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Education Crisis

Education Crisis

THE ABOLITION OF THE UNIVERSITY

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Open Library of Humanities (OLM)

CFP: The Abolition of the University: Deadline: Nov 1st, 2015

Deadline: 1st November 2015

In 1968, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o and his colleagues at the University of Nairobi called for the abolition of the English department. They attacked an enduring colonial legacy and envisioned an intellectual renaissance in Africa. In 2012, at the University of Glasgow: “Forty years after Ngũgĩ and his colleagues argued for it in Nairobi, the abolition of the Scottish Department was achieved by managerial diktat in Glasgow.” Two institutional interventions: the first driven by the desire to liberate education from epistemological and pedagogical domination; the second, by the neoliberal business model. This special edition seeks to consider the chequered history of the westernised university, to diagnose its embattled present, and to imagine its future.

In recent months, academics, non-academic staff, students and their allies across the UK, Canada, the Netherlands, Ireland, Albania, Finland, Colombia, Mexico and elsewhere, have staged protests against neoliberal reform of universities. Wendy Brown argues that the evolution of neoliberalism from a set of economic policies into mode of reason imperils not just liberal institutions but democracy itself. Education across the board is jeopardised by the corporate university model. The liberal arts face multidirectional threats, of extinction and irrelevance. Yet as Gayatri Spivak suggests, if the humanities is the ethical healthcare of society, what resources can we summon to reform, destroy, transform, or re-create the university? Or less innocently, as Bill Readings suggests, simply foster a space where academics (and students) can “work without alibis” in acknowledgement that radical possibilities are constrained by the societies in which universities are situated.

This special edition calls for a cross-disciplinary response, from the humanities and social sciences to all critical, creative and deviant positionalities. Diverse submissions are encouraged from policy reform to short stories. In particular, the edition reaches out to those who traditionally or purposefully find themselves outside the ivory towers: those not included and unassimilated.

Contributions will be considered around (but not limited to) these themes:

  • The western / imperial history of the university
  • Literary / creative representations of the university
  • Epistemologies / pedagogies of possibility
  • Western imperial humanism and the humanities
  • The co-option of postcolonial / Black / queer studies and ‘minority’ / transnational / diasporic literatures
  • Education in an age of neoliberalism / neo-colonialism
  • New models for higher education, including cooperatives, free schools etc.
  • The pedagogy of debt
  • The ‘Student As Producer’
  • Accelerationism and competition in the university
  • Activism: Strike / Occupy / Transform (In / Against / Beyond)
  • Resistance through radical poetics / humanisms

The special collection, edited by Lou Dear (University of Glasgow, l.dear.1@research.gla.ac.uk) and Martin Eve (Birkbeck, University of London, martin.eve@bbk.ac.uk), is to be published in the Open Library of Humanities (ISSN 2056-6700). The OLH is an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation-funded open-access journal with a strong emphasis on quality peer review and a prestigious academic steering board. Unlike some open-access publications, the OLH has no author-facing charges and is instead financially supported by an international consortium of libraries.

Submissions should be made online at: https://submit.openlibhums.org/ in accordance with the author guidelines and clearly marking the entry as [“The Abolition of the University,” SPECIAL COLLECTION]. Innovative submissions that do not clearly fit the submission guidelines are welcome and we encourage authors to contact the editors to discuss this. Submissions will then undergo a double-blind peer-review process. Authors will be notified of the outcome as soon as reports are received.

See: https://www.openlibhums.org/2015/05/14/cfp-the-abolition-of-the-university-deadline-nov-1st-2015/

HEdownload

OPEN LIBRARY OF HUMANITIES: https://www.openlibhums.org/

 

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Student Debt

Student Debt

STUDENT DEBT

Berkeley Journal of Sociology

Call for Submissions on Student Debt

In collaboration with Debt and Society, the Berkeley Journal of Sociology is seeking submissions about student debt. Submissions will be considered for the 2015 print edition of the BJS as well as an online series that will launch in September 2015.

In addition to short essays (less than 3,500 words), we are also seeking photo essays, illustrations, reviews, and critical replies to published content.

Submissions must be received by June 1, 2015 and should be emailed to both submissions@berkeleyjournal.org and charlie.eaton@berkeley.edu.

Full BJS submission guidelines can be found here.

The goals of the series are described further here.

Berkley Journal of Sociology: http://berkeleyjournal.org/

Debt& Society: http://debtandsociety.org/a-call-for-submissions-on-student-debt/

Call for Submissions: http://berkeleyjournal.org/2015/04/a-call-for-submissions-on-student-debt/

Submission Guidelines: http://berkeleyjournal.org/submissions/

EDITORIAL_Student-loans_Devin-Beauregard

**END**

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Herbert Marcuse

Herbert Marcuse

PRAXIS AND CRITIQUE: LIBERATION, PEDAGOGY, AND THE UNIVERSITY

International Herbert Marcuse Society Sixth Biennial Conference

Praxis and Critique: Liberation, Pedagogy, and the University

12-15 November 2015, Salisbury University (Salisbury, Maryland, USA)

 

CALL FOR PAPERS: Abstracts due May 20, 2015

 

In recent years, the problems and contradictions intrinsic to capitalist society have resulted in a number of manifest, seemingly permanent, crises. Many researchers, academics, and activists have seized on the urgency of recent coalescing crises—from environmental degradation to economic inequality, political instability to social unraveling, and beyond—in an attempt to ameliorate and analyze the consequences of these dilapidated social relations. The work of Herbert Marcuse aims to radically re-envision social relations via critical theory as a way to formulate a praxis of liberation. However, if we live in a society, as Marcuse puts it, “without negation,” how shall this critical rationality be cultivated?

The International Herbert Marcuse Society seeks papers for the 2015 biennial conference, “Praxis and Critique: Liberation, Pedagogy, and the University,” that address the broad pedagogical concerns of cultivating emancipatory rationality. Faculty, independent scholars, activists, artists, and others are invited to submit papers. Papers may want to address, but are certainly not limited to, the following problematics:

  • What role can and should critical pedagogy play in today’s institutions of higher education? Given Marcuse’s emphasis on praxis, critical pedagogy cannot be limited to classroom space in universities – how can a critical rationality translate into programs of activism, agitation, and organization?
  • How is the work of Marcuse, the Frankfurt School, and/or critical theory generally relevant to the current context of political, social, economic, and cultural struggles?
  • What is the meaning of praxis and critique today? Do Marcuse’s contemporary interlocutors help us refine, understand, recast, or critique visions of a critical rationality?
  • What can we learn from activists and scholars from a wide range of critical theories, dealing with liberation in areas such as critical race theory, intersectionality, LGBTQIA studies, disability studies, and postcolonial theory?
  • How does Marcuse’s critical theory provide a lens through which to assess the current condition of advanced industrial society?

Student participation is also encouraged. The conference organizers are particularly interested in encouraging undergraduate and graduate student participation. To this end, we encourage faculty to teach related or special topics classes in fall 2015 and to bring students of all levels to the conference. Undergraduate students are invited to present papers in special concurrent sessions. Undergraduate and graduate students will also have the opportunity to submit conference papers for publication to special conference editions.

This conference is an interdisciplinary, multimedia engagement with the many dimensions of Herbert Marcuse’s work. So, in addition to the presentation of papers, the conference will also present artistic work.

Artistic Presentations:

The Salisbury University Gallery will present two related exhibitions.

The first is “Versprechen, dass es anders sein kann” (Promises that it can be different) by painter Antje Wichtrey.
Salisbury University Gallery Director, Elizabeth Kauffman, will curate the second exhibition.

For more information, contact the conference organizers:

Dr. Sarah Surak (smsurak@salisbury.edu) and Dr. Robert Kirsch (rekirsch@salisbury.edu)

 

**END**

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Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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Education Crisis

Education Crisis

THE ACADEMIC MANIFESTO: FROM AN OCCUPIED TO A PUBLIC UNIVERSITY

Willem Halffman and Hans Radder

 

First published in Krisis: Journal of Contemporary Philosophy, 2013, Issue 3 (in Dutch)

Now available in English: translated by Jan Evertse

 

Willem Halffman and Hans Radder

The academic manifesto: From an occupied to a public university

 

1 The occupied university

The university has been occupied – not by students demanding a say (as in the 1960s), but this time by the many-headed Wolf of management.1 The Wolf has colonised academia with a mercenary army of professional administrators, armed with spreadsheets, output indicators and audit procedures, loudly accompanied by the Efficiency and Excellence March. Management has proclaimed academics the enemy within: academics have to be distrusted, tested and monitored, under the permanent threat of reorganisation, discontinuance and dismissal. The academics allow themselves to be meekly played off against one another, like frightened, obedient sheep, hoping to make it by staying just ahead of their colleagues. The Wolf uses the most absurd means to

remain in control, such as money-squandering semi- and full mergers, increasingly detailed, and thus costly, accountability systems and extremely expensive prestige projects.

This conquest seems to work and the export of knowledge from the newly conquered colony can be ever increased, but inland the troubles fester. Thus, while all the glossed-up indicators constantly point to the stars, the mood on the academic shop floor steadily drops. The Wolf pops champagne after each new score in the Shanghai Competition, while the university sheep desperately work until they drop2 and the quality of the knowledge plantations is starting to falter, as is demonstrated by a large number of comprehensive and thorough analyses.3 Meanwhile, the sheep endeavour to bring the absurd anomalies of the occupation to the Wolf’s attention by means of an endless stream of opinion articles, lamentations, pressing letters and appeals. In turn, the Wolf reduces these to mere incidents, brushes them aside as inevitable side effects of progress, or simply ignores them.

Although our description and evaluation were written from the perspective of Dutch universities, the gist of our account (and quite a few details) applies to other countries as well, especially in Europe.4 While management’s occupation may not be as advanced in the Netherlands as it is in England (Holmwood 2011), it has already established a powerful continental bridgehead (De Boer, Enders and Schimank 2007). To show how these developments are more than just incidents, we list six critical processes and their excesses below. We will then proceed to analyse causes and suggest remedies.

 

Notes:

This article is a slightly updated and edited translation of the Dutch original, which appeared in Krisis: Tijdschrift voor actuele filosofie 2013 (3), pp. 2-18. We are grateful for helpful commentary on that version by the Krisis editorial team, in particular René Gabriëls. We would also like to thank Ilse and Jan Evertse for translating the Dutch text into English.

2 According to accepted clinical norms, a quarter of Dutch professors of medical science (especially the younger ones) suffer from burn-out (Tijdink, Vergouwen en Smulders 2012).

3 See, e.g., Ritzer (1998); Graham (2002); Hayes and Wynyard (2002); Bok (2003); Washburn (2003); Evans (2005); Shimank (2005); Boomkens (2008); Gill (2009); Tuchman (2009); Radder (2010); Krijnen, Lorenz and Umlauf (2011); Collini (2012); Sanders and Van der Zweerde (2012); Dijstelbloem et al. (2013); Verbrugge and Van Baardewijk (2014).

4 See Lorenz (2006 and 2012); Krücken (2014). In line with the situation in most European

 

See the full article in English at: https://www.academia.edu/9923660/The_academic_manifesto_From_an_occupied_to_a_public_unversity

Krisis: Tijdschrift voor actuele filosofie: http://www.krisis.eu

 

**END**

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Workplace

Workplace

MARX, ENGELS AND THE CRITIQUE OF ACADEMIC LABOR

Call for Papers

Marx, Engels and the Critique of Academic Labor

Special Issue of Workplace: A journal for academic labor

Guest Editors: Karen Gregory & Joss Winn

Articles in Workplace have repeatedly called for increased collective organisation in opposition to a disturbing trajectory: individual autonomy is decreasing, contractual conditions are worsening, individual mental health issues are rising, and academic work is being intensified. Despite our theoretical advances and concerted practical efforts to resist these conditions, the gains of the 20th century labor movement are diminishing and the history of the university appears to be on a determinate course.

To date, this course is often spoken of in the language of “crisis.” While crisis may indeed point us toward the contemporary social experience of work and study within the university, we suggest that there is one response to the transformation of the university that has yet to be adequately explored: A thoroughgoing and reflexive critique of academic labor and its ensuing forms of value. By this, we mean a negative critique of academic labor and its role in the political economy of capitalism; one which focuses on understanding the basic character of ‘labor’ in capitalism as a historically specific social form. Beyond the framework of crisis, what productive, definite social relations are actively resituating the university and its labor within the demands, proliferations, and contradictions of capital?

We aim to produce a negative critique of academic labor that not only makes transparent these social relations, but repositions academic labor within a new conversation of possibility.

We are calling for papers that acknowledge the foundational work of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels for labor theory and engage closely and critically with the critique of political economy. Marx regarded his discovery of the dual character of labor in capitalism (i.e. concrete and abstract) as one of his most important achievements and “the pivot on which a clear comprehension of political economy turns.” With this in mind, we seek contributions that employ Marx’s and Engels’ critical categories of labor, value, the commodity, capital, etc. in reflexive ways which illuminate the role and character of academic labor today and how its existing form might be, according to Marx, abolished, transcended and overcome (aufheben).

 

Contributions:

  1. A variety of forms and approaches, demonstrating a close engagement with Marx’s theory and

method: Theoretical critiques, case studies, historical analyses, (auto-)ethnographies, essays, and

narratives are all welcome. Contributors from all academic disciplines are encouraged.

  1. Any reasonable length will be considered. Where appropriate they should adopt a consistent style

(e.g. Chicago, Harvard, MLA, APA).

  1. Will be Refereed.
  2. Contributions and questions should be sent to:

Joss Winn (jwinn@lincoln.ac.uk) and Karen Gregory (kgregory@ccny.cuny.edu)

Publication timetable

  • Fully referenced ABSTRACTS by 1st February 2015
  • Authors notified by 1st March 2015
  • Deadline for full contributions: 1st September 2015
  • Authors notified of initial reviews by 1st November 2015
  • Revised papers due: 10th January 2016
  • Publication date: March 2016.

Possible themes that contributions may address include, but are not limited to:

The Promise of Autonomy and The Nature of Academic “Time”

The Laboring “Academic” Body

Technology and Circuits of Value Production

Managerial Labor and Productions of Surplus

Markets of Value: Debt, Data, and Student Production

The Emotional Labor of Restructuring: Alt-Ac Careers and Contingent Labor

The Labor of Solidarity and the Future of Organization

Learning to Labor: Structures of Academic Authority and Reproduction

Teaching, Learning, and the Commodity-Form

The Business of Higher Education and Fictitious Capital

The Pedagogical Labor of Anti-Racism

Production and Consumption: The Academic Labor of Students

The Division of Labor In Higher Education

Hidden Abodes of Academic Production

The Formal and Real Subsumption of the University

Alienation, Abstraction and Labor Inside the University

Gender, Race, and Academic Wages

New Geographies of Academic Labor and Academic Markets

The University, the State and Money: Forms of the Capital Relation

New Critical Historical Approaches to the Study of Academic Labor

About the Editors:

 

Karen Gregory

kgregory@ccny.cuny.edu @claudikincaid

Karen Gregory is lecturer in Sociology at the Center for Worker Education/Division of Interdisciplinary Studies at the City College of New York, where she heads the CCNY City Lab. She is an ethnographer and theory-building scholar whose research focuses on the entanglement of contemporary spirituality, labor precarity, and entrepreneurialism, with an emphasis on the role of the laboring body. Karen cofounded the CUNY Digital Labor Working Group and her work has been published in Women’s Studies Quarterly, Women and Performance, The Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy, and Contexts.

Joss Winn

jwinn@lincoln.ac.uk @josswinn

Joss Winn is a senior lecturer in the School of Education at the University of Lincoln, UK. His research extends broadly to a critique of the political economy of higher education. Currently, his writing and teaching is focused on the history and political economy of science and technology in higher education, its affordances for and impact on academic labor, and the way by which academics can control the means of knowledge production through co-operative and ultimately post-capitalist forms of work and democracy. His article, “Writing About Academic Labor,” is published in Workplace 25, 1-15.

Details at: http://josswinn.org/2014/12/call-for-papers-marx-engels-and-the-critique-of-academic-labor/

See also: http://blogs.ubc.ca/ices/2014/11/30/cfp-marx-engels-and-the-critique-of-academic-labor-ices-criticaltheory-criticalpedagogy-frankfurtschool/

Karl Marx

Karl Marx

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

STUDENTS AND POLITICS

Society for Research into Higher Education

Date – 23 January 2015, 12.15 – 16.00

Venue – SRHE, 73 Collier St, London N1 9BE

Network – Student Experience

This seminar explores student activism and students influencing institutional, national and societal politics. Current movements, events and research will be explored, including new ways, methods and organisations that students are involved in. Issues such as how institutions are reacting to, working with and engaging with students and/or disempowering students will be discussed. A particular focus will be on how students’ activity in politics influences institutional decision-making, policies and the curriculum.

Speakers will include students, student organisations, researchers and policy makers.

Speakers:

Alastair D. Robertson, Abertay University, Director of Teaching & Learning Enhancement, ESD Student Attitudes longitudinal survey from HEA and institutional initiatives

Andre Pusey, Lecturer, Built Environment and Engineering, Leeds Beckett University

Ben Glover, Post-Crash Economics Society, University of Manchester

Sarah Amsler, Reader, School of Education, University of Lincoln

 

To reserve a place: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

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Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

EUROPEAN HIGHER EDUCATION: EXPLORING EFFECTIVE STRATEGIES FOR TURBULENT TIMES

Society for Research into Higher Education

University of Porto, Portugal

Date – Monday, 01 September 2014: 13.30 – 18.30

Venue – University of Porto, Portugal

Network – Joint ECER/SRHE

This pre-Seminar to the ECER 2014 Conference (http://www.eera-ecer.de/ecer2014), is co-organised by EERA Network 22: Research in Higher Education and the Society for Research into Higher Education (SRHE), in cooperation with Centre for Research and Intervention in Education (CIIE) from FPCE – University of Porto

Venue: Faculty of Psychology and Education Sciences, University of Porto
Rua Alfredo Allen 4200-135, Porto, Portugal

Over the past years, in many European countries, higher education has been in turmoil as, for example, budget cuts have impacted significantly on the lives of  academics and students in higher education institutions. Higher education institutions are still expected to be one of the driving forces of nation states by creating new knowledge and educating a future workforce.

The aim of this seminar is to:

  • Bring together colleagues from various European countries to discuss how higher education can cope with turbulent times and how to move forward.
  • Bring insights into and examples from various European countries on current developments in higher education.
  • Provide a meeting point for emerging researchers to discuss current issues and network with established researchers in the field of higher education.

In order to promote lively discussions and a possibility to network and share opinions the second half of the seminar will be interactive workshops. There will be four parallel sessions each of which has moderators to promote lively discussions. The results of these interactive sessions will be reported on and disseminated.

 

Chair: Jani Ursin, Link-Convenor of EERA Network22: Research in Higher Education

11.30–12.30            Registration and networking

12.30–13.30            Lunch

13.30–14.00            Welcome
Helena Costa Araujo, Director of CIIE
Helen Perkins,  Director of Society for Research into Higher Education

14.00–15.00            Keynote:
‘What is the nature of the relationship between changes in European higher education and social science research on higher education and how can it be strengthened?’
Professor Rosemary Deem (Royal Holloway, University of London, UK)

15.00–15.30           Instructions for parallel sessions

15.30–17.00           Parallel sessions:

Session 1:

Future prospects in HE for Early Career researchers
Presenters/Facilitators: Mr Patrick Baughan, Department of Learning and Development, City University London, UK
University-Professor Dr Liudvika Leisyte, TU University Dortmund, Germany
(see: http://www.eera-ecer.de/ecer2014/emerging-researchers-conference/network-workshops/nw-22/#c215201)

Session 2:

Sustaining high quality teaching and learning in higher education
Presenters/Facilitators:   Dr Paul Ashwin, Lancaster University
Dr Mari Karm, University of Tartu, Estonia
In this workshop we will explore the challenges of using the available research evidence to sustain high quality teaching and learning in higher education. We will focus on two key and related issues in supporting high quality teaching and learning: the engagement of students in their learning and how we can use knowledge of this engagement to inform the professional development of academic staff. Through short presentations, as well as small group and plenary discussions, we will explore the following questions:
• What tensions are there in the research evidence in these two areas?
• What implications do these tensions have when we attempt to use this evidence to inform teaching and learning practices in higher education?
• How can we make use of our institutional experiences to further develop the research evidence?
• How can we make the research evidence useable in our institutional  contexts?
Session 3:

Developing as a researcher in turbulent times: becoming and being an ‘extended’ professional’
A presentation by Professor Linda Evans University of Leeds
Facilitator: Dr Christine Teelken, VU University Amsterdam, Netherlands

‘In this lecture Professor Evans will draw upon her own work on researcher development, to analyse what it takes to be an ‘extended’ researcher in the precarious and changing 21st century European Research Area (ERA). Adapting Eric Hoyle’s work on ‘extended’ and ‘restricted’ models of professionality, characteristics of the ‘restricted’ and ‘extended’ European researcher will be proposed. Of particular relevance to early career academics and researchers, the lecture will address  issues related to how they may develop their research skills and raise their profiles.’

Session 4:

Higher education and employment: building the connections
Presenters/Facilitators:  Dr Camille Kandiko Howson, King’s Learning Institute, King’s College London, UK
Auxiliary Professor Mariana Alves, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal

Employability has always been a key feature of higher education, from the earliest days of the University of Bologna, to the vocational training of clerics, doctors and lawyers and the myriad professional, vocational and higher learning of today. This workshop brings together notion of “learning for learning’s sake” and “students’, institutions’ and governments’ needs for an educated workforce”. This workshop draws on research projects exploring employability from a variety of contexts. Three main themes discussed are:

– graduates’ employability – relevance  for students options and perspectives
– graduates’ employability – relevance for educational policies (either at national and/or institutional levels)
– graduates’ employability – current trends concerning educational and professional trajectories

Employability will be considered in individual, institutional, national and regional contexts. The workshop will draw on research but will have an interactive basis, encouraging participants to reflect on how employability is conceptualised. Key issues include the impact of employability on students and graduates, particularly in relation to student fees; the role and relevance of educational policies; and future trajectories.

 

Workshop participants are asked to reflect on these issues, and to think about the following questions:

1. How do you frame ‘graduates’ employability’? What resources do you draw on for this? For example research, reports, websites…
2. How is ‘graduates’ employability’ framed in higher education research? What fields does this cover? What disciplinary approaches?
3. What research, data and information will be needed in the future to enhance, assure and research graduates’ employability?

Participants are encouraged to read Chapter 3 of the report linked below (Final Report):

http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/learningteaching/kli/research/student-experience/student-expectations-perceptions-HE.aspx

17.15–18.30     Summing up the workshops and the seminar

18.30–20.30     Reception (sponsored by SRHE)

 

Reserve a place: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

Society for Research into Higher Education: http://www.srhe.ac.uk

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Education

Education

SOCIETY FOR RESEARCH INTO HIGHER EDUCATION CONFERENCE 2014

CALL FOR PAPERS

Inspiring future generations; embracing plurality and difference in higher education

SRHE Conference dates: 10-12 December 2014

Venue: Celtic Manor, Newport, Wales, UK.

Reminder: Closing date for submissions: 27th June 2014

 

The Society for Research into Higher Education extends a very warm welcome to all who wish to participate.

Researchers are invited to present their work in a variety of ways: by submitting papers for presentation, individually or as part of a symposium or round table, by submitting a poster and/or by attending as a delegate and contributing to the many different discussions and debates within this vibrant three-day event.

We encourage presentations and discussions that explore both global and local perspectives as well as trends in higher education policies and practices. We also welcome conceptual and theoretical contributions that add to current discourses- or initiate new ones.

Of particular interest this year will be contributions examining the increasingly diverse higher education landscape and how the processes of research, of knowledge production, knowledge-exchange, and knowledge sharing are changing in response to increasing plurality and difference within and across the sector.

Conference registration is now open. The early booking discount ends on Friday 26 September 2014

 

SRHE Newer Researchers’ Conference: 9 December 2014

This is an excellent event for postgraduate students and newer researchers, providing the opportunity to present research work in a nurturing environment and participate in seminars and discussions.

Closing date for submissions: 11 July 2014

 

Further conference details are available from the link below or simply via www.srhe.ac.uk

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Teaching Marx

Teaching Marx

MUSLIM STUDENTS IN POST 9-11 AMERICA

The Centre for Research and Evaluation in Muslim Education (CREME) invites you to a seminar on: ‘Muslim students in post 9-11 America: Racial interpellation and intersectional identities’.

Presenter: Dr Arshad Ali, Institute of Education

Date: Thursday 05 June 2014
Time: 17:30 – 19:00
Venue: Committee Room 1 (Institute of Education, 20 Bedford Way, London WC1H 0AL)

The seminar will conclude with a farewell reception for Arshad, who is leaving the Institute at the end of June.

Kind regards,

Ellora

 

Ellora Khan

Administration Officer

Institute of Education, University of London

20 Bedford Way, London WC1H 0AL

T: +44 (0)20 7911 5328

E: E.Khan@ioe.ac.uk

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Education Crisis 7GOVERNING ACADEMIC LIFE: PROVISIONAL PROGRAMME

Conference at the London School of Economics & The British Library

25th and 26th June 2014

 

Provisional Programme

(Some of the details below are subject to change, and more will be added later)

Website: http://www.governing-academic-life.org/provisional-programme/

 

 

Wednesday, 25th June

 

09.30-10.45: Refreshments

10.45-11.00: Welcome and opening remarks

 

11.00-12.30: Opening Plenary

Gurminder Bhambra (Warwick), ‘The Neoliberal Assault on the Public University’
Wendy Brown (Berkeley) ‘Between Shareholders and Stakeholders: University Purposes Adrift’
Mike Power (LSE) ‘Accounting for the Impact of Research’

 

12.30-13.30: Lunch

 

13.30-15.00: Parallel Sessions

 

A. (Anti-)Social Science, the neoliberal art of government, and higher education

John Holmwood (Nottingham) , ‘Neo-liberalism as a theory of knowledge and its implications for the social sciences and critical thought’
Nick Gane (Warwick), ‘Neoliberalism: How Should the Social Sciences Respond?’
Andrew McGettigan (Critical Education blog), ‘Human Capital in English Higher Education’

 

B. What is an author, now? Futures of scholarly communication and academic publishing

Roundtable discussion with Steffen Boehm (Essex), Christian Fuchs (Westminster), Gary Hall (Coventry), Paul Kirby (Sussex)

Chair: Jane Tinkler (LSE)

 

15.00-15.15: Refreshments

 

15.15-17.00: Parallel Sessions

 

A. Feminism and the knowledge factory
Convenor: Valerie Hey, Centre for Higher Education and Equity Research (CHEER, University of Sussex)

Barbara Crossouard (CHEER), ‘Materializing Foucault?’
Valerie Hey (CHEER), ‘Neo-Liberal Materialities and their Dissident Daughters’
Louise Morley (CHEER), ‘Researching the Future: Closures and Culture Wars in the Knowledge Economy’

 

B. Co-operative higher education
Convenor: Joss Winn (Lincoln)

Richard Hall, ‘Academic Labour and Co-operative Struggles for Subjectivity’
Mike Neary (Lincoln), ‘Challenging the Capitalist University’
Joss Winn (Lincoln), ‘The University as a Worker Co-operative’
Andreas Wittel (Nottingham Trent) ‘Education as a Gift’

 

18.15-20.00: Pay bar at Terrace Room, British Library

 

18.30-20.00: Remember Foucault? (Terrace Room, British Library)

Mitchell Dean (Copenhagen Business School), ‘Michel Foucault’s “apology” for neoliberalism’
Lois McNay (Oxford) ‘Foucault, Social Weightlessness and the Politics of Critique’

Chair: Peter Miller (LSE)

 

 

Thursday, 26th June

 

09.30- 11.00: Parallel Sessions

 

A. Governing academic freedom

Stephen J. Ball (Institute of Education: University of London) ‘Universities and “the economy of truth”’
Penny Jane Burke (Roehampton) and Gill Crozier (Roehampton), ‘Regulating Difference in Higher Education Pedagogies’
Rosalind Gill (City University), ‘The Psychic Life of Neoliberalism in the Academy’

 

B. Teaching the ungovernable: rethinking the student as public

Convenor: Carl Cederström (Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University)

Sam Dallyn (Manchester Business School, Manchester University), ‘Management Education: Critical Management Myopia and Searching for an Alternative Public’
Carl Cederström (Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University), ‘The Student as Public’
Matthew Charles (Institute for Modern and Contemporary Culture, University of Westminster), ‘The Ungovernable in Education: On Unintended Learning Outcomes’
Mike Marinetto (Cardiff Business School, Cardiff University), ‘The Ungovernable Syllabus: Social Science Fiction and the Creation of a Public Pedagogy’

 

11.00-11.30: Refreshments

 

11.30-13.00: Parallel Sessions

 

A. Measurement, management and the market university

Elizabeth Popp Berman (SUNY Albany), ‘Quantifying the Economic Value of Science: The Production and Circulation of U.S. Science & Technology Statistics’
Isabelle Bruno (University of Lille 2), ‘Quality management in education and research: an essay in genealogy’
Christopher Newfield (UC Santa Barbara), ‘The Price of Privatization’

 

B. Para-academic Practices: becoming ungovernable?
Convenor: Paul Boshears

Paul Boshears (European Graduate School; continent), ‘Rudderless Piloting, Unwavering Pivoting, Governing without Coercion’
Fintan Neylan (Dublin Unit for Speculative Thought), ‘The Logic of Para-Organisation’
Robert Jackson (Lancaster) ‘Para-academia and the Education of Grownups’
Eileen Joy (Punctum Books), ‘Amour Fou and the Clockless Nowever: Radical Publics’ (by weblink)

 

13.00-14.30: Lunch

14.30-16.45: Final Plenary: Beyond the Neoliberal Academy

Convenor: Des Freedman (Goldsmiths): Participants tbc.

 

16.45-17.00: Closing remarks

 

*****END*****

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

STUDENT UNIONS AND THE CHANGING NATURE OF STUDENT LEADERSHIP IN THE UK

Society for Research into Higher Education

Date – 2 June 2014: 13.00-17.00

Venue – SRHE, 73 Collier St, London N1 9BE

Network – Student Experience

This event explores the role of student leadership in UK Higher Education, including the role and function of institutional student unions, the National Union of Students and relationships with institutions, sector agencies and the government. Within institutions, the positioning and governance for student union officers, student union staff and senior management varies. The event draws together recent research, analysis of policies and commentaries from representatives and experts.
Speakers include:

Professor Rachel Brooks, University of Surrey: presenting on her work for the NUS and the Leadership Foundation for HE on the changing nature of student leadership.

Jim Dickinson, Chief Executive at Union of UEA Students, responding to the report

Dr Camille Kandiko Howson, King’s College London: presenting on her QAA-funded research on Student Expectations with reference to collective and individual notions of student engagement and representation.

The programme will include a roundtable of discussants of the presentations.

To reserve a place: http://www.srhe.ac.uk/events/

Note: Unless otherwise stated SRHE events are free to members, there is a charge of £60 for non-members.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

cover 3

EDUCATION IN EUROPE: THE POLITICS OF AUSTERITY

An e-book Edited by Ken Jones

This is a free download of a new book edited by Ken Jones: Education in Europe: The Politics of Austerity

It is published by RadicalEd Books: http://www.radicaledbks.com

ISBN 978-0-9575538-3-5

  

It includes articles on:

France (Guy Dreux);

Italy (Rosalind Innes);

Spain, (Rosa Canadell);

Greece (Anna Traianou);

And European labour markets (Nico Hirtt).

 

Here is the link: http://radicaledbks.files.wordpress.com/2013/09/education-in-europe.pdf

 

With best wishes

Ken Jones

Professor of Education
Educational Studies
Goldsmiths, University of London
New Cross
SE14 6NW
ken.jones@gold.ac.uk

Education in Europe

Education in Europe

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski