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Tag Archives: Digitization

The Failure of Capitalism

The Failure of Capitalism

CYBER-PROLETARIAT: GLOBAL LABOUR IN THE DIGITAL VORTEX

NEW FROM PLUTO PRESS:

Cyber-Proletariat: Global Labour in the Digital Vortex

By Nick Dyer-Witheford

http://bit.ly/1AeNq5z

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Praise for CYBER-PROLETARIAT:

‘Cyber-Proletariat tracks the eddies and flows of the perfect storm that is contemporary capitalism. This panoramic work reveals the relentless force of material destruction and brutal violence concealed by the sleek surfaces of digital culture’ – Benjamin Noys, Professor of Critical Theory, University of Chichester and author of Malign Velocities: Accelerationism and Capitalism

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Coltan mines in the Congo; electronics factories in China; devastated neighbourhoods in Detroit. Cyber-Proletariat shows us the dark-side of the information revolution; an unsparing analysis of class power and computerisation.

Nick Dyer-Witheford reveals how technology facilitates growing polarisation between wealthy elites and precarious workers. He reveals the class domination behind everything from expanding online surveillance to intensifying robotisation. At the same time he looks at possibilities for information technology within radical movements; contemporary struggles are cast in the blue glow of the computer screen.

Cyber-Proletariat brings heterodox Marxist analysis to bear on modern technological developments. The result will be indispensable to social theorists and hacktivists alike and essential reading for anyone who wants to understand how Silicon Valley shapes the way we live today.

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ON THE PLUTO BLOG: http://bit.ly/1HsH55Z

READ THE BOOK ONLINE: http://bit.ly/1K0fr0B

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Even Bigger Data

Even Bigger Data

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Information Technology

Information Technology

THIRD CALL FOR PAPERS ISIC: THE INFORMATION BEHAVIOUR CONFERENCE

Information Seeking In Context (ISIC)

2-5 September, 2014: Short Papers and Panels

ISIC is now accepting calls for panel proposals. These are expected to address new, exciting, and controversial issues. They should be provocative, informative, and entertaining. Panel proposals should include:
•    Summary of the topics to be covered.
•    Name, affiliation and contact information for the panel chair.
•    Names and affiliations of up to four panellists (in addition to the panel chair) who have made a commitment to participate.
•    Short summary of their position statements.
•    Brief biography of each participant.
For the first time ISIC will also provide a dedicated track for short papers for work in progress.  The purpose of this track is to present late-breaking results, work in progress, and follow-up extensions or evaluations of existing methods. Short papers will be peer-reviewed in a one-stage process by the program committee. Submissions for the short paper track should be 3 pages (at most), excluding references, and 4 pages (at most), in total. They will be orally presented at the conference  with each presenter being allocated 15 minutes, 10 – 12 minutes to present their paper and a couple of minutes to answer any questions.

Important Dates
The deadline for submission is March 17, 2014

Author Guidelines and Submission
Submit your paper through the ISIC2014 paper submission site http://isic2014.com/

Conference Location
ISIC is a biennial conference. The last ISIC conference was held in 2012 in Keio University, Tokyo, Japan and the earlier conference in 2010 in the Universidad de Murcia, Spain. We are delighted that in 2014 it will be hosted by Leeds University Business School. The Business School is internationally renowned for the quality of its teaching, its research and its facilities. The City of Leeds is a modern vibrant city which has excellent transportation links but is also provides access to the beautiful countryside and heritage of Yorkshire.

Conference Organsation
The conference is being jointly organised by the University of Leeds Business School, University of Sheffield iSchool and the Department of Information Studies, University of Aberystwyth.

ISIC Conferene 2014: http://isic2014.com/

**END**

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

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The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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Digitisation Perspectives - Ruth Rikowski

LIANZA CONFERENCE 2012

LIANZA Conference 2012
Ipukarea – Celebrate, Sustain, Transform Palmerston North, New Zealand
23-26 September

The LIANZA 2012 Conference Programme Committee is pleased to announce Marshall Breeding as a keynote speaker.

Marshall Breeding is Director for Innovative Technologies and Research for the Vanderbilt University Libraries in Nashville, Tennessee and Executive Director of the Vanderbilt Television News Archive – a large-scale archive of digital video content.

Other keynote speakers:
Meredith Farkas, Head of Instructional Services at Portland State University in Oregon.
Rolf Hapel, Director of Citizens’ Services and Libraries (CSL) in Aarhus, Denmark. DK, founding Director of social media training company MediaSnackers.
Mavis Mullins, Director of Paewai Mullins Shearing Ltd and Trustee of several Maori development organisations.
Karen Schneider, Director of the Cushing Library at Holy Names University in Oakland, California.
 
Read more about the keynote speakers: http://www.lianza.org.nz/news-events/conferences/conference-2012/speakers      

Read more about LIANZA Conference 2012: http://www.lianza.org.nz/news-events/conferences/conference-2012-welcome

Lisa Crombie
Communications Manager
Library and Information Association of New Zealand
lisa@lianza.org.nz     
http://www.lianza.org.nz

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

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Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Ghosts

ON HAUNTOLOGY \ CAPITALIST REALISM – TWO TALKS BY MARK FISHER

THE COLLOQUIUM FOR UNPOPULAR CULTURE AND NYU’S ASIAN/ PACIFIC/ AMERICAN STUDIES PROGRAM present:

TWO TALKS BY MARK FISHER

What are grey vampires and how do they retard the insurrectionary potential of digital  discourse?  How does Derrida’s notion of hauntology contribute to an understanding of dubstep artist Burial?  Is ‘Basic Instinct 2’, routinely derided as a cine-atrocity, a Lacanian reworking of Ballard, Baudrillard and Bataille in service of the creation of a ‘phantasmatic, cybergothic London’?  What is interpassivity and in what ways has it come to define the corporatized incarceration of modern academia?

Over the last decade, Mark Fisher has established a reputation as one of the exhilarating cultural theorists in Britain.  A co-founder of the Cybernetic Culture Research Unit (CCRU) at Warwick University ­and described by Simon Reynolds as the academic equivalent of Apocalypse Now’s Colonel Kurtz ­ he brings together psychoanalysis, political analysis and speculative fiction to create an extraordinary body of rogue scholarship, a theory-rush with few parallels.

Fisher is the author of ‘Capitalist Realism’, the editor of ‘The Resistible Demise of Michael Jackson’ (both Zer0 Books, 2009), and writes regularly for Sight and Sound, Film Quarterly, The Wire and Frieze, as well as maintaining a well-known blog at http://k-punk.abstractdynamics.org.  He teaches at the University of East London, Goldsmiths, University of London, and the City Literary Institute.

The Colloquium for Unpopular Culture and NYU’s Asian/ Pacific/ American Studies program are pleased to be hosting Fisher’s first talks inAmerica.

See ‘ The Metaphysics of Crackle’, at: http://pontone.pl/pontones-special-guest-mix-k-punk-the-metaphysics-of-crackle/

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MARK FISHER, THESE ARE NON-TIMES AS WELL AS NON-PLACES: REFLECTIONS ON HAUNTOLOGY
 
WHEN: Wednesday 4 May 2011, 6:30pm
WHERE: Room 471, 20 Cooper Square [East 5th and Bowery]
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

”Through their generic and transient qualities ­ workstations devoid of personal effects, relations with colleagues as fleeting as those with passengers on a commuter journey ­ many workplaces now resemble non-places, either literally, as in the case of a hotel, corporate coffee chain or out-of-town supermarket, or symbolically, in the form of temporary assignments for faceless employers (dis)located in anonymous buildings, where the worker-commuter then follows the same global timetables, navigates the same software applications and experiences the same sense of placelessness, the feeling of being mere data in the mainframe.”

So writes Ivor Southwood in his analysis of precarious labour, ‘Non-Stop Inertia’ (2011). In the last decade, the proliferation of corporate non-places has been accompanied by the spread of cyberspace-time, or Itime, a distributed or unpunctuated temporality. It’s no coincidence that, as this unmarked time increasingly came to dominate cultural and psychic space, Derrida’s concept hauntology (re)emerged as the name for a paradoxical zeitgeist.  In ‘Specters of Marx’, Derrida argued that the hauntological was characterised by ‘a time out of joint’, and this broken time has been expressed in cultural objects that return to a wounded or distorted version of the past in flight from a waning sense of the present. Sometimes accused of nostalgia, the most powerful examples of hauntological culture actually show that nostalgia is no longer possible.

In conditions where pastiche has become normalised, the question has to be: nostalgia compared to what? James Bridle has recently argued that ‘the opposite of hauntology … [is] to demand the radically new’, but hauntology in fact operates as a kind of thwarted preservation of such demands in conditions where – for the moment at least – they cannot be met. Whereas cyberspace-time tends towards the generation of cultural moments that are as interchangeable as transnational franchise outlets, hauntology involves the staining of particular places with time – albeit a time that is out of joint. In this lecture, Fisher will explore the hauntological culture of the last few years in relation to the question of place, using examples from music (Burial, The Caretaker, Ekoplekz, Richard Skelton), film (Chris Petit, Patrick Keiller) and fiction (Alan Garner, David Peace).

MARK FISHER, DEPACIFICATION PROGRAM: FROM CAPITALIST REALISM TO POST-CAPITALISM

WHEN: Thursday 5 May 2011, 6:30pm
WHERE: Room 471, 20 Cooper Square [East 5th and Bowery]
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

”It would be best, perhaps, to think of an alternate world – better to say the alternate world, our alternate world – as one contiguous with ours but without any connections or access to it. Then, from time to time, like a diseased eyeball in which disturbing flashes of light are perceived or like those baroque sunbursts in which rays from another world suddenly break into this one, we are reminded that Utopia exists and that other systems, other spaces, are still possible” (Fredric Jameson, ‘Valences of the Dialectic’).

In his 2009 book ‘Capitalist Realism’, Mark Fisher started to explore some of the affective, psychological and political consequences of the deeply entrenched belief that there is no alternative to capitalism. After 1989, capital seemed to enjoy full spectrum dominance of both global space and the unconscious. Every imaginable future was capitalist.  What has been mistaken for post-political apathy, Fisher argued, was a pervasive sense of reflexive impotence in the face of a neoliberal ideological program which sought to subordinate all of culture to the imperatives of business. The subject of post-Fordist capitalism is no passive dupe; this subject actively participates in an ‘interpassive’ corporate culture which solicits our involvement and encourages us to ‘join the debate’.

As Fisher argues in the book, education has been at the forefront of this process, with teachers and lecturers locked into managerialist self-surveillance, and students induced into the role of consumers.

In the eighteen months since ‘Capitalist Realism’ was published, the neoliberal program has been seriously compromised, but capitalist realism has intensified – with austerity programs pushed through on the basis that it is unthinkable that capitalism should be allowed to fail. At the same time, this new, more desperate form of capitalist realism has also faced unexpected challenges from a militancy growing in Europe, the Middle East and even in the heartlands of neoliberalism such as the UK and the US. Now that history has started up again, and Jameson’s ‘baroque sunbursts’ flare brighter than they have for a generation, we can begin to pose questions that had receded into the unimaginable during the high pomp of neoliberal triumphalism: what might a post-capitalism look like,
and how can we get there?

Fisher will argue that the Left will only succeed if it can reclaim modernity from a neoliberal Right that has lost control of it. This entails understanding how the current possibilities for agency are contoured and constrained by the machinery of what Deleuze and Foucault called the Control Society, including cyberspace, the media landscape, psychic pathologies and pharmacology – failures to act are not failures of will, and all the will in the world will not eliminate capitalism. It also entails recognising that neoliberalism’s global hegemony arose from capturing desires which it could not satisfy. A genuinely new Left must be shaped by those desires, and not be lulled, once again, by the logics of failed revolts.

Queries: ss162@nyu.edu

***END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Archive

BEYOND 2.0: NEW MODELS OF INFORMATION

A Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) in Sussex Event

Thursday 19th May, 4-6pm – University of Brighton

As the web matures and Web 2.0 and social media services become embedded in our everyday lives the information world is entering a new phase. The vast quantities of data being generated by these new services, the challenges posed to traditional publishers and the plethora of new devices such as iPads and smart phones will change the work of information professionals over the coming decade.

This talk, by Dr Martin De Saulles of the University of Brighton, will outline some of the challenges as well as the opportunities for those who work with information. It will be followed by an opportunity for questions and discussion. 

Venue: Watts Building, University of Brighton, Lewes Rd, Brighton BN2 4GJ

Cost: £5 for CILIP members, £10 for non-members

Light refreshments will be available.

To book your place, contact Audrey Marshall by email: a.m.marshall@brighton.ac.uk

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

F.W. Taylor

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (CEBM) 2011


Call for Papers
October 28-30, 2011     

Shanghai, China

Web site: http://www.engii.org/cet2011/cebm2011.aspx
The 2011 International Conference on Engineering and Business Management (CEBM2011) will be held in Shanghai/China, Oct. 28-30, 2011, CEBM is part of World Congress on Engineering and Technology (CET) which will take place in Shanghai China. The CET is composed of several conferences on the frontier topics in the engineering and technological subjects.

The CET conference proceedings will be published by IEEE, and the accepted papers will be indexed by Ei Compendex and ISTP.

IEEE (IEEE Conference Calendar): http://www.engii.org/cet2011/NewsContent.aspx?newsID=527  

Paper Submission Deadline: April 30, 2011
Acceptance Notification: June 15, 2011

The conference is soliciting state-of-the-art research papers in the following areas of interest:

  • Business Project Management
  • Crisis, Emergency and Risk Management
  • Customer Management
  • Data Mining and E-commerce
  • Decision Making Process
  • Digital City
  • E-Government
  • Engineering Management
  • Enterprise Management
  • Environmental and Energy Management
  • Financial Analysis
  • Geographic Information System
  • Human Resources Management
  • Information Assurance and Security
  • Investment Analysis
  • Knowledge Management
  • Logistics Management
  • Management Consulting
  • Management of Information Systems
  • Operations Research and Management Science
  • Process Improvement
  • Project Management
  • Quality Control
  • Requirement Analysis
  • Sales and Marketing
  • Service Science
  • Systems Engineering and Analysis
  • Technology Innovation
  • Transportation Management
  • Urban Management

 

For more information, please contact:
Email: cebm@engii.org
QQ: 58329403
QQ group: 133861010 133861899

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Utopia

KRITIKOS

Volume 7

November–December 2010

Contents:

A Faustian Bargain, or An Open Letter to the President of SUNY Albany…(g.petsko)

The Catastrophe of the Digital and the Fate of Photography…(g.coulter)

And so Lyotard thought: “Specifically, I went too far in identifying knowledge with narrative.”…(n.ruiz)

Nicholas Ruiz III, PhD

Editor, Kritikos

http://intertheory.org

NRIII for Congress 2012

http://intertheory.org/nriiiforcongress2010.html

Nicholas Ruiz III for Congress

PO Box 1372

New Smyrna Beach, FL 32170

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

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Archive

LIBRARIES IN THE DIGITAL AGE

The Association of Independent Libraries

Libraries in a Digital Age 

A one-day conference on the problems and opportunities facing libraries in the age of the Internet 

To be held at the Royal Astronomical Society, 

Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BQ 

Thursday 14 October 2010 

10.30 a.m. – 4.30 p.m. 

Programme 

10.30 Coffee and Welcome 

10.45 Social networking: just a lot of twittering?  Gwyneth Price

Gwyneth Price is Head of Collection Development Services at the Institute of Education (London) and is particularly interested in information literacy and the use of social networking software in libraries.  Her presentation will focus on some examples of Web 2.0 technologies and how they impact on libraries in the digital age. 

11.30 A plan for the future of our public library service.  Tim Coates 

Tim Coates is an author and was head of Waterstone’s bookshops in its early years. For the last decade he has become widely known for his pursuit of the improvement of the public library service. For his address to the conference on libraries in the digital age Tim has indicated his intention to use this opportunity to make a major statement on the state of libraries in England and what needs to be done for them to survive and fill a role for future generations.

12.15 The Oxford-Google Book Digitization Partnership.  Michael Popham

Michael Popham is Head of the Oxford Digital Library, a core service of the Bodleian Libraries, serving the University of Oxford. Michael has been working in the fields of digitization and electronic text creation for more than two decades, and co-ordinates Oxford’s collaboration with Google Books. The Bodleian Library was one of the first five libraries to began collaboration with the Google Books Library Project (see http://books.google.com/googlebooks/partners.html). This presentation will outline the Partnership’s efforts to digitize the Bodleian’s entire holdings of out-of-copyright C19th material, and the lessons we have learned from this challenging endeavour.

13.00 Lunch

14.00 Merchants of Culture: the publishing industry in the 21st century. Professor John B Thompson 

John B. Thompson is Professor of Sociology at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of Jesus College, Cambridge. His publications include Books in the Digital Age (2005) and Merchants of Culture: The Publishing Business in the Twenty-First Century (2010). The book publishing industry today is facing some of the greatest challenges it has known since Gutenberg. Caught in the pincer of an economic downturn and a digital revolution, everyone involved in the book business – publishers, agents and booksellers – is being forced to rethink what they do. Based on ten years of in-depth research on the publishing industry, Thompson analyses some of the key changes that have transformed the industry in recent years and shows how publishers are seeking to rethink their practices in the face of an uncertain future. 

14.45 Copyright and the Knowledge Commons.  Martyn Everett

Martyn Everett, writer, historian, former librarian and Chairman of Saffron Walden Town Library Society. The internet and digitisation provide the opportunity to create a knowledge and information Commons in which libraries could play a key role.  Yet the combination of new technology, commercialisation, and changes in the nature of ‘copyright’ threaten to constrict and regulate access to information as never before. Which side are you on?

15.30 Tour of the Royal Astronomical Society Library including a short talk about the Library’s digitisation programme by Librarian Peter Hingley. 

16.30 Concluding remarks 

Timings are approximate and the organisers reserve the right to change the programme without notification 

Cost £40 per person including lunch. 

Please make cheques payable to “The Association of Independent Libraries’ and send to: 

The Association of Independent Libraries, c/o The Leeds Library, 18 Commercial Street, Leeds LS1 6AL 

Tel: 0113-245-3071 

enquiries@theleedslibrary.org.uk

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Archive

Archive

THE ARCHIVE AND EVERYDAY LIFE CONFERENCE
Call for Proposals:

”The Archive and Everyday Life” Conference
May 7-8, 2010
McMaster University

Confirmed Keynotes: Ann Cvetkovich (An Archive of Feelings: Trauma, Sexuality, and Lesbian Public Cultures), Angela Grauerholz (At Work and Play: A Web Experimentation), Ben Highmore (The Everyday Life Reader; Everyday Life and Cultural Theory), Michael O’Driscoll (The Event of the Archive)

This conference will bring together academics, advocates, artists, and other cultural workers to examine the intersecting fields of archive and everyday life theory. From Simmel through Mass Observation to contemporary Cultural Studies theorists, the objective of everyday life theory has been, as Ben Highmore writes, to “rescue the everyday from conventional habits of the mind…to attempt to register the everyday in all its complexities and contradictions.” Archive theory provides a means to explore these structures by “making the unfamiliar familiar,” hence opening the possibility of generating “new forms of critical practice.” The question of a politics of the archive is critical to the burgeoning field of archive theory. How do we begin to theorize the archive as a political apparatus? Can its effective democratization be measured by the participation of those who engage with both its constitution and its interpretation?

“Archive” is understood to cover a range of objects, from a museum’s collection to a personal photograph album, from a repository of a writer’s papers in a library to an artist’s installation of found objects. Regardless of its content, the archive works to contain, organize, represent, render intelligible, and produce narratives. The archive has often worked to legitimate the rule of those in power and to produce a historical narrative that presents class structure and power relations as both common-sense and inevitable. This function of the archive as a machine that produces History-telling us what is significant, valued, and worth preserving, and what isn’t-is enabled through an understanding of the archive as neutral and objective (and too banal and boring to be political!). The archive has long occupied a privileged space in affirmative culture, and as a result, the archive has been revered from afar and aestheticized, but not understood as a potential object of critical practice.

Can a dialogue between archive theory and everyday life theory work to “take revenge” on the archive (Cvetkovich)? If the archive works to produce historical narratives, can we seize the archive and its attendant collective consciousness as a tool for resistance in countering dominant History with resistant narratives? While the archive has worked to preserve a transcendental, “affirmative” form of culture, bringing everyday life theory into conversation with archive theory opens up the possibility of directing critical attention to both the wonders and drudgeries of the everyday. Archiving the everyday-revealing class structures and oppression on the basis of race and gender, rendering working and living conditions under global capitalism visible, audible, and intelligible-redirects us from our busyness and distractedness, and focuses our attention on that which has not been understood to be deserving of archiving. The archive provides the time and space to think through a collection of objects organized around particular set of interests. If the archive could grant us a space in which to examine everyday life, rather than sweeping it under the carpet as a trivial banality, we could begin to understand our conditions and develop the desire to change them.

How can we envision the archive as a site of ethics and/or politics? Does the archive simply represent a place to amass memory, or can it, following Benjamin, represent a site to make visible a history of the present, thus amassing fragments of the everyday, which can in turn be used to uproot the authority of the past to question the present? In short, what happens when we move beyond the archive as merely a collection and begin to theorize it as a site of constant renewal and struggle within which the past and present can come together? Furthermore, how then does the archive as an everyday practice allow us to understand or change our perception of temporality, memory, and this historical moment?

Areas of inquiry for submissions may include, but are not limited to, the following topics and questions:

* The archive both includes and excludes; it works to preserve while simultaneously doing violence. Are the acts of selection, collection, ordering, systematizing, and cataloguing inherently violent?
* The question of digitization: the internet as digital archive and the digitization of the physical archive. Digitizing the archive renders collections invisible and distant, yet increasingly searchable and quantifiable. Does the digitization of the archive reveal new ways of seeing persistent power structures? Or does it hide them?
* National and colonial archiving: questions of power and national identity. * The utopian, radical potential of the archive as well as its dystopian possibilities.
* Indigenous modes of archiving.
* Visibility and pedagogy: while the archive often works to hide, conceal, and store away, it can also reveal and display that which otherwise remains invisible. Do barriers to access restrict this emancipatory function of the archive?
* Questions of collective memory and nostalgia (for Benjamin, a retreat to a place of comfort through nostalgia is not a political act).
* The archive as revisionist history.
* The archive as a form of surveillance.
* The role of reflexivity with respect to the manner in which the archive is constructed/produced/curated.
* Function of the narrative form for the archive: how does the way in which the archive reveals its own constructedness unravel the concept of the archive as “historical truth”?
* The future of the archive: preservation and collection look forwards as well as into the past. How should we understand the hermeneutic function of the archive and the struggle over its interpretation?
* The relationship between the archive and the archivist/archon.
* Mechanisms of inclusion and exclusion in the archive: who speaks and who is spoken for?
* The affective relationship between the archive and the body.

Following the conference, we intend to publish an edited collection of essays based on the papers presented at the conference to facilitate the circulation of ideas in this exciting field of inquiry.
 
“The Archive and Everyday Life” Conference will take place 7-8 May, 2010, sponsored by the Department of English and Cultural Studies at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario (John Douglas Taylor Fund). The conference format will be diverse, including paper presentations, panels, round-table exchanges, artistic performances, and exhibitions.
We encourage individual and collaborative paper and panel proposals from across the disciplines and from artists and community members. 

Paper Submissions should include (1) contact information; (2) a 300-500 word abstract; and (3) a one page curriculum vitae or a brief bio.

Panel Proposals should include (1) a cover sheet with contact information for chair and each panelist; (2) a one-page rationale explaining the relevance of the panel to the theme of the conference; (3) a 300 word abstract for each proposed paper; and (4) a one page curriculum vitae for each presenter. 

Please submit individual paper proposals or full panel proposals via e-mail attachment by October 15, 2009 to tayconf@mcmaster.ca with the subject line “Archive.” Attachments should be in .doc or .rtf formats. Submissions should be one document (i.e. include all required information in one attached document).

Conference organizing committee: Mary O’Connor, Jennifer Pybus, and Sarah Blacker

Website: http://www.humanities.mcmaster.ca/~english/Taylor_2010/index.html

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