to the number of performers, Forest Roots will now start at 8.00pm!

Transport: Bus – 86, 25, 330, 58, 308; Overground – Forest Gate (TfL Rail) and Wanstead Park

Stay forever young

Jenny and Caroline

Forest Root: Country, Folk, Blues and Beyond

 

NOTE: Victor Rikowski will be one of the performers. Ruth Rikowski will be singing with Forest Voices.

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Hegemony

Hegemony

THE END OF PROGRESSIVE HEGEMONY: REGRESSIVE TURN IN THE PASSIVE REVOLUTIONS OF LATIN AMERICA

Wednesday 2 December 2015

Evening Guest Lecture in the School of Politics and International Relations,

Queen Mary University of London

The End of Progressive Hegemony: Regressive Turn in the Passive Revolutions of Latin America

Massimo Modonesi, Professor of Sociology, UNAM, Mexico City

The experience of the so-called progressive governments in Latin America (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, Uruguay and Venezuela) seems to have entered an impasse that some authors have labelled the end of a cycle. Starting from their characterization as passive revolutions we can analyse the current processes of these governments according to a shared, defining feature: the relative loss of hegemony, that is to say of the capacity to construct cross-class consensus. This loss is traceable to a shift from a progressive profile to a more regressive one in these governments and their actions, perceptible as much in new equilibriums in their constituent blocs and social alliances, as in their public policy orientation and relationships to social movements. In the short term horizon, it does not appear that there will be an imminent break with the political-institutional order and a return of the Right, but  there is an observable conservative turn in the region ̵ 1; more perceptible in some countries (Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay, and Ecuador) than in others (Venezuela and Bolivia). On the other hand, alongside this emerging context of an offensive by the national and international Right within Latin America, there is also a clear reactivation of protest on the part of popular actors, organizations and movements; they are emphasizing their antagonistic profile once again, against the grain of the subordination they experienced during the progressive cycle of Latin American passive revolutions.

What: Lecture on the present state of progressive governments in Latin America, and the simultaneous reactivation of the Right and popular social movements of the Left.

When: Wednesday 2 December 2015, 18:00-20:00

Where: David Sizer Lecture Theatre (Francis Bancroft), Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Campus

Massimo Modonesi is a Professor of Sociology at the Autonomous National University of Mexico / Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) in Mexico City. He is an editor of arguably the most important sociological journal in Latin America, Observatorio social de América Latina (OSAL), and sits on the editorial board of the leading leftist magazine in Mexico, Memoria. Modonesi is also an authority on the political writings of Antonio Gramsci, and an expert in both contemporary Marxist theory and socio-political movements and the Left in twentieth and twenty-first century Latin America. He is the author of Subalternity, Antagonism, Autonomy (Pluto, 2013), as well as several influential books in Spanish.

Attendance is free of charge, but please register here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/massimo-modonesi-the-end-of-progressive-hegemony-tickets-19634320782

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/lecture-at-qmul-december-2-the-end-of-progressive-hegemony-regressive-turn-in-the-passive-revolutions-of-latin-america-massimo-modonesi

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism

AN ALTERNATIVE TO NEO-LIBERAL EDUCATION

NEW ANARCHIST RESEARCH GROUP

JOINT MEETING WITH THE SOCIAL SCIENCE CENTRE (LINCOLN)

Saturday 28 November 2015

2.00 pm – 4.30pm

The Torriano Meeting House

99 Torriano Ave

Kentish Town

LONDON, NW5 2RX

The Torriano Meeting House: https://torrianomeetinghouse.wordpress.com/

The Social Science Centre (SSC) in Lincoln is a self-organised co-operative higher learning provider that is democratic at all levels of its organisation. The scholars who are members of the Centre work and study together whether they are traditionally students or teachers. One of the aims of the Centre is to analyse and dissolve the tensions in the relationships between research and teaching, and students and academics. Set up by academics from the University of Lincoln, the Centre has no relationship with the University, although it is a critique of the formal institution as a dysfunctional neoliberal arrangement in many ways. The SSC aims to ‘reinvent’ the University and transform the scholars’ relationship to knowledge in order to insert their own experiences into theoretical knowledges that aim to emancipate them as active change agents. The SSC engenders provocations, conversations and discussions that enliven the notion that all those who are involved in active knowledge work should become (co-) producers of knowledge. Two of the (student) scholars and an academic from Lincoln will be visiting the Anarchist Research Group to talk about the centre and their experiences studying there.

In this session, we would like to tell you a little about our experiences with the SSC and then invite a discussion on the SSC, self-organised education and the relationships between education, learning, and social change.

The Social Science Centre provides free public higher education in the city of Lincoln and emphasises the collective and collaborative nature of education. The Centre was opened in 2011 by academics and students and Lincoln residents who feel passionately that those wishing to study higher education should not have to take on the burden of debt. There is no fee to pay when joining the Centre, only what you can afford. Free also means freedom to study outside of the current disciplinary structures of higher education around topics and issues that are of direct concern to you and your local community.

ANARCHIST RESEARCH GROUP: Our meetings are friendly and informal. They are usually held on the fourth Saturday each month, at the Torriano Meeting House in Kentish town, 99 Torriano Avenue, London NW5 2RX between 2.00pm and 4.30 pm
Directions: From Kentish Town tube station walk up Leighton Road, and turn left into Torriano Avenue.

We take a collection after each meeting to cover the cost of the venue.

Website: http://torrianomeetinghouse.wordpress.com/where-we-are/ 

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Dr. Glenn Rikowski

Dr. Glenn Rikowski

CRISES, COMMODITIES AND EDUCATION: DISRUPTIONS, ERUPTIONS, INTERRUPTIONS AND RUPTIONS

 

Glenn Rikowski

This is my first writing in over a year.

It is paper prepared for the ‘Research in Critical Education Studies’ (RiCES) Seminar that I will be speaking to tomorrow in the School of Education, University of Lincoln.

It is on Academia, at: http://www.academia.edu/18511424/Crises_Commodities_and_Education_Disruptions_Eruptions_Interruptions_and_Ruptions

 

CONTENTS:

Introduction

 

PART I

 

Preliminary Investigations

Marxism, Fragility and Crisis – John Holloway

Crisis

Crisis – and Janet Roitman

 

Two Theories of Education Crisis

The Classical Theory of Education Crisis – Crises in Education

Critique of the Classical Theory of Education Crisis

The Autogenous Theory of Education Crisis

 

 PART II

 

Social Forms, Commodities and Capitalist Education

Social Forms

Commodity Forms and Education

       

Crises in Labour Power Production

Primitive Socialisation

Crises of Labour-Power Production in Education As Crises for Capital

 

Crises in the Production of General Commodities in Education

Another Bundle of Commodities

 Crises in the Production of General Commodities in Education

 

Interlude: Four Forms of Crisis Recognition

Disruption

Eruption

Interruption

Ruption (Rupture)

Mergation

       

Crises of Labour-power Production and Education

Disruption

Eruption

Interruption

Ruption (Rupture)

 

Crises of Production of General Commodities in Education

Disruption

Eruption

Interruption

Ruption (Rupture)

 

Comparative and Relative Moments

Comparative Moments

The Relative Moment

 

Conclusion

 

References

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Ernesto Laclau

Ernesto Laclau

HEGEMONY, POPULISM AND EMANICIPATION: REMEMBERING ERNESTO LACLAU

Birkbeck College, University of London

Birkbeck Institute for Humanities

Malet Street

London WC1E 7HX

Friday, December 4th and Saturday, December 5th, 2915

This conference will celebrate the life and work of Ernesto Laclau, who died last year. Originally from Argentina, his ideas about radical democracy and populism influenced grassroots activists, thinkers and politicians from Latin America’s new left to Greece, Spain and Great Britain. His highly original essays and books “drew on the work of Antonio Gramsci to probe the assumptions of Marxism, and to illuminate the modern history of Latin America”, as Robin Blackburn wrote in his obituary, as well as Europe. As he says, “with collaborators including his wife, Chantal Mouffe, and the cultural theorist Stuart Hall, Laclau played a key role in reformulating Marxist theory in the light of the collapse of communism and failure of social democracy. His “post-Marxist” manifesto Hegemony and Socialist Strategy (1985), written with Mouffe, was translated into 30 languages, and sales ran into six figures.” Indeed, as Blackburn points out “Laclau believed that the European left had much to learn from Latin America, with its spirit of self-criticism and innovation. He argued that the left should not be embarrassed by charges of populism, whether directed at Chávez or at the Greek left wing party Syriza. It was crucial to distinguish between right wing populism masquerading wholesale privatization and scapegoating from left-wing programmes of “urbanisation” that introduce or defend social and economic justice combining self-government with the transformation of the relation between the state and the people at its base.

All sessions are 90 minutes. Presentations should be no longer than 30 minutes each.

 

Friday, December 4th

Embassy of Argentina 65 Brook Street, W1 K4AH

12.00-14.00:        Registration and Coffee,

14.00 -14.30:       Opening Comments

Ambassador Alicia Castro

Oscar Guardiola (Birkbeck Institute for Humanities)

14.30 – 16.00:

Oliver Marchart (Kunstakademie, Dusseldorf) Laclau’s Political Ontology

Nancy Fraser (New School) Thinking Antagonism: On the Political Contradictions of Financial Capital (BY SKYPE)

16.30 – 18.00

Letitia Sabsay (LSE) The Rhetorical Foundations of Society

Lasse Thomassen (Birkbeck) Hegemony and Socialist Strategy 30 years after: three research agendas

18.30:         Vin d´honneur

 

Saturday, December 5th,

Birkbeck Institute for Humanities

9.00: Coffee

9.30 – 11:00:

Jean-Claude Monod (CNRS) The part and the whole: metaphor and metonymy in the rhetorical construction of the People

Yannis Stavrakakis (Thessaloniki) Theorising populism in light of the Greek Financial Crisis

11:30-13:00:

Rada Iveković (Paris) Around the somewhat meditative rhetoric of Ernesto Laclau

Ricardo Camargo (Universidad de Chile) Articulation and Assault in Laclau’s Politics

13.00-14.00:        LUNCH

14.00-15.30:

Paula Biglieri (University of Buenos Aires) Populism and Emancipation

Mark Devenney (University of Brighton) The New Hegemony: Resisting Financial and Actuarial Capital

16.00-17.30:

Fabienne Brugère (Université Paris 8) Is Feminism Populism?

Jeremy Gilbert (Uni. of East London) What is a demand? The subject of politics in the later Laclau

17.30 – 18.00:     CLOSING COMMENTS

Website: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/events-calendar/celebrating-the-work-of-ernesto-laclau/

 

Ernesto Laclau

Ernesto Laclau

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

images (9)THE MAKING OF THE HUMANITIES V

CALL FOR PAPERS AND PANELS

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore

5–7 October 2016

The fifth conference on the history of the humanities, ‘The Making of the Humanities V’, will take place at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore (USA), from 5 till 7 October 2016.

Goal of the Making of the Humanities (MoH) Conferences

The MoH conferences are organized by the Society for the History of the Humanities and bring together scholars and historians interested in the history of a wide variety of disciplines, including archaeology, art history, historiography, linguistics, literary studies, musicology, philology, and media studies, tracing these fields from their earliest developments to the modern day.

We welcome panels and papers on any period or region. We are especially interested in work that transcends the history of specific humanities disciplines by comparing scholarly practices across disciplines and civilizations.

Please note that the Making of the Humanities conferences are not concerned with the history of art, the history of music or the history of literature, etc., but instead with the history of art history, the history of musicology, the history of literary studies, etc.

Structure of the Conference

MoH-V will feature three days of panel and paper sessions, next to three keynote speakers and a closing panel on the Status of the Humanities. A reception will take place on the first day in the magnificent Peabody Library, and a banquet on the second day. An overview of the previous conferences and resulting publications is on the Society’s homepage.

Keynote Speakers MoH-V

Karine Chemla (ERC project SAW, SPHERE, CNRS & U. Paris Diderot): “Writing the history of ancient mathematics in China and beyond in the 19th century: who? for whom?, and how?”

Anthony Grafton (Princeton U.): “Christianity and Philology: Blood Wedding?”

Sarah Kay (New York U.): “Inhuman Humanities and the Artes that Make up Medieval Song”

Abstract Submissions

Abstracts of single papers (25 minutes including discussion) should be in Word format and contain the name of the speaker, full contact address (including email address), the title and a summary of the paper of maximally to historyhumanities@gmail.com.

Deadline for abstracts: 30 April 2016

Notification of acceptance: End of June 2016

Panel Submissions

Panels last 1.5 hours and can consist of 3-4 papers including discussion and possibly a commentary. Panel proposals should be in Word format and contain respectively the name of the chair, the names of the speakers and commentator, full contact addresses (including email addresses), the title of the panel, a short (150 words) description of the panel’s content and for each paper an abstract of maximally 250 words. Panel proposals should be sent (in Word) to historyhumanities@gmail.com.

Deadline for panel proposals: 30 April 2016 Notification of acceptance: End of June 2016

Registration and Accommodation

Registration for the conference will be possible from April 2016. The conference fee will be kept as low as possible (the exact fee and information on student discount will be published in April 2016). Details about the conference fee and accommodation will also be posted in April 2016.

Organization and Support

Amsterdam Centre for Cultural Heritage and Identity

The Humanities Center, JHU

The Sheridan Libraries, JHU

Institute for Logic, Language and Computation

Huizinga Institute of Cultural History

MoH International Committee

Rens Bod (U. of Amsterdam), Christopher Celenza (JHU, Baltimore), Hent de Vries (JHU, Baltimore), Julia Kursell (U. of Amsterdam), Fenrong Liu (Tsinghua University), Jaap Maat (U. of Amsterdam), Helen Small (U. of Oxford), Thijs Weststeijn (U. of Amsterdam)

MoH Local Organizing Committee

Stephen Nichols (JHU), Hent de Vries (JHU), Christopher Celenza (JHU)

History of Humanities Journal

Selected conference papers will be published in the new journal History of Humanities. The first issue is due to appear in March 2016.

images (10)

History of Humanities Journal: http://www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/journals/journal/hoh.html

The Making of the Humanities Conferences: http://makingofthehumanities.blogspot.co.uk/

Society for the History of Humanities: http://www.historyofhumanities.org/2015/10/29/call-for-papers-and-panels-the-making-of-humanities-v/

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

images (2)