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Monthly Archives: July 2012

EduFactory

‘TO HAVE THE COURAGE OF UNCERTAINTY’: CULTURES OF PRECARITY

An International Conference

Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense, December 6-7, 2012

 

Key note speakers:

Judith Revel

Paolo Virno (tbc)

Giorgio Vasta

Maurizio Lazzerato (tbc)

 

Call for Papers

This international conference is the third and last in a cycle of conferences that started last year in Amsterdam, and continued at Chapel Hill (USA) in May 2012, and is part of the international research project Precarity and Post- autonomia: the Global Heritage, funded by NWO (The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research) which involves several Dutch universities (Universiteit Leiden/ Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Universiteit Utrecht) in collaboration with two North-American Universities (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill) and the University of Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense. The project aims at stimulating the debate on today’s developments in “autonomist” movements, born mainly from Italy’s workers movements during the Seventies, and to connect these currents with a broader reflection on the topic of precarity within globalized capitalism.

The title of the conference originates in a newspaper article by the young Sicilian writer Giorgio Vasta in which he unpacks the identikit of the new generations. Vasta feels that those born in the 1970s, the 1980s and the 1990s, have grown up with the perception of the ‘end of the present’ and of the present as the ‘end’. If this impossibility or incapacity of having a perspective is proper to today’s youth, then this, says Vasta, should become their stronghold: “Because if our connotation is uncertainty – alienation not as an anomaly but as a permanent experience of the real – in that case it becomes fundamental to not turn uncertainty into an alibi but to use it as a tool for knowledge. To have the courage of uncertainty” (La Repubblica, 6-10-2009).

This uncertainty mentioned by Vasta is synonymous with crisis, with a two-faced precarity that therefore becomes ambivalent and that is not longer recomposable into a dialectical object. On the one hand the condition of economic insecurity, caused by the traumatic consequences of so-called labour “flexibility” in globalized capitalism, reduces the subject to a (biopolitical) state of permanent precarity. On the other hand, however, the claim of an identity that is precarious and resistant at the same time, and which is located outside and against the capitalist system, would entail that there still exists a margin from which we can pronounce a cultural critique. If we move our attention towards the ‘creative industries’, these seem to have incorporated precarity as a mode of cultural production. If this is true, the question is to determine the margin of “relative heteronomy” acceptable to survive economically without sacrificing artistic liberty. This could be a way to consider initiatives such as the Coordination des intermittents et précaires d’Ile de France in France and the occupation of the Valle Theatre in Rome, supported by the Generation TQ, the movement of cognitive laborers between thirty-forty (http://www.generazionetq.org/). One may ask what type of autonomy is envisioned by the artists’ resistance against capitalism and if their confinement to an “autonomous” margin could lead, on the contrary, towards the depoliticization of the aesthetic of the avant- gardes? What does marginality mean if we start from a general precarization of public and private space? In the past decade, art institutions and academic contexts have become privileged spaces for conversations concerning both the (partly subversive) knowledge of the precarious, and a search for commons (in order to constitute the political). As for academic contexts, a reference can be made to EduFactory (http://www.edu-factory.org/wp/), a transnational collective that focuses on conflicts and transformation of the university.

Narratives of precarity express two components: that of an inquiry of and a charge against post-Fordist society, and that of the creation of a new kind of precarious ontology. The case-study of Italy seems particularly interesting because it offers the opportunity to analyze the palimpsest both of a history of long duration, transmitted by (post)autonomous workers movements and radical thought in 1970s Italy, and a recent history of social movements that starts from the (tragic) events of the G8 summit at Genoa (2001) – but many other countries and movements must be taken into account, from the first EuroMayDay parade (2001), to the Madrid-based feminist activist group “Precarias a la deriva” (2004), to the transnational indignados movement (2011, Spain) and to the Occupy movement.

The intention of the conference is thus to establish a link between transnational narratives of precarity – narrative in the broad sense of storytelling, including various representational and performative arts in prose and in poetry – and different types of cultural activism. The central question is whether such cultures of resistance, when embedded within art institutions or social movements, do not risk becoming expressions of containment policies, of strategies of ‘governmentality’ (Foucault) that conforms the precarious subject to the cultural logic of capitalism. If the absence of dialectics allows instead for a multidirectional relationship between object and subject, the question is whether this ambivalence of precariousness may become a new way of being that invites an artistic and political revisioning of cultural activism operating at the margins. Therefore the conference also questions whether the ways of creating narratives, and indeed forms of representation of precarity, undergo the same dynamics as the biopolitical subject. Language itself is put into a state of precariousness, and comes to war with itself.

 

Topics include but are not limited to:

            -­‐  Aesthetics of precarity in arts and in social movements

            -­‐  Forms of cultural activism

            -­‐  Cultural “events” of precarity

            -­‐  Precarity and memory

            -­‐  The luxury of precarity? Whose precarity?

            -­‐  The aesthetization of precarity

            -­‐  Precarity and new forms of cultural production (i.e. the ‘creative industries’)

            -­‐  Precarization as constituent power

            -­‐  Precarity and new forms of local, regional or global ethics of ‘relationality’

            -­‐  A ‘geo-aesthetics’ of precarity 

 

The languages of the conference are English, French, and Italian.

Abstracts of about 200 words together with a brief biography should be sent before 09/20/2012 to the following two Email addresses: scontari@u-paris10.fr / M.M.Jansen@uu.nl  

Acceptance of proposals will be communicated by 10/15/2012. 

Scientific Project and Organization: Silvia Contarini (Paris Ouest Nanterre) and Monica Jansen (UtrechtUniversity).

In collaboration with: Luca Marsi and Christophe Mileschi (Université Paris Ouest Nanterre); Judith Revel (Université Paris 1) NWO partners: Vincenzo Binetti (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor), Joost de Bloois (University of Amsterdam), Silvia Contarini (Université Paris Ouest, Nanterre La Défense), Frans-Willem Korsten (Leiden University/Erasmus University Rotterdam), Federico Luisetti (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill), Monica Jansen (Utrecht University).

Originally published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-to-have-the-courage-of-uncertainty.-cultures-of-precarity-nanterre-6-7-december-2012  

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

 

 

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The Spirit of Capital

RELIGION AND RADICALISM CONFERENCE

Second Call for Papers

University of Newcastle, 5-6 October 2012

Venue: The Lockup, former police station. We will meet in the prisoners’ exercise yard …

The Lockup Cultural Centre: http://www.thelockup.info/events-functions/

 

Since the ‘religions of the book’ centre on calls to personal and social transformation (Hebrew shuv, Greek metanoia, Arabic tawbah), they have given rise to repeated radical and revolutionary movements. This radicalism continues, even in the context of the privatized and individualist faith of the West, but also in Eastern contexts, such as the Taiping Rebellion in China. The political and legal definition of such an act is ‘treason’: conspiring to overthrow the ‘state’, whether the political state or the states of our social and individual lives.

Theology is also notorious for supporting the status quo (see Romans 13). Thus, theology is caught between political reaction and radicalism: the same theological system – whether Christian, Islamic or Jewish – can foster support of an oppressive status quo and yet undermine that state. Or, one theological system – notably some forms of Islam – may challenge the dominance of another, such as Christianity (see Qur’an 5:51).

This tension between religious reaction and radicalism, which takes place within and between theological traditions, is the focus of a two-day conference at the University of Newcastle, to be held on 5-6 October, 2012. It is part of the ‘Religion in Political Life’ project at the university. We will include speakers who bring new perspectives to this discussion, especially from Asia.

 

Topics include but are not limited to:

1. Permutations of theological treason in Christianity, Islam and Judaism.

2. Internal and systemic tensions between religious radicalism and conservatism.

3. Events when religion’s treasonable resources were deployed to overthrow the ‘state’.

4. Theological dimensions of Islamic-Western tension and misunderstanding.

 

The symposium will bring five international experts to Newcastle to present papers at the conference. The speakers are Zhang Shuangli (Fudan University, Shanghai), Geng Youzhuang (Renmin University, Beijing), Chin Kenpa (Chung Yuan Christian University, Zhongli, Taiwan), Ward Blanton (University of Glasgow) and James Crossley (University of Sheffield).

Please send paper proposals to me by 14 August.

There is no registration cost for the conference and food will be included, but you will need to get here and find a bed. Recommended accommodation includes The Grand Hotel, the Novocastrian and the great YHA, right by the beach.

Conference website: http://www.newcastle.edu.au/institute/humanities-research/programmes-of-research/ripl/religion-and-radicalism-conference.html

Originally published in ‘Historical Materialism News’: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/second-call-for-papers-theology-and-treason-conference-newcastle-5-6-october-2012  

 

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Capitalism IS Crisis

REMEMBERING THE IMPOSSIBLE TOMORROW: ITALIAN POLITICAL THOUGHT AND THE RECENT CRISIS IN CAPITALISM

Call for Papers
Remembering the Impossible Tomorrow: Italian Political Thought and the Recent Crisis in Capitalism
The British Society for Phenomenology 2013 Annual Conference
5th- 7th April, 2013
St Hilda’s College Oxford

During Marx’s time radical thought was formed from a convergence of three sources: German philosophy, English economics, and French politics. In the introduction to Radical Thought in Italy: A Potential Politics (1996) Michael Hardt argued that these tides had shifted, with radical movements drawing from French philosophy, US economics, and Italian politics. More recently, Matteo Pasquinelli has argued that ‘Italian theory’ has attained an academic hegemony comparable to that held by French philosophy in the 1980s.

But despite the proliferation of analysis and organizing drawing from and inspired by the history of autonomous politics in Italy, where are these voices today? In 2012, if you listened to the mainstream politicians and economic experts and no-one else, you would hardly know that there was any financial crisis in 2008. You might have a faint recollection that for a brief moment alternative voices were heard in the media, but now it as if nothing at all had happened. The waters that once had parted have now engulfed us again. It is the same voices articulating the same tired ideas as the whole of Europe slides into the nightmare of austerity, despite the fact they do not appear to have any relation to reality, and even those who speak them seem exhausted and worn out.

For some time now, many of us have noticed that there have been different voices, and they began speaking many years before 2008 warning us of an impending disaster. These voices were coming from Italy. Perhaps because of their own experience, the radical Italian thinkers never believed the logic of the market could solve its own problems or that life and capital were one and the same. Our hope is to draw from this history as well as listen to some of the new generation of Italian political thinkers, to share their ideas, offer an alternative diagnosis of the present, and perhaps even a suggestion of what different future might look like.

Confirmed Speakers:
Franco Barchiesi
Franco ‘Bifo’ Beradi
Federico Chicchi
Paolo Do
Silvia Federici
Dario Gentili

Please send an abstract of approx 500 words to Lars Iyer (lars.iyer@newcastle.ac.uk) by 24th September 2012.

The BSP conference does not have parallel sessions. As a consequence, there are only two places available for papers drawn from the Call for Papers.

 

**END**

 

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Negation

PRODUCTIVE NEGATION

“Productive Negation”: the inaugural issue of the Journal of Peer Production is now published

JPP: http://peerproduction.net/issues/issue-1/

The Journal of Peer Production scrutinises the contradictions of peer (collaborative) production. It is thus situated in between grassroots initiatives and discussions driven by practitioners and activists and the debates taking place in academia. The inaugural issue’s theme, “Productive Negation”, aims to interrogate the role of peer production as a “work of the negative”, that is to say as a critical force. As the traditional left is struggling to come up with an adequate response to the mounting crisis of the capitalist system, contributors propose a range of interpretations about the relationship between the profit-oriented capitalist mode of production and the commons-based and oriented mode of peer production. The Journal of Peer Production also strives to make a small contribution to the reforming of scientific publishing. Taking a cue from Wikipedia, the journal publishes original article submissions, reviewers’ reports, and signals indicating how reviewers perceive the revised article. Our ambition
is to make the process of peer reviewing papers more transparent and more effective.

The inaugural issue is coordinated by Mathieu O’Neil. It includes three research papers, four invited comments and three debate papers:

George Dafermos, Authority in Peer Production: The Emergence of Governance in the FreeBSD Project

Stefano De Paoli, Vincenzo D’Andrea and Maurizio Teli, Why Free Software Is Not the Antonym of Commercial Software: Two Case Studies from Corporate and Volunteer Based Projects

Francesca Musiani, Caring About the Plumbing: On the Importance of Architectures in Social Studies of (Peer-to-Peer) Technology

Michel Bauwens, From the Theory of Peer Production to the Production of Peer Production Theory

Jakob Rigi, Peer to Peer Production as the Alternative to Capitalism: A New Communist Horizon

Christian Siefkes, Beyond Digital Plenty: Building Blocks for Physical Peer Production

Jean Zin, Changing the System of Production

Stefan Meretz, Peer Production and Societal Transformation: Ten Patterns Developed by the Oekonux Project

Maurizio Teli, Peer Production and Societal Transformation: A Practice-Based Perspective

Toni Prug, A Note on Evaluation Processes for Social Phenomena with Ambitious Claims

 

Originally published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/productive-negation-the-inaugural-issue-of-the-journal-of-peer-production-now-available  

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

 

Education

IRELAND INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON EDUCATION – 2012

IICE 2012

CALL FOR PAPERS

***********************************************
Ireland International Conference on Education (IICE-2012)
October 29-31, 2012, Dublin, Ireland (http://www.iicedu.org)
***********************************************

The IICE is an international refereed conference dedicated to the advancement of the theory and practices in education. The IICE promotes collaborative excellence between academicians and professionals from Education.

The aim of IICE is to provide an opportunity for academicians and professionals from various educational fields with cross-disciplinary interests to bridge the knowledge gap, promote research esteem and the evolution of pedagogy. The IICE 2012 invites research papers that encompass conceptual analysis, design implementation and performance evaluation. All the accepted papers will appear in the proceedings and modified version of selected papers will be published in special issues peer reviewed journals.

The topics in IICE-2012 include but are not confined to the following areas:

*Academic Advising and Counselling
*Art Education
*Adult Education
*APD/Listening and Acoustics in Education Environment
*Business Education
*Counsellor Education
*Curriculum, Research and Development
*Competitive Skills
*Continuing Education
*Distance Education
*Early Childhood Education
*Educational Administration
*Educational Foundations
*Educational Psychology
*Educational Technology
*Education Policy and Leadership
*Elementary Education
*E-Learning
*E-Manufacturing
*ESL/TESL
*E-Society
*Geographical Education
*Geographic information systems
*Health Education
*Higher Education
*History
*Home Education
*Human Computer Interaction
*Human Resource Development
*Indigenous Education
*ICT Education
*Internet technologies
*Imaginative Education
*Kinesiology & Leisure Science
*K12
*Language Education
*Mathematics Education
*Mobile Applications
*Multi-Virtual Environment
*Music Education
*Pedagogy
*Physical Education (PE)
*Reading Education
*Writing Education
*Religion and Education Studies
*Research Assessment Exercise (RAE)
*Rural Education
*Science Education
*Secondary Education
*Second life Educators
*Social Studies Education
*Special Education
*Student Affairs
*Teacher Education
*Cross-disciplinary areas of Education
*Ubiquitous Computing
*Virtual Reality
*Wireless applications
*Other Areas of Education  

Paper Submission:
To submit a paper, please visit http://www.iicedu.org/Paper%20Submission.html

Important Dates:
*Research Paper, Student Paper, Case Study, Report Submission Date: September 01, 2012
*Extended Abstract (Work in Progress) Submission Date:  September 10, 2012
*Proposal for Workshops Submission Date: July 15, 2012
*Notification of Workshop Acceptance/Rejection: July 25, 2012
*Posters Proposal Submission Date: August 10, 2012
*Notification of Posters Acceptance/Rejection: August 15, 2012
*Notification of Extended Abstract (Work in Progress) Acceptance/Rejection: September 18, 2012
*Notification of Research Paper, Student Paper, Report Acceptance /Rejection: September 10, 2012
*Camera Ready Paper Due: September 30, 2012
*Early Bird Registration (Authors and Participants): May 30, 2012 – August 20, 2012
*Late Bird Registration Deadline (Authors and Participants): August 21, 2012 – October 10, 2012
*Conference Dates:  October 29-31, 2012

For further information please visit IICE-2012 at http://www.iicedu.org

**END**

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Infinity Pool – Bali

INFINITY AND IMMORTALITY – ADRIAN MOORE

Sunday Lecture – Infinity and Immortality

Conway Hall, Red Lion Square, London, WC1R 4RL

29 July 2012

11.00, £3 on the door / free to members of the South Place Ethical Society

 

Adrian Moore shall consider questions that arise in connection with the desirability or otherwise of immortality. In particular, he will address Bernard William’s argument that a never-ending life would eventually become tedious to the point of unendurability. Moore will suggest that there are two questions that need to be distinguished, even though they can easily appear to be equivalent. First, would immortality be preferable to mortality? And second, is death a bad thing? Distinguishing these questions helps us to understand better the force of Williams’ argument.

“I’ll be exploring fundamental questions about human mortality, beginning with the question of whether it would be preferable never to die” — Adrian Moore, New Statesman, p.38.

See: http://conwayhall.org.uk/talks-lectures

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

The Incident

REVIEW 31 – LATEST ARTICLES (JULY 2012)

Marika Lysandrou on Badiou’s ‘The Adventure of French Philosophy’:
http://review31.co.uk/article/view/49/a-double-critique

Dan Barrow on Geoff Dyer’s ‘Zona’:
http://review31.co.uk/article/view/48/the-last-word

Marc Farrant on Balibar’s ‘Politics and the Other Scene’:
http://review31.co.uk/article/view/47/border-country

Tom Snow reviews Mark Godfrey’s ‘Alighiero E Boetti’:
http://review31.co.uk/article/view/46/the-extrovert-and-the-introvert

Rosa Ainley on ‘The Architecture of Failure’:
http://review31.co.uk/article/view/45/future-past-tense

Sebastian Truskolowski on The Hipster Myth:
http://review31.co.uk/article/view/42/the-hipster-myth

Belinda Webb reviews ‘Letters to Hitler’:
http://review31.co.uk/article/view/43/dear-f%EF%BF%BDhrer

Robert Barry on ‘Turing’s Cathedral’:
http://review31.co.uk/article/view/44/one-dimensional-universe

 

About Review 31: http://review31.co.uk/about

Originally published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/latest-articles-from-review-31

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

 

 

Monsters

MONSTERS OF THE MARKET – BY DAVID McNALLY

Monsters of the Market: Zombies, Vampires, and Global Capitalism

http://www.haymarketbooks.org/pb/Monsters-of-the-Market

By David McNally

Drawing on folklore, literature and popular culture, this book links tales of monstrosity from England to recent vampire- and zombie-fables from sub-Saharan Africa, and it connects these to Marx’s persistent use of monster-metaphors in his descriptions of capitalism. Reading across these tales of the grotesque, McNally offers a novel account of the cultural economy of the global market-system.

Part of the Historical Materialism Book Series.

About the author
David McNally Ph.D (1983) is Professor of Political Science at York University, Toronto. He is the author of five previous books and has published widely on political economy, Marxism, and contemporary social justice movements.

Reviews

“This outstanding new work from David McNally is indispensable for serious monster fans and radicals both – and almost giddyingly so for those of us who are both.” —China Miéville, author of Embassytown

“McNally delivers a tour de force analysis of global capital from the upper registers of derivatives trading down to popular fables of African monsters … Monsters of the Market is one of the best books I’ve read in years and it will definitely stimulate thinking about the nature of globalization, the labor theory of value and the relationship between commodities and speculative objects, collective fantasy, and other nebulous problems confronting historical materialism in the future.” —Mark Worrell, Marx and Philosophy Review of Books
 

Originally published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-in-paperback-from-haymarket-monsters-of-the-market-by-david-mcnally

**END**

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Philosophy

RADICAL PHILOSOPHY – 174

Radical Philosophy 174, July/August 2012 OUT NOW

 

Articles

Peter Nyers, Moving Borders: The Politics of Dirt

Ackbar Abbas, Adorno and the Weather

Peter Osborne, Disguised as a Dog: Cynical Occupy?

Andrew McGettigan, The Privatization of Higher Education

Nicholas Ray, Jean Laplanche, 1924-2012

Nina Power and Erica Lagalisse on the Right to Protest

 

Reviews:

Matthew Charles on Benjamin’s Early Writings

Todd Cronan on Adorno and Horkheimer’s Towards a New Manifesto

Tom Bunyard on Stiegler’s The Decadeence of Industrial Democracies

James Ingram on Abensour’s Democracy Against the State

Jessica Schmidt on Posthuman International Relations

Christine Battersby on Alison Stone’s Feminism, Psychoanalysis and Maternal Subjectivity

Tamkin Hussain on Malabou’s Changing Difference

Douglas Spencer on The Political Unconscious of Architecture

Samantha Frost on Howie’s Between Feminism and Materialism

David Winters on Woessner’s Heidegger in America

Martijn Boven on Chris Danta’s Literature Suspends Death

 

Available £6 / $13 from all good booksellers, including Waterstones, Borders, Tate, LRB.

Selected content from RP174 free at www.radicalphilosophy.com

Subscribe online: http://www.radicalphilosophy.com

£30 for six issues (UK), £53 for twelve issues (UK)
Student offer: £24 for six issues (UK)

Current and back issues now available exclusively to all subscribers online. Including articles, from 1972-2011, by Alliez, Althusser, Badiou, Balibar, Berardi, Bhabha, Bourdieu, Buck-Morss, Butler, Canguilhem, Cassin, Caygill, Connolly, Critchley, Cusset, Didi-Huberman, Duttmann, Feyerabend, Foucault, Groys, Hallward, Harootunian, Haug, Horkheimer, Lacoue-Labarthe, Laplanche, Lazzarato, Le Doeuff, Macherey, Malabou, Negri, Osborne, Ranciere, Segal, Sloterdijk, Sohn-Rethel, Soper, Spivak, Stengers, Virilio, and many others.

Editorial Collective

http://www.radicalphilosophy.com

Originally published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/radical-philosophy-174-july-august-2012-out-now  

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Education Crisis

ANALYSES FROM THE ANTIPODES

Friday 7th September, 2012

SRHE, 73 Collier Street, London N1 9BE

11.30-4.30 (lunch served after the first presentation)

 

There is a perception among the continental European academic community that a single Anglo-Saxon intellectual world exists, united by a common language and culture. This seminar contributes towards putting that assumption to the test. Is Australasian research into higher education in fact distinct from that carried out in other Anglophone contexts? Do Australasian researchers bring to their work culturally- and geographically-influenced perspectives that elude or challenge their UK-based colleagues? To address these – and other – questions about ‘Antipodean’ analyses, the SRHE’s International Research and Researchers Network is pleased to host a seminar in which three Australasian-based academics talk about their current work, and UK-based Australian, Professor Susan Robertson from the University of Bristol, responds as discussant.

 

The rise and rise of higher education and research in East Asia, and some implications for comparative analysis

Professor Simon Marginson, University of Melbourne, Australia

Investment in research and development in East Asia and Singapore now exceeds that of the UK and Europe. The rate of growth in science is astonishing, and many ‘World class universities’ have emerged. East Asian developments (and potential developments in other geo-spatial regions) suggest that the universal templates for comparative education need to be rethought. Global modernisation is associated with convergent political economies that are nonetheless articulated through distinctive political-cultural configurations. This presentation will address these, and other, related, issues.

 

Research into doctoral pedagogy, practice and process-towards-product

Dr Susan Carter, Centre for Academic Development, University of Auckland, New Zealand

Research on doctoral pedagogy focuses on a range of intriguing aspects: personal experience; institutional policy and rhetoric; pedagogy; and product. In this presentation, Dr Carter critiques the changing nature of the social negotiations that the doctorate makes. Her perspective on the social and personal representation of the thesis is generic: she shows the tensions between the generic requirements for a thesis, the discipline/epistemological demands, and the authorial desire for an authentic voice.

 

Do we want to overcome the failure of feedback? New analyses for new times

Professor David Boud, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia

Criticism by students about feedback has long dominated student surveys. Poor perceptions of feedback have generated many simplistic exhortations and prescriptions. Less visibly, research literature now offers increasingly well-founded advice about what might be done to improve feedback in courses. The problem, though, is that this research points not to incremental change but to challenges to cherished assumptions about what HE teachers do. This presentation will address what are these new ways of thinking about feedback, and what implications they have for how HE teaching and learning is organised.

 

Event booking details

To reserve a place at this seminar please register at: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/, or telephone +44 (0) 207 427 2350.  

SRHE events are open to all and free to SRHE members as part of their membership package. The delegate fee for non-members is £25 up until 31 July and £45 from 1 August. Non-members wishing to join the Society may do so at the time of registration and the delegate fee will be waived. Please note that places must be booked in advance and that a £45 fee for non-attendance will be charged if a place has been reserved but no notice of cancellation/non-attendance has been given in advance.

 

Yours sincerely

Francois Smit

SRHE Event Manager

Society for Research into Higher Education

73 Collier Street

London N1 9BE

Telephone 0207 427 2350

Fax number 0207 278 1135

srheoffice@srhe.ac.uk

http://www.srhe.ac.uk

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Work

WORKING USA: THE JOURNAL OF LABOR AND SOCIETY (June 2012)

Working USA: The Journal of Labor and Society

June 2012

Volume 15, Issue 2

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/wusa.2012.15.issue-2/issuetoc

The Changing Shape of Unions and Working Class Organizations: Lessons from North America and Europe (pages 149–151)

Immanuel Ness

ROBERT J. ALEXANDER’S U.S. LEFT-WING INTERVIEW COLLECTION AND ARCHAEOLOGY OF DISSIDENT COMMUNISM (pages 153–175)

Victor G. Devinatz

A RENEGADE UNION: ORGANIZING IN THE SERVICE AND DISTRIBUTIVE INDUSTRIES, SOME LESSONS FROM THE PAST (pages 177–195)

Lisa Phillips

THE CHICAGO COURIERS UNION, 2003–2010: A CASE STUDY IN SOLIDARITY UNIONISM (pages 197–215)

Colin Bossen

WHY WE NEED A SURVEY OF UNIONS (pages 217–232)

Jack Fiorito and Gregor Gall

GERMANY AND IRELAND UNEMPLOYMENT COMPARED, OR WHY GERMANY PROFITED FROM THE WORLD ECONOMIC CRISIS (pages 233–265)

Ralf Jeremias

LABOR UNIONS IN CONTEMPORARY RUSSIA: AN ASSESSMENT OF CONTRASTING FORMS OF ORGANIZATION AND REPRESENTATION (pages 267–283)

Irina Olimpieva

JUDGING WORK: WHAT LAW SEES OR DOES NOT SEE (pages 285–296)

Ellen Dannin

Commentary and Review Essays

WHO IS THE UNION? TWO STUDIES IN LABOR PATRIOTISM AND SHOP-FLOOR DISSENT (pages 297–303)

Steve Early

“THE SKY IS FALLING!” (pages 305–308)

Steve Leberstein

Book Reviews

Wisconsin Uprising: Labor Fights Back – Edited by Michael D. Yates (pages 309–313)

Fernando Gapasin

With God on Our Side: The Struggle for Workers Rights in a Catholic Hospital – By Adam D. Reich (pages 313–315)

Samantha Winslow

Play, Creativity and Social Movements – By Benjamin Shepard (pages 315–318)

Heather Gautney

Policing Sexuality: Sex, Society and the State – By Julian C. H. Lee (pages 319–320)

Harri Sutherland-Kay

Power, Freedom, Compassion: Transformations for a Better World – By Richard Winter (pages 320–322)

John Green

Originally published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/announcing-summer-2012-issue-of-wusa-the-journal-of-labor-and-society  

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Crisis

THE FINANCIALIZED IMAGINATION AND BEYOND

Call for Papers—The Financialized Imagination and Beyond
Special issue of TOPIA: Canadian Journal of Cultural Studies, Fall 2013
Proposals due: September 14, 2012

Link to PDF version of the CFP: http://t.co/xcuw44bq

Edited by Max Haiven (New York University/Nova Scotia College of Art and Design University) and Jody Berland (York University)

Narrowly defined as the so-called “FIRE” industries (high finance, insurance and real estate), finance has gained tremendous power over the global economy in recent years. Critics describe “financialization” as a profound and far-reaching social and cultural shift. Advances in financial modelling, computing and communications technology have changed the nature and power of financial speculation, but the vast expansion of new forms of debt, credit and everyday financial services have also had dramatic impacts on daily life. From credit cards to sub-prime mortgages, from student debt to the privatization of pensions, from pay-day loans to online stock trading, financial practices have become mainstream cultural issues. Films, biographies, novels, television shows and web-texts about finance and financiers (lionized or demonized) are more popular than ever. Logics of finance inform and shape public policy and social institutions, from hospitals and schools to science and cultural production, with “risk management,” “return on investment,” and “market efficiency” as key weapons of the neoliberal lexicon. Driven in part by immaterial, speculative, leveraged wealth, capitalism normalizes precarious labour and life in both material and immaterial forms, and each of us is expected to manage our risk portfolios and embrace a life of endless speculation. While the politics of debt, predatory lending and speculative capital have long shaped geopolitical realities, especially in the developing world, the unapologetic “age of austerity” threatens a new intensity of inequality and exploitation, with dramatic human and ecological consequences.

Facing continuous global financial crises and new social movements emerging to contest this “age of austerity,” cultural studies has important questions to ask about the financialized imagination. How is “finance” represented in fiction, film, journalism and art? How is finance itself a form of “representation” as well as a cultural phenomenon driven by beliefs, narratives and technologies? How do representational technologies contribute to the production of wealth? How do we explain the charisma of the speculator, the valorization of “risk management” and the fetishization of “financial literacy” under hyper-neoliberalism? What are finance’s effects on cultural production and the political economy of culture? How is the rise of digitized financial power related to the global play of material and immaterial economics, labour and culture? How is financialization connected to and expressed through race, class, gender, sexuality, colonialism, imperialism and ablism? What are the geopolitical and affective consequences of financialization? How do we historicize and “periodize” financialization, and what is at stake in analyzing what Marx called “fictitious capital”? What are the effects of financialization on everyday culture? How is debt linked to politics of precarity, disposability or borders? Are there ecologies of financialization? How does finance’s tremendous power to commodify potential futures as present-day “risk” affect how we imagine the future? What are the contours and limits of the “financialized imagination”? Have we moved from a society of the spectacle to a society of speculation? What lies beyond?

Social movements such as the Occupy movement and, more broadly, anti-austerity struggles from Athens to Chile, Nigeria to India, Korea to Montreal have been waging cultural struggles over the meaning of debt, the uses and abuses of banking, and the nature of economic power. Critical films, fiction, blogs and other genres seek to probe finance, financialization and the financial crisis, with varying degrees of success.

TOPIA invites contributors to propose academic articles, shorter “offerings,” reviews and review essays for a special issue on the “financialized imagination and beyond.” Themes and topics include (but are not limited to):

 

*Cultural representations of finance, financialization, financiers and the financial crisis in and across media

* The cultural politics of debt and credit in everyday life: government spending, ecological debt and debt as a paradigm of social discipline

* Finance as representation of space, time, knowledge, culture, materiality or immateriality

* Calculation and the new common sense: the fate of futurity, the cultural idiom of speculation and the practices of “risk management”

* Finance capital(ism) and the politics and economics of cultural production: the financing of culture

*The cultural politics of crisis

*The interplay of oppressions (gender, sexuality, race, class, ability, citizenship) and finance, from racialized predatory sub-prime lending to women-focused microcredit schemes, from the “Wall Street Man” to the legacies of debt-bondage and slavery

* The roots and legacies of colonialism and imperialism in finance (and vice versa)

* The financialization of daily life and social institutions

* The cultural and affective dimensions of finance, financial labour and financial speculation: how are cultures of speculation built and reproduced? What does financial wealth represent? What kinds of affects and sensations are produced by wealth through speculation, display, or loss?

* Tension and interplay between material and immaterial capital, labour and culture, money and power

* Historical precedents and patterns of finance and financialization: narrating events from Tulip Mania to the collapse of the Asian Tigers; from the speculative value of enslaved Africans to the predatory sub-prime mortgage industry that thrived on inner-city poverty 

* Struggles against finance, financialization and austerity, and their spaces, strategies, narratives, potentials and limits

* Horizons beyond the crisis
Prospective authors should submit a 300-word proposal, accompanied by a brief biographical note, to the editors by September 14, 2012. Selected authors will be invited to prepare articles by February 15, 2013, with publication dependent on the peer-review process. The issue will be published in Fall 2013.

More information can be found at TOPIA’s website, http://www.yorku.ca/topia.

Please direct proposals and queries to Max Haiven at maxhaiven@nyu.edu, and to Jody Berland at jberland@yorku.ca.

Originally published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/call-for-papers-the-financialized-imagination-and-beyond  

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com