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WORK AND PEER PRODUCTION

CALL FOR PAPERS

Journal of Peer Production

Work and Peer Production
Editors: Phoebe Moore (Middlesex University London), Mathieu O’Neil (University of Canberra), Stefano Zacchiroli (University Paris Diderot)

The rise in the usage and delivery capacity of the Internet in the 1990s has led to the development of massively distributed online projects where self-governing volunteers collaboratively produce public goods. Notable examples include Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) projects such as Debian and GNOME, as well as the Wikipedia encyclopedia. These distributed practices have been characterised as peer production, crowdsourcing, mass customization, social production, co-configurative work, playbour, user-generated content, wikinomics, open innovation, participatory culture, produsage, and the wisdom of the crowd, amongst other terms. In peer production, labour is communal and outputs are orientated towards the further e xpansion of the commons, an ecology of production that aims to defy and resist the hierarchies and rules of ownership that drive productive models within capitalism (Moore, 2011); while the commons, recursively, are the chief resource in this mode of production (Söderberg & O’Neil, 2014).

Peer projects are ‘ethical’ as participation is primarily motivated by self-fulfillment and validated by a community of peers, rather than by earning wages. Their governance is ‘modular’, understood in a design sense (decomposable blocks sharing a common interface), but also in political-economy terms: participants oppose restricted ownership and control by individually socializing their works into commons. Conflicting interpretations of their societal impact have been articulated (O’Neil, 2015). Skeptics view the abjuration of exclusive property rights over the goods they produce as irrelevant, and ethical-modular projects as increasing w orker exploitation: participants’ passionate labour occurs at the expense of less fortunate others, who do not have the disposable income, cultural capital, or family support to engage in unpaid labour (Moore & Taylor, 2009; Huws, 2013). In contrast, reformists, often hailing from a management perspective, suggest that the co-optation of communal labour by firms will improve business practices and society (Arvidsson, 2008; Demil et al., 2015). Finally activists celebrate the abjuration of exclusive property rights, and present ethical-modular projects as key actors in a historical process leading to the supersession of capitalism and hierarchy (Kostakis & Bauwens, 2014).

This last perspective raises a central challenge, which is the avoidance of purely utopian thinking. In other words, how can commons-based peer production reach deeply into daily life? How can ‘already existing non-capitalist economic processes’ be strengthened, ‘new no n-capitalist enterprises’ be built, and ‘communal subjects’ be established (Gibson-Graham, 2003: 157)? An increasingly large free public goods and services sector could well cohabit in a plural economy with employment in cooperatives, paid independent work, and the wage-earning of the commercial sector. However analysis of peer production typically eschews mundane considerations such as living wages, benefits, job security, working conditions, work-induced medical conditions, and debates on labour organization. How can peer production operate as a sustainable practice enabling people to live, if labour and work issues are not formally addressed?

To advance this agenda, the tenth issue of the Journal of Peer Production, titled Peer Production and Work, calls for papers in two linked areas:

*Peer production in a paid work society*
Nowadays firms attempt to monetize crowdsourced labour. The paradigmatic example is Amazon’s Mechanical Turk labourers (popularly known as ‘Turkers’, ‘cloud workers’ or ‘click workers’) who accomplish micro-tasks such as tagging and labeling images, transcribing audio or video recordings, and categorizing products. This extreme modularization of work results in their status being that of independent contractors rather than employees with rights, necessitating novel means of protection and redress (Irani & Silberman, 2013). The so-called ‘sharing economy’ also uses peer production methods, such as the self-selection of modular and granular tasks, to extract ever-more value from the labour of volunteer ‘prosumers’ (Frayssé & O’Neil, 2015). Capitalist firms are also increasingly engaging with ethical-modular organizations, in some cases paying wages to participants. Such labour is thus both ‘alienated’, or sold, and ‘communal’, as workers freely cooperate to produce commons. Do traditional categories such as exploitation and alienation still apply?
Topics may include, but are not limited to:

* Peer production and the global political economy
* Peer production and the rise of precarious work
* Peer workers and possibilities for worker organisation
* Does the autonomy of peer workers cause conflict in firms, and how is it resolved?
* What strategies do firms adopt to co-opt peer production (e.g., ‘hackhathons’)?
* Do tensions around property rights emerge?
* Subjectivity in peer production
* Peer production and intellectual property, coded work

*Paid work in peer production projects*
How does paid labour affect ethical P2P projects? Mansell and Berdou (2010) argue that firms supporting the work of programmers who contribute to volunteer projects, to the commons, will not affect the ‘cooperative spirit’ of projects; nor can this support prevent the results of labour from being socialized into commons. Is this always the case?
Topics may include, but are not limited to:
* How do peer projects deal with the presence of paid or waged labour?
* Is this topic discussed within peer production projects? In what way?
* What benefits do paid or waged workers enjoy in peer projects?
* How does paid labour affect peer production projects?

*Timeline*
300-500 word abstract due: 30 July 2015
Notification to authors: 30 August 2015
Submission of full paper: 31 December 2015
Reviews to authors: 15 February 2016
Revised papers: 30 April 2016
Signals due: 30 May 2016
Issue release: June/⁠July 2016

*Submission guidelines*
Submission abstracts of 300-500 words are due by July 30, 2015 and should be sent to work@peerproduction.net

All peer reviewed papers will be reviewed according to Journal of Peer Production guidelines. See http://peerproduction.net/peer-review/process/
Full papers and materials are due by December 31, 2015 for r eview.
Peer reviewed papers should be around 8,000 words; personal testimonies or ‘tales of toil’ in the Processed World tradition should be up to 4,000 words.

*References*
Arvidsson, A. (2008). The ethical economy of consumer coproduction. Journal of Macromarketing, 8, 326-338.

Demil, B., Lecoq. X. & Warnier, E. (2015). The capabilities of bazaar governance: Investigating the advantage of business models based on open communities. Journal of Organizational Change Management, in press.

Frayssé, O. & O’Neil, M. (2015) Digital labour and prosumer capitalism: The US matrix. Basingstoke: Palgrave, in press.

Gibson-Graham, J.K. (2003). Enabling ethical economies: Cooperativism and class. Critical Sociology, 29, 123-164.

Huws, U. (2013). The underpinnings of class in the digital age: Living, labour and value. Socialist Register, 50, 80-107.

Irani, L. & Silberman, M. (2013). Turkopticon: Interrupting worker invisibility in Amazon Mechanical Turk. Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems.

Kostakis, V. & Bauwens, M. (2014) Network society and future scenarios for a collaborative economy. Basingstoke: Palgrave.

Mansell, R. & Berdou, E. (2010). Political economy, the internet and FL/OSS development. In Hunsinger, J., Allen, M. & Klastrup, L. (Eds.) International handbook of Internet research (pp. 341-362). Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Springer.

Moore, P. (2011). Subjectivity in the ecologies of P2P Production. The Journal of Fibreculture FCJ-119. Online.

Moore, P. & Taylor, P. A. (2009). Exploitation of the self in community-based software production: Workers’ freedoms or firm foundations? Capital & Class, 99-117.

O’Neil, M. (2015). Labour out of control: The political economy of capitalist and ethical organizations. Organization Studies, 1-21.

Söderberg, J. & O’Neil, M. (2014). ‘Introduction’. Book of Peer Production (pp. 2-3). Göteborg: NSU Press.

****

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-journal-of-peer-production-work-and-peer-production

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

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Even Bigger Data

Even Bigger Data

iFUTURES POSTGRADUATE CONFERENCE

A reminder that the call for papers for iFutures closes on Friday 5th June.

iFutures is a one-day conference organised by doctoral students for doctoral students in the Information Science community on Tuesday, July 7th, at the University of Sheffield.

This conference aims to give a welcoming platform for early career researchers to present their work to their peers.

This year the theme is “Open Information Science: exploring new landscapes”

Students are invited to present research papers, Pecha Kucha sessions, and posters.

More details, including a tentative programme for the day and registration, can be found on the conference website: http://ifutures.group.shef.ac.uk/

We are inviting the following types of submissions:
a) Papers: Intended as a means of introducing your current research in a 15 minute presentation followed by 5 minutes for questions and answers. Abstracts should be no more than 500 words; final papers should be no more than 1500 words.
b) Posters: Display your research for discussion with fellow PhD students. Abstracts should be no more than 300 words; final papers are optional (no more than 1000 words).
c) Pecha Kucha Presentations: How do you envision your research, or IS research in general, impacting openness in society or science? You have 20 slides lasting 20 seconds each to address this question. For more information about the Pecha Kucha format, see http://www.pechakucha.org/. Abstracts should be no more than 300 words; final papers are optional (no more than 1000 words).

Authors are requested to submit abstracts by Friday, June 5th. Abstracts are being reviewed by a panel of PhD students, and accepted submissions will be notified by Friday 12th June.  Successful authors of papers will be invited to submit a short paper of up to 1500 words, for publication in our open access conference proceedings. Poster and Pecha Kucha presenters will also have the option of submitting a paper for publication.

To begin the submissions process, go to:
https://conferencepapers.shef.ac.uk/index.php/iFutures/if2015/about/submissions
N.B. When creating a profile please be sure to tick “Author” at the bottom of the registration page. Once you have created a profile, clicking on the User Home tab will allow you to begin a New Submission.

For more information please contact the iFutures team (ifutures@sheffield.ac.uk).

Big Data

Big Data

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

The Failure of Capitalism

The Failure of Capitalism

CYBER-PROLETARIAT: GLOBAL LABOUR IN THE DIGITAL VORTEX

NEW FROM PLUTO PRESS:

Cyber-Proletariat: Global Labour in the Digital Vortex

By Nick Dyer-Witheford

http://bit.ly/1AeNq5z

—————–

Praise for CYBER-PROLETARIAT:

‘Cyber-Proletariat tracks the eddies and flows of the perfect storm that is contemporary capitalism. This panoramic work reveals the relentless force of material destruction and brutal violence concealed by the sleek surfaces of digital culture’ – Benjamin Noys, Professor of Critical Theory, University of Chichester and author of Malign Velocities: Accelerationism and Capitalism

—————–

Coltan mines in the Congo; electronics factories in China; devastated neighbourhoods in Detroit. Cyber-Proletariat shows us the dark-side of the information revolution; an unsparing analysis of class power and computerisation.

Nick Dyer-Witheford reveals how technology facilitates growing polarisation between wealthy elites and precarious workers. He reveals the class domination behind everything from expanding online surveillance to intensifying robotisation. At the same time he looks at possibilities for information technology within radical movements; contemporary struggles are cast in the blue glow of the computer screen.

Cyber-Proletariat brings heterodox Marxist analysis to bear on modern technological developments. The result will be indispensable to social theorists and hacktivists alike and essential reading for anyone who wants to understand how Silicon Valley shapes the way we live today.

—————–

ON THE PLUTO BLOG: http://bit.ly/1HsH55Z

READ THE BOOK ONLINE: http://bit.ly/1K0fr0B

—————–

Want an inspection copy for your course? Visit www.plutobooks.com/lecturers.asp for more details.

Want a book for review? Email our publicity team at publicity@plutobooks.com.

Sign up to our newsletter for special offers, news and events: www.plutobooks.com/subscribe.asp.

Follow us online:

Twitter: @plutopress

Facebook: facebook.com/PlutoPress

Blog: plutopress.wordpress.com

YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCQoo96QH1KmyUkVc_Fd6ieg

Instagram: instagram.com/plutopress/

Flickr: flickr.com/photos/95999817@N02/

—————–

Paperback | 9780745334738 | £18.99 / $30 / €23
Hardback | 9780745334745 | £60 / $100 / €75

Kindle | 9781783712830 | £18.99 / $30 / €23
EPUB | 9781783712823 | £18.99 / $30 / €23
PDF | 9781783712816 | £60 / $99

Even Bigger Data

Even Bigger Data

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

A World To Win

A World To Win

DEMOCRACY AND CITIZENSHIP

A WORLD TO WIN

This Monday evening, March 9th, starting at 7.00 pm, we have a critical webinar concerning Democracy and Citizenship, coming just two months before the general election.

It discusses how we can become active citizens and make democracy work for us.

The presenter, Cormac Russell, lectured for eight years on active citizenship and democracy at the National College of Ireland.

There is no charge for taking part.

Here’s the link:

Try to log is about five minutes before the webinar starts and you can test the link right now.

Please make every effort to partake and feel free to pass on this information to all your contacts.

 

Visit awtw network at: http://aworldtowin.ning.com/?xg_source=msg_mes_network

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Information

Information

UCL CENTRE FOR DIGITAL HUMANITIES SEMINAR SERIES 2014-15

We are very pleased to announce the programme for the UCLDH Seminar Series for 2014-15. All are welcome and there will be drinks after each talk. Please note that registration is required.

 

Alberto Campagnolo, Book conservator, Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana

Thursday 20th November 2014

5.30pm, G31, Foster Court

Scalpels and magic wands. From the physical world of book conservation to the magic of Digital Humanities

 

Cristina Amati, Department of Computer Science, UCL

Wednesday 26th November 2014

5.30pm, G31, Foster Court

Image Aesthetics: From Philosophical to Computational Exploration

 

Dr Kathryn E. Piquette, Cologne Center for eHumanities, Universität zu Köln

Wednesday 3rd December 2014

5.30pm, G31, Foster Court

Illuminating the Herculaneum Papyri with New Digital Imaging Techniques

 

Dr Jane Winters, Institute of Historical Research

Wednesday 28th January 2015

5.30pm, G31, Foster Court

Big data for humanities research: from digging into the parliamentary record to exploring the UK Web Archive

 

Further talks for 2015 are TBC.

For further information and details on how to register, please see the UCLDH Seminar Series page.

 

Kind regards,

Sarah Davenport

Centre Co-ordinator

Centre for Digital Humanities

Department of Information Studies

University College London

Gower Street, WC1E 6BT

tel: 020 7679 7204 | email: s.davenport@ucl.ac.uk

web: www.ucl.ac.uk/dh | blog: blogs.ucl.ac.uk/dh/| twitter: @UCLDH

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

 

Glenn Rikowski’s article, Education, Capital and the Transhuman – can also now be found at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/9033532/Education_Capital_and_the_Transhuman

PosthumanTHE MATERIALITY OF THE IMMATERIAL: ICTs AND THE DIGITAL COMMONS

Call for Papers: The Materiality of the Immaterial: ICTs and the Digital Commons

See: http://www.triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/announcement/view/23

Special issue of tripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique

Online @ http://www.triple-c.at

Abstract submission deadline: January 15, 2015

Guest Editors:

Vasilis Kostakis, Ragnar Nurkse School of Innovation and Governance, Tallinn University of Technology (Estonia), P2P Lab (Greece);

Andreas Roos, Human Ecology Division, Lund University (Sweden)

With an escalating environmental crisis and an unprecedented increase of ICT diversity and use, it is more crucial than ever to understand the underlying material aspects of the ICT infrastructure.  This special issue therefore asks the question: What are the true material and socio-environmental costs of the global ICT infrastructure?

In a recent paper (Fuchs 2013) as well as in the book Digital Labour and Karl Marx (Fuchs 2014), Christian Fuchs examined the complex web of production relations and the new division of digital labour that makes possible the vast and cheap ICT infrastructure as we know it. The analysis partly revealed that ICT products and infrastructure can be said to embody slave-like and other extremely harsh conditions that perpetually force mine and assembly workers into conditions of dependency. Expanding this argument, the WWF reported (Reed and Miranda 2007) that mining in the Congo basin poses considerable threats to the local environment in the form of pollution, the loss of biodiversity, and an increased presence of business-as-usual made possible by roads and railways.  Thus ICTs can be said to be not at all immaterial because the ICT infrastructure under the given economic conditions can be said to embody as its material foundations slave-like working conditions, various class relations and undesirable environmental consequences.

At the same time, the emerging digital commons provide a new and promising platform for social developments, arguably enabled by the progressive dynamics of ICT development. These are predominantly manifested as commons-based peer production, i.e., a new mode of collaborative, social production (Benkler 2006); and grassroots digital fabrication or community-driven makerspaces, i.e., forms of bottom-up, distributed manufacturing. The most well known examples of commons-based peer production are the free/open source software projects and the free encyclopaedia Wikipedia. While these new forms of social organisation are immanent in capitalism, they also have the features to challenge these conditions in a way that might in turn transcend the dominant system (Kostakis and Bauwens 2014).

Following this dialectical framing, we would like to call for papers for a special issue of tripleC that will investigate how we can understand and balance the perils and promises of ICTs in order to make way for a just and sustainable paradigm. We seek scholarly articles and commentaries that address any of the following themes and beyond. We also welcome experimental formats, especially photo essays, which address the special issue’s theme.

Suggested themes

Papers that track, measure and/or theorise the scope of the socio-environmental impact of the ICT infrastructure.

Papers that track, measure and/or theorise surplus value as both ecological (land), social (labour) and intellectual (patent) in the context of ICTs.

Understanding the human organisation of nature in commons-based peer production.

Studies of the environmental dimensions of desktop manufacturing technologies (for example, 3D printing or CNC machines) in non-industrial modes of subsistence, e.g. eco-villages or traditional

agriculture, as well as in modern towns and mega-cities.

Suggestions for and insights into bridging understandings of the socio-economic organisation of the natural commons with the socio-economic organisation of the digital commons drawing on types of

organisations in the past and the present that are grounded in theories of the commons.

Elaboration of which theoretical approaches can be used for overcoming the conceptual separation of the categories immaterial/material in the digital commons.

 

References

Benkler, Yochai. 2006. The wealth of networks: How social production transforms markets and freedom. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Fuchs, Christian. 2014. Digital labour and Karl Marx. New York: Routledge.

Fuchs, Christian. 2013. Theorising and analysing digital labour: From global value chains to modes of production. The Political Economy of Communication 1 (2): 3-27, online at: http://www.polecom.org/index.php/polecom/article/view/19.

Kostakis, Vasilis and Michel Bauwens. 2014. Network society and future scenarios for a collaborative economy. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.

Reed, Erik and Marta Miranda. 2007. Assessment of the mining sector and infrastructure development in the congo basin region. Washington DC: World Wildlife Fund, Macroeconomics for Sustainable Development Program Office, 27, online at: http://awsassets.panda.org/downloads/congobasinmining.pdf

 

Schedule

Submission of abstracts (250-300 words) by January 15, 2015 via email to [log in to unmask]

Responses about acceptance/rejection to authors: February 15, 2015.

Selected authors will be expected to submit their full documents to tripleC via the online submission system by May 15, 2015:

http://triple-c.at/index.php/tripleC/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions

Expected publication date of the special issue: October 1, 2015.

About the journal

tripleC: Communication, Capitalism & Critique is an academic open access online journal using a non-commercial Creative Commons license. It is a journal that focuses on information society studies and studies of media, digital media, information and communication in society with a special interest in critical studies in these thematic areas. The journal has a special interest in disseminating articles that focus on the role of information in contemporary capitalist societies. For this task, articles should employ critical theories and/or empirical research inspired by critical theories and/or philosophy and ethics guided by critical thinking as well as relate the analysis to power structures and inequalities of capitalism, especially forms of stratification such as class, racist and other ideologies and capitalist patriarchy. Papers should reflect on how the presented findings contribute to the illumination of conditions that foster or hinder the advancement of a global sustainable and participatory information society. TripleC was founded in 2003 and is edited by Christian Fuchs and Marisol Sandoval.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Glenn’s article Education, Capital and the Transhuman has also recently been added to Academia, and can be found at: https://www.academia.edu/9033532/Education_Capital_and_the_Transhuman

 

Information

Information

TRANSVERSAL TEXTS

Launch of a new multilingual platform: Transversal Texts

Transversal Texts is an abstract machine and text machine at once, territory and stream of publication, production site and platform – the middle of a becoming that never wants to become a publishing company.
http://transversal.at/
http://transversal.at/transversal/0614/eipcp/en

Transversal Texts consists of an experimental site for publishing books and e-books in multiple languages, the multilingual web journal transversal, and a blog on current news from the middle of translation, social movements, art practices and political theory.

+ books
Beginning in October 2014 we will start experimenting with the publication of affordable books and e-books for free downloading, multilingual as far as possible, including texts by Félix Guattari & Antonio Negri, Precarias a la deriva, Gin Müller, Rubia Salgado, Monika Mokre, Brigitta Kuster, Ulf Wuggenig, Birgit Mennel, Stefan Nowotny and Gerald Raunig. The program can be found here: http://transversal.at/books

+ journal
The most recent issue of our web journal is an in-depth discussion of the general starting point for the project transversal texts. Under the title “The Insurrection of the Published” the journal provides specific insights into the “Death Throes of the Publication Industry” and the potentials of an empancipatory concatenation of writing, translating, and publicly negotiating publications. Authors: eipcp, Isabell Lorey / Otto Penz / Gerald Raunig / Birgit Sauer / Ruth Sonderegger, Stevphen Shukaitis, Felix Stalder, Traficantes de Sueños, An Anonymous Iranian Collective.
In cooperation with the new journal Kamion.
http://transversal.at/transversal/0614

+ blog
In the transversal texts blog a translocal network of authors conjoins current political texts with announcements about events, publications, actions, manifestations, and campaigns.
http://transversal.at/blog

Please forward to other interested people.


transversal texts
eipcp – european institute for progressive cultural policies
a-1060 vienna, gumpendorfer strasse 63b
a-4040 linz, harruckerstrasse 7
contact@eipcp.net
http://eipcp.net

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Communisation

Communisation

IISH COLLECTIONS MADE AVAILABLE ONLINE

International Institute of Social History

Leading IISH collections made available online

Announcement, IISH, Amsterdam, Netherlands

 

Starting today, dozens of the IISH’s leading archives are fully available to view free of charge via the institute’s catalogue. Celebrated collections can now be studied from anywhere in the world, including the papers of Pieter Jelles Troelstra and Ferdinand Domela Nieuwenhuis, Lev Trotsky, the German Social Democrat politicians Eduard Bernstein and Karl Kautsky, and the French anarchist Louise Michel, as well as the archives of political parties as the Dutch Social-Democratic Party.

The digitalized documents can be browsed and each piece can be viewed in full screen mode. By adjusting the size and contrast, or rotating, it will be possible to consult the material easily. The documents can also be downloaded as a pdf file or printed out.

The Institute has digitalized its archives in recent years using Metamorfoze, a national programme that aims to preserve the printed materials that form part of our heritage. SNS Reaal has also made an important contribution: for the last two years, the company has been supporting a major project undertaken by the Institute to digitalize the most famous and important archives that were purchased between 1935 and 1940 using funds from the ‘Centrale’ life insurance company (a precursor of SNS Reaal). In the coming years, many more IISH collections, including the archives of Marx and Engels, will be made available online.

 

Look into the archives of:

Bakunin at http://search.socialhistory.org/Record/ARCH00018  –

Lev Trotsky at http://search.socialhistory.org/Record/ARCH01483/Description

Alexander Berkman at http://search.socialhistory.org/Record/ARCH00040  –

Eduard Bernstein at http://search.socialhistory.org/Record/ARCH00042

Domela Nieuwenhuis at http://search.socialhistory.org/Record/ARCH00483

Frank van der Goes at http://search.socialhistory.org/Record/ARCH00518

Alexander Herzen at http://search.socialhistory.org/Record/ARCH00517

Karl Kautsky at http://search.socialhistory.org/Record/ARCH00712

Labour and Socialist International at http://search.socialhistory.org/Record/ARCH01368

Louise Michel at http://search.socialhistory.org/Record/ARCH02550

Henriette Roland Holst at http://search.socialhistory.org/Record/ARCH01198

SDAP at http://search.socialhistory.org/Record/ARCH01292

Troelstra at http://search.socialhistory.org/Record/ARCH01482

 

Read more about the ‘Centrale’ digitization project at: http://socialhistory.org/nl/projects/centrale-digitization-project and http://socialhistory.org/en/news/leading-iish-collections-made-available-online

IISH: http://socialhistory.org/

 

First published in: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/leading-iish-collections-made-available-online

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

PROTEST IN A DIGITAL AGE

Wednesday 7th May 2014, 7.30

Bishopsgate Institute

230 Bishopsgate

London EC2M 4QH

See: http://www.bishopsgate.org.uk/event/451/Troublemakers?—Protest-in-a-Digital-Age?&Keyword=troublemakers&TypeID=

This is part of the ‘Troublemakers?’ series of events, see: http://www.bishopsgate.org.uk/Events/Troublemakers

Social media has changed the way people organise and demonstrate creating new types of fast-moving protest groups and challenges for the authorities. From the Arab Spring to the London riots, UK Uncut and Occupy tell us their experience of policing and public responses while experts explain the challenges faced by those who seek to control the movements.

Speakers include Symon Hill (author of Digital Revolutions: Activism in the Internet Age), Jamie Bartlett (Head of the Violence and Extremism Programme and the Centre for the Analysis of Social Media at Demos) plus representatives from Occupy and UK Uncut. The event will be chaired by the Ian Dunt (politics.co.uk).

Cost £9 / £7 concession (*A postage fee of £1 applies for sending out tickets booked online or over the telephone)

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Knowledge

Knowledge

6th QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN LIBRARIES INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

CALL FOR PAERS – Extended

QQML2014

27-30 May 2014

Kadir Has University, Istanbul, Turkey

http://www.isast.org

 

Please see below the replies to the main questions posed and more information:

Yes, you can participate and attend the conference without presenting an abstract or paper. However, you should send the registration form to ask for an attendance permission

An Abstract accepted is mandatory for an oral or poster presentation

The paper is optional. If you submit a paper it will be considered for the Conference Proceedings and the post-conference publications in Books and the QQML Journal (www.qqml.net ). Two new issues have been added. The e-journal is included in EBSCOhost and DOAJ.

The abstract submission deadline was extended to March 10, 2014 in order to include submissions of abstracts to the special sessions proposed and to the regular sessions as well.

Submissions of abstracts to special or contributed sessions could be sent directly to the conference secretariat at secretar@isast.org . Please refer to the Session Number (see below) to help the secretariat to classify the submissions.

Session organizers should notify the conference secretariat by March 10 and include the abstracts collected for their special sessions.

If you already have submitted your Abstract and you have not received a reply please notify the conference secretariat.

Archive

Archive

Conference Excursions

A half day (14:30-19:30) conference excursion in the afternoon of the second day of the conference (28 May 2014) is scheduled: Visit of the classical Istanbul including some of Istanbul’s major sights…

A full day Excursion in the day following the last day of the conference (31 May 2014)…

 

For more information and Abstract/Paper submission and Special Session Proposals please visit the conference website at: http://www.isast.org or send email to: secretar@isast.org

Looking forward to welcoming you in Istanbul,

With our best regards,

On behalf of the Conference Committee

Dr. Anthi Katsirikou, Conference Co-Chair
University of Piraeus Library Director
Head, European Documentation Center
Board Member of the Greek Association of Librarians and Information Professionals

 

Special and Contributed Sessions Code No

1. Bibliographic Control
1. Terminology project
2. Multiple controlled vocabularies
3. Subject thesaurus
4. Bibliographic utilities
5. New cataloguing rules, RDA and MARC21

2. Bibliometric research
1. Bibliometrics
2. Analysis of patterns of information
3. Usage data
4. Publication data
5. Citation analysis
6. Content analysis
7. Web sites
8. Databases

3. Change of Libraries and Managerial techniques
1. Human resources management
2. Organizational challenges
3. Strategic management
4. Re-engineering change in higher education
5. Fast-responded library
6. Learning organization

4. Changes in Learning, Research and Information needs and Behaviour of Users
1. 21st century librarians for 21st century libraries
2. New services for the research and learning communities
3. Redefining the library service experience
4. Forging collaboration between librarians and students
5. Library in the digital workflow of research
6. Content analysis of academic libraries’ Facebook profiles
7. Marketing the academic library through online social network advertising
8. International cooperation towards the development of technology in academic libraries

5. Climate Change Data and Climate Change Impacts
1. National greenhouse gas inventories
2. Inventory submissions
3. National communications
4. Information sources and availability
5. Socio-economic data
6. Definitions and methodologies
7. Climate change fund
8. Socio-economic data socio-economic data
9. Climate-related risks and disasters
10. Regional centres and networks
11. Risk management and reduction
12. Adaptation strategies
13. Access to information
14. Public awareness and participation
15. International cooperation
16. Research dialogue
17. Systematic observation
18. Sustainable development

6. Communication Strategies
1. Working with faculty, students, and staff
2. Users – Non users
3. Alumni, Partners, Stakeholders
4. Groups / teams
5. Archives, historical societies, museums and art galleries
6. Consortia

7. Data Analysis and Data Mining
1. Content analysis
2. Ontologies
3. Knowledge discovery
4. Machine learning
5. Databases
6. Data visualization

8. Development and Assessment of Digital Repositories
1. Preservation of records for the next generations
2. Demonstration on fiscal responsibility and sustainability
3. Development of new metrics of their usages
4. Evaluation and best practices

9. Development of Information and Knowledge Services on the Public Library
1. Public libraries transformations
2. Dynamic information market
3. Public library’s role in the society
4. Challenges before libraries today
5. Diversified societies
6. Public library’s policy
7. Communities and information market
8. Public libraries as creative industries
9. Production and consumption of knowledge

10. Digital Libraries
1. Digitization
2. Museum and art digital objects
3. Archival digital objects
4. Public libraries digital projects
5. Digital content for teaching
6. Digital images
7. Metadata
8. Repositories

11. Economic Co-operation and Development
1. Socio-economic, environmental and emissions data
2. Energy statistics
3. Economic and social development
4. Working parties and organizations
5. Education, training and public awareness
6. Financial mechanism
7. Green climate fund
8. Investments

12. Energy Data and Information
1. Energy consumption, products, prices and taxes
2. Energy-related statistical data include coal, oil, gas, electricity and heat statistics
3. Energy balances, prices and emissions
4. Emissions from fuel combustion from its energy data
5. Data from firms, government agencies, industry organizations and national publications

13. Environmental Assessment
1. International, national, regional, local core data sets
2. Integrated Environment Assessment
3. Global Environmental Outlook
4. Statistical and geo-referenced historical data sets
5. Emission database for global atmospheric research
6. Socio-economic data
7. Ocean observation

14. Financial strength and sustainability
1. Fund raising
2. Cost benefit analysis
3. Cost assessment
4. Value analysis

15. Health Information Services
1. Research by health information professionals
2. Role of librarians in implementing Evidence based medicine/practice
3. Prospects and challenges of implementing Research4Life in low income countries

16. Historical and Comparative case studies related to Librarianship
1. Library historiography
2. Agencies, people, and movements within the development of librarianship
3. Comparative case studies related to libraries, special collections, or library programs/services

17. Information and Data on various aspects of Food and Agriculture
1. Agricultural production and trade
2. Land use, and means of production
3. Trade indices and food supply
4. Population and labour force
5. Food balance sheets
6. Fertilizer and pesticides
7. Forest products
8. Fishery products
9. Agricultural machinery

 

18. Information and Knowledge Services

1.    Resource development policy

2.    Resource project description

3.    Research and development of the services

4.    Knowledge discovery and knowledge creation

5.    Knowledge mining

6.    Team building and management

 

19. Information Literacy: Information sharing, Democracy and Lifelong Learning

1.    Information Literacy and citizenship

2.    Strategic approaches to Information Literacy

3.    New pedagogic challenges for libraries

4.    Collaborative work between librarians and academic staff

5.    Independent learning skills, online information skills and lifelong learning

6.    Concepts of learning, teaching and the developments in networked technology

7.    Staff development and Information Literacy

8.    New areas of practice and research

9.    Information literacy projects on special scientific disciplines

10.    Advocacy, marketing and promotion

11.    Benchmarking

12.    Evaluation and assessment

 

20. Library Cooperation: Problems and Challenges at the beginning of the 21st century

1.    Union catalogue and storage equipment

2.    Collection policy and collection development

3.    Joint acquisitions (purchasing, access, inter-library loan and document delivery)

4.    Joint digitization’s projects

5.    Local, regional and country heritage

6.    Human resource in local, regional and country level

7.    Organizational culture

 

21. Library change and Technology

1.    Communicating change, scenarios and projections

2.    Adaptation technology

3.    Technology information

4.    Technology diffusion

5.    Technology needs assessment

6.    Technology research and development

7.    Technology transfer

 

22. Management

1.    Excellence and innovation

2.    Quality and benchmarking

3.    Measures and metrics

 

23. Marketing

1.    Marketing research

2.    Public relations

3.    Publicity

4.    Communication

 

24.Museums, Libraries and Cultural Organizations

1.    Networks and collaborations

2.    Cultural policy, diversity and intercultural dialogue

3.    Marketing & communications management

4.    Case studies

5.    European integration

6.    Multiculturalism, interculturalism, transculturalism

7.    National and international collaboration

8.    Cultural policies, migration and mobility

9.    Identity, memory and heritage

10.    Divergence and commonality

11.    Visitor experiences in collaborative projects

12.    Archiving, preservation and exhibition technologies

13.    Arts funding 

14.    Arts policy

15.    Libraries, theaters, music, film industry, television etc

16.    Libraries, archives and museums and their admission

 

25. Music Librarianship

1.    Musical archives

2.    Collections of music assessment

3.    Copyright and broadcasting issues, copying costs

4.    Librarianship and musicology

5.    Music bibliography

6.    Music library automation

7.    Music publishing industry

8.    Presentation on the duties, challenges and satisfactions of performance music librarians

9.    Collections of music preservation

10.    Space and music collections

 

26. Performance Measurement and Competitiveness

1.    Criteria of performance indicators (PI) selection for libraries and the kinds of PI

2.    Different methodologies proposed for library assessment

3.    The technological effect

4.    Financial indicators

5.    Organizational performance

6.    Comparison among governmental and non-governmental organizations’ performance

 

27. Publications

1.    Internet Filtering

2.    Privacy and share of information in libraries

3.    The Read/ Write Web and the future of library research

4.    Digital rights, copyright management and libraries

 

28. Quality evaluation and promotion of information

1.    User education in informational recourses

2.    The importance of personal involvement

3.    Accreditation of digital libraries

4.    Development of a network of peers

5.    Cataloguing is changing

6.    Customer services

7.    Management/administration

8.    OPAC 2.0 – the catalogue on web

9.    The benefit of change

10.    Electronic library

11.    Digital repository management

 

29. Technology & Innovations in Libraries and their Impact on Learning, Research and Users

1.    Creating webliographies

2.    Computing interfaces and how libraries need to adapt

3.    Creating materials samples collection to support the engineering curriculum

4.    Embedding librarians in the classroom

5.    Teaching scholarly communication and collaboration through social networking

6.    Sustainable development and the role of innovative & benchmarked practices

7.    Fostering innovation through cultural change

8.    Science & technology libraries as multi academic activities centres

9.    Change as a service

10.    Embedding innovation for  scholarly information & research

11.    Trends, possibilities and scenarios for user-centred libraries

 

30. Technology Transfer and Innovation in Library Management

1.    Innovative management

2.    Human resources management

3.    Competence management

4.    Communications in organizations

5.    Intercultural management

6.    Information technology and knowledge management

7.    Library’s ethics and social responsibility

 

31. Scientific, Technical and Socio-Economic Aspects of Mitigation of Climate Change

1.    Stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations

2.    Dangerous anthropogenic interference

3.    Forest degradation

4.    Afforestation and reforestation

5.    Forest Management

6.    Land-use change

7.    Aviation and marine “Bunker Fuels”

8.    Research and systematic observation

9.    Methodological issues

10.    Socio-economic data and tools

Ruth Rikowski

Ruth Rikowski

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

 

 

Philosophy

Philosophy

THE PHILOSOPHERS’ MAIL

http://www.thephilosophersmail.com/index.php

What This Is All About

The Philosopher’s Mail is a new news organisation, with bureaux in London, Amsterdam and Melbourne, run and staffed entirely by philosophers.

It is committed to bringing you the latest, biggest stories, as interpreted by philosophers rather than journalists.

Why did this organisation start? Because today, the most attractive, charming, sexy and compelling news outlets enjoy unparalled influence over the minds of tens of millions of people. But unfortunately, they rarely put out content that might make the world a better place.

At the same time, there are lots of serious, earnest good people attempting to change things, but they put out publications full of very interesting and dense articles that only reach tiny and already-convinced audiences.

So the good ideas go nowhere and the not-so-great ideas mesmerise us from every screen. Therefore, the world doesn’t change.

The goal of the Philosopher’s Mail is to prove a genuinely popular and populist news outlet which at the same time is alive to traditional philosophical virtues.

Socrates

Socrates

For too long, philosophers have been happy merely to be wise and right. This has offered them huge professional satisfaction but it has not influenced the course of society. The average work of philosophy currently reaches 300 people.

Hence the challenge that explains the birth of The Philosophers’ Mail, a new media outlet rooted in popular interests, sensibilities and inclinations of the day – but that tries to read and caption the news with an eye to traditional central philosophical concerns – for compassion, truth, justice, complexity, calm, empathy and wisdom.

The site views the rolling succession of the day’s news as an occasion for the development of insight, generosity and emotional intelligence.

News is not simply information about what is happening in the world. It is one of the key places where we daily shape our underlying assumptions about life – about what is important, admirable, scandalous, normal; where we rehearse attitudes to fear, hope, good and evil. This is why the news is a major target of concern for real philosophers.

The Philosophers’ Mail makes use of popular starting points – the stories a lot of people like to read and talk about already. It is generous to our natural inclinations: to read celebrity gossip, look at erotic images and read shock stories. It is sympathetic (as a starting point) to popular biases: anxiety about whatever feels foreign, a taste for vengeance, lack of empathy for the very poor, envy of the very rich, resentment of the powerful, suspicion of those who seem clever, dislike of awkward truths…

We start by acknowledging such attitudes: it isn’t strange to be unnerved by a Romanian family begging on a French train; it would be thrilling to have sex with Jennifer Lawrence; one can empathise with the feeling that George Osborne doesn’t quite know what real life is like; it is natural to want to switch off when hearing about trouble in Africa.

We don’t start by asking what the wise or good or serious outlook might be. There are plenty of people pushing such lines already – for that one could turn to the Economist, or the New York Times.

The epochal challenge is to reach the people who don’t engage with complex news.

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski