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images (9)SPACE, IDENTITIES AND MEMORY

Birkbeck Institutes of Social Research and the Humanities Graduate Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS

Space, Identities and Memory

Deadline for Submission of Abstracts: 11/03/2016.

Contact: bihbisrconference@gmail.com

We invite postgraduate researchers, academics, activists, artists, and practitioners from across disciplines to contribute to the Birkbeck Institutes’ (BIH/BISR) annual two day conference held from the 13th to the 14th  May 2016.

This year’s conference theme seeks to examine the interplay between identity, space and memory, exploring the ways in which identities may be created, formed and informed by spatial and temporal contexts. In particular, we seek to examine to what extent identities are performed in response to political, social and cultural pressures, including historical circumstances leading to the construction of acceptable and unacceptable identities.

The conference aims to capture the complex overlaying of identities in time and space, and the agency of individuals and communities as they address their own complex understandings of the temporality of identity. Conversely, we hope the conference will highlight how space and time are influenced and shaped by everyday life, sociabilities, mobilisations and processes of subjectivation. In particular we are seeking papers that engage with topics such as:

 

  • The built environment: how are housing, architecture, urbanity and concepts of public and private space harnessed in the self-fashioning of individual and communal identity?
  • Gender, sexuality and race, the politics of becoming and the deterritorialisation of the body;
  • ’Home’, domesticity and concepts of solitude and isolation across time and space;
  • Spaces of dissent and resistance: how is memory imbricated in public spaces as sites of encounters, direct action and creative practices?
  • Displacements and borders: constructing or disassembling boundaries from local to global;
  • Explorations in the use of maps, social cartography and critical geography;
  • Exclusion and inclusion in institutional spaces: how have institutionalised spaces cemented or challenged contemporary and past perspectives on identity?
  • Narrating the past: memorialisation, contestation and re-enactment
  • Innovative methods and approaches in the investigation of the intersections between space, identity and memory

 

Our first confirmed keynote speaker is Andy Merrifield. The conference will conclude with a round table bringing together activists, practitioners and academics.

This is an interdisciplinary conference, designed to foster creative thinking and new research agendas. To this end, we encourage papers from a diversity of disciplinary backgrounds that explore the interconnections of space, identity and memory.

We are particularly interested in receiving contributions from artists and practitioners in education, the heritage sector or related fields to participate in this interdisciplinary conference.

Proposals

We warmly welcome abstracts for 20-minute panel papers. Abstracts should be between 200-300 words in length. Please include a short biography with your submission.  The deadline for submission of abstracts is the 11/03/2016. Authors will be notified regarding the acceptance of their paper after submissions have been reviewed and no later than 31/03/2016.

Contact Details

Please send enquiries and proposals to Beth Hodgett, Calum Wright, Eva Lauenstein & Moniza Rizzini at:

bihbisrconference@gmail.com

images (11)

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

images

 

Celestial Dome Inverted

Celestial Dome Inverted

DARK NIGHTS OF THE UNIVERSE

Recess, in conjunction with The Public School New York, Presents:

Dark Nights of the Universe
et nox sicut dies illuminabitur

A four-night theoretical exploration of mysticism in dialogue with Du noir univers, a text by François Laruelle.

April 26th – 29th, 2012

Classes nightly at 7pm

 

Night I: Eugene Thacker – Remote: The Forgetting of the World
Clodagh Emoe – Mystical Anarchism. Screening and discussion. Introduced by Simon Critchley.

 

Night II: Daniel Colucciello Barber – Whylessness: The Universe is Deaf and Blind.

 

Night III: Nicola Masciandaro – Secret: No Light Has Ever Seen the Black Universe

 

Night IV: Alexander Galloway – Rocket: Present at Every Point of the Remote

 

Classes will begin at 7pm. Visitors are welcome to join each day or a selection of days.

Recess will house a temporary library of relevant texts, which visitors may browse and annotate freely throughout Recess’s public hours and during the classes.  The exhibition will feature visual works by  Clodagh Emoe and Aaron Mette, and audio works by Eugene Thacker and Taku Unami.

Participants:

Daniel Colucciello Barber, Simon Critchley, Clodagh Emoe, Alexander Galloway, Nicola Masciandaro, Aaron Mette, Eugene Thacker, and Taku Unami.

Download Du noir univers. The English edition of this essay was first translated and published by Miguel Abreu as “Of Black Universe in the Human Foundations of Color” in the catalogue Hyun Soo Choi: Seven Large-Scale Paintings (New York: Thread Waxing Space, 1991): 2-4. It has been reproduced here with a few slight modifications. The original French essay, titled “Du noir univers: dans les fondations humaines de la couleur,” was published in La Décision philosophique 5 (April 1988): 107-112.

Audio archive of the series available here.

RSVP encouraged: click here.

Download the press release.

Click here to view images.

For image request or more information contact info@recessactivities.org

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

PosthumanCONTESTED EXCHANGES: SPACE, PLACE AND THE PERFORMANCE OF DEMOCRACY

Conference: ARTAUD FORUM 2015

Friday 27th – Sunday 29th March 2015, Artaud Centre, Brunel University, London

“Participation is an issue that has everything to do with the physical city and its design. For example, in the ancient polis, the Athenians put the semi-circular theatre to political use; this architectural form provided good acoustics and a clear view and of speakers in debates; moreover, it made the perception of other people’s responses during debates possible. In modern times, we have no similar model of democratic space – certainly no clear imagination of an urban democratic space.” (Richard Sennett, The Open City, URBAN AGE / BERLIN / NOVEMBER 2006 p.4)

The Arab Spring, Occupy Movement, England Riots, and Ukrainian Revolution are events that show how dissent is at its most powerful when it spills over into public space and becomes a visible event for the world to see. Of course, these events also demonstrate the potency of digital media to circulate these voices of dissent to a wider global public sphere. They therefore add value to the argument that suggests every sort of public debate and ‘politics’ can increasingly be ‘democratised’ through online platforms and virtual presences. At the same time, politicians have been encouraging ordinary people to work together with voluntary, public and private bodies in order to revitalise local communities.

However, these developments have created tensions in cities and towns. On the one hand, a ‘deliberative’ approach to citizenship has arisen that attempts to listen to local grievances and seeks to ‘empower’ people in communities through the creative opportunities that public and private investment provides. On the other hand, cities and towns have increasingly privatised their public space through the likes of new shopping centres, redevelopment schemes, and private housing schemes. Alongside these networks of gentrification, many authorities, planners, and security forces have also installed new modes of surveillance in public space that code people’s behaviour in different ways, while different governments across the world have equipped their police and security forces with increased legislative powers to regulate cities and towns.

Taken all together, these processes have created assemblages of power, fissures and fluidities in public space. Deliberative opportunities have opened up for a whole network of ordinary voices to be heard in the public sphere, while new modes of control and governance would seem to confine these voices within configurations of control. Tensions between both of these mean that novel spaces for alternative assemblages and performances of activism, citizenship and democracy have the potential to arise.

But why might performance/s in such public spaces be considered fundamental to the democratic process? Where the performance of democracy is not considered a metaphor for action or intent but as something fundamental to the process itself, how have these performances grown or have been stifled within processes already described? In an age of digital media, what is in fact the value of physical space and physical bodies for democracy? What is the role of space and place in the performance of democracy as well as in notions of ‘public’ spaces that are increasingly difficult to define as ‘of the people’ /popular/ public?

In 2015, the biannual Artaud Forum would like to meet days before Parliament dissolves on the30 March, itself the final dissolution before the UK General Election on 7 May, to consider these important issues. Indeed, at this critical moment of suspension, the Forum would like to interrogate the function and significance of place and space for (or against) the ‘performance’ of democracy, from a range of disciplinary perspectives that might include, but is not limited to, geography, history, politics, sociology, psychology, theatre, and architecture.

 

Plenary Speakers include

Davina Cooper (University of Kent)

John Parkinson (University of Warwick)

 

Conference Fees

Weekend: £45 / concession £35

Saturday or Sunday:  £25 / concession £20

Friday night launch: FREE

 

Organised by Grant Peterson, Mary Richards and John Roberts (Brunel University, London). For more information, contact Mary.Richards@brunel.ac.uk  or John.Roberts@brunel.ac.uk

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

 

 

Communisation

Communisation

JOURNAL OF CULTURAL RESEARCH IN ART EDUCATION

The Journal of Cultural Research in Art Education (jCRAE) is an annual publication of the United States Society for Education through Art. jCRAE focuses on social and cultural research relevant for art and visual culture education, including cultural foundations of art education, cross-cultural and multicultural research in art education, and cultural aspects of art in education. These areas should be interpreted in a broad sense and can include community arts organizations, schools, arts administration, art therapy, and other disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches that are relevant to art and visual culture education. Theoretical research and research in which qualitative and/or quantitative methods as well as visual and other formats and strategies are used will be considered for publication.

CALL FOR PAPERS for 2014

Mini-themed issue (Volume 34, 2014) on Space, Place, And Time in Art and Visual Culture Education

How do space and place affect the way we experience the world and create art? How do they affect the politics of who we are and how we teach? The Journal of Cultural Research in Art Education invites submissions for a mini-themed issue on Space, Place, and (or) Time in Art and Visual Culture Education, to be published Summer 2014.

Submissions from a broad range of perspectives are encouraged. A variety of formats are also welcome—including traditional academic essays, visual essays, or alternative formats—that fit the purposes of the journal to address issues of art, education, and culture.  Image-based submissions should be accompanied by explanatory text or an artist statement. Short manuscripts are generally 1,000 to 2,000 words, longer manuscripts 3,000 to 4,000 words.

Click here for a longer prospectus on the theme, or to submit, please visit http://www.jcrae.org.

Submissions on other topics are always welcome; space, place, and (or) time are a “mini-theme.”

Preferred deadline: 1 November, 2013

Send your submissions electronically to the journal editor, Elizabeth Garber, at egarber@email.arizona.edu.

Elizabeth Garber, Editor
University of Arizona
School of Art, PO 210002
Tucson AZ 85721.0002
egarber@email.arizona.edu

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Utopia

Utopia

CREATING WORLDS: THE AFFECTIVE SPACES OF EXPERIENTIAL POLITICS

Final call for participants: 

Creating worlds: The affective spaces of experimental politics

Monday 14 January, 2013
Royal Holloway, Bedford Square, 2 Gower Street, WC1E 6DP.
10am-5pm
Facilitated by Anja Kanngieser and Jenny Pickerall.

This event seeks to bring together those exploring questions of how we live within, formulate, create and antagonise, spaces and places of politics: public and private, macro-political and micro-political. It is specifically interested in inviting conversation about spaces in which self-organisation occur, whereby people come together in some sort of common articulation. Moreover, what is of key interest is the ‘how’: how people come together in what kinds of spaces and places; what forces and desires inform these collective spaces, and how they are sustained; how spaces and subjects are processually entangled; how social reproduction occurs – the lines of class, gender, race, ability; and the ways spaces are differentiated, that is to say, how boundaries are performed. 

Rather than marking topographies of conventional ‘radical’ political sites, such as social centres, camps, protests, assemblies, allotments, workplaces, bookstores, what might be uncovered are the more messy affective and relational threads that run though them, and also far beyond them, and how we might even begin to apprehend and engage with them.

There will be three roundtables on the themes of:

Spatiality and affect with Kye Askins, Harriet Hawkins and Paul Simpson. Facilitated by Anna Feigenbaum

Spatiality and organisation (social reproduction) with Tim Cresswell, Jane Wills and Nazima Kadir. Facilitated by Fabian Frenzel

Spatiality and politics with Adam Ramadan, Andy Davies and Uri Gordon. Facilitated by Gavin Brown.

Please submit a short (200 word) statement by 15 December 2012 on why you would like to attend when registering your interest toanja.kanngieser@rhul.ac.uk. Attendance is limited to 30 people. 

Some travel funding is available for unwaged/ underwaged participants.

This event is part of a series associated with the Protest Camps: Experiments in Alternative Worlds projecthttp://protestcamps.org/ and is funded by an ESRC Postdoctoral Fellowship with Royal Holloway, University of London.

http://www.transversalgeographies.org

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski’s paper, Critical Pedagogy and the Constitution of Capitalist Society has been published at Heathwood Press as a Monthly Guest Article for September 2012, online at:

http://www.heathwoodpress.com/monthly-guest-article-august-critical-pedagogy-and-the-constitution-of-capitalist-society-by-glenn-rikowski/

 

Heathwood Press: http://www.heathwoodpress.com 

 

The Individuality Pr♥test: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/transcontinental/the-individuality-prtest

I Love Transcontinental: http://ihearttranscontinental.blogspot.co.uk/

 

 

 

Aesthetics

THE LONG DURÉE OF THE FAR RIGHT

The Longue Durée of the Far Right: Ideology, Organization, State Formation and International Relations

October 2012 (Queen Mary, University of London)

 

Call for Papers

The (re)emergence of far-right parties and social movements in various parts of the world – and particularly in Europe – in recent years has been widely discussed in the press and in academic commentary. In contrast to their ‘revolutionary’ bedfellows on the communist left, since the end of the Cold War far-right parties have come to form a significant and disturbing part of the political geography in a number of countries. Whilst their influence has been uneven – from participating in governing coalitions in Western Europe (the Austrian Freedom Party and the Italian Lega Nord) and in India (the Bharatiya Janata Party) to spawning a violent Islamophobic street movement (the English Defence League in the UK), to forming a major component of anti-imperialist movements across much of the Islamic world – their general appearance across time and space suggests that the current era is comparable to the earlier historical conjunctures of far-right mobilization in the late nineteenth century and inter-war periods. The varied forms of far-right have combined with their contrasting ideological dimensions, which has made the taxonomy of far-right something of an academic industry in itself. In particular, the far-right has come to be divided over its ‘post-fascist’ rhetorical commitment to (liberal) democracy as opposed to an authoritarian and demagogic populism and also between a neo-fascist commitment to a statist and protectionist model of capitalism and an embrace of much of the policy formulas of neo-liberalism by some strands of the contemporary far-right.

These developments raise a number of analytical and political questions. How distinct are these contemporary manifestations of the far-right compared to the previous historical forms of the far-right? How analytically useful is the concept of fascism in describing the generic far-right? What are the social bases of the far-right – past and present? Which methodological framework provides the most useful analytical tool to examine and understand the far-right? What of the relationship between the evolving dynamics of uneven capitalist development and geopolitical order on the determination of far-right movements – historical and contemporary?

The aim of this workshop is to promote an inter-disciplinary engagement with these issues through bringing together scholars from a range of different subject areas (IR, IPE, Geography, History, Sociology, Comparative Politics and Political Theory) to re-think the linkages between the historical, sociological and international dimensions of the far-right – as ideology, movement and state – over the longue durée from its emergence as a distinct and modern form of politics in the late nineteenth century to its more recent re-emergence in their intertwining local, national and international contexts.

Possible themes for consideration, but not limited to:

Comparative historical case studies of far-right movements and states

Analytical issues of comparisons and comparative methodologies

International relations of fascist state formation processes

Far-right movements in colonial and post-colonial contexts

Evolving class and social compositions of the far-right

Political economies of fascist states

Distinctions and relations between ideologies, movements and states

Geopolitical ordering and far-right movements and states – imperial, Cold War and post-Cold War eras

Capitalist development, uneven, combined or  otherwise and conjunctures of crisis on processes of far-right emergence, evolution and transformation

Geographical and spatial variations in the far-right – urban/rural, local/national, north/south

Aesthetic representations in architecture, art and culture

Racialized conceptions of space and territoriality in ideologies and state practices

 

Please send proposals (of no more than 500 words), along with biographical and institutional information to Rick Saull (r.g.saull@qmul.ac.uk) or Alex Anievas

(alexander.anievas@st-annes.ox.ac.uk) by June 4, 2012

 

**END**

 

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Space

TAKING UP SPACE

Call for Papers

Here are the details: Taking up Space Cultural Studies Postgraduate Event 25th – 26th June 2012, Goldsmiths College, University of London 

This is a one / two day conference exploring the meaning and understanding of space in its physical manifestations as well as in its discursive forms; through which identity, meaning, value and authority can be mapped in particular ways.

We cannot avoid space. It is inevitable. The ways in which we understand ourselves, others and the world around us implies some notion of space. Our sense of self and society is worked through and is contained in space: culture does not only take place, but also creates it “making symbolic use of its objects” (Lefebvre).

To what degree does our conception of space change when we understand ourselves as self-enclosed or permeable beings? Can art and performance therefore mediate the relationship between the self, objects and environment? “The activities of travel, journey and navigation fabricate the social world as well as reveal it” (Caroline Knowles).

The space of the streets has become the site of dis-order and territory has become a prime issue for understanding contemporary social tensions. The recent riots in the UK brought into the forefront questions such as who owns space, how we can use this as a place for resistance and what notions of space are currently active in shaping and operating the socially constructed body. The possession of a categorized space can be considered in line with homelessness as a dislocation of the public and private, attesting to the multi-dimensionality of space and both the potentials and restrictions embodied in it.

The upcoming Olympics also signify the difficulties facing spaces contesting belonging and struggle. Questions of locality and identity are important, inciting questions of nationalism and tourism, paramount to the formation of cultural identity. In turn, the Occupy movement and one year anniversary ofTahrir Squarereinstates the need to define sacred and everyday space and the potentials in multiple usages of place. This conference will ask how can we negotiate the historicisation of memory? The aim of this conference is to rethink how space is interacted with and reconfigured in different mediums as a site for action as well as containment. If we cannot avoid space how can this be used to further an understanding of self or curtail ideas of autonomy? How are we embodied by space and embodying it at the same time? In what ways can space be used as a site for artistic and political development and how does the contemporary world and being become through the spatial? We welcome proposals for papers, discussions, short film, dance, performances, workshops and other engagements and activities engaging among others with the different ways of being in space.

Topics, experiences, understandings and possibilities might include but are not restricted to: • Temporality and embodiment • Knowledge and materiality • Interaction between objects and self • Memory/ history/ time • Bodies and public and private • Restrictions and exclusions • Performance / realm of aesthetics • Identity/ territory / alienation • Subversive potential – resistance / containment 

Abstracts/ proposals of 300-500 words should be sent to takingupspace2012@gmail.com by 15th March 2012. 

Program will be confirmed mid-April. 

**END**

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub,Bangor, northWales)  

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Space

SPACES OF TRANSFORMATION

Topology
Spaces of Transformation
The Vast Space-Time of Revolutions Becoming

Saturday 12 May 2012, 14.00–17.00

With Drucilla Cornell on ‘The Site of Revolution’, David Harvey on ‘The Spaces of Anti-Capitalist Transition’ and Achille Mbembe.

Chaired by Doreen Massey

This keynote conversation is followed by a performance by Rubedo in the Starr Auditorium starting at 19.00.

Tate Modern Starr Auditorium
£15 (£12 concessions)
For tickets book online
or call 020 7887 8888.

Details: http://www.tate.org.uk/modern/eventseducation/talksdiscussions/24993.htm

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

 

David Harvey

DAVID HARVEY LECTURE IN BRISTOL

David Harvey Lecture, Bristol, 19th July: Crises, Urbanization and the City as a Terrain for Anti-Capitalist Struggle

PUBLIC LECTURE

Bristol Institute of Public Affairs

Crises, Urbanization and the City as a Terrain for Anti-Capitalist Struggle

Professor David Harvey, Graduate Centre, City University of New York

 

David Harvey is one of the world’s most influential social scientists.  His many books include The New Imperialism; Paris, Capital of Modernity; Social Justice and the City; Limits to Capital; The Urbanization of Capital; The Condition of Postmodernity; Justice, Nature, and the Geography of Difference; Spaces of Hope; Spaces of Capital: Towards a Critical Geography, A Brief History of Neoliberalism and The Enigma of Capital.  His work also contributes to broader social and political debate; he is a leading proponent of the idea of ‘The Right to the City’, and in recent years he has become an internationally recognised ‘public intellectual’ in part due to the success of his very popular online lectures on Marx’s Capital  and superb public lectures.  We are delighted to welcome you all to this very special event.

Tuesday, 19 July 2011, 5:30pm

Peel Lecture Theatre, Reception to Follow

School of Geographical Sciences, University Road, University of Bristol

 

Details: http://socofed.com/2011/06/15/david-harvey-lecture-bristol-19th-july-crises-urbanization-and-the-city-as-a-terrain-for-anti-capitalist-struggle/

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Dr Linus

2ND INTERNATIONAL SUMMER INSTITUTE IN QUALITATIVE RESEARCH: PUTTING THEORY TO WORK

Education and Social Research Institute, Manchester Metropolitan University, 18 – 22 July 2011

Summer Institute Director: Maggie MacLure

Plenary Keynote Speakers 2011:

DEBORAH BRITZMAN, York University, Canada
‘On matters of soft theory and affected belief: a psychoanalytic approach to the defense of theory’.

LINDA TUHIWAI SMITH, University of Waikato, New Zealand
‘Decolonizing research in new spaces with new possibilities’?

HARRY TORRANCE, Manchester Metropolitan University
‘Mixed methods research: what is the role of qualitative methods’?

LISA MAZZEI, Gonzaga University, USA
‘Plugging one text into another: thinking with theory in qualitative research’

HELEN COLLEY, Manchester Metropolitan University
‘Time, space and ethics: thinking through Marx’

KATE McCOY, State University of New York (New Paltz)
‘Heroin’s monstrous beauties: mark(et)ing affect and abject

KERI FACER, Manchester Metropolitan University
‘Democracy, education and reclaiming narratives of the future’

BILL GREEN, Charles Sturt University, Australia 
‘Emergent methodologies in educational research’

MAGGIE MACLURE, Manchester Metropolitan University
‘”The first secret of the stammerer”: writing without representing’

Putting Theorists to Work (Practical Sessions): Butler, Derrida, Braidotti, Lacan, Foucault, Bourdieu, Deleuze, and others.

Delegate-led sessions (optional): for delegates wishing to present their own research.

The Summer Institute will be of interest to qualitative researchers who are looking for stimulating engagements with theory, from doctoral students to more experienced researchers, across the social sciences, education, health and caring professions.

Standard delegate fee: £295
Email inquiries: SIQR@mmu.ac.uk
Information and registration: www.esri.mmu.ac.uk/siqr/about.php

A note from Maggie MacLure:

This is just to let you know that the keynote presentations from *last year’s* Summer Institute are downloadable, as audio-files, text and/or powerpoint presentations, from: http://www.esri.mmu.ac.uk/siqr/downloads.php 

Speakers include: Patti Lather, Stephen Ball, Neil Mercer, Erica Burman, Ian Parker, Nick Lee, Maggie MacLure, Bridget Somekh, Lorna Roberts, Liz Jones, Rachel Holmes.  

We still have some places available for this year’s event, so I have included the information again below.

Do circulate to anyone who might be interested.

Best wishes 

Maggie MacLure

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

World Crisis

SLAVOJ ŽIŽEK: ‘THE SITUATION IS CATASTROPHIC, BUT NOT SERIOUS’

Co-sponsored by the Center for Place, Culture and Politics

Launch of the Committee on Globalization and Social Change

A talk by Slavoj Žižek: “The Situation Is Catastrophic, but Not Serious”

April 4 / Proshansky Auditorium / 6:30 p.m. 
CUNY GRADUATE CENTER/ 365 FIFTH AVENUE (AT 34TH STREET), NEW YORK CITY

Free, reservations required.

For more information, call 212-817-8215.

Slavoj Žižek is “the world’s hippest philosopher,” according to the British newspaper The Telegraph. He “can spin you from Heidegger to Hershey bars (by way of Hitchcock and Hizbollah).” Žižek is a “master of the counterintuitive observation,” according to The New Yorker.

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Zizek