Skip navigation

Tag Archives: New Economy

Intern Nation

INTERN NATION

NEW IN PAPERBACK:

‘INTERN NATION: HOW TO EARN NOTHING AND LEARN LITTLE IN THE BRAVE NEW ECONOMY’

By ROSS PERLIN

Published: 1st May 2012

 

The first no-holds-barred expose of the exploitative world of internships

Millions of young people – and increasingly some not-so-young people – now work as interns. They famously shuttle coffee in a thousand magazine offices, legislative backrooms, and Hollywood studios, but they also deliver aid inAfghanistan, map the human genome, and pick up garbage. Intern Nation is the first exposé of the exploitative world of internships. In this witty, astonishing, and serious investigative work, ROSS PERLIN profiles fellow interns, talks to academics and professionals about what unleashed this phenomenon, and explains why the intern boom is perverting workplace practices around the world.

The hardcover publication of this book precipitated a torrent of media coverage in theUSandUK, and Perlin has added an entirely new afterword describing the growing focus on this woefully underreported story. Insightful and humorous, INTERN NATION will transform the way we think about the culture of work.

 ————

Praise for INTERN NATION:

    “Perlin’s attempt to understand internships as a symptom of wider trends in the economy … makes the book such a fascinating read.”

–      SPECTATOR

http://www.spectator.co.uk/books/7044593/part_2/empty-lines-on-a-cv-.thtml

 

    “A book that offers landmark coverage of its topic.”

    – Andrew Ross, LONDON REVIEW OF BOOKS

http://www.lrb.co.uk/v33/n10/andrew-ross/a-capitalists-dream

 

    “A portrait of how white-collar work is changing … thought-provoking and at times jaw-dropping – almost a companion volume to Naomi Klein’s celebrated 2000 exposé of modern sweatshops, No Logo.”

    – Andy Beckett, GUARDIAN

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/may/08/intern-nation-ross-perlin-review

 

    “A compelling investigation of a trend that threatens to destroy “what’s left of the ordered world of training, hard work and fair compensation” … Full of restrained force and wit, this is a valuable book on a subject that demands attention.”

–      OBSERVER

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/may/15/intern-nation-ross-perlin-review

 

    “[An] eye-opening, welcome exposé.”

    – SUNDAY TIMES

 

    “Organizations inAmericasave $2 billion a year by not paying interns a minimum wage, writes Ross Perlin in INTERN NATION.”

    – ECONOMIST

http://www.economist.com/node/18586856?story_id 586856 

 

    “Well-researched and timely.”

–      DAILY TELEGRAPH

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/bookreviews/8552716/Intern-Nation-by-Ross-Perlin-review.html

 

    “[E]ye-opening … The book tackles a sprawling topic with earnestness and flair.”

    -Katy Waldman,WASHINGTON POST

 

    “Perlin … has an eye for polemical effectiveness.”

    – TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT

 

     “A serious and extremely well-written text that offers sophisticated historical material about the origins of internship and its impact on the individuals concerned, the firms that use it and the world of work more generally.”

    -CaryL. Cooper, TIMES HIGHER EDUCATION

 

    “Perlin contends that most internships are illegal, according to the Fair Labor and Standards Act, stripping people who are employees in all but name of workers’ rights.”

–      NEW YORKER

http://www.newyorker.com/arts/reviews/brieflynoted/2011/05/16/110516crbn_brieflynoted1

 

 “‘Interns built the pyramids’, the great magazine The Baffler once declared. And that was just the beginning of their labors, as Ross Perlin demonstrates in this fascinating and overdue exposé of the wage labor without wages, the resumé-building servitude, at the heart of contemporary capitalism.”

–      Benjamin Kunkel, a founding editor of N+1 and author of the novel INDECISION

    “This vigorous and persuasive book … argues that the fundamental issue is the growing contingency of the global workforce.”

–      Roger D. Hodge, BOOKFORUM

http://www.bookforum.com/inprint/018_02/7802

    “A timely book addressing the exploitation of the nation’s younger workforce under the guise of the ‘internship model.'”

    – Most Anticipated Books of Spring 2011, HUFFINGTON POST

———————————

Ross Perlin is a graduate of STANFORD, SOAS, AND CAMBRIDGE, AND HAS WRITTEN FOR, THE NEW YORK TIMES, TIME MAGAZINE, LAPHAM’S QUARTERLY, GUARDIAN, DAILY MAIL and OPEN DEMOCRACY. He is researching disappearing languages inChina.

———————————

ISBN: 9781844678839 / $14.95 / £9.99 / $18.50CAN/ Paperback / 286 pages

———————————–

For more information about INTERN NATION, or to buy the book visit: http://www.versobooks.com/books/1112-intern-nation

 

**END**

 

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

 

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski 

 

KE + LLL

THE KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY AND LIFELONG LEARNING: A CRITICAL READER

Edited by

D.W. Livingstone
University of Toronto, Canada
and
David Guile
University of London, UK

 

The Knowledge Economy and Education volume 4

ISBN 978-94-6091-914-5 hardback USD99/EUR90

ISBN 978-94-6091-913-8 paperback USD49/EUR45

April 2012, 382 pages

 

This book presents some of the most trenchant critical analyses of the widespread claims for the recent emergence of a knowledge economy and the attendant need for greater lifelong learning.

The book contains two sections: first, general critiques of the limits of current notions of a knowledge economy and required adult learning, in terms of historical comparisons, socio-political construction and current empirical evidence; secondly, specific challenges to presumed relations between work requirements and learning through case studies in diverse current workplaces that document richer learning processes than knowledge economy advocates intimate. Many of the leading authors in the field are represented.

There are no other books to date that both critically assess the limits of the notion of the knowledge economy and examine closely the relation of workplace restructuring to lifelong learning beyond the confines of formal higher education and related educational policies. This reader provides a distinctive overview for future studies of relations between work and learning in contemporary societies beyond caricatures of the knowledge economy.  

The book should be of interest to students following undergraduate or postgraduate courses in most social sciences and education, business and labour studies departments, as well as to policy makers and the general public concerned about economic change and lifelong learning issues.

D. W. Livingstone is Canada Research Chair in Lifelong Learning and Work and Professor Emeritus  at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto.

David Guile is Professor of Education and Work at the Institute of Education, University of London.

Free Preview
Buy this book at Amazon: paperback | hardback
Amazon International
Buy this book at Barnes & Noble: paperback | hardback

At Sense Publishers: https://www.sensepublishers.com/product_info.php?products_id=1446&osCsid=f3d0c8f0782b298c81ab3847a87e65dd  

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

 

John Marsh

John Marsh

CLASS DISMISSED: WHY WE CAN’T TEACH OR LEARN OUR WAY OUT OF INEQUALITY

John Marsh

Paperback, 328 pages
ISBN-13: 978-1-58367-243-3
Cloth (ISBN-13: 978-1-58367-244-0)
Released July 2011

Monthly Review Press

In Class Dismissed, John Marsh debunks a myth cherished by journalists, politicians, and economists: that growing poverty and inequality in the United States can be solved through education. Using sophisticated analysis combined with personal experience in the classroom, Marsh not only shows that education has little impact on poverty and inequality, but that our mistaken beliefs actively shape the way we structure our schools and what we teach in them.

Rather than focus attention on the hierarchy of jobs and power—where most jobs require relatively little education, and the poor enjoy very little political power—money is funneled into educational endeavors that ultimately do nothing to challenge established social structures, and in fact reinforce them. And when educational programs prove ineffective at reducing inequality, the ones whom these programs were intended to help end up blaming themselves. Marsh’s struggle to grasp the connection between education, poverty, and inequality is both powerful and poignant.

Marsh’s forceful, erudite treatment lays bare the fact that the U.S. seems largely unwilling to change underlying social structures that sustain poverty and inequitable life chances….the drumbeat of his important message needs to be amplified in a nation widely deaf to it. Highly Recommended.” ——CHOICE

This well-researched and well-argued book chillingly illustrates the toxic effects of growing inequality in contemporary U.S. society by revealing how educational opportunity and the myth of meritocracy carries more of people’s hopes and dreams than its shoulders can bear. Class Dismissed is a powerful treatise towards explaining the hidden and not-so-hidden costs of economic inequality and why abolishing poverty would be the best thing we can do to increase equality of educational opportunity…. John Marsh makes a bold and courageous case for a politics of economic justice.” ——Peter McLaren, author, Capitalists and Conquerors; professor, Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, University of California, Los Angeles

At a moment when the increasing inequality of American life is almost universally blamed on the failures of our schools, nothing could be more timely than this powerful demonstration that bad education has not produced the growing gap between the rich and the poor and that better education will not reduce it. If you really want less poverty, Marsh argues, don’t give poor people more advanced degrees, give them more money—and help them join unions.” ——Walter Benn Michaels, professor of English, University of Illinois, Chicago

John Marsh asks some uncomfortable but necessary questions about the current drive for mass college education. In a clear, persuasive, and troubling account, he shows that education is not the cure-all, as it is advertised by many across political lines. A must-read for those thinking about higher education.” ——Jeffrey J. Williams, co-editor, The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism; professor of literary and cultural studies, Carnegie Mellon University

John Marsh is Assistant Professor of English atPennStateUniversity. In addition to many articles and reviews, he is the author of Hog Butchers, Beggars, and Busboys: Poverty, Labor, and the Making of Modern American Poetry, and the editor of You Work Tomorrow: An Anthology of American Labor Poetry, 1929-1941, which won the Tillie Olsen Award for Creative Writing.

Original Source: http://monthlyreview.org/press/books/pb2433/

John Marsh talks about his book at Against the Grain via Pacifica Radio: http://www.againstthegrain.org/program/549/id/151209/wed-4-11-12-education-and-inequality – This is brilliant! – Glenn Rikowski

Against the Grain: http://www.againstthegrain.org/

Review of Class Dismissed by Alex Snowdon at Counterfire: http://www.counterfire.org/index.php/articles/book-reviews/15094-class-dismissed-why-we-cannot-teach-or-learn-our-way-out-of-inequality

At Amazon.com: http://www.amazon.com/Class-Dismissed-Cannot-Teach-Inequality/dp/1583672443 (Hb) and http://www.amazon.com/Class-Dismissed-Cannot-Teach-Inequality/dp/1583672435/ref=tmm_pap_title_0 (Pb)

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

THE CREATIVE UNIVERSITY – FIRST CALL FOR PAPERS
Faculty of Education, Office of Teaching and Learning, Waikato University

School of Creative Arts, James Cook University

THE CREATIVE UNIVERSITY CONFERENCE

Hosted by 

Universityof Waikato, Te Whare Wananga O Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand

15-16 August, 2012

First Call for Papers

Deadline for submission:  

Abstracts due: May 1st 2012

Full papers due: July 1st 2012

Education and research have been transformed in the development of knowledge economies. The knowledge, learning and creative economies manifest the changing significance of intellectual capital and the thickening connections between on one hand economic growth, on the other hand knowledge, creativity (especially imagined new knowledge, discovery), the communication of knowledge, and the formation and spreading of creative skills in education. Increasingly economic and social activity is comprised by the ‘symbolic’ or ‘weightless’ economy with its iconic, immaterial and digital goods. This immaterial economy includes new international labour markets that demand analytic skills, global competencies and an understanding of markets in tradeable knowledges. Developments in information and communication technologies (ICTs) not only define globalisation they are changing the format, density and nature of the exchange and flows of knowledge, research and scholarship. Delivery modes in education are being reshaped. Global cultures are spreading in the form of knowledge and research networks. Openness and networking, cross-border people movement, flows of capital, portal cities and littoral zones, and new and audacious systems with worldwide reach; all are changing the conditions of imagining and producing and the sharing of creative work in different spheres. The economic aspect of creativity refers to the production of new ideas, aesthetic forms, scholarship, original works of art and cultural products, as well as scientific inventions and technological innovations. It embraces open source communication as well as commercial intellectual property. 

All of this positions education at the centre of the economy/ creativity nexus. But are education systems, institutions, assumptions and habits positioned and able so as to seize the opportunities and meet the challenges? 

This conference investigates all the aspects of education in (and as) the creative economy.The conference objective is to extend the dialogue about the relationship between contemporary higher education and the changing face of contemporary economies. A number of terms describe the nature of the contemporary capitalism of advanced economies: ‘cognitive capitalism’, ‘metaphysical capitalism’, ‘intellectual capitalism’, ‘designer capitalism’. The conference will explore the relationship between the arts and sciences and this new form of capitalism. It will look at the global reach and international imperatives of aesthetic and scientific modes of production, the conditions and character of acts of the imagination in the range of fields of knowledge and arts in this period, and the role of the research university in the formation of the creative knowledge that has a decisive function in contemporary advanced economies.  

Please send title and abstract as an expression of interest to Professor Michael A. Peters: mpeters@waikato.ac.nz

Details at: http://tcreativeu.blogspot.co.uk/p/first-call-for-papers.html

The Creative University: http://tcreativeu.blogspot.co.uk

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Capitalist Crisis

CAPITALISM IN CRISIS AND POLITICAL ALTERNATIVES

The Critical Studies Graduate Research Group at the Universityof Brighton is pleased to invite you to a day of workshops on ‘Capitalism in Crisis and Political Alternatives’ on Friday 20th of May with Mary Mellor, Alberto Toscano, Mark Fisher and Mark Devenney.

You can find a link with more information on our webpage: http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/csrg.

The event is free, but registration is essential. There are only a few places remaining which will distributed on a ‘first come, first serve’ basis. If you would like to attend, please send an email to B.A.Hofstaetter@brighton.ac.uk

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

No Future

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 19th MARCH 2011

EVENTS

PANEL AND BOOK LAUNCH – “EDUCATING ELITES: CLASS PRIVILEGE AND EDUCATIONAL ADVANTAGE”

Wednesday, April 13th, 2011
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), room 5-250
252 Bloor St. West (St. George subway station), Toronto

10:00am – 11:45am (Panel)
11:45am – 1:00pm (Book Launch / Lunch Reception)

Panelists:

– Jane Kenway, Professor Monash University – “Elite Schools, Trans-national Capitals, and Global Elite Formations”
– Paul Tarc, Assistant Professor University of Western Ontario – “The Uses of International Education for (Becoming) Elites: The Case of the International Baccalaureate”
– Adam Howard, Associate Professor Colby College – “Shifting Landscapes: Elite Education in the New Economy”
– Rubén Gaztambide-Fernández, Assistant Professor CTL, OISE – “Notes on the Emergence and Significance of Elite Schooling as a Subject of Educational Research”

Chair : Kari Dehli, Professor SESE, OISE

Books by the panelists will be on sale from the Toronto Women’s Bookstore: http://www.womensbookstore.com

Co-sponsors: Ontario Institute for Studies in Education – Department of Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning; Department of Sociology and Equity Studies in Education; Comparative, International & Development Education Centre; Centre for Media and Culture in Education, Toronto Women’s Bookstore
+++++

COMMON THREAD COMMUNITY CHORUS OF TORONTO – BENEFIT CONCERT FOR MENNONITE NEW LIFE CENTRE & JUSTICIA FOR MIGRANT WORKERS

March 26
7:30 pm
St Simon’s Anglican Church, 525 Bloor Street East
Sherbourne subway station (Glen Road exit)

Tickets: Adults $20/advance – $25/door;  Students & Seniors $15/advance – $20/door; Children under 10 – free

http://www.commonthreadchorus.ca/sites/default/files/poster-spring-2011.jpg

– Mennonite New Life Centre: http://mnlct.org
– Justicia for Migrant Workers:  http://justicia4migrantworkers.org
– Proyecto Altiplano:  http://myspace.com/proyectoaltiplano/stream

Common Thread Chorus: http://www.commonthreadchorus.ca

For Tickets: 416-410-5022 or info@commonthreadchorus.ca
+++++

CU EXPO 2011 – COMMUNITY-UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIPS: BRINGING GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES TO LOCAL ACTION

May 10-14, 2011
Waterloo Region, Ontario

CU Expo 2011 will showcase the exemplars in community-university partnerships worldwide, and explore and introduce creative ways of strengthening our local communities.

The conference is expected to draw over 800 people from Canada and around the world who are passionate about the power of community-university partnerships as a vehicle for social change. Students, community leaders, researchers, educators, funders, policy makers and others invested in community-building will be in attendance.

The CU Expo movement began in Canada as a response to individuals involved community-university partnerships needing a forum to share experiences, strategies and ideas. CU Expo 2011 will address the conference objectives, themes and streams through a variety of session offerings and opportunities for dialogue.

Learn more: http://www.cuexpo2011.ca/

+++++

BUILDING SOLIDARITY: CAMPUS LABOUR STRUGGLES AND THE STUDENT CONNECTION

A forum to discuss and unite worker and student struggles at U of T

March 31, 2011
6-9pm
Bahen Centre, University of Toronto
Room 2175 (40 St. George Street)

A brief overview of the working conditions at the University of Toronto shows that something is just not right: most contract faculty members have virtually no job security; largely racialized food-service workers are paid less than a living wage; post-doctoral fellows have zero input in the drafting of their contracts; female administrative staff members receive less pay than their male counterparts; and non-tenured professors fear termination for voicing opinions on contentious political issues.

Meanwhile, students at the U of T are also engaged in pitched battles to keep post-secondary education accessible and equitable. Campaigns to eliminate ever-increasing tuition fees, to defend equity-based programs under threat of extinction, to challenge autocratic room booking policies, and to overturn unrepresentative and unaccountable governing bodies are just some of the issues that they organize around everyday.

In short, there is a whole host of injustices that plague both workers and students on this campus. As a working group of the newly-formed University of Toronto General Assembly, Student-Worker Solidarity (SWS) seeks to challenge this state of affairs by bringing different campus workers together to speak with students about their issues, while also providing students with an opportunity to relay their concerns to workers.

With this forum, SWS hopes to begin the conversation in order to create new ways of thinking about and participating in the struggles of those who make our University what it is.

Speakers will include members of the following:

– Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) Local 3902
– United Steelworkers (USW) Local 1998
– UniteHERE Local 75
– University of Toronto Faculty Association (UTFA)
– University of Toronto General Assembly (UTGA)

**Refreshments will be provided
**Email utgeneralassembly@gmail.com for more information
**This event is endorsed by OPIRG-Toronto

+++++

SOCIAL ECONOMY CENTRE LUNCHBOX SPEAKERS’ SERIES –  HOUSING ALTERNATIVES

Wednesday, March 23, 2011
Noon – 1:30 pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto
252 Bloor St. West, Toronto
Room 12-199

with Joe Deschênes Smith and Michael Shapcott

– Joe Deshchênes Smith will talk about investment process for new affordable housing, as well as attributes of the Home Ownership Initiative’s 2nd mortgage for low/modest income home-buyers.
– Michael Shapcott will discuss the social economy elements of the Precarious Housing report recently released by Affordable Housing and Social Innovation at the Wellesley Institute.

Moderator: David Hulchanski, Director, Centre for Urban and Community Studies, University of Toronto

Bring your lunch and a mug. Water, coffee and tea will be provided.

For more information, please contact Lisa White: secspeakerseries@gmail.com

This event will also be webcast live on the Internet.  Please see our website for detailed instructions: http://socialeconomy.utoronto.ca

+++++

PANEL – PAUL ROBESON: THE TALLEST TREE IN OUR FOREST

Wednesday, March 23
7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
East Common Room, Hart House
University of Toronto
7 Hart House Circle

Speakers:
– Ken Jeffers (City of Toronto Manager, Access and Diversity, Parks Forestry and Recreation)
– Norm Kelly (Writer and Playwright)
– Lee Lorch (Civil rights activist and York Professor Emeritus)
– Rathika Sitsabaiesan (Scarborough-Rouge River Federal NDP Candidate)

Sponsored by Centre for the Study of the United States

+++++

NEWS & VIEWS

UFCW CANADA RELEASE: WORKERS’ ACTION CENTRE LAUNCHES PROVINCIAL INITIATIVE – “UNDERCOVER STORIES ON WAGE THEFT”

Wage theft, in its various incarnations, is a workplace plague in Canada which is evident in a variety of communities. It is a particularly painful in immigrant communities. Many employers continuously abuse Employment Standards protections of these precarious workers as a means to simple but effectively improve profits.

On behalf of the 250,000 UFCW Canada members across Canada, we say NO to Wage Theft and YES to the much needed advocacy initiatives by the Workers’ Action Centre in Toronto. No worker deserves to get less than their fair wage. Every worker deserves to be heard.

We commend the Workers’ Action Centre on their initiative entitled “Undercover Stories on Wage Theft” and their advocacy in support for this initiative. We encourage you to take the time to support this important campaign.

To learn more: http://www.workersactioncentre.org

+++++

ALTERNATIVE FEDERAL BUDGET 2011 LAUNCHED – RETHINK, REBUILD, RENEW: A POST-RECESSION RECOVERY PLAN

From Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA)

The Alternative Budget presents a comprehensive recovery plan designed to:

– get Canadians working in good jobs again;
– reduce record-high income inequality, strengthen Canada’s middle class, and improve supports for Canada’s poor and most vulnerable;
– protect public programs that all Canadians rely on — including public health care and public pensions;
– manage Canada’s debt-to-GDP ratio without vital public program cuts;
– get serious about reducing greenhouse gas emissions; and
– launch a multi-pronged initiative to expand high value-added production in key sectors.

Read more: http://www.policyalternatives.ca/afb2011

+++++

TEACHING ABOUT LABOR ISSUES AND THE WISCONSIN WORKER FIGHTBACK

From Rethinking Schools

According to labor historian Mark J. Naison, the movement of workers that began in Wisconsin and is now spreading to other states is “the most important labor struggle in the United States in the 21st century.”

The current uprising of workers in Wisconsin and other states presents a powerful opportunity to teach students about what the protests are about and why their teachers and neighbors are joining the struggle.  It’s an opportunity to critically examine issues, and to model for students’ responsible civic action and engagement in the political process.

As members of teacher unions, we have an additional responsibility, summarized by the late Howard Zinn in an interview published in Transforming Teacher Unions:

“If teacher unions want to be strong and well-supported, it’s essential that they not only be teacher unionists but teachers of unionism. We need to create a generation of students who support teachers and the movements of teachers for their rights.”

Embrace this “teachable moment” and share with us in the comments what resources you are using, how you are using them, and how your students are responding.

Read more: http://rethinkingschools.org/news/WIProtestTeachingResources.shtml

+++++

BOOK – THE SPIRIT LEVEL: WHY GREATER EQUALITY MAKES SOCIETIES STRONGER

[The authors] Wilkinson and Pickett make an eloquent case that the income gap between a nation’s richest and poorest is the most powerful indicator of a functioning and healthy society. Amid the statistics that support their argument (increasing income disparity sees corresponding spikes in homicide, obesity, drug use, mental illness, anxiety, teenage pregnancies, high school dropouts—even incidents of playground bullying), the authors take an empathetic view of our ability to see beyond self-interest…There is evidence that the human brain—with its distinctively large neocortex—evolved the way it has because we were designed to be attentive to, depend on, and be depended on by others.

Ordering information: http://www.amazon.com/Spirit-Level-Equality-Societies-Stronger/dp/1608190366

Hear Wilkinson give a 1:34:42 speech on the subject of his book. The volume is okay after he’s introduced. The graphics he uses appear on your screen as he proceeds through the presentation.

http://www.fhs.sfu.ca/news/events/special-guest-speaker-dr.-richard-g.-wilkinson

+++++

MAYTREE FOUNDATION – THE “PILOT” FOR RECRUITING TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS FOR LOW-SKILLED JOBS SHOULD BE ABOLISHED

The latest Maytree discussion paper argues that the growth in the temporary foreign worker program is contrary to Canada’s social and economic interests. It suggests that those currently in Canada under the Pilot Project for Occupations Requiring Lower Levels of Formal Training should be granted permanent residence.

Read more: http://bit.ly/eVP7jX

+++++

NO FARE IS FAIR – A ROUNDTABLE WITH MEMBERS OF THE GREATER TORONTO WORKERS’ ASSEMBLY TRANSIT COMMITTEE

By Ali Mustafa, The Bullet

The Greater Toronto Workers’ Assembly (GTWA) is a promising new initiative aiming to build a united, non-sectarian, and militant anti-capitalist movement in the city among a diversity of rank-and-file labour unionists, grassroots community organizers, and youth alike. Since the GTWA’s inception in early 2010, mass public transit has emerged as one of the organization’s key political battlegrounds. In this in-depth roundtable discussion, members of the GTWA’s transit committee Jordy Cummings, Lisa Leinveer, Leo Panitch, Kamilla Pietrzyk, and Herman Rosenfeld explore both the opportunities and obstacles facing the campaign Towards a Free and Accessible TTC.

Read more: http://www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/480.php

(END)
++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++

ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK: UPDATE 30th JANAURY 2011

 

EVENTS

FREE SCREENING OF ‘HOME SAFE TORONTO’ DOCUMENTARY

Friday, February 4
7:30pm – 10:30pm
The Centre of Gravity
1300 Gerrard St. East, Toronto

With Street Nurse and Executive Producer Cathy Crowe and Director Laura Sky

HOME SAFE TORONTO is the second in the Sky Works series of documentaries that deals with how Canadian families live with the threat and the experience of homelessness.

It shows how the housing crisis in Canada is an expression of the increasing economic and job insecurity that has devastated the manufacturing sector in the Greater Toronto Area and throughout southern Ontario.

The film reveals the consequences of this “new economy”, where families surviving on low wages with no benefits, or on dwindling social assistance, are faced with the terrible choice between keeping a roof over their heads or putting food on the table.

+++++

GREATER TORONTO WORKERS’ ASSEMBLY

Saturday, February 19
9:30am – 6:00pm
Steelworkers’ Hall, 25 Cecil St, Toronto

How to join the GTWA: http://www.workersassembly.ca/join

Committees: http://www.workersassembly.ca/committees

Our vision statement: http://www.workersassembly.ca/vision

Contact us at: workingclassfightback@gmail.com

+++++

BLACK HISTORY MONTH CELEBRATION

Thursday, February 24, 5:00pm – 8 pm and
Friday, February 25, 9:00am – 1:00pm
Ontario Federation of Labour (OFL) Building
15 Gervais Drive, Toronto

The OFL and CBTU (Coalition of Black Trade Unionists) present the acclaimed exhibition “And Still I Rise: A History of African Canadian Workers in Ontario.” This travelling exhibit originally developed by the Workers Arts and Heritage Centre explores the rich legacy of Ontario’s black Community.

Four exhibits designed to look like train coaches span the twentieth century with exhibition topics ranging from “Challenges to Freedom”: “1900 to World War II” to the reflective “Legacy of African Canadians”. Visitors are invited to learn more about the historic and present day lives and experiences of Black Canadians through the investigation of themes including immigration, work roles and the labour movement, the agitation of civil rights, the contributions of African Canadians to the arts and sports, the importance of church, schools and voluntary organizations to building strong communities.

For more information, contact Janice Gairey at jgairey@ofl.ca or 416.347.9732.

+++++

“EL CONTRATO”: FILM PRESENTED BY PUEBLITO FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT WEEK 2011

February 8, 2011
6:00pm-9:00pm
Beit Zatoun
612 Markham St., Toronto

“El Contrato” follows the path of migrant workers from Central Mexico to pick tomatos in Lemington, Ontario and the struggles and racism they face. Following the movie, prominent speaker Chris Ramsaroop will be addressing the issues about how immigrant workers in Canada still face injustices in today’s labour market and what should be the role of the Canadian labour movement.

To register for this event please email barrerasandy@hotmail.com with your name, email address and number of tickets you would like to reserve.

Suggested donation: $10.00

+++++

CONFERENCE & CFP – TRANSNATIONAL MIGRATION AND ADULT EDUCATION: GLOBAL ISSUES AND DEBATES

June 9, 2011
9:30 am – 4 pm
Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
University of Toronto

A pre-conference held in conjunction with the 52nd Adult Education Research Conference (AERC) and the 30th Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education (CASAE) Conference

Keynote speakers: Dr. Roxana Ng, OISE/University of Toronto and Dr. Mary V. Alfred, Texas A&M University

When migrants arrive in a new society, they bring with them their values, language and culture, contributing significantly to the diversity of their host countries. Without a doubt, the resulting demographic, social, and cultural changes create new opportunities for development as well as new challenges for adult education. However, we are left to grapple with many important questions, such as: What is the impact of transnational migration on adult education? What are the challenges and opportunities for adult education? How can adult education best facilitate migrants’ adaptation in a new society?

Call for Proposals: If you are conducting research or have completed studies in this area, we invite you to submit proposals to: Dr. Shibao Guo, University of Calgary, guos@ucalgary.ca. Deadline: February 15, 2011

For more information: http://silenceandvoice.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/AERC-CASAE-Call-2011.pdf

+++++

NEWS AND VIEWS

RADICAL LABOR EDUCATION, PART I (FROM CHEAP MOTELS AND A HOT PLATE)

By Michael Yates

We are on our way to Amherst, Massachusetts, where I will be teaching a two-week course in labor economics to labor union brothers and sisters.  I have been a labor educator for thirty years. I have taught working people, mostly union leaders and members, a wide variety of courses in all kinds of settings… While working people are often enough unhappy with their work, or lack of it, and alienated from the political system, they ordinarily do not have a very clear understanding of the nature of our political economy or a desire to radically transform it. Why is this?

Read more: http://blog.cheapmotelsandahotplate.org/2010/12/27/radical-labor-education-part-i/

+++++

SHARING IN A COMMON STRUGGLE

By Anthony Arnove, Socialist Worker

Anthony Arnove, Howard Zinn’s collaborator on projects like the book Voices of a People’s History of the United States and the documentary The People Speak, pays tribute to a friend whose sense of solidarity and joy in life was infectious.

FILMING OUR documentary The People Speak in Boston one afternoon, Howard said that the camaraderie between our cast members, the sense of collective purpose and joy, was a feeling he hadn’t experienced with such intensity since his active participation in the civil rights movement.

Since Howard’s passing, I have thought often of that moment, which crystallizes for me what made him so compelling an example of someone committed to, and enjoying to its fullest, a life of struggle.

Read more: http://socialistworker.org/2010/02/12/sharing-in-the-struggle

+++++

EGYPT (FROM WADE RATHKE: CHIEF ORGANIZER BLOG)

If there was ever a more dramatic case study of the political impact of protest on or off the grid of internet, telecommunications, and social networking, the world saw it on the streets of Egypt yesterday. It was as if there were a perfect laboratory experiment on what would happen if the only avenues for protest were “old school” removing the variable of communications.

Read more: http://chieforganizer.org/2011/01/29/egypt/

+++++  

BEARING THE BRUNT OF A NEW WITCH-HUNT

By Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Socialist Worker

The bipartisan campaign against “privileged” public-sector workers threatens to erode some of the gains of the civil rights and Black Power movements.

IN THE run-up to the midterm elections, overheated rhetoric from both Republicans and Democrats identified public-sector workers as a central factor in historically high budget state deficits and the collapse of local economies.

Public-sector workers have been described as the “haves”–as an “elite” group of workers who are living high on the fat of tax dollars, while the rest of the workforce wallows in job insecurity, lack of health care, foreclosure and falling wages.

Read more: http://socialistworker.org/2011/01/27/brunt-of-a-new-witch-hunt

+++++

“ALONE TOGETHER”: AN MIT PROFESSOR’S NEW BOOK URGES US TO UNPLUG

By David Zax, Fast Company

In her new book, an MIT professor shares her ambivalence about the overuses of technology, which, she writes, “proposes itself as the architect of our intimacies.”

Sherry Turkle has been an ethnographer of our technological world for three decades, hosted all the while at one of its epicenters: MIT. A professor of the social studies of science and technology there, she also heads up its Initiative on Technology and Self. Her new book, Alone Together, completes a trilogy of investigations into the ways humans interact with technology. It can be, at times, a grim read. Fast Company spoke recently with Turkle about connecting, solitude, and how that compulsion to always have your BlackBerry on might actually be hurting your company’s bottom line.

Read more: http://www.fastcompany.com/1716844/alone-together-an-mit-professors-new-book-urges-us-to-unplug

+++++

POVERTY BY POSTAL CODE 2: VERTICAL POVERTY

Poverty by Postal Code 2: Vertical Poverty presents new data on the growing concentration of poverty in the City of Toronto and the role that high-rise housing is playing in this trend. The report tracks the continued growth in the spatial concentration of poverty in Toronto neighbourhoods, and in high-rise buildings within neighbourhoods. It then examines the quality of life that high-rise buildings are providing to tenants today. Its primary focus is on privately owned building stock in Toronto’s inner suburbs. This research is part of United Way’s Building Strong Neighbourhoods Strategy.

Read more: http://unitedwaytoronto.com/verticalpoverty/report/introduction/

(END)
++++++++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++++++++

ABOUT CSEW (CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION & WORK, OISE/UT):

Head: Peter Sawchuk
Co-ordinator: D’Arcy Martin

The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

Our major project is APCOL: Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning. This five-year project (2009-2013), funded by SSHRC-CURA, brings academics and activists together in a collaborative effort to evaluate how organizations approach issues and campaigns and use popular education.

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Situationism

ESSEX / BRIGHTON SEMINARS ON AESTHETICS & POLITICS 10/25-10/26

:: Curating Resistance :: Aesthetics & Ethics in Social Movement ::
:: October 25th, 2010:: University of Essex ::
:: Room 4.722 :: 1PM – 5PM ::
http://www.minorcompositions.info/curatingresistance.html

Participants: Gavin Grindon (Kingston) // Paul Halliday (Goldsmiths) // Antigoni Memou (University of East London) // Matthew Poole (Essex)

Avant-garde and social movement art production has long had a troubled and conflictual relationship with the museum and the archive. The call to abandon the gallery as a space for art separated from everyday life, one that all too often neutralizes the antagonistic energies of radical art, reverberates from Dada through Fluxus, the Surrealists to Reclaim the Streets. But in today’s post-Fordist creativity-fuelled economy, the call to end this division rings hollow precisely because it has already been accomplished: the energies of insurgent creativity are rendered into forms of dispersed production for the net economy. The surrealist invocation of the marvellous is today’s advertising copy. Joseph Beuys’ proclamation that “everyone is an artist” has been realized in perverse form as “everyone is a worker,” where relationality is ‘socially sculpted’ through the circuits of an always present network culture as opportunities for capitalist valorization: all YouWork and MyProfit.

What might there be that could avoid these tensions and contradictions, or at least begin to suggest ways to work through and against them? Where does one go when life itself is both a direct producer of value and the substance of artistic production? To a gallery of the streets? Or maybe a university of trash? Is the archive of the undercommons a pile of zines sitting at the back of the infoshop? A pile of fleshy tissue inscribed on by a Kafka-esque writing machine? Perhaps it is all and none of these things. Thus we return to the question of the archive and history not to catalog social movement artistic production for a gallery-morgue or the productivity of the metropolitan factory, but rather to consider what an ethics and aesthetics of developing a living archive of experience and knowledges that can feed back into and through the fabric of everyday life might be.

Sponsored by the University of Essex Management Centre (http://www.essex.ac.uk/ebs/research/emc).

For more information contact Stevphen Shukaitis (sshuka@essex.ac.uk).

Metropolitan Strategies, Psychogeographic Investigations
:: A Drifting Seminar :: Brighton, October 26th, 2010 ::
Starting @ the Cowley Club, 2PM
http://www.minorcompositions.info/brightondrift.html

The notion of psychogeography (as well as many other ideas of the Situationists) appears frequently within political and artistic discussions. Indeed, they circulate to the point of cliché, in the process becoming almost completely emptied of content. The derive is reduced to a leisurely stroll, perhaps accompanied with some secondary musings about the nature of the spectacle, a dash of literary activity, or perhaps some local history. This is a hollowing out of the concept. Psychogeography for the Situationists was primarily not an aesthetic activity, but more than anything a strategic approach to understanding the forces shaping the city and from those finding points of intervention in it. At times it verged on a nearly military framework, working to gain an intuitive understanding of the territory and its layering of images, affects, and circuits of capitalist valorization.

Today we find ourselves in a condition of ever intensified spectacular sociability: all of life put to work in webs of biopolitical production, overwhelming communicative and media flows, and the reshaping of the metropolis through culture led gentrification. More than ever well-developed psychogeographic investigations are needed to comprehend the shaping of the metropolis and the possibilities this offers for political action. But this is not a task for the carefree wanderings of the flaneur, but perhaps better suited for what Ian Sinclair has described as the superseding figure of the stalker, the one who knows where he is going, but not why or how.

The aim of this encounter is to draw together concepts from psychogeography and unitary urbanism with recent writings on the shaping of the metropolis today. And from this approach to understanding the changing nature of the city elaborate new political strategies. For instance, if the metropolis is a factory, how would it go on strike? If all of everyday life and communication is put to work, how can we throw down our tools? And if capital attempts to recuperate all forms of radical politics in order to turn them into new energies for continued accumulation, is a strategy of concealment or incomprehensibility one way to escape from these dynamics?

This event will not be based around formal presentations, but rather will rather take the form of a drifting seminar. Participants will be asked to read several pieces of text that will form the basis of discussion and exploration.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Henry Giroux

POLICY FUTURES IN EDUCATION – VOLUME 8 NUMBER 1, 2010

Now available at
http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pfie/content/pdfs/8/issue8_1.asp

POLICY FUTURES IN EDUCATION
Volume 8 Number 1 2010, ISSN 1478-2103

Henry A. Giroux. Zombie Politics and Other Late Modern Monstrosities in the Age of Disposability

Sigrid Haunberger. Did Educational Expansion Trigger the Development of an Education Society? Chances and Risks of a New Model of Society

Brian McKenna. Exposing Environmental Health Deception as a Government Whistleblower: turning critical ethnography into public pedagogy

John Opute. Managing Reward in Developing Economies: the challenge for multinational corporations

Alex Means & Kendall Taylor. Assessing the Debt: George W. Bush’s legacy and the future of public education under Barack Obama

Mark T. Yates & Richard D. Lakes. After Pell Grants: the neoliberal assault on prisoners

Khalida Tanvir Syed. Storied Understandings: bringing Aboriginal voices to Canada’s multicultural discourse

Stuart Tannock. Learning to Plunder: global education, global inequality and the global city

Janet Mansfield. ‘Literacies’ in the Arts: a new order of presence

D. Brent Edwards Jr. Trends in Governance and Decision-Making: a democratic analysis with attention to application in education

Tina (A. C.) Besley. Digitized Youth: constructing identities in the creative knowledge economy

OCCASIONAL THOUGHTS

Henry A. Giroux. Torturing Children: Bush’s legacy and democracy’s failure

Access to the full texts of current articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription. However, all articles become free-to-view 18 months after publication.

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION (single user access). Subscription to the 2010 issues (i.e. full access to the articles in Volume 8, Numbers 1-6) is available to individuals at a cost of US$54.00. Personal subscriptions also include automatic free access to ALL PAST ISSUES. If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.co.uk/subscribePFIE.asp

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION (institution-wide access). If you are working within an institution that maintains a Library, please urge them to purchase a Library subscription so access is provided throughout your institution; full details for libraries can be found at www.symposium-journals.co.uk/prices.html

For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact Professor Michael A. Peters (mpet001@illinois.edu).

In the event of problems concerning a subscription, or difficulty in gaining access to the journal articles, please contact the publishers at support@symposium-journals.co.uk

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski: https://rikowski.wordpress.com

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com