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Tag Archives: Economic History

JAPMARXIST THEORY AND THE POLITICS OF HISTORY IN MODERN JAPAN

The Center for Social Theory and Comparative History will host its next event on: Marxist Theory and the Politics of History in Modern Japan

Thursday, June 2nd
4:00pm – 6:00 pm
6275 Bunche Hall
Basing himself on his new book, The Sublime Perversion of Capital (Duke University Press, 2016), Gavin Walker will examine the Japanese debate about capitalism from the 1920s to 1950s, using it as his point of departure to consider current discussions of uneven development and contemporary topics in Marxist theory and historiography. Walker locates the debate’s culmination in the work of Uno Kozo, whose investigations into the development of capitalism and the commodification of labour power are essential for rethinking Marxism today. Walker’s analysis of the Japanese debate shows how Marxist thought was globalized from the start.

Gavin Walker teaches in History and East Asian Studies at McGill University. He has written extensively on modern Japan, on Marxism, and on contemporary questions of political organization.

For more information, contact the Center for Social Theory and Comparative History at (310) 206-5675 or abenanav@ucla.edu.

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cstch-lecture-june-2nd-gavin-walker-on-japanese-marxism

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

 

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Rosa Luxemburg

Rosa Luxemburg

THE COMPLETE WORKS OF ROSA LUXEMBURG

Support the ongoing effort to produce:

The Complete Works of Rosa Luxemburg

The effort to issue The Complete Works of Rosa Luxemburg (issued by Verso Books) has reached a critical phase, and we appeal for your help in enabling future volumes to be published.

The Complete Works was inaugurated in March 2011 with the 600-page Letters of Rosa Luxemburg, the largest collection of her correspondence ever published in English. Volume I of the Complete Works, entitled Economic Writings 1, was published in 2013 and contains the first full English translation of one of her most important books, Introduction to Political Economy, as well as eight newly-discovered manuscripts on anthropology, economic history, and the theory of crises. Volume II, entitled Economic Writings 2, was published in 2015 and contains a new translation of The Accumulation of Capital and the Anti-Critique.

We are now raising funds to cover the costs of translation of her Political Writings, beginning with three volumes (Vols. 3, 4 and 5) devoted to “On Revolution.” They will contain all of her writings on the 1905-06 Russian Revolution, 1917 Russian Revolution, and 1918-19 German Revolution. These reveal Luxemburg at her finest—as a fierce supporter of revolutionary democracy, with a sensitive grasp of spontaneous freedom struggles as well as of non-hierarchical forms of organization. Many of these writings—a large number of them translated from Polish—have never appeared in print since their initial publication, and most have never before appeared in English.

The Complete Works will make her entire body of work available for the first time in any language. All of the writings will be newly translated, with the highest level of scholarly editing. But we cannot continue to commission translations without your support. We need to raise an additional $35,000 to help pay for the translation costs of the next three volumes.

We urge you to make a contribution to the Rosa Luxemburg page of the Toledo Fund, at https://toledo.nationbuilder.com/complete_works_rosa_luxemburg

There are few better ways of celebrating International Women’s Month!

—The Editorial Board, Rosa Luxemburg Complete Works.

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/please-support-the-complete-works-of-rosa-luxemburg

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

 

downloadWHY STUDY THE RICH?

Public Programme

April 23, 2016: 12.30-5.30pm, Free

Rabbits Roads Institute

Old Manor Park Library

835 Romford Road

Manor Park

London

E12 5JY
Map

An afternoon of talks and discussion

Refreshments served. Older children and young adults welcome.

Book via eventbrite.co.uk or email info@rabbitsroadinstitute.org

images (1)

‘Why study the Rich?’ is an event that brings together cross-disciplinary approaches to studying wealth in society. Come and listen to talks by activists, writers and artists whose scrutiny, investigation and differing perspectives attempt to challenge cultural narratives and societal structures that are intrinsically linked to the maintenance of power.

Open discussion with the audience is encouraged throughout the afternoon, as together we discuss how studies of ‘the rich’ might reveal a deeper understanding of the conditions of contemporary life and contribute to the debate about inequality in society.

 

Confirmed Speakers:

Roger Burrows, Professor of Cities at Newcastle University

Aditya Chakrabortty, senior economics commentator for The Guardian

Jeremy Gilbert, writer, researcher and activist & Professor of Cultural and Political Theory at UEL

Katharina Hecht, PhD student at LSE, on Economic Inequality

Jo Littler, Reader in Cultural Industries at City University London

Laure Provost, Artist, screening film ‘How to make money religiously

 

‘Why study the Rich?’ culminates a project called The Rich as a Minority Group by artists Ruth Beale and Amy Feneck in collaboration with GCSE Sociology students from Little Ilford School in Newham.

Rabbits Road Institute: http://createlondon.org/event/rabbits-road-institute/ and http://oldmanorparklibrary.org/rri/

Sign up to the Rabbits Road newsletter

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

images (2)

downloadTHE ARTS OF LOGISTSICS

Call for Papers

3rd and 4th June 2016

Queen Mary University of London

Keynote Presentations: Deborah Cowen (University of Toronto) and Alberto Toscano (Goldsmiths, University of London)

The so-called “logistics revolution” and its attendant technologies have made possible capitalism’s reproduction and restructuring over the past half century. Among other things, logistics sped up the loading and unloading of ships and helped establish the “global factory,” thereby drastically reducing the labor time required to produce and circulate commodities. This allowed capitalism to expand its economies of scale and relocate manufacturing to wherever worker militancy and the costs of labor were lowest. While the logistics infrastructure has transformed social life the world over, it also has opened up new opportunities for resistance to exploitation. Since the onset of the financial crisis, an array of movements internationally have turned to logistics as a terrain of political struggle, from the work slowdowns of logistics employees to the port and highway blockades of social movements as various as Occupy, the “Boycott, Divest, and Sanction” campaign, and BlackL ivesMatter. Logistics is also increasingly material for art, from representations of global trade in photography and literature to the use of actual shipping containers as performance spaces and pop-up galleries.

“The Arts of Logistics” brings together scholars, activists, and artists from across the humanities and social sciences to interrogate how social movements and the arts respond to a world remade by logistics. Long an important topic for economists, management theorists, and sociologists, logistics is only recently emerging as an object of substantive study by artists and researchers in the humanities. Thus, this conference seeks to further define scholarly, political, and artistic conversations on the nexus of political economy, anti-capitalist struggle, and art.

 

Possible topics participants could engage include the following:

-The politics and aesthetics of mapping logistics or infrastructure – Container art and architecture

-Historical representations of empire, trade, and commodity flows

-The emergence of counter-logistics as an anti-capitalist strategy

-Cultures of surveillance and security

-Labour and consumer activism around the “global factory”

-Data and network visualisation

-Queering logistics

 

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers in a variety of formats. As an interdisciplinary conference, we also welcome practical demonstrations by artists, performances lectures, roundtables, and more.

Please submit an abstract of 300 words (max) and a short bio of 50 words (max) to both conference organisers: Shane Boyle (m.s.boyle@qmul.ac.uk) and Aylwyn Walsh (awalsh@lincoln.ac.uk) by February 22. Please make sure to include your preferred contact information and specify ‘The Arts of Logistics’ in your subject line. If you are interested in making a proposal that involves multiple contributions or lasts longer than 20 minutes (like a roundtable or screening) please be in touch with the organisers as soon as possible.

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-the-arts-of-logistics

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Crisis

Crisis

CRISES? WHAT CRISES?

Call for Papers for a Session on:

Crises? What Crises?

Society for Socialist Studies (SSS)

Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, 2016

University of Calgary

May 31 – June 3, 2016

 

 

Economists aren’t sure the world economy ever got over the 2008/9 crisis but already warn of new financial and sovereign debt crises. Secular stagnation has become common parlance in economic circles.

Only environmentalists, pointing at climate change, the decline of biodiversity, water shortages and concomitant desertification, paint an even gloomier picture of the state and future of the world.

Not surprisingly, political scientists register a crisis of legitimation but also various crises of representation making it difficult for the discontented to articulate their concerns and mount movements for social and ecological change.

For the most parts, the left with its tradition of seeing itself as socialist heir of capitalist crises can’t capitalize on the overabundance of such crises. The crisis of the left, one might think, is even deeper than the various crises of capitalism.

  • The session “Crises? What Crises?” invites papers discussing any of the following questions:
  • Which kinds of crises is capitalism facing these days? Crises of the economy, ecology, legitimation, representation and/or hegemony?
  • Do these crises affect only subsystems of capitalism or do they add up to an organic or general crisis of capitalism?
  • Are these crises structural or conjunctural?
  • What role could the left play in overcoming capitalist crises?
  • Is the left in crisis, too? If so, what kind of crisis is that and how might it be overcome?

Session organizer:

Ingo Schmidt, ingos@athabascau.ca

Paper titles and abstracts (maximum of 100 words) should be submitted by Friday, January 29, 2016.

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-crises-what-crises-socialist-studies-session-calgary-may-31-june-3-2016

 

Work on Crisis (and Education) by Glenn Rikowski:

Rikowski, G. (2014) Crises in Education, Crises of Education, A paper prepared for the Philosophy of Education Seminars at the University of London Institute of Education 2014-15 Programme, 22nd October 2014. Available at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Rikowski, G. (2015) Crises, Commodities and Education: Disruptions, Eruptions, Interruptions and Ruptions, a paper prepared for the Research in Critical Education Studies (RiCES) Seminar, School of Education, University of Lincoln, 19th November 2105 (Revised 2nd December, 2015). Available at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/18511424/Crises_Commodities_and_Education_Disruptions_Eruptions_Interruptions_and_Ruptions

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

CRISIS

CRISIS

I must work harder!

I must work harder!

HISTORICAL MATERIALISM LONDON CONFERENCE 2015 – PRE-REGISTRATION

Reminder: Only 4 days left to pre-register for the HM 2015 London Conference*

* NB: remember please that this year’s conference is at the SOAS Russell Square site, not Vernon Square as last year!
The Old is Dying and the New Cannot Be Born: States, Strategies, Socialisms

Twelfth Annual Historical Materialism Conference

School of Oriental and African Studies, Central London, 5-8 November 2015
As austerity tightens its grip around the throats of the peoples of Europe, but also rears its ugly head in Brazil and elsewhere, we are forced to recognize that it is not the mere by-product of the ‘economic crisis’ but a political project in its own right, one whose aim is to deepen and consolidate the most uncompromising forms of neoliberal capitalism. It cannot be said that this project has hitherto been met with passivity, even if social movements of resistance have been mostly far from strong enough to halt its advance. Yet something is perhaps beginning to change, namely the emergence of counter-austerity projects that have pitched themselves at a political – even electoral or governmental – level. With all their weaknesses, hesitations and contradictions, the chinks of light in Southern Europe, amongst others, should compel Marxists to pose a whole series of ‘old’ strategic and theoretical problems in new garbs and new configurations, ​but perhaps also to retire some of our dear fetishes and shibboleths, and to experiment with forms and strategies adequate to our present. Among the themes that have returned to the agenda are: the relationship of movements and parties of the radical Left to states and governments; the need for a political response to how class power is enmeshed with forms of domination that have gender, race, imperialism or sexuality as their axes; possible « socialist » futures and the ‘transitional’ mediations implied by them; the guiding dichotomies of left thought: reform and revolution, revolution and revolt, state and movement, parties classes and masses; the link between the limits to capital and the limits of politics.

Over a hundred panels on a wide variety of topics and plenary sessions on: Race, Mobility and the State; Austerity and Socialist Strategy in Southern Europe; Social Reproduction Theory; Marxism and Religion; Workers’ Struggles in South Africa.

Provisional Programme: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/conferences/annual12/ProvProgramme.pdf/view
Conference Poster for download: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/conferences/annual12/conference-poster

download (11)

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

download (1)RULES FOR THE WORLD MARKET

Professor Paul Cammack

Tuesday, 27 October 2015, 5-7 PM

Room G3 (SOAS Main Building)

Discussant: Dr Alessandra Mezzadri (SOAS)

Abstract: It is too often forgotten that some of the first calls for structural adjustment from the late 1970s on came from the OECD and the World Bank, and were directed towards the advanced Western economies. These organizations urged them to reform their welfare regimes and to open their economies to exports from the newly industrialised countries in particular. This paper characterises them primarily as producers of rules for the world market, and follows the evolution of the ‘world market project’ through to the present, with reference to the successive conjunctures of 1989-91 and 2008-2009. The principal focus is on the promotion of competitiveness, and the reform of labour markets and social protection. It is argued that the project is best understood as centrally concerned with the development of capitalist relations of production on a global scale.

Professor Paul Cammack received his PhD from the University of Oxford. He was until recently a faculty member in the Department of Asian and International Studies at City University of Hong Kong, China where he taught Global Political Economy. Professor Cammack has recently published “World Market Regionalism at the Asian Development Bank” in the Journal of Contemporary Asia and a series of Working Papers on the multilateral development banks and the Global Financial Crisis. Professor Cammack’s research interests include the response of multilateral development banks to the financial crisis, the political economy of Latin America, Marxism, south-south cooperation and the politics of development.

ALL WELCOME, NO NEED TO BOOK.

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/professor-paul-cammack-rules-for-the-world-market-soas-ocober-27

We Are the Crisis

We Are the Crisis

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

1968

1968

BEFORE ‘68

Conference—”Before ’68: The Left, activism & social movements in the long 1960s”

Conference Dates: 13 and 14 February 2016

Venue: School of History, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ, UK and hosted by UEA School of History in conjunction with the journal Socialist History and the Institute of Working Class History (Chicago).

The events of 1968, particularly those in France, have achieved a mythical status in both the memory and the historiography of the 1960s. For some, 1968 marked the end-point of a realignment of the European ‘New Left’. For others 1968 represented a student generation in revolt, and many of the first accounts which sought to explain the history and meaning of ’68 were written by that generation.

More recently historians have tried to demythologise ’68, looking both at less ‘glamourous’ locales and at the deeper histories of anti-colonial struggles and worker activism prior to the events of that year. The aim of this conference is to explore the diverse histories of social activism and left politics in Britain and elsewhere, and how they prepared the ground for and fed into ‘1968’.

Themes might include, but are not limited to:

  • Anti-nuclear & peace movements
    Civil Rights struggles
    The Black Power movement
    Anti-colonial politics
    The activities of the Labour movement and the ‘traditional’ Left
    The grassroots activism of the ‘New Left’
    Far Left challenges: Trotskyism & Maoism
    Campaigns around housing and the built environment
    Campaigns around race and discrimination in the workplace and housing
    Solidarity movements with struggles abroad (e.g. South Africa, Vietnam)
    Campaigns for Homosexual Equality
    Second Wave Feminism

We are seeking papers of 5,000 to 10,000 words on any aspects of left activism and social movements in the period preceding 1968 to be presented at the conference. Selected papers will be published in a special issue of the journal Socialist History. Attendance at the conference will be free of charge, but we ask that anyone wishing to attend registers in advance.

Proposals for papers and any enquiries should be submitted to Ben Jones.

Email: b.jones5@uea.ac.uk

Deadline for proposals for papers: 31 October 2015

download (3)

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/call-for-papers-before-9268-the-left-activism-social-movements-in-the-long-1960s-1

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

download (4)

Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism

THE MONT PELERIN PLAGUE? REVISITING AND RETHINKING NEOLIBERALISM

Call for Papers

Association of American Geographers Conference

2016

San Francisco, 29 March – 2 April 2016

 

The Mont Pelerin Plague? Revisiting and Rethinking Neoliberalism

Organizers

Kean Birch (York University, Canada)

Simon Springer (University of Victoria, Canada)

 

Outline

From its initial conceptualization in Mont Pelerin in 1947, neoliberalism has now become a ubiquitous term. In geography, and elsewhere, it is used to theorize everything from the development of ecosystem services through urban regeneration to financialization (Springer, Birch & MacLeavy 2016). Across a range of disciplines it is conceptualized in various ways as, for example, a geographical process; a form of governmentality; the restoration of elite class power; a discourse; a political project of institutional change; a set of transformative ideas; a development policy paradigm; a radical political slogan; an epistemic community or thought collective; an economic ideology or doctrine; a particular form of violence; and so on. Such variety and diversity in intellectual analysis (i.e. an explanatory framework) and substantive topic (i.e. a thing to explain) have produced a glut of concepts, theories, and analyses. While this medley might be seen as a necessary – and fruitful – outcome of such a hybrid and heterogeneous process, it also has the potential side-effect of leaving us more confused than enlightened. It is increasingly difficult, on the one hand, to parse or synthesize this intellectual (yet often contradictory) abundance and, on the other hand, to apply it to policy or practical issues facing diverse communities, societies, organizations and individuals around the world. It also risk becoming a self-fulfilling prophecy, where despite our hesitancies, we come to believe that there really is no alternative. A body of literature is emerging that is critical of current conceptions and understandings of neoliberalism, highlighting these issues (e.g. Boas & Gans-Morse 2009; Barnett 2009; Weller and O’Neill 2014; Flew 2014; Birch 2015; Venugopal 2015).

 

Questions

It is time to take stock of what we are left with by adopting neoliberalism as a key spanner in our analytical toolkit. Consequently, the aim of this session is to revisit and rethink neoliberalism as an abstract concept and as an empirical object. We invite contributors to critically revisit dominant conceptions of neoliberalism, to rethink how we use neoliberalism as an analytical and methodological framework, and to offer new ideas about how to productively (re)conceptualize neoliberalism. Below we outline some broad questions that contributors might like to consider engaging, although others are welcome:

  1. How conceptually useful has neoliberalism been in geography?
  2. How has the concept of neoliberalism evolved over the last two decades?
  3. How are we plagued by neoliberalism, or are we plagued by its ongoing prioritization?
  4. Does neoliberalism represent the most useful or critical way of understanding the current state of the world?
  5. Does neoliberalism need updating as a critical concept in ways that take us beyond hybridity and variegation?
  6. What is missing from debates on neoliberalism in contemporary geographical scholarship?
  7. What makes neoliberalism such a popular analytical framework in geography?
  8. Are there alternative ways to conceptualize neoliberalism?
  9. Are we in need of finding alternative conceptions that break with the language of ‘neoliberalism’ altogether?
  10. What might new visions beyond neoliberalism yield in terms of our collective political future?

 

Abstract Submission

If you would like to participate in the session, please submit an abstract (250 words max) by 19 October 2015 to bothkean@yorku.ca and springer@uvic.ca. If you would like to participate in other ways (e.g. discussant) then please feel free to contact us as well.

Please note: once you have submitted an abstract to us, you will also need to register AND submit an abstract on the AAG website. The AAG abstract deadline is 29 October 2015 to: http://www.aag.org/cs/http://www.aag.org/cs/annualmeeting/how_to_submit_an_abstract

 

See: http://www.politicalgeography.org/2015/09/24/cfp-aag-2016-the-mont-pelerin-plague-revisiting-and-rethinking-neoliberalism/

 

Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

313111_coverSEMINARS ON CONTEMPORARY MARXIST THEORY

 

 

 

 

Wednesday 21 October

Stathis Kouvelakis

Lessons of the Greek Crisis

6pm

S-1.04 Strand Building (NB in basement), King’s College London, Strand WC2R 2LS

 

Monday 9 November

Riccardo Bellofiore & Alex Callinicos

A Dialogue on Alex Callinicos’s book Deciphering Capital: Marx’s Capital and Its Destiny

5pm

K0.20, King’s Building, King’s College London, Strand WC2R 2LS

 

Wednesday 25 November

Nicholas De Genova

Theorising the ‘Crisis’ of the European Border Regime

6pm

342N Norfolk Building, King’s College London, Strand WC2R 2LS

 

Karl Marx

Karl Marx

The Seminar in Contemporary Marxist Theory is a collaboration among scholars in the departments of European & International Studies, Geography, and Management at King’s College London.

For further information contact Stathis Kouvelakisstathis.kouvelakis@kcl.ac.uk

 

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/london-seminar-on-contemporary-marxist-theory

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

clip_image008INVENTING THE FUTURE: POSTCAPITALISM AND A WORLD WITHOUT WORK – Nick Srnicek and Alex Williams – Book Launch

At Housmans

Housmans Bookshop, 5 Caledonian Road, King’s Cross
London, N1 9DX
Tel: 020 7837 4473
e: shop@housmans.com

Wednesday 28th October, 7.00pm

Entry £3, redeemable against any purchase

 

Launch of Inventing the Future: Postcapitalism and a World Without Work

By Nick Srnicek and Alex Williams

Verso, 2015

ISBN-13: 978-1-78478-096-8 (paperback)

 

Despite the profound crisis of capitalism and the mass mobilizations of people around the world in response, there has been no successful contestation of neoliberalism’s hegemony. Inventing the Future is a major new manifesto that argues for a novel set of alternatives for the future—alternatives which seek to rekindle a popular modernity.

Against the confused understanding of the high-tech and neoliberal world by both the right and the left, this book claims that the emancipatory and future-oriented possibilities of our society can be reclaimed. Instead of running from a complex future, the authors envisage a post-capitalist economy is capable of advancing living standards, liberating humanity from work and developing technologies which free us from biological and environmental constraints.

Reviews

“Nick Srnicek and Alex Williams’ project dares to propose a different way of thinking and acting. Given the fizzling of the Occupy moment, a radical rethinking of the anarchic approach is badly needed but just not happening. This book could do a lot of work in getting that rethink going.” – Doug Henwood, author of Wall Street

“The Left has lost its grip on the future. In retreat from technological modernity, too many leftists have fled to the local, the organic and the spontaneous. Inventing the Future shows why these strategies are misguided, and offers a vision of how left-wing politics can be rebuilt for the 21st century.” – Mark Fisher, author of Capitalist Realism: Is there no Alternative?

Events at Housmans: http://www.housmans.com/events.php

Housmans – radical booksellers since 1945: http://www.housmans.com/

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

 

download (1)HISTORY AND CLASS STRUGGLES

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Dear friends, dear colleagues,

We are pleased to inform you of the publication of the new issue of Actuel Marx review, whose main dossier is devoted to “History and class struggles.” It is available in bookstores since yesterday. You will find below the summary of this volume.

The magazine will participate in a series of initiatives in 2016, we will keep you informed.

Remember that the journal only lives thanks to its subscribers. Find in this address newsletter subscriptions, thank you in advance for your support: http://www.puf.com/puf_wiki/images/b/ba/TARIF_ABONNEMENT2015.pdf

Among the themes of upcoming issues: Psychoanalysis and Marxism, Around the global ruling class, green Marxism, Russian Revolution …

Best regards,
Jean-Numa Ducange and Guillaume Sibertin-Blanc
Actuel Marx co-di rectors

http://www.puf.com/Revues:Actuel_Marx_2015_-_n%C2%B0_58

 
Dossier : histoire et lutte de classes

Jean-Numa DUCANGE
Marx, le marxisme et le « père de la lutte des classes », Augustin Thierry
Bryan D. PALMER
La lutte de classe et les dépossédés
Eugénia PALIERAKI
Le MIR, la révolution et ses classes sociales dans le Chili des années 1960
Geoff ELEY
Réflexions sur la formation de la classe ouvrière, le passé et le présent
Jacques GUILHAUMOU
Révolution française et grammaire de la lutte de classe. Marx, Gramsci, Wittgenstein
Un entretien de Déborah COHEN avec Michèle RIOT-SARCEY
Le « mouvement ouvrier » en questions

INTERVENTIONS
Lilian TRUCHON
Retour sur le marxisme et le darwinisme
Claire DODEMAN
Marx et l’élaboration du concept de nature dans la philosophie de Merleau-Ponty
Julien PALLOTTA
Bourdieu face au marxisme althussérien : la question de l’État
Christophe DARMANGEAT Certains étaient-ils plus égaux que d’autres ?
II – Formes d’exploitation sous le communisme primitif
Florent GABARRON-GARCIA
Pour une histoire populaire de la psychanalyse. De quoi Ernest Jones est-il le nom ?
EN DÉBAT
Catherine COLLIOT-THELENE et Franck FISCHBACH
Pourquoi la philosophie sociale ?
COMPTE-RENDUS
Marxismes, théorie critique, histoire…

 

Bonjour à toutes et tous,

Nous avons le plaisir de vous informer de la parution du nouveau numéro de la revue Actuel Marx dont le dossier central est consacré à « Histoire et luttes de classes ». Il est disponible en librairie depuis hier. Vous trouverez ci-dessous le sommaire du nouveau numéro.

La revue participera à une série d’initiatives en 2016, nous vous tiendrons informés.

N’oubliez pas que la revue ne vit que grâce à ses abonnés. Retrouvez à cette adresse le bulletin d’abonnements, merci d’avance de votre soutien :

http://www.puf.com/puf_wiki/images/b/ba/TARIF_ABONNEMENT2015.pdf

Parmi les thématiques des numéros à venir : Psychanalyse et marxisme, autour de la classe dominante mondiale, marxisme vert, révolution russe…

Bien cordialement,

Jean-Numa Ducange et Guillaume Sibertin-Blanc
Co-directeurs d’Actuel Marx

http://www.puf.com/Revues:Actuel_Marx_2015_-_n%C2%B0_58

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/actuel-marx-nouvelle-parution

Political Economy

Political Economy

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/