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Tag Archives: Marxism and Education

Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski

SOME ADDITIONS TO ACADEMIA: FEBRUARY 2015

 

Over the last month I have added quite a few items to my Academia site.

 

Here are the main additions that have not been included on other blogs:

 

 

 

PAPERS

 

The Confederation of British Industry and the Business Takeover of Schools (2007)

https://www.academia.edu/11138462/The_Confederation_of_British_Industry_and_the_Business_Takeover_of_Schools

 

Postmodernism in Educational Theory (with Peter McLaren, 2002)

https://www.academia.edu/11135246/Postmodernism_in_Educational_Theory

 

Prelude: Marxist Educational Theory After Postmodernism (2002)

https://www.academia.edu/11012712/Prelude_Marxist_Educational_Theory_After_Postmodernism

 

Time and Speed in the Social Universe of Capital (with Mike Neary, 2002)

https://www.academia.edu/10545768/Time_and_Speed_in_the_Social_Universe_of_Capital

 

Marxist Educational Theory Transformed (2000)

https://www.academia.edu/11086968/Marxist_Educational_Theory_Transformed

 

Working Schoolchildren in Britain Today (with Mike Neary, 1997)

https://www.academia.edu/11108460/Working_Schoolchildren_in_Britain_Today

 

 

 

VOLUMER ARTICLES

 

Post-Fordism and Schools in England (2008)

https://www.academia.edu/11048029/Post-Fordism_and_Schools_in_England

 

Forms of Capital: Critique of Bourdieu on Social Capital (2008)

https://www.academia.edu/11049106/Forms_of_Capital_Critique_of_Bourdieu_on_Social_Capital

 

Utopia and Education (2008)

https://www.academia.edu/11139021/Utopia_and_Education

 

Globalisation and Education Revisited (2008)

https://www.academia.edu/11109450/Globalisation_and_Education_Revisited

 

Snowballs and Risk in Schools (2008)

https://www.academia.edu/11027085/Snowballs_and_Risk_in_Schools

 

Nihilism and the Devaluation of Educational Values in England Today (2008)

https://www.academia.edu/11135945/Nihilism_and_the_De-valuation_of_Educational_Values_in_England_Today

 

Forms of Capital: Critique of Bourdieu on Cultural Capital (2008)

https://www.academia.edu/11048536/Forms_of_Capital_Critique_of_Bourdieu_on_Cultural_Capital

 

Playground Risks and Handcuffed Kids: We Need Safer Schools? (2007)

https://www.academia.edu/11074776/Playground_Risks_and_Handcuffed_Kids_We_Need_Safer_Schools

 

On Education Studies (2007)

https://www.academia.edu/11137286/On_Education_Studies

 

Education the HSBC Way (2007)

https://www.academia.edu/11109879/Education_the_HSBC_Way

 

The ‘Standards’ Language-game for Schools in England (2007)

https://www.academia.edu/11109014/The_Standards_Language-game_for_Schools_in_England_Today

 

Higher education and Confused Employer Syndrome (2006)

https://www.academia.edu/11075569/Higher_Education_and_Confused_Employer_Syndrome

 

On Tranhumanism and Education (2006)

https://www.academia.edu/11108794/On_Transhumanism_and_Education

 

 

Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

PosthumanALIEN LIFE: MARX AND THE FUTURE OF THE HUMAN

My article, Alien Life: Marx and the Future of the Human, is now available at Academia.

It was published as:

Rikowski, G. (2003) Alien Life: Marx and the Future of the Human, Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory, Volume 11 Issue 2, pp.121-164.

The article can be viewed on Academia at: http://www.academia.edu/10986589/Alien_Life_Marx_and_the_Future_of_the_Human

It was a polished and heavily edited version of a paper I presented a few years earlier at one of the Birkbeck College Seminars on Marx, Individuals & Society, run by the late Cyril Smith: Marx and the Future of the Human (2000).

This paper is also on Academia, at: http://www.academia.edu/6043714/Marx_and_the_Future_of_the_Human

For those interested in the interface of Marxism and Post/Trans-humanism, my article Education, Capital and the Transhuman may also be of value.

This article is also at Academia, at:

http://www.academia.edu/9033532/Education_Capital_and_the_Transhuman

Also of interest on this theme is Planet of the Capitorg

This can also be found at Academia:

https://www.academia.edu/6921390/Planet_of_the_Capitorg

Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski

@ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Karl Marx

Karl Marx

8th INTERNATIONAL MARX & ENGELS COLLOQUIUM

Call for Papers

8th International Marx & Engels Colloquium

Marxist Studies Centre – Cemarx at University of Campinas – Unicamp

Campinas (SP)
Brazil

July 2015

The 8th International Colloquium Marx and Engels of the Marxist Studies Centre (Cemarx) will be held from 14 to 17 July 2015 at the Institute of Philosophy and Human Sciences at Unicamp. Papers should be submitted by February 21st 2015:

See: http://www.ifch.unicamp.br/formulario_cemarx/instrucoes.php (The form is in Portuguese, but in case of any problem regarding to the language, please contact us: cemarx@unicamp.br)

General Information

The 8th International Marx & Engels Colloquium accepts three modalities of participation: papers (to be presented in Thematic Groups), Roundtables and Posters. In all modalities, the submissions have to achieve one of the following aims: a) to have the Marxist theory as their subject of research in order to analyse this theory, criticize it or develop it; and b) to utilize the Marxist theoretical framework in empirical researches. The submitted papers and proposal must fit into the event’s Thematic Groups (see below).

Each researcher can make only one submission. One modality has to be chosen. In case of papers, it is necessary to indicate which Thematic Group they fit in. Occasionally, the 8th International Marx & Engels Colloquium Organizing Committee might reallocate the papers from one group to another.

 

The 8th Colloquium’s Thematic Groups are the following:

 

TG 1Theoretical work of Marx and Marxism

Critical examination of Marx and Engels’ work and classical Marxism works in the 19th and 20th centuries. Polemics stimulated by Marx’s theoretical work.

 

TG 2Marxism

Critical examination of the different branches and schools of Marxist thought and their transformations during the 19th and 20th centuries. Theoretical work of Brazilian and Latin American Marxists. Issues on the renovation of Marxism.

 

TG 3Marxism and Human Sciences

Examination of the Marxism’s influence on Economics, Sociology, Political Science, Anthropology, History, International Relations, Law, Geography and Social Work. Examination of the Marxist critique of Human Sciences and the contributions of Human Sciences for the development of Marxism. Marxist theoretical polemics and conceptual developments in these areas of knowledge. The presence of Marxism in the Brazilian and Latin American universities.

 

TG 4Economy and politics in contemporary capitalism

The Marxist approach to economical, political and social transformations of capitalism at the end of the 20thcentury and the beginning of the 21st century. New accumulation patterns of capital, new imperialist phase, transformations of the State and capitalist democracy. The condition of dominant and dependent countries. Brazil and Latin America. Capitalism and ecology.

 

TG 5Class relations and social struggle in contemporary capitalism

The Marxist approach to the transformations of class structure. Laborers, working class, “new working class” and “middle class”. The petite bourgeoisie. The peasants in current capitalism. The current debate on the decline of class polarization in the end of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st century. The working classes and the new configuration of the bourgeoisie. The social classes in Brazil and Latin America. The Marxist concept of social class and class struggle in contemporary capitalism. Social movements and popular protests in local and international context.

 

TG 6Work and production in contemporary capitalism

Social Theory, labor and production. The labor theory of value and contemporary capitalism. Theoretical conceptions on production structure. Production processes: process of valorisation and process of work. Control and management of the production process. Class struggle in production. Theories on the affirmation and denial of the “centrality of work”. The new forms of labour exploitation: immaterial labour, casual labour, precarious labour and informational work. Work and social emancipation.

 

TG 7Gender, race and sexuality in contemporary capitalism

Reflection on gender, race and sexuality relations, and their role in the reproduction of capitalism. Analysis of the relationship between exploitation and oppression, and configurations of the social, sexual and racial divisions of labor today. Discussion on consubstantiality/ intersectionality of social relations and the Marxist theory. Debates on politics, Marxism and feminist, black and LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) movements.

 

TG 8- Education, capitalism and socialism

The relationships between the educational system and capitalism according to the Marxist perspective: training of workforce; education and social classes; ideology and educational process; educational policy. The Marxist analysis of education in Brazil and Latin America. The cultural apparatuses of capitalism (universities, research centres). The cultural centres created by the socialist movement. Analysis of the innovative educational experiences in the societies emerged in the revolutions of the 20th century. Marxist theory and education.

 

TG 9Culture, capitalism and socialism

Capitalism and cultural production: the new tendencies; plastic arts, literature and cultural industry. Marxist analysis of culture in Brazil and Latin America. Culture and socialism: the cultural movements in the societies originated in the revolutions of the 20th century. Marxism and cultural production.

 

TG 10Socialism in the 21st century

Marxist analysis of the 20th century Revolutions. The communist and socialist heritage of the 19th and 20thcenturies and the socialism of the 21st century. Marxism and socialism. The issue of renovation of socialism. The theory of transition to socialism. Workers and socialist transition. Strong points and obstacles for the reconstruction of the socialist movement in the 21st century.

 

 

Modalities of submission (Portuguese, Spanish or English)

1.Papers

Papers can be based on on-going or finished research (research projects do not fit in this modality). Papers should have between fifteen and twenty thousand characters (including spaces and footnotes), in 12 points Times New Roman font format. Submissions must not exceed this limit; otherwise, it will be rejected. Papers should include proposed title, author’s name and position (professor, lecturer, post-graduate student, independent researcher). Papers should clearly define the topic/subject that will be examined, including theses and arguments, and making explicit the debate (theoretical, historiographical or political) within the paper is inserted. Important: papers should follow the citation rules displayed at Cemarx’s website. The accepted papers will be published in the Annals of the colloquium. Some papers may subsequently be selected for publication in books organized by Cemarx or in the journals associated with the latter. In such cas es, the author should do a review of the text submitted having, therefore, the opportunity to develop the paper further.

Registration fee: US$ 25.

2.Roundtables

Roundtables are proposals submitted by groups, research centers or even scientific and cultural associations. A Roundtable is composed of a set of at least three and no more than four presentations. For a roundtable, the submitted proposals should be more developed than those submitted as communication papers in thematic groups. Only a small number of roundtables will be accepted. The coordinator of the roundtable must submit in his/her proposal including the title and summary of the roundtable in which there is a brief explanation of the topic addressed. After submitting the proposal and his/her own paper, the Coordinator must indicate the full name and email of other members. They, in turn, will submit their own papers on a proper form. The submission of participants’ paper of the roundtable must follow the same format that was specified in the general information (see above).

Registration fee per member of roundtable: US$ 25

3.Posters

The 8th International Marx & Engels Colloquium is open for participation of undergraduate students who can present scientific initiation papers whose subjects fit in one of the Thematic Groups of the colloquium.

The paper abstract should have between three to five thousand characters (including spaces and footnotes) in Times New Roman font format, 12 points. The paper should include title, author’s name and the undergraduate course in which he/she  is enrolled. Papers should present the research’s subject and its main ideas and information. The poster submission format will be published at Cemarx’s website.

Registration fee: 15 US$

Submission of Papers

Papers should be submitted by February 21st. Researchers should fill in the on line submission form at Cemarx’s website ( http://www.ifch.unicamp.br/formulario_cemarx/instrucoes.php). The form is in Portuguese, but in case of any problem regarding to the language, please contact us: cemarx@unicamp.br. Foreign researchers can pay the registration fee only during the event.

 

Notification of Acceptance

Accepted papers will be divulged at Cemarx’s website by April 2015.

 

Important dates

Beginning of registration: November 21st, 2014

Deadline for Registration: February 21st, 2015

Disclosure of Accepted Submissions: April 21st, 2015

Date of the Colloquium: July 14 – 17, 2015

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/call-for-papers-8th-international-marx-engels-colloquium-marxist-studies-centre-cemarx-at-university-of-campinas-july-2015

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

UNICONFLICTS

UNICONFLICTS In Spaces of Crisis: Critical Approaches In, Against and Beyond the University

International Open Gathering

11–14 June 2015

At the Department of Architecture, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

Encounters and Conflicts in the City

Details: http://urbanconflicts.wordpress.com/

 

Calling

The group “Encounters and Conflicts in the City” calls radical research groups, critical workshops and researchers, students and collectives that are placed in, against and beyond the neoliberal university in an open gathering on the 11-14th June 2015 at the Department of Architecture at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki.

Through this gathering, we aim to create a public space of dialogue transcending divisions among academic and scientific disciplines and to critically approach the urban issues of the era of crisis, through a dialectic, intersectional and postcolonial approach.

The central questions that we wish to raise are two:

  1. What is the role of knowledge, of the university and of researchers in the era of crisis?
  2. What are the critical epistemological and methodological tools for studying the spatial expressions of the ongoing crisis at multiple scales?

Within this context, we seek to examine the ongoing crisis not just as an over-accumulation crisis but also as a crisis of social disobedience and of the inability of the circulation of capital, patriarchy and nationalism. Moving against the mystification of the crisis, we are interested in critical approaches that focus on the spatialization of social relations and examine the spaces of dissent. Particularly, we wish to examine the articulations, the limits, the contradictions and the dialectic relation of commons, enclosures, inclusion, exclusion, insurgency and counter-insurgency as well as their hybrid intermediate forms, which emerge in and through physical space, modes of communication and the constitution of communities. Overall, we aim to break the North/South or East/West dichotomies and to focus on the fields of gender, race, class and culture.

Building on the critical evaluation of social relations, the circulation of social struggles and subjects and communities in motion, we search for their contentious spaces and their spatial transformations, limits, possibilities and contradictions in the era of crisis. Moreover, understanding education as a unity of theory and practice, we seek these epistemological and methodological tools that emerge from and aim to the deepening and the circulation of social struggles and social movements. In the context of today’s global and local crisis, we note that while a plethora of social struggles and insurgencies emerge, the academic research often appropriates and commercializes their ideas. It is exactly here that we identify the dead-end.

Hence, we seek to surpass the so called academic activism and to set as a main target of this open gathering the critical examination of the following:

A. The role of knowledge and of researchers in the university and in social movements

The neoliberal University and the educational system constitute strategic mechanisms for the production and reproduction of social relations. In particular, within a dynamic process of neoliberalization, the university studies are intensified and are linked more and more to the labour market. Within this context, we wish to examine issues such as the production of knowledge, knowledge as a common, the neoliberalization of the University, the new educational enclosures and the concept of Anti-university.

The transformation of knowledge into private property and consequently into a commodity creates new enclosures in the field of knowledge. These new enclosures in neoliberal education are expressed both through the commodification of the physical space of the universities and through the objectification of human abilities. Some indicative examples are the increase of studying costs, the studying loans, the control of access to information, the commercialization of academic papers and books, the securitization of the University space, the criminalization and the rhetoric against student mobilizations, the suppression of the struggles of university employees and the restriction of the freedom of speech.

However, since 1960s and 1970s, the universities are spaces of collective emancipatory movements, of social struggles and of radical experiments of self-organization for the production of knowledge. As a response to these movements, since 1980s, a number of educational reforms have been introduced. These reforms seek to promote the marketization of the university, aiming to produce the appropriate competitive workforce and to supress student movements.

Yet, during the last decade, many dynamic student movements have emerged in France (2006), Greece (2006-2007), the USA (2009-2010), the UK (2010), Italy (2010-2011) and so on, which targeted the enclosure of knowledge and were connected and inspired many other urban social movements.

 

Axes of Discussion

A.1 Social education and emancipatory movements in the universities

-Student movements: limits and contradictions, connection with other urban movements, confrontation of their suppression and criminalization

-Perspectives of a radical pedagogy towards the knowledge as common

-Ideas and practices of free–‐autonomous universities beyond the education of the neoliberal university

A.2 Control and commodification of knowledge

-Public, state and private education in the neoliberal era

-Politics of knowledge enclosures and copyrights

-The suppression of academic freedom and of the freedom of speech

-Knowledge as private property and commodity for the production of value and surplus value

-Student loans and study costs as mechanisms of disciplining

-The cultural politics of the neoliberal university

-Paid and unpaid work at the University

A.3 The role of the researcher

-Lifelong education, competitiveness and the precarious status of the researcher

-The researcher as producer of dominant discourses and her/his role in the reproduction of power

-Competitiveness, academic carrie and academic divisions and hierarchies

-The biopolitical character of the neoliberal education and the construction of new identities

-Education as praxis, understood as a unity of theory and practice

-Researchers, networks and groups against and beyond the neoliberal university

 

B. Critical epistemological and methodological tools for the study of the crisis’s spatial expressions at multiple scales

Against the privatization and commodification of the academic knowledge and the intended hegemony of the neoliberal perspectives, we seek those critical epistemological tools of knowledge production that encourage social emancipation.

During the last years, urban movements and a plethora of visible and invisible practices of resistance and emancipation offer a variety of tools for the destabilization of the dominant ideologies, ways of disaggregation of power, negotiation of contradictions and visibility of differences. In parallel, today there is the urgent need for the promotion, circulation and deepening of these critical perspectives and their linking to social struggles. Thus, we aim to discuss epistemological and methodological tools, such as the following:

B1. Dialectic critical urban theory

Which are those critical approaches that assist us to perceive and examine the multiple dimensions of urban space? How do dialectic approaches and critical urban theory contribute to the understanding of the spaces of social movements and the spaces of capital, racism and patriarchy?

B2. Intersectionality and urban space in the era of crisis

How does intersectionality contribute to the study of the urban space? Which are the intersectional crossings of the multiple systems of domination, oppression and discrimination such as race, class, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, religion, dis/ability, age, cast, language, culture, body size, education level or citizenship?

B3. Cultural and postcolonial approaches

How do cultural and postcolonial studies contribute to the understanding of urban space and the conceptualization of body, identity and modes of communication. How does the criminalization and the suppression of alternative modes of culture, information and lifestyle operate as mechanisms of control, disciplining and normalization? What is the role of social media in the communication of social struggles? We seek the expression of the ongoing crisis through the spaces of architecture, art, media, and internet.

 

Within the above context, we call critical research groups, workshops, collectives and individuals to participate in a gathering during 11-14 June 2015. If you would like to participate, please provide us with your abstract (300 words) by 1 March 2015 at the latest, to the following e-mail: urbanconflicts@gmail.com

Participation is free and we will try to provide accommodation for as many participants as possible.

 

“Encounters and conflicts in the city” group

Costas Athanasiou, Eleni Vasdeki, Elina Kapetanaki, Maria Karagianni, Matina Kapsali, Vaso

Makrygianni, Foteini Mamali, Orestis Pangalos, Haris Tsavdaroglou

Thessaloniki

Thessaloniki

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Crisis

Crisis

Education Not for Sale

Education Not for Sale

NEOLIBERALISM AND THE DEGRADATION OF EDUCATION

Alternate Routes: A Journal of Critical Social Research

VOL 26 (2015)

Edited by Carlo Fanelli and Bryan Evans

Contributors to this anthology trace how neoliberalism has impacted education. These effects range from the commercialization and quasi-privatization of pre-school to post-secondary education, to restrictions on democratic practice and research and teaching, to the casualization of labour and labour replacing technologies, and the descent of the university into the market which threatens academic freedom. The end result is a comprehensive and wide-ranging review of how neoliberalism has served to displace, if not destroy, the role of the university as a space for a broad range of perspectives.

Neoliberalism stifes the university’s ability to incubate critical ideas and engage with the larger society. Entrepreneurship, however, is pursued as an ideological carrier serving to prepare students for a life of precarity just as the university itself is being penetrated and occupied by corporations. The result is an astonishing tale of transformation, de-democratization and a narrowing of vision and purpose.

Contents: http://www.alternateroutes.ca/index.php/ar/issue/view/1590/showToc

Current Issue: http://www.alternateroutes.ca/index.php/ar/issue/view/1590

Alternative Routes: http://www.alternateroutes.ca/index.php/ar

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski: https://rikowski.wordpress.com

Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

THE ACADEMIC MANIFESTO: FROM AN OCCUPIED TO A PUBLIC UNIVERSITY

Willem Halffman and Hans Radder

 

First published in Krisis: Journal of Contemporary Philosophy, 2013, Issue 3 (in Dutch)

Now available in English: translated by Jan Evertse

 

Willem Halffman and Hans Radder

The academic manifesto: From an occupied to a public university

 

1 The occupied university

The university has been occupied – not by students demanding a say (as in the 1960s), but this time by the many-headed Wolf of management.1 The Wolf has colonised academia with a mercenary army of professional administrators, armed with spreadsheets, output indicators and audit procedures, loudly accompanied by the Efficiency and Excellence March. Management has proclaimed academics the enemy within: academics have to be distrusted, tested and monitored, under the permanent threat of reorganisation, discontinuance and dismissal. The academics allow themselves to be meekly played off against one another, like frightened, obedient sheep, hoping to make it by staying just ahead of their colleagues. The Wolf uses the most absurd means to

remain in control, such as money-squandering semi- and full mergers, increasingly detailed, and thus costly, accountability systems and extremely expensive prestige projects.

This conquest seems to work and the export of knowledge from the newly conquered colony can be ever increased, but inland the troubles fester. Thus, while all the glossed-up indicators constantly point to the stars, the mood on the academic shop floor steadily drops. The Wolf pops champagne after each new score in the Shanghai Competition, while the university sheep desperately work until they drop2 and the quality of the knowledge plantations is starting to falter, as is demonstrated by a large number of comprehensive and thorough analyses.3 Meanwhile, the sheep endeavour to bring the absurd anomalies of the occupation to the Wolf’s attention by means of an endless stream of opinion articles, lamentations, pressing letters and appeals. In turn, the Wolf reduces these to mere incidents, brushes them aside as inevitable side effects of progress, or simply ignores them.

Although our description and evaluation were written from the perspective of Dutch universities, the gist of our account (and quite a few details) applies to other countries as well, especially in Europe.4 While management’s occupation may not be as advanced in the Netherlands as it is in England (Holmwood 2011), it has already established a powerful continental bridgehead (De Boer, Enders and Schimank 2007). To show how these developments are more than just incidents, we list six critical processes and their excesses below. We will then proceed to analyse causes and suggest remedies.

 

Notes:

This article is a slightly updated and edited translation of the Dutch original, which appeared in Krisis: Tijdschrift voor actuele filosofie 2013 (3), pp. 2-18. We are grateful for helpful commentary on that version by the Krisis editorial team, in particular René Gabriëls. We would also like to thank Ilse and Jan Evertse for translating the Dutch text into English.

2 According to accepted clinical norms, a quarter of Dutch professors of medical science (especially the younger ones) suffer from burn-out (Tijdink, Vergouwen en Smulders 2012).

3 See, e.g., Ritzer (1998); Graham (2002); Hayes and Wynyard (2002); Bok (2003); Washburn (2003); Evans (2005); Shimank (2005); Boomkens (2008); Gill (2009); Tuchman (2009); Radder (2010); Krijnen, Lorenz and Umlauf (2011); Collini (2012); Sanders and Van der Zweerde (2012); Dijstelbloem et al. (2013); Verbrugge and Van Baardewijk (2014).

4 See Lorenz (2006 and 2012); Krücken (2014). In line with the situation in most European

 

See the full article in English at: https://www.academia.edu/9923660/The_academic_manifesto_From_an_occupied_to_a_public_unversity

Krisis: Tijdschrift voor actuele filosofie: http://www.krisis.eu

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Workplace

Workplace

MARX, ENGELS AND THE CRITIQUE OF ACADEMIC LABOR

Call for Papers

Marx, Engels and the Critique of Academic Labor

Special Issue of Workplace: A journal for academic labor

Guest Editors: Karen Gregory & Joss Winn

Articles in Workplace have repeatedly called for increased collective organisation in opposition to a disturbing trajectory: individual autonomy is decreasing, contractual conditions are worsening, individual mental health issues are rising, and academic work is being intensified. Despite our theoretical advances and concerted practical efforts to resist these conditions, the gains of the 20th century labor movement are diminishing and the history of the university appears to be on a determinate course.

To date, this course is often spoken of in the language of “crisis.” While crisis may indeed point us toward the contemporary social experience of work and study within the university, we suggest that there is one response to the transformation of the university that has yet to be adequately explored: A thoroughgoing and reflexive critique of academic labor and its ensuing forms of value. By this, we mean a negative critique of academic labor and its role in the political economy of capitalism; one which focuses on understanding the basic character of ‘labor’ in capitalism as a historically specific social form. Beyond the framework of crisis, what productive, definite social relations are actively resituating the university and its labor within the demands, proliferations, and contradictions of capital?

We aim to produce a negative critique of academic labor that not only makes transparent these social relations, but repositions academic labor within a new conversation of possibility.

We are calling for papers that acknowledge the foundational work of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels for labor theory and engage closely and critically with the critique of political economy. Marx regarded his discovery of the dual character of labor in capitalism (i.e. concrete and abstract) as one of his most important achievements and “the pivot on which a clear comprehension of political economy turns.” With this in mind, we seek contributions that employ Marx’s and Engels’ critical categories of labor, value, the commodity, capital, etc. in reflexive ways which illuminate the role and character of academic labor today and how its existing form might be, according to Marx, abolished, transcended and overcome (aufheben).

 

Contributions:

  1. A variety of forms and approaches, demonstrating a close engagement with Marx’s theory and

method: Theoretical critiques, case studies, historical analyses, (auto-)ethnographies, essays, and

narratives are all welcome. Contributors from all academic disciplines are encouraged.

  1. Any reasonable length will be considered. Where appropriate they should adopt a consistent style

(e.g. Chicago, Harvard, MLA, APA).

  1. Will be Refereed.
  2. Contributions and questions should be sent to:

Joss Winn (jwinn@lincoln.ac.uk) and Karen Gregory (kgregory@ccny.cuny.edu)

Publication timetable

  • Fully referenced ABSTRACTS by 1st February 2015
  • Authors notified by 1st March 2015
  • Deadline for full contributions: 1st September 2015
  • Authors notified of initial reviews by 1st November 2015
  • Revised papers due: 10th January 2016
  • Publication date: March 2016.

Possible themes that contributions may address include, but are not limited to:

The Promise of Autonomy and The Nature of Academic “Time”

The Laboring “Academic” Body

Technology and Circuits of Value Production

Managerial Labor and Productions of Surplus

Markets of Value: Debt, Data, and Student Production

The Emotional Labor of Restructuring: Alt-Ac Careers and Contingent Labor

The Labor of Solidarity and the Future of Organization

Learning to Labor: Structures of Academic Authority and Reproduction

Teaching, Learning, and the Commodity-Form

The Business of Higher Education and Fictitious Capital

The Pedagogical Labor of Anti-Racism

Production and Consumption: The Academic Labor of Students

The Division of Labor In Higher Education

Hidden Abodes of Academic Production

The Formal and Real Subsumption of the University

Alienation, Abstraction and Labor Inside the University

Gender, Race, and Academic Wages

New Geographies of Academic Labor and Academic Markets

The University, the State and Money: Forms of the Capital Relation

New Critical Historical Approaches to the Study of Academic Labor

About the Editors:

 

Karen Gregory

kgregory@ccny.cuny.edu @claudikincaid

Karen Gregory is lecturer in Sociology at the Center for Worker Education/Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at the City College of New York, where she heads the CCNY City Lab. She is an ethnographer and theory-building scholar whose research focuses on the entanglement of contemporary spirituality, labor precarity, and entrepreneurialism, with an emphasis on the role of the laboring body. Karen cofounded the CUNY Digital Labor Working Group and her work has been published in Women’s Studies Quarterly, Women and Performance, The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy, and Contexts.

Joss Winn

jwinn@lincoln.ac.uk @josswinn

Joss Winn is a senior lecturer in the School of Education at the University of Lincoln, UK. His research extends broadly to a critique of the political economy of higher education. Currently, his writing and teaching is focused on the history and political economy of science and technology in higher education, its affordances for and impact on academic labor, and the way by which academics can control the means of knowledge production through co-operative and ultimately post-capitalist forms of work and democracy. His article, “Writing About Academic Labor,” is published in Workplace 25, 1-15.

Details at: http://josswinn.org/2014/12/call-for-papers-marx-engels-and-the-critique-of-academic-labor/

See also: http://blogs.ubc.ca/ices/2014/11/30/cfp-marx-engels-and-the-critique-of-academic-labor-ices-criticaltheory-criticalpedagogy-frankfurtschool/

Karl Marx

Karl Marx

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Rosa Luxemburg

Rosa Luxemburg

CONFERENCE ON MARXIST-FEMINISM IN BERLIN

An historic conference on Marxist-Feminism that will be taking place in collaboration with the Rosa Luxemburg Foundation in Berlin next March 20-22, 2015.

The draft programme has just been posted: www.rosalux.de/marxismus-feminismus

 

Speakers include (among others) Frigga Haug, Gayatri Spivak, Saskia Sassen, Lynn Segal, Nira Yuval-Davis, Zilla Eisenstein, Helen Colley, Shahrzad Mojab, Cynthia Cockburn, Erica Burman.

The event will also include the launch of the new book from Zed Press, Marxism and Feminism, with Shahrzad Mojab, Helen Colley, Cynthia Cockburn, and Frigga Haug.

Registration is via the ‘Anmeldeformular’ in red at the bottom of the conference page.

Please distribute to all your interested networks.  This will be a very important event to discuss the resurgence of Marxist-Feminist thought in recent years.

Best wishes

Helen

Helen Colley, MA (Oxon), PhD
Professor of Lifelong Learning and Director of Graduate Education, SEPD, University of Huddersfield
Visiting Professor of Adult Education, OISE, University of Toronto.

 

The strength of Critique: Trajectories of Marxism – Feminism

International Congress

More than 40 years ago, feminists among Marxists in many countries spoke out. They criticized the concept of labour that was then commonly used in Marxism, they criticized value theory, views on domestic labour and the family, the way of dealing and interacting with each other and with the nature around us, on the economy and wars, visions of the future and the urge for liberation.
They triggered passionate debates – their criticism wasn’t totally ignored. But the work they have carried out on an international scale is far from complete. For some decades feminist Marxist debates subsided because neoliberalism, stumbling from one crisis to another, had brought other issues into focus.
Next year, in March 2015, we intend to pick up the threads. Many of those voices — and many who have since joined — will come together at a congress in order to investigate what has been left undone. We will discuss successes and defeats as well as new projects with the intention of finding out together what has been gained so far, what we need to continue working on, what new issues are on the agenda, and how we can bundle our energies to achieve worldwide resonance to our demand to intervene.
What remains as fundamental as almost half a century ago is that socialist feminists join forces internationally.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Educating from Marx

Educating from Marx

 

Mezmerize

Mezmerize

POWER, ACCELERATION AND METRICS IN ACADEMIC LIFE

Call for Contributions: Power, Acceleration and Metrics in Academic Life

There is little doubt that science and knowledge production are presently undergoing dramatic and multi-layered transformations accompanied by new imperatives reflecting broader socio-economic and technological developments. The unprecedented proliferation of audit cultures preoccupied with digitally mediated measurement and quantification of scholarship and the consolidation of business-driven managerialism and governance modes are commonplace in the contemporary academy. Concurrently, the ever-increasing rate of institutional change, (the need for) intensification of scientific and scholarly production/communication and diverse academic processes seem to characterize the overall acceleration of academic life (i.e., in many disciplines the new maxim ‘patent and prosper’ (Schachman) supplements the traditional ‘publish or perish’). Quantification and metrics have emerged not only as navigating instruments paradoxically exacerbating the general dynamization of academic life but also as barely questioned proxies for scientific quality, career progression and job prospects, and as parameters redrawing what it means to be/work as a scholar nowadays (i.e., the shifting parameters and patterns of academic subjectivity). Metrification now seems to be an important interface between labour and surveillance within academic life, with manifold affective implications.

This workshop will inquire into the techniques of auditing and their attendant practices and effects and will also probe into scholars’ complicity in reproduction of such practices. It will consider processes of social acceleration within the academy and their implications for the management of everyday activity by those working within it. This will include:

  • empirical and theoretical engagements with the acceleration of higher education
    the origins of metrification of higher education
    metrification as a form of social control
    the challenges of self-management posed by metrification and/or acceleration
    common strategic responses to these challenges
    the relationship between metrification and acceleration
    how metrification and acceleration relate to a broader social crisis

The workshop will take place in December 2015 in Prague. At present, we’re seeking to clarify the level of interest before determining the length of the event, fixing a date and inviting keynote speakers. Please send expressions of interest – a biographical note and brief description of interest in the topic – to mark@markcarrigan.net and filip.vostal@gmail.com – deadline January 31st 2015.

Venue

Hosted by Institute of Philosophy of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic the event will take place in Vila Lanna, V Sadech 1, 160 00, Prague 6, Czech Republic (http://www.vila-lanna.cz/index.html)

Travel

Air: From Vaclav Havel Airport Prague take the bus no 119 to Dejvicka (which is the terminal stop). Vila Lanna is 5-6min walk from there.

Train: From Main Railway Station (Praha hlavni nadrazi, often abbreviated Praha hl. n), take metro line C (red), change at Muzeum for line A (green) and get off at the terminal stop Dejvicka. Vila Lanna is 5-6min walk from there.

See: http://markcarrigan.net/2014/10/20/call-for-contributions-power-acceleration-and-metrics-in-academic-life/

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Glenn Rikowski’s article, Education, Capital and the Transhuman – can also now be found at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/9033532/Education_Capital_and_the_Transhuman

Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski

RECENT ADDITIONS TO ACADEMIA – GLENN RIKOWSKI

The following papers by Glenn Rikowski were recently added to Academia:

Crises in Education, Crises of Education (2014) A paper prepared for the Philosophy of Education Seminars at the University of London Institute of Education 2014-15 Programme, 22nd October 2014, online at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

On Education for Its Own Sake (2005) 17th Ocober 2005, London, online at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/9099777/On_Education_for_Its_Own_Sake

Silence on the Wolves: What is Absent in New Labour’s Five Year Strategy for Education (2005) University of Brighton, Education Research Centre, Occasional Paper, May 2005, online at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/9150947/Silence_on_the_Wolves_What_is_Absent_in_New_Labours_Five_Year_Strategy_for_Education

Education, Capital and the Transhuman (2002) Chapter 6, in: Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory, edited by Dave Hill, Peter McLaren, Mike Cole & Glenn Rikowski, Lanham MD: Lexington Books, online at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/9033532/Education_Capital_and_the_Transhuman

The ‘Which Blair’ Project: Giddens, the Third Way and Education (2000) Forum for promoting 3-19 comprehensive education, Vol.42 No.1, pp.4-7, online at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/9169470/The_Which_Blair_Project_Giddens_the_Third_Way_and_Education

Nietzsche’s School? The Roots of Educational Postmodernism (1998) A paper prepared for the Social Justice Seminar, Semester 2, University of Birmingham, School of Education, 24th March 1998, online at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/9099116/Nietzsches_School_The_Roots_of_Educational_Postmodernism

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL EDUCATION V – 2015

Analyze, Educate, Organize: Critical Education for Social and Economic Justice

ICCE V: International Conference on Critical Education

June 15 – 18, 2015, Wroclaw, Poland

Conference website: http://www.icce.uls.edu.pl/icce

The International Conference on Critical Education (ICCE), previously held in Athens (2011, 2012), Ankara (2013) and Thessaloniki (2014), is a forum for scholars, educators and activists committed to social and economic justice.  The 5th ICCE: Analyze, educate, organize. Critical education for social and economic justice will take place in the Polish city of Wroclaw from June 15 – 18, 2015.

At a time of economic crisis, when education is under siege by neoliberal capitalism, (neo)conservatism and aggressive nationalism, when teachers and academics are being proletarianized, youth criminalized, schools and universities turned into commodities, and when different forms of fundamentalism are growing, critical education, as a theory and as a movement, is gaining in relevance. International communities of critical educators build resistance to these processes and are engaged in fostering social change leading to a more just, equal and fair society.

We invite emergent/new scholars, teachers, activists as well as those more experienced to submit abstracts that explicitly engage with these issues. The languages of the conference are English and Polish. Simultaneous translation will be provided during plenary sessions and selected parallel sessions.

Please send proposals written in the English language of maximum 150 words, including your name, a title, affiliation, contact information to iisce@dsw.edu.pl by March 20, 2015 (please indicate the language in which you will present – ENG/PL).  For more information, please visit www.icce.uls.edu.pl.  If you are presenting in another language, such as Turkish, for example, you will need to provide your own translator.

Keynote Speakers

Peter McLaren (Chapman University, California, USA)

Antonia Darder (Loyola Marymount University, USA)

Joyce Canaan (Birmingham City University, UK)

Hana Cervinkova (University of Lower Silesia, Wroclaw, Poland)

Adam Chmielewski (University of Wroclaw, Poland)

Anna Dzierzgowska (Jacek Kuroń High School, Warsaw, Poland)

Panagiota Gounari (University of Massachusetts, Boston, USA)

George Grollios (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece)

Gail Edwards (Newcastle University, UK)

Dave Hill (Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, UK)

Aygülen Kayahan Karakul (İzmir Katip Çelebi University, İzmir, Turkey)

Ravi Kumar (South Asian University, Delhi, India) (tbc)

Robert Kwaśnica (University of Lower Silesia, Wroclaw, Poland)

Piotr Laskowski (Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland)

Heidi Mirza (Goldsmiths College, University of London, London, UK)

Lilia Monzo (Chapman University, California, USA)

Ünal Özmen (Journalist/Author, Turkey)

Lotar Rasiński (University of Lower Silesia, Wroclaw, Poland)

Guy Senese (Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona, USA)

Bogusław Śliwerski (Academy of Special Education, Warsaw, Poland)

Kostas Skordoulis (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece)

Tomasz Szkudlarek (University of Gdańsk, Poland)

Paolo Vittoria (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)

Ahmet Yildiz (Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey)

Marta Zahorska – Bugaj (University of Warsaw, Poland)

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

 

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