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Gilles Deleuze

Gilles Deleuze

GILLES DELEUZE AND FELIX GUATTARI: REFRAINS OF FREEDOM

SUBMIT YOUR PAPERS!

Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari: Refrains of Freedom,” an international conference to be held in Athens, is now accepting submissions.

Deadline for submissions is November 1, 2014.

 

Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari: Refrains of Freedom

International Conference,
24-26 April, 2015, Panteion University, Athens, Greece.

 

We invite abstracts for papers and panel discussions on all aspects of Deleuze and Guattari’s work, and we particularly welcome contributions attempting to elucidate the meaning of Deleuze and Guattari’s claim that “pluralism equals monism” as well as its significance for a number of issues central to their writings:

* What are the implications of this claim for ontology, epistemology, ethics, politics, language and the arts?

* Given that Deleuze is talking about absolute difference (A differs from itself) rather than comparative differenc (A differs from B), can we still speak of subjects and objects and transformative change?

* Deleuze and Guattari’s philosophy of difference in the face of multiculturalism, identity politics and cultural traditions.

* Between the fixity of cultural traditions and their nihilist rejection.

* Forcefields and extended spaces.

* Repetition as the maker of difference.

* “Autrement qu’ être/Autrement qu’ autre.”

* Memory, heterogeneity, the friend, the one thousand tiny sexes.

* Schizoanalysis.

* “Pluralism equals monism” and literature.

* “Pluralism equals monism” and the arts (visual arts, music, cinema, theater, dance, new and multi-disciplinary art forms, art-science-technology and society in a technological age).

* Pluralism equals monism” and the people to come.

 

Abstracts of papers and panels can be written in English, French or Greek, and must not exceed 500 words.

Submissions can be in .doc, .docx, .rtf or .pdf format and must include title, author’s name, institutional affiliation and contact information. The reading available for paper presentations is 30 minutes.

Panel abstracts must include a brief description of the panel as a whole and summaries of the individual papers. They must also include the title of the panel, the titles of the papers, the names of the participants, institutional affiliations and contact information. The length of the panel must not exceed 120 minutes (discussion included). Submissions will be made through the Easy Chair webside, which requires that the person submitting an abstract should create a simple account with Easy Chair.

 

Instructions on how to use the programme may be found by visiting:
http://www.easychair.org/

Submission deadline: November 1, 2014.

Νοtification of decision: January 15, 2015.<

For further information, please, see the conference website:

http://deleuzeandguattariathens2015.blogspot.gr/p/about.html or contact Constantin Boundas (cboundas@trentu.ca), Iannis Zannos (zannos@gmail.com) or Dana Papachristou (ntaniela@gmail.com).

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

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Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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Marx's Grave

Marx’s Grave

BUDDHISM AND RADICAL THEORY

Dear All

This new journal The Arrow: A Journal of Wakeful Society, Culture, and Politics may interest you.

It is a site on inquiry at the intersection of Buddhism, meditation, critical theory, and social change.

Articles in the inaugural issue by Michaele Ferguson, Adam Lobel, and myself put thinkers like Foucault, Marx, Deleuze, and Arendt into conversation with contemplative practices of the self and the social.

Give the journal a gander: http://www.arrow-journal.org/

———————-

James K. Rowe
Assistant Professor
School of Environmental Studies
University of Victoria
Coast Salish Territory
Office – Turpin Building, Rm B224
Phone – 250.853-3574
Email – jkrowe@uvic.ca

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Herbert Marcuse

Herbert Marcuse

CRITICAL THEORY BEYOND NEGATIVITY: THE ETHICS, POLITICS AND AESTHETICS OF AFFIRMATION

Summer School Utrecht

Call for Applications

18.08.2014 – 22.08.2014

Course Director: Professor Rosi Braidotti

 

The intensive course “Critical Theory Beyond Negativity: the Ethics, Politics and Aesthetics of Affirmation” explores critical theory in the Continental philosophy tradition, with special reference to the work of Gilles Deleuze, Luce Irigaray, Henri Bergson and Rosi Braidotti. The course offers an introduction to contemporary critical debates on the function of ‘the negative’ in the construction of subjects and of their epistemic and ethical values. Starting from an assumption that we are in the midst a ‘posthuman turn,’ it explores different aspects of posthuman subjectivity and stresses the productive potential of the posthuman condition, advocating for the politics of affirmation.

This is an intensive course convened and taught by Prof. Rosi Braidotti and an interdisciplinary team of co-teachers including Dr. Iris v.d. Tuin and Maria Hlavajova. It consists of keynote lectures in the morning and three thematic tutorials for four afternoons (the class ends at noon on Friday). The theme of the course this year is: “Critical Theory Beyond Negativity: the Ethics, Politics and Aesthetics of Affirmation.” The course is about contemporary critical theory in the Continental philosophy tradition, with special reference to the work of Gilles Deleuze, Luce Irigaray, Henri Bergson and Rosi Braidotti. The course offers an introduction to contemporary critical debates on the function of ‘the negative’ in the construction of subjects and of their epistemic and ethical values.

The starting assumption is that we are in the midst a ‘posthuman turn’ which both calls for and paves the way for affirmative politics. Cultural diversity, global migration, digital ‘second life’, genetically modified food, advanced prosthetics, robotics and reproductive technologies are familiar facets of our global and technologically mediated societies. How do they affect the self-understanding, the cultural representations and the social and political participations of contemporary subjects? How does a neo-Spinozist approach based on vitalist materialism illuminate these issues? The emphasis on Deleuzian nomadic theory aims to outline a project of sustainable modern subjectivity and to offer an original and powerful alternative for scholars working in cultural and social criticism. Arranged thematically, the sessions of the course explore the different aspects of critical theory debates about contemporary subjectivity: the function of the negative and the need for more affirmative praxis; embodiment, gender and racial differences, multi-cultural and post-secular citizenship, issues linked to globalization, network societies, contemporary art and techno-science. The course stresses the productive potential of these features of our culture and it promotes the politics of affirmation, which emphasize the importance of affects and the imagination. It establishes a theoretical framework that combines critique and creation, granting a major role to the arts and new media. By inscribing affirmative posthuman subjects in the context of contemporary culture, the course also assesses the extent to which intense technological mediation and global networks have blurred the traditional distinction between the human and its others, both human and non-human others, thus exposing the non-naturalistic structure of the human subject.

The course analyzes the escalating effects of the posthuman condition, which encompass new relationships to animals and other species and ultimately questions the sustainability of our planet as a whole. After delving into the inhumane and structurally unjust aspects of our culture by looking at new wars and contemporary conflicts, the course concludes by outlining new forms of cosmopolitan nomadic citizenship and new art practices that explore this complexity. Rather than perceiving the posthuman situation as a loss of cognitive and moral self-mastery, this course argues that it helps us make sense of our flexible nomadic identities. The challenge for critical theory today consists in seizing the opportunities for new social bonding and community building, while pursuing sustainability and empowerment.

Adorno

Adorno

COURSE LEADER

Prof. Rosi Braidotti

 

LECTURERS

Rosi Braidotti (B.A. Hons. Australian National University, 1978; PhD Cum Laude, Université de Paris, Panthéon- Sorbonne, 1981; Senior Fulbright Scholar, 1994; Honorary Degree ‘Philosophiae Doctrix Honoris Causa’, University of Helsinki, 2007; Knight in the Order of the Netherlands Lion, 2005; Honorary Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities, 2009) is Distinguished University Professor and founding Director of the Centre for the Humanities at Utrecht University. Her books include Patterns of Dissonance, Polity Press, 1991; Nomadic Subjects, Columbia University Press, 1994 and 2011a (second ed.); Metamorphoses, Polity Press, 2002; Transpositions, Polity Press, 2006; La philosophie, lá où on ne l’attend pas, Larousse, 2009; Nomadic Theory. The Portable Rosi Braidotti, Columbia University Press, 2011b and The Posthuman, Polity Press, 2013. Since 2009 she is a board member of CHCI (Consortium of Humanities Centres and Institutes). For more information please check http://www.rosibraidotti.com

Iris van der Tuin is Assistant Professor of Gender Studies and Philosophy of Science in the Graduate Gender Programme of Utrecht University, the Netherlands. A leading researcher in the next generation of feminist philosophers, she has edited Doing Gender in Media, Art and Culture (Routledge, 2009) with Rosemarie Buikema, and wrote New Materialism: Interviews & Cartographies (Open Humanities Press, 2012) with Rick Dolphijn. Her work on new feminist materialism has appeared in Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, Australian Feminist Studies, European Journal of Women’s Studies, and Women’s Studies International Forum. She is currently holding the prestigious post-doctoral fellowship of The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) and has spent a semester as a visiting fellow in the Department of the History of Science at Harvard University in the US. For more information please check http://www.uu.nl/gw/medewerkers/IvanderTuin

Maria Hlavajova is founding artistic director of BAK, basis voor actuele kunst, Utrecht, the Netherlands since 2000. She is also currently leading the project FORMER WEST (2008–2014), which she initiated and developed as a research, education, publication, and exhibition undertaking, realized through an international collaborative effort involving a dense network of researchers and art institutions. In 2011 Hlavajova organized the project of the Roma Pavilion in the framework of the 54th Venice Biennale entitled Call the Witness, and in 2007 she curated the three-part project Citizens and Subjects, the Dutch contribution to the 52nd Venice Biennale, which included a new video installation by Aernout Mik in the Dutch Pavilion, a critical reader (Citizens and Subjects: The Netherlands, for example, co-edited with Rosi Braidotti and Charles Esche), and a series of lectures, workshops, residencies, and master classes (Citizens and Subjects: Practices and Debates). Hlavajova has organized numerous exhibitions and projects at BAK including: Lawrence Weiner: Dicht Bij, 2010; Sanja Iveković: Urgent Matters, 2009 (a two-part exhibition at BAK and the Van Abbemuseum); The Return of Religion and Other Myths, 2008–2009; and many others. Hlavajova lives and works in Amsterdam and Utrecht. For more information please check http://www.formerwest.org/Team/MariaHlavajova

Gilles Deleuze

Gilles Deleuze

 

TARGET GROUP

This interdisciplinary course is aimed at research-minded advanced master and PhD students with a critical and curious intellectual disposition. A strong background in at least one of the following disciplines is required: critical theory, Continental philosophy, gender studies, media and technology studies, social and political theory, postcolonial and race studies, cultural studies.

COURSE AIM

To provide an introduction to contemporary critical theory in the Continental philosophy tradition through the exploration of debates about contemporary subjectivity, globalization and power, and the politics of affirmation.

STUDY LOAD

Students will be required to prepare thoroughly before the course by studying the reading material and preparing discussion questions. The one-week course will consist of lectures in the mornings and tutorials in the afternoon, except for the last day of the course (the class on the last day will end at noon).

FEE

• € 500 – Course + course materials + housing

• € 300 – Course + course materials

REGISTRATION

http://www.utrechtsummerschool.nl/courses/culture/critical-theory-beyond-negativity-the-ethics-politics-and-aesthetics-of-affirmation

REGISTRATION DEADLINE

1 June 2014

MORE INFORMATION

Goda Klumbyte, Personal Assistant to Prof. Rosi Braidotti Achter de Dom 20, 3512 JP Utrecht, The Netherlands

E: BraidottiAssistant.gw@uu.nl P: +31 30 253 5537

http://www.rosibraidotti.com

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Gilles Deleuze

Gilles Deleuze

CINEMATICITY: CITY AND CINEMA AFTER DELEUZE

Call for Papers: Cinematicity: City and Cinema after Deleuze

Organizers: David B. Clarke, Marcus A. Doel, Richard G. Smith

This session of the Royal Society of Geographers & Institute of British Geographers Annual International Conference 2014, focuses on the ‘co-production’ of filmic and urban space. That term, as it features in the conference theme, relates to knowledge – proposing that ‘new encounters are disrupting conceptions of where knowledge resides.’ Engaging Deleuze’s discussions of cinema, this session questions the framing of co-production in terms of dwelling. The reciprocal presupposition of cinema and city would seem, rather, to embody a sense of becoming. Thus, Deleuze’s conceptions of the cinemas of the movement-image and time-image recall Lewis Mumford’s claim that, ‘In the city, time becomes visible.’ How does cinema think the city, and vice-versa, to generate new, transformative senses of cinematicity? Contributions exploring the connections between cinematic and urban space are invited, potentially including work on early cinema and living pictures; considerations of specific cities, films or genres; conceptions of city and cinema as spiritual automata; and a multiplicity of other creative conceptualizations of cinematicity.

Please send abstracts of no more than 200 words by 14th February to: d.b.clarke@swansea.ac.uk

Annual International Conference 2014: http://www.rgs.org/WhatsOn/ConferencesAndSeminars/Annual+International+Conference/Annual+international+conference.htm

Contact:
David B. Clarke
Centre for Urban Theory
Department of Geography
Swansea University
Swansea SA2 8PP, UK
Tel. +44(0)1792 602317
E-mail: d.b.clarke@swansea.ac.uk

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Feminism

Feminism

FEMINIST CRITICAL ANALYSIS

Please find below the Call for Applications for the upcoming Feminist Critical Analysis course, which will take place in Dubrovnik(Croatia) from May 28 to June 1. Note that the extended deadline is April 28, but we urge you to apply as soon as possible.

We would also like to draw your attention to the stipends offered to doctoral/PhD students by the Inter-University Center in Dubrovnik. You can find more information here: http://www.iuc.hr/hesp-osi.php  

Sincerely yours,
Center for Gender Studies Jove Ilića 165 11000 Belgrade

———————————

Feminist Critical Analysis
Inter-University Center (IUC), Dubrovnik
May 28th to June 1st, 2012

The Center for Gender and Politics of the Belgrade University (Political Science Department), Women’s and Gender Studies at Rutgers of the State University of New Jersey, and the Department of Gender Studies of the Central European University (CEU) in Budapest are pleased to announce the next annual postgraduate course in

Feminist Critical Analysis: Science, Bodies and the New Materialism

The course will be held at the Inter-University Centre, Dubrovnik (www.iuc.hr) from May 28 to June 1 (2012).

The course is co-directed by Dasa Duhacek, Center for Gender and Politics, University of Belgrade, Ethel Brooks, Women’s and Gender Studies Department, Rutgers University and Anna Loutfi, Gender Studies Department, Central European University (CEU).

The course is built on the intellectual dialogue among a diverse body of scholars from different geographical locations and the participating faculty is drawn from different universities.

Topic

The seminar invites discussion of a key issue currently bringing together disciplines from across the humanities, social, physical and life sciences: the nature of materiality. What are the significant philosophical and theoretical contributions to materialism – past and present? Why does it become necessary for political or social theory to engage with particular ideas of materialism or materiality at certain historical junctures? What does it mean to speak of the social, cultural, political and historical meanings of natural or material concepts? How might the ‘natural sciences’ incorporate social theories of ontology and agency, and how might the ‘social sciences’ incorporate issues around materiality as they surface in, say, neurobiology or physics? How can knowledge help situate and make sense of embodiment and lived experience? We encourage explorations of ecological frameworks that challenge reductionist, mechanistic, and exclusively molecular approaches to life and living systems. We encourage reading and debate around the work of contemporary thinkers in the fields of biopolitics who interrogate ‘the politics of life itself’ (e.g. Giorgio Agamben). We also invite discussion around the work of ‘the new materialists’. This is a rich field that takes on a wide range of modern philosophical traditions. These include, but are not confined to, ‘vitalistic’ theories (e.g.Henri Bergson, Gilles Deleuze), neo-Marxian materialisms (Bourdieu, Balibar), phenomenological accounts of agency and materiality (Merleau-Ponty, Heidegger), theories of psychic power as a materialist force in the world (Nietzsche, Freud), feminist re-engagements with materiality, lived experience and biology (Moira Gatens, Elizabeth Wilson, Coole and Frost, Elizabeth Grosz), as well as social scientific investigations of problems in the neurosciences, such as the problem of consciousness or the mind-brain relation (Fernando Vidal).

ELIGIBILITY

IUC courses are conducted at a postgraduate level. All postgraduate students interested in the topic may apply for participation. Participants should seek funds from their own institutions to cover travel and accommodation costs. Limited financial support is available for participants from Central and Eastern Europe. All meetings are conducted in English.

APPLICATION PROCEDURE

A short narrative (up to 250 words) explaining your interest in the topic and your C.V. with your current complete contact information should be submitted by e-mail;

Final deadline for applications is April 28, 2012

Please send your applications to the Center for Gender and Politics University of Belgrade, Faculty of Political Sciences, at studijeroda@fpn.bg.ac.rs with Dubrovnik 2012 in the subject heading.

 

**END**

 

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Turbulence

SEMINAR ON POLITICAL ORGANIZATION

University of Essex March 12th

Essex Centre for Work, Organization and Society Seminar

Lessons of 2011: Three Theses on Political Organization
Rodrigo Nunes, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande Do Sul
March 12th, 4PM-6PM @ University of Essex Room 5N.7.23

With the Arab Spring, the Spanish indignados, Occupy and so much more, 2011 is likely to go down in history as a very special year – perhaps even the beginning of something. But what would that something be? This presentation attempts to draw some conclusions about the present state and future of politics and organization by examining the practices of the movements that erupted in the last year. Thinking beyond their usual representation by the media, trying to avoid either describing them as something entirely new and unheard of or as manifestations of an ultimately non-political culture, what can be the lessons of 2011?

Bio: Rodrigo Nunes is a post-doctoral fellow at (Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande Do Sul, Brazil), with a PNPD/CAPES grant. He has a PhD in philosophy from Goldsmiths College, University of London, and is a member of the editorial collective of Turbulence (http://www.turbulence.org.uk). His writing, on philosophy, art and politics, has appeared in such publications as Radical Philosophy, Deleuze Studies, Transform, Mute, ephemera, The Guardian, Z and others.

Stevphen Shukaitis
Autonomedia Editorial Collective
http://www.autonomedia.org
http://www.minorcompositions.info

“Autonomy is not a fixed, essential state. Like gender, autonomy is created through its performance, by doing/becoming; it is a political practice. To become autonomous is to refuse authoritarian and compulsory cultures of separation and hierarchy through embodied practices of welcoming difference… Becoming autonomous is a political position for it thwarts the exclusions of proprietary knowledge and jealous hoarding of resources, and replaces the social and economic hierarchies on which these depend with a politics of skill exchange, welcome, and collaboration. Freely sharing these with others creates a common wealth of knowledge and power that subverts the domination and hegemony of the master’s rule.” – subRosa Collective

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Gilles Deleuze

TRANSDISCIPLINARY TEXTS
‘Dialectic of Enlightenment’ and ‘Capitalism and Schizophenia’
22–23 March 2012
The Cinema, The French Institute, 17 Queensberry Place, London SW7

DAY 1 (22 March) 

Anti-systematic Systematicity: Negative Anthropology and Dual Authorship in Horkheimer and Adorno’s ‘Dialectic of Enlightenment’

9.30–10.00  Registration
10.00–10.15   Introduction: Peter Osborne (CRMEP)
10.15–11.00  ‘Adorno and the Weather: Critical Theory in an Era  of Climate Change’, Ackbar Abbas (University of California, Irvine)
11.00–11.45  Discussion
11.30–11.45  Break
11.45–12.30  ‘Why Do the Sirens Sing?’ Collaborating, Configuring and Categorizing with Dialectic of Enlightenment’, Nancy S. Love (Appalachian State University, Boone, NC)
12.30–13.00  Discussion

DAY 2 (23 March) 

Transversality: Experimentation and Dual Authorship in Deleuze & Guattari’s ‘Capitalism and Schizophenia’

9.30–10.00  Registration
10.00–10.15   Introduction: Éric Alliez (CRMEP/University of Paris 8)
10.15–11.00   ‘Deleuze and Guattari: Capitalism and Sovereign Freedom’, Dorothea Olkowski (University of Colorado)
11.00–11.45  Discussion
11.30–11.45  Break
11.45–12.30  ‘Is the Collective Assemblage of Enunciation Humanly Possible?’ Stéphane Nadaud (Hôpital de Ville-Évrard, Seine-Saint-Denis)
12.30–13.00   Discussion

The talks are free, but registration is essential, at: http://transdisciplinaritytexts.eventbrite.com/

Organized by the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) Kingston University London, as part of their AHRC research project, ‘Transdisciplinarity and the Humanities: Problems, Methods, Histories, Concepts’ –  Workshop 2: Case Studies 1

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Gilles Deleuze

DELEUZE AND GUATTARI AND OCCUPY

Saturday 25th Feb 2-5pm

Occupy LSX / School of Ideas
Featherstone Rd
Islington
EC1Y 8RX

An afternoon of talks, about the relevance of Deleuze and Guattari’s ideas to Occupy. 

Deleuze and Guattari’s writings are considered, by political activists, philosophers, artists and writers to provide the most insightful analysis of the crisis we face today.  It is claimed that the rhizomic, nomadic and creative nature of Occupy is inherently DeleuzeoGuattarian. This afternoon of talks tests these claims and asks; does Deleuze and Guattari’s conceptual apparatus scythe right through to the heart of capitalist production: do they provide vitalist, non-paranoid, (entirely pragmatic) systems of thought around which both a world can be torn down and a new one built? 

How it feels to be free: becoming-together with Deleuze & Guattari  
Jeremy Gilbert, Reader at the University of East London.

Minor Politics, Activism, and Occupy 
Nick Thoburn, Lecturer in Sociology: University of Manchester.

Worldwide, Occupy will not publish a solidified list of aims or a manifesto, preferring to speak of a thousand struggles, a thousand acts of resistance spoken though thousands of voices. Is this the same as Deleuze and Guattari’s A Thousand Plateaus? 
Andrew Conio, Senior Lecturer University of Wolverhampton, Associate Lecturer Chelsea School of Art.

Further information contact A.Conio@wlv.ac.uk 

The School of Ideas: http://schoolofideas.org.uk/ 

**END**

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

SURVIVING ECONOMIC CRISES THROUGH EDUCATION – BY DAVID R. COLE

David R. Cole (ed.)

Surviving Economic Crises through Education

New York, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Frankfurt am Main, Oxford, Wien, 2012. 288 pp.

Global Studies in Education. Vol. 11

General Editors: Michael Peters, Cameron McCarthy, Athlone C. (Tina) Besley and Fazal Rizvi

Print: ISBN 978-1-4331-1478-6 pb.

SFR 35.00 / €* 26.20 / €** 27.00 / € 24.50 / £ 22.00 / US$ 36.95

Order online: http://www.peterlang.com

This book comes at a time of increasing anxiety about the repercussions of financial instability and the probability of widespread market volatility. The educators and researchers whose work is collected here have considered these factors deeply when constructing their responses to prevailing financial conditions. These views guide the reader through economic crises as a mode of survival and as a means to deploying education at its most meaningful and intense. The approach aligns practice with theory and takes the empirical evidence from these studies as a means to determining the economic influence on education. This book will be a valuable asset for teachers and professors, as well as an excellent textbook for undergraduate and graduate classrooms.

Contents:

Stephen J. Ball: Foreword. Crisis and Attentiveness – David R. Cole: Introduction to Surviving Economic Crises through Education – Michael A. Peters: ‘Knowledge Economy’, Economic Crisis and Cognitive Capitalism: Public Education and the Promise of Open Science – Jim Crowther/Mae Shaw: Education for Resilience and Resistance in the ‘Big Society’ – Mike Cole: Capitalist Crisis and Fascism: Issues for Educational Practice – Gustavo E. Fischman/Victor H. Diaz: Teach for WhatAmerica? Beginning Teachers’ Reflections about Their Professional Choices and the Economic Crisis – Patrick Carmichael/Kate Litherland: Transversality and Innovation: Prospects for Technology-Enhanced Learning in Times of Crisis – Silvina Gvirtz/Ana Laura Barudi: When the Sun Does not Shine after the Rain: The Effects of the 2001 Crisis on the Education System of Argentina – Ana Inés Heras: Struggle for Agency in Contemporary Argentinean Schools – Silvia Grinberg/Eduardo Langer: Education and Governmentality in Degraded Urban Territories: From the Sedimented to the Experience of the Actual – David R. Cole: Doing Work as a Reflection of the Other: Notes on the Educational Materialism of Deleuze and Guattari – Robert Haworth/Abraham P. DeLeon: The Crisis of Mutative Capitalism: Holey Spaces, Creative Struggle and Educative Innovations – Torill Strand: The Current Dynamics of Professional Expertise: The Movable Ethos, Pathos, and Logos of Four Norwegian Professions – R. Scott Webster: Educating the Person for Democratic Participation – Jason J. Wallin: Remachining Educational Desire: Bankrupting Freire’s Banking Model of Education in an Age of Schizo-Capitalism – Marcus Bussey: Afterword. When No Crisis Is the Real Crisis! The Endless Vertigo of Capitalist Education.

The Author:

David R. Cole received his PhD in education from the University ofWarwick. He is an Associate Professor in English and pedagogy at the University of Western Sydney. David has edited three books (two with Darren Pullen) and has published a novel. His latest monograph is Educational Life-Forms: Deleuzian Teaching and Learning Practice.

Reviews:

“At last, we have a book that not only attempts to chart the crucial relationship between education and the crisis of economics, but one that explores critically and insightfully what that crisis may tell us about how to proceed in both opening up new understandings of pedagogy, education, politics, and charting a notion of hope that is as militant as it is realistic. We live at a crucial time, when the ethos of surviving has replaced the possibility of imagining a decent life and the promises of a real democracy. The discourse of surviving for the authors in this book does not suggest a retreat into cynicism or a life stripped of possibility. On the contrary, it suggests a new beginning, a new sense of struggle, and a new sense of hope. ‘Surviving Economic Crises through Education’ puts education back into politics, and in doing so puts politics back on a footing that makes individual and collective struggle possible again.” (Henry Giroux, Global Television Network Chair, English and Cultural Studies,McMasterUniversity)

“The recent huge hiccup of capitalism (‘global financial crisis’) and its continuing gurgles of pain have profound implications for education, teacher training, and the role of knowledge for human betterment (given that claims to knowledge and expertise were no protection from the cataclysm itself). This collection shows us why this is so, framing an imperative for rethinking education as a process of self-knowing and empowerment in a period of enormous economic and ontological insecurity. David R. Cole has brought together a significant set of theorists whose empirical evidence flows through to insights and indications of what is to be done. One hopes, as some of the authors propose, it is the very depth of the crisis that may force the shedding of the most deeply entrenched (mis)beliefs about education, enabling thereby a new if wobbly space for innovation and growth.” (Andrew Jakubowicz, Professor of Sociology, Director of the Institute of Cultural Diversity, University of Technology,Sydney)

“In times of economic crisis politicians often present their policies by claiming that ‘there is no alternative.’ This book unmasks such claims by providing critical readings of the politics of contemporary crisis talk and by presenting a range of generative educational responses that provide real alternatives for educational thought and action. This is a timely and inspiring collection that affirms the crucial role of education in the struggle for democracy in uncertain times.” (Gert Biesta, Professor of Education and Director of Research, School of Education & Laboratory for Educational Theory,Universityof Stirling)

“This book represents a kaleidoscope of views on the roles of education in a world rapidly changing since the 2008 financial crisis and the collapse of the Western world economies. Ideas mushroom from each chapter challenging the role of education in a capitalist society. A mustread for those from various disciplines who care about education.” (Arnaud Chevalier, Senior Lecturer in Economics, Royal Holloway,UniversityofLondon)

**END**

 

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a new song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Educational Life-Forms - David R. Cole

EDUCATIONAL LIFE-FORMS – DAVID R. COLE

Manchester Metropolitan University Human Sciences Seminar

13 October, 17:00 – 20:00

Location: Room 303 Sandra Burslem Building

Lower Ormond Street, Manchester, M15 6HB

 

Educational Life-forms: Deleuzian Teaching and Learning Practice

David R Cole (UTS, Australia)

 

This presentation takes the philosophy of Gilles Deleuze and applies it to educational practice. To understand how and why to do this, David R Cole puts forward the notion of educational life-forms, which are moving concepts based on Deleuzian principles. This talk depends on and through the construction of the philosophy of life in education.

The life-forms that come about due to the philosophy of life in education rest on epiphanies, the virtual and affect. The speaker looks to infuse educational practice with the philosophy of life, though not through simple affirmation or a construction of counter metaphysics to representation in education.

This talk uses Deleuze for practical purposes and sets out to help academics, teachers and students to think otherwise about the current praxis of education.

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski: https://rikowski.wordpress.com

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Baruch Spinoza

BEYOND SPINOZA

Beyond Spinoza invite proposals for 30 minute presentations which trace or explore the presence of Early Modern philosophical concepts in contemporary philosophy and psychoanalysic theory. These could include, but are not limited to:

Spinoza and French philosophy (Badiou, Deleuze), Spinoza and psychoanalysis (Freud, Lacan), Spinoza and politics (Balibar, Macherey), Spinoza and self-transformation (Foucault, Lacan), Spinoza and schizoanalysis (Guattari, Deleuze), Leibniz and French philosophy (Deleuze, Gueroult), Leibniz and contemporary art, Leibniz and maths.

Beyond Spinoza is a collective of London-based postgraduate students who wish to enrich and deepen their understanding and enjoyment of contemporary philosophy by exploring its historical and conceptual roots.

The series will run once a week, for three consecutive weeks, at Goldsmiths College in July 2011. Each session will comprise two 30 minute presentations followed by discussion and drinks. The series will be followed later in the year by a publication of revised papers.

Please submit proposals of around 300 words to beyondspinoza@gmail.com on or before the 1st June 2011

***END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Ghosts

ON HAUNTOLOGY \ CAPITALIST REALISM – TWO TALKS BY MARK FISHER

THE COLLOQUIUM FOR UNPOPULAR CULTURE AND NYU’S ASIAN/ PACIFIC/ AMERICAN STUDIES PROGRAM present:

TWO TALKS BY MARK FISHER

What are grey vampires and how do they retard the insurrectionary potential of digital  discourse?  How does Derrida’s notion of hauntology contribute to an understanding of dubstep artist Burial?  Is ‘Basic Instinct 2’, routinely derided as a cine-atrocity, a Lacanian reworking of Ballard, Baudrillard and Bataille in service of the creation of a ‘phantasmatic, cybergothic London’?  What is interpassivity and in what ways has it come to define the corporatized incarceration of modern academia?

Over the last decade, Mark Fisher has established a reputation as one of the exhilarating cultural theorists in Britain.  A co-founder of the Cybernetic Culture Research Unit (CCRU) at Warwick University ­and described by Simon Reynolds as the academic equivalent of Apocalypse Now’s Colonel Kurtz ­ he brings together psychoanalysis, political analysis and speculative fiction to create an extraordinary body of rogue scholarship, a theory-rush with few parallels.

Fisher is the author of ‘Capitalist Realism’, the editor of ‘The Resistible Demise of Michael Jackson’ (both Zer0 Books, 2009), and writes regularly for Sight and Sound, Film Quarterly, The Wire and Frieze, as well as maintaining a well-known blog at http://k-punk.abstractdynamics.org.  He teaches at the University of East London, Goldsmiths, University of London, and the City Literary Institute.

The Colloquium for Unpopular Culture and NYU’s Asian/ Pacific/ American Studies program are pleased to be hosting Fisher’s first talks inAmerica.

See ‘ The Metaphysics of Crackle’, at: http://pontone.pl/pontones-special-guest-mix-k-punk-the-metaphysics-of-crackle/

***

MARK FISHER, THESE ARE NON-TIMES AS WELL AS NON-PLACES: REFLECTIONS ON HAUNTOLOGY
 
WHEN: Wednesday 4 May 2011, 6:30pm
WHERE: Room 471, 20 Cooper Square [East 5th and Bowery]
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

”Through their generic and transient qualities ­ workstations devoid of personal effects, relations with colleagues as fleeting as those with passengers on a commuter journey ­ many workplaces now resemble non-places, either literally, as in the case of a hotel, corporate coffee chain or out-of-town supermarket, or symbolically, in the form of temporary assignments for faceless employers (dis)located in anonymous buildings, where the worker-commuter then follows the same global timetables, navigates the same software applications and experiences the same sense of placelessness, the feeling of being mere data in the mainframe.”

So writes Ivor Southwood in his analysis of precarious labour, ‘Non-Stop Inertia’ (2011). In the last decade, the proliferation of corporate non-places has been accompanied by the spread of cyberspace-time, or Itime, a distributed or unpunctuated temporality. It’s no coincidence that, as this unmarked time increasingly came to dominate cultural and psychic space, Derrida’s concept hauntology (re)emerged as the name for a paradoxical zeitgeist.  In ‘Specters of Marx’, Derrida argued that the hauntological was characterised by ‘a time out of joint’, and this broken time has been expressed in cultural objects that return to a wounded or distorted version of the past in flight from a waning sense of the present. Sometimes accused of nostalgia, the most powerful examples of hauntological culture actually show that nostalgia is no longer possible.

In conditions where pastiche has become normalised, the question has to be: nostalgia compared to what? James Bridle has recently argued that ‘the opposite of hauntology … [is] to demand the radically new’, but hauntology in fact operates as a kind of thwarted preservation of such demands in conditions where – for the moment at least – they cannot be met. Whereas cyberspace-time tends towards the generation of cultural moments that are as interchangeable as transnational franchise outlets, hauntology involves the staining of particular places with time – albeit a time that is out of joint. In this lecture, Fisher will explore the hauntological culture of the last few years in relation to the question of place, using examples from music (Burial, The Caretaker, Ekoplekz, Richard Skelton), film (Chris Petit, Patrick Keiller) and fiction (Alan Garner, David Peace).

MARK FISHER, DEPACIFICATION PROGRAM: FROM CAPITALIST REALISM TO POST-CAPITALISM

WHEN: Thursday 5 May 2011, 6:30pm
WHERE: Room 471, 20 Cooper Square [East 5th and Bowery]
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

”It would be best, perhaps, to think of an alternate world – better to say the alternate world, our alternate world – as one contiguous with ours but without any connections or access to it. Then, from time to time, like a diseased eyeball in which disturbing flashes of light are perceived or like those baroque sunbursts in which rays from another world suddenly break into this one, we are reminded that Utopia exists and that other systems, other spaces, are still possible” (Fredric Jameson, ‘Valences of the Dialectic’).

In his 2009 book ‘Capitalist Realism’, Mark Fisher started to explore some of the affective, psychological and political consequences of the deeply entrenched belief that there is no alternative to capitalism. After 1989, capital seemed to enjoy full spectrum dominance of both global space and the unconscious. Every imaginable future was capitalist.  What has been mistaken for post-political apathy, Fisher argued, was a pervasive sense of reflexive impotence in the face of a neoliberal ideological program which sought to subordinate all of culture to the imperatives of business. The subject of post-Fordist capitalism is no passive dupe; this subject actively participates in an ‘interpassive’ corporate culture which solicits our involvement and encourages us to ‘join the debate’.

As Fisher argues in the book, education has been at the forefront of this process, with teachers and lecturers locked into managerialist self-surveillance, and students induced into the role of consumers.

In the eighteen months since ‘Capitalist Realism’ was published, the neoliberal program has been seriously compromised, but capitalist realism has intensified – with austerity programs pushed through on the basis that it is unthinkable that capitalism should be allowed to fail. At the same time, this new, more desperate form of capitalist realism has also faced unexpected challenges from a militancy growing in Europe, the Middle East and even in the heartlands of neoliberalism such as the UK and the US. Now that history has started up again, and Jameson’s ‘baroque sunbursts’ flare brighter than they have for a generation, we can begin to pose questions that had receded into the unimaginable during the high pomp of neoliberal triumphalism: what might a post-capitalism look like,
and how can we get there?

Fisher will argue that the Left will only succeed if it can reclaim modernity from a neoliberal Right that has lost control of it. This entails understanding how the current possibilities for agency are contoured and constrained by the machinery of what Deleuze and Foucault called the Control Society, including cyberspace, the media landscape, psychic pathologies and pharmacology – failures to act are not failures of will, and all the will in the world will not eliminate capitalism. It also entails recognising that neoliberalism’s global hegemony arose from capturing desires which it could not satisfy. A genuinely new Left must be shaped by those desires, and not be lulled, once again, by the logics of failed revolts.

Queries: ss162@nyu.edu

***END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com