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The Usual Suspects

The Usual Suspects

RADICAL HISTORIES / HISTORIES OF RADICALISM

CALL FOR PAPERS

RADICAL HISTORIES/HISTORIES OF RADICALISM

A MAJOR CONFERENCE AND PUBLIC HISTORY FESTIVAL

1-3 July 2016, Queen Mary University of London

This international event commemorates twenty years since the death of the leftwing social historian Raphael Samuel and forty years since the founding of History Workshop Journal. The event will explore radical approaches to the past and histories of radical ideas and action through lectures, panels, performances, screenings, workshops and exhibitions.

The event is hosted by Queen Mary University of London and organised by the Raphael Samuel History Centre (www.raphael-samuel.org.uk). It is intended to engage a diverse audience, and to bring together practitioners of many varieties of historical research, curatorship, writing and performance, from both inside and outside the academy. Other venues and partners for the event include Bishopsgate Institute, the London Metropolitan Archives and Tower Hamlets Local Studies Library.

The event will open on the evening of Friday 1st July with a plenary session ‘Radical history then and now’ involving radical historians, historians of radical movements and movement activists, past and present. It will close with a panel discussion on ‘Raphael Samuel and his Legacies’. In between these plenary sessions, there will be papers, film screenings, workshops, meetings and performances, all exploring a wide range of themes and ideas in radical history.

We have grouped these themes as follows:

  1. Radical movements:
    History of radical movements and organisations; parties; left-wing activism; working-class radicalisms; national liberation struggles; popular mobilisations, past and present.
  2. Diversity, difference and beyond:
    Histories of feminism, gender and sexuality; histories and activism of race and ethnicity; disability politics.
  3. Local and global histories:
    Radical London; migration/movement of peoples; empire/post-colonial histories; globalisation; internationalism in a global age.
  4. Culture, art and environment:
    Heritage and public history; radical arts; environmental activism; housing politics.
  5. History, policy, and the idea of politics:
    Europe; government; elites; the move to the right; austerity; neo-liberalism; the politics of the academy

How to contribute:
Contributions that reflect on any of these themes in relation to any period of history are invited from academic and non-academic historians, and from those working or practising in the arts, education, heritage and culture, as well as activists campaigning in any of these areas.

The themes are indicative only, and we will consider proposals that fall outside them so long as these relate to the overall conference theme. We welcome offers of traditional academic papers but would particularly like to encourage proposals for other session formats likely to engage a varied audience, for example panel discussions, interactive hands-on workshops (for example, around primary source materials), photo-essays, exhibitions and performances. Contributions that focus on any period of history are welcome, as are contributions that offer reflections on methodologies (whether of the historian or the activist).

Please send a 250 – 500 word proposal, including a description of the format and content of the proposed paper, session, workshop, meeting, screenings, or performance. Include an abstract if appropriate, and the names of any other speakers or participants. AT THE TOP OF YOUR PROPOSAL PLEASE INDICATE THE CONFERENCE STRAND (A –E above) TO WHICH YOU THINK YOUR PROPOSAL RELATES MOST CLOSELY.

Please submit your proposal to Katy Pettit, Raphael Samuel History Centre administrator (k.pettit@uel.ac.uk) by Monday September 14th. Proposers will be notified by November 30th.

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About the Raphael Samuel History Centre (RSHC)
Originally founded by the historian Raphael Samuel at the University of East London in 1996 as the Centre for East London History, and renamed after him in 2008, the Raphael Samuel History Centre has since expanded into a partnership between UEL, Birkbeck College University of London, Queen Mary University of London and Bishopsgate Institute in the City of London.

An extensive range of events, projects and research activities operates under our umbrella as we seek to stimulate debate about the continuing force of the past in the present. Our dynamic and engaged approach to history goes beyond the limits of the academy to include people of all ages and backgrounds.

The Centre is recognised nationally and internationally as the hub for intelligent debate that links history to present-day concerns and crosses boundaries between academic and public/popular history. We aim to put history in conversation both with other disciplines, and with contemporary activism and politics. In the spirit of Raphael Samuel and more broadly of the History Workshop movement, we are committed to a democratic, non-elitist and inclusive approach to history. We aim to support, nurture and encourage both new-career academic historians and those working in history outside academia. We provide a forum for debate about the place of history in public life, in schools, heritage organizations and the media. We enter into partnership with other organizations – large and small – in order to stimulate interest in and discussion of history.

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-radical-histories-histories-of-radicalism

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

CLR James

CLR James

RADICAL THINKERS: SET 10

OUT NOW: RADICAL THINKERS: SET 10

The tenth set in the series features four books on the history and development of psychoanalysis and psychiatry.

 

THE DIALECTICS OF LIBERATION edited by DAVID COOPER

http://www.versobooks.com/books/1933-the-dialectics-of-liberation

 

FREUD: THEORY OF THE UNCONCIOUS by OCTAVE MANNONI

http://www.versobooks.com/books/1937-freud

 

READ MY DESIRE: LACAN AGAINST THE HISTORICISTS by JOAN COPJEC

http://www.versobooks.com/books/1939-read-my-desire

 

THE WEARY SONS OF FREUD by CATHERINE CLEMENT

http://www.versobooks.com/books/1935-the-weary-sons-of-freud

 

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LONDON EVENT

DIALECTICS OF LIBERATION

A contemporary revisiting of the now legendary 1967 Congress, with guest speakers including Selma James and Lynne Segal

15th July, 7pm, Roundhouse, Chalk Farm Road, NW1 8EH

The Dialectics of Liberation Congress was held at the Roundhouse in July 1967. The now legendary meeting of minds was a unique expression of the politics of modern dissent. Existential psychiatrists, Marxist intellectuals, anarchists and political leaders met to discuss the key social issues of the next decade.

Against the backdrop of rising student frustrations, racism, class inequality, and environmental degradation, this conference aimed to create genuine revolutionary momentum by fusing ideology and action on the levels of the individual and of mass society.

Taking ‘the demystification of violence’ in all its expressions, and bridging theory and practice, speakers included Herbert Marcuse and Lucien Goldmann to represent the theoretical pole, and Stokely Carmichael on Black Power as an activist, and Carol Schneeman, Allen Ginsberg and R.D. Laing in between.

Verso Books presents an event revisiting some of the issues discussed in light of the sweeping political, economic and technological changes that the world has seen since, on the 48th anniversary of the congress and the publication of a new edition of The Dialectics of Liberation, compiling interventions from contributors as part of Verso’s Radical Thinkers series.

Join Selma James, Lynne Segal, Nina Power, Ewa Jasiewicz, Benjamin Noys and Mark Fisher to discuss the legacy of the meeting and contemporary social issues surrounding the forms of struggle, feminism and anti-racism, sexuality, mental health, education, the environment and climate change and activism.

Tickets are £5 (with £1.95 fee per transaction) and available from the Roundhouse website – https://tickets.roundhouse.org.uk/booking/production/bestavailable/17555?performance=

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THE DIALECTICS OF LIBERATION edited by DAVID COOPER

http://www.versobooks.com/books/1933-the-dialectics-of-liberation

A revolutionary compilation of speeches which produced a political groundwork for many of the radical movements in the following decades, featuring Stokely Carmichael, Herbert Marcuse, R. D. Laing, Paul Sweezy, and others.

DAVID COOPER (1931-1986) was a South African–born theorist and existential psychiatrist.

FREUD: THEORY OF THE UNCONCIOUS by OCTAVE MANNONI

http://www.versobooks.com/books/1937-freud

A clearly written and highly organized introduction of the work of one of the twentieth century’s greatest thinkers.

OCTAVIO MANNONI (1898-1989) was a leading thinker in the French psychoanalytical tradition inspired by Jacques Lacan.  After travelling to Africa and residing for more than twenty years in Madagascar, where he held various positions while working as an ethnologist, Mannoni returned to France to develop his influential work on colonization.

READ MY DESIRE: LACAN AGAINST THE HISTORICISTS by JOAN COPJEC

http://www.versobooks.com/books/1939-read-my-desire

Pits the psychoanalytic theory of Jacques Lacan against the historicist approach of Michel Foucault to develop a profound critique of historicism.

JOAN COPJEC is a Professor of Modern Culture and Media at Brown University.  She has written or edited eleven books, including ‘Supposing the Subject’ and ‘Radical Evil’

THE WEARY SONS OF FREUD by CATHERINE CLEMENT

http://www.versobooks.com/books/1935-the-weary-sons-of-freud

A Communist, feminist, and analysand asks what the social function of psychoanalysis should be and condemns what it has become.

CATHERINE CLEMENT is a prominent French philosopher, novelist, feminist, and literary critic. After studying at the Ecole normale superieure under Claude Levi-Strauss and Jacques Lacan, she became a leading member of the school of French feminism and ecriture feminine.

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Verso, originally founded in 1970 to publish continental theory in translation for the first time, brought the work of radical thinkers such as Jacques Lacan and Jean-Paul Sartre to a wider English-speaking audience. The Radical Thinkers series continues to bring philosophy to new audiences as part of Verso’s broader intellectual and political project. The series of beautifully designed and affordable editions of classic works of theory now exceeds 100 published titles and counts over 300,000 copies sold.  This tenth set in the series features four books on the history and development of psychoanalysis and psychiatry.

“A golden treasury of theory.”—Eric Banks, Bookforum

“Verso’s beautifully designed Radical Thinkers series, which brings together seminal works by leading left-wing intellectuals, is a sophisticated blend of theory and thought.”—Ziauddin Sardar, New Statesman

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All books are PAPERBACK, priced £9.99/$16.95/$19.95CAN

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Visit Verso’s website for information on our upcoming events, new reviews and publications and special offers: http://www.versobooks.com

Sign up for the Verso mailing list:

https://www.versobooks.com/users/sign_up

Follow us online:

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/VersoBks

Twitter: http://twitter.com/VersoBooks

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/out-now-radical-thinkers-set-10-four-books-on-the-history-and-development-of-psychoanalysis-and-psychiatry

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

UEA

UEA

BEFORE 68: THE LEFT, ACTIVISM AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS IN THE LONG 1960s

Weekend Conference: Before 68: The Left, Activism & Social Movements in the Long 1960s

Call for Papers

Dates: 13 and 14 February 2016

Venue: School of History, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ, UK

Organised and hosted by UEA School of History in conjunction with the journal Socialist History and the Institute of Working Class History, Chicago.

The events of 1968, particularly those in France, have achieved a mythical status in both the memory and the historiography of the 1960s. For some, 1968 marked the end-point of a realignment of the European ‘New Left’. For others 1968 represented a student generation in revolt, and many of the first accounts which sought to explain the history and meaning of ‘68 were written by that generation.

More recently historians have tried to demythologise ‘68, looking both at less ‘glamourous’ locales and at the deeper histories of anti-colonial struggles and worker activism prior to the events of that year. The aim of this conference is to explore the diverse histories of social activism and left politics in Britain and elsewhere, and how they prepared the ground for and fed into ‘1968’. Themes might include, but are not limited to:

  • Anti-nuclear & peace movements
  • Civil Rights struggles
  • The Black Power movement
  • Anti-colonial politics
  • The activities of the Labour movement and the ‘traditional’ Left
  • The grassroots activism of the ‘New Left’
  • Far Left challenges: Trotskyism & Maoism
  • Campaigns around housing and the built environment
  • Campaigns around race and discrimination in the workplace and housing
  • Solidarity movements with struggles abroad (e.g. South Africa, Vietnam)
  • Campaigns for Homosexual Equality
  • Second Wave Feminism

We are seeking papers of 5000 to 10000 words on any aspects of left activism and social movements in the period preceding 1968 to be presented at the conference. Selected papers will be published in a special issue of the journal Socialist History. Attendance at the conference will be free of charge, but we ask that anyone wishing to attend registers in advance. Proposals for papers and any enquiries should be submitted to Ben Jones. Email: b.jones5@uea.ac.uk

Deadline for proposals for papers: 31 October 2015

From UEA website: https://www.uea.ac.uk/history/news-and-events/-/asset_publisher/oAKg6av1Sw6j/blog/weekend-conference-before-68-the-left-activism-social-movements-in-the-long-1960s

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-before-68-the-left-activism-social-movements-in-the-long-1960s

Norwich Cathedral

Norwich Cathedral

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Marxism and Feminism

Marxism and Feminism

MARXISM AND FEMINISM

A new book edited by Shahrzad Mojab

See: http://www.zedbooks.co.uk/node/20825

Global events, from economic crisis to social unrest and militarization, disproportionately affect women. Yet around the world it is also women who are leading the struggle against oppression and exploitation. In light of renewed interest in Marxist theory among many women activists and academics, Marxism and Feminism presents a contemporary and accessible Marxist-feminist analysis on a host of issues. It reassesses previous debates and seeks to answer pressing questions of how we should understand the relationship between patriarchy and capitalism, and how we can envision a feminist project which emancipates both women and society.

With contributions from both renowned scholars and new voices, Marxism and Feminism is set to become the foundational text for modern Marxist-feminist thought.

Reviews

‘Marxism and Feminism is a serious, nuanced collection that covers a great deal of ground in a clear and concise way. The essays here represent a profoundly warm, human way of thinking through some of the toughest political problems of our age. It will be of great use to anyone thinking seriously about the relationship between Marx and feminism, not to mention gender, race, class, intersectionallity, patriarchy, work and many other key topics today.’
Nina Power, author of One Dimensional Woman

‘The relationship between Marxists and Feminists has always been problematic. But in these times of an ongoing crises of capitalism, when the whole world is looking for alternatives to the present destructive World System, Shahrzad Mojab’s Marxism and Feminism is especially necessary today. I hope that many women and men read it.
Maria Mies, author of Patriarchy and Accumulation on a World Scale

‘Marxism and feminism are back! This book marks a refreshing return to basics after years spent in the wilderness of identity politics and the ‘cultural turn’. Offering a rich synthesis of the key concepts in both schools of thought, the book provides a valuable resource for rethinking Marxism, feminism, a renewed project for human emancipation and, yes… revolution.’
Radha D’Souza, University of Westminster

‘Marxism and Feminism is an outstanding contribution to the shared project of scholar-activists across diverse disciplines and movements. The collection is both the result of, and a significant contribution to, a (re)emerging conversation – one that attends to, as Shahrzad Mojab succinctly notes, ‘two major emancipatory projects.’ The keywords approach is inspired, providing breadth and depth in a single, accessible, and highly engaged volume.’
Abigail B. Bakan, University of Toronto

‘Reading this book made me aware of how much such a book is needed to awaken a dialogue between Marxism and feminism. I didn’t agree with all that I read, but that’s exactly what a book with this framework should do to awaken us.’
Dorothy Smith, University of Victoria

The Future Present

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements

 

1 Introduction: Marxism and feminism

Shahrzad Mojab
Part One: Class and race in Marxism and feminism

2 Gender relations
Frigga Haug

3 The Marx within feminism
Frigga Haug

4 Building from Marx: reflections on ‘race’, gender and class
Himani Bannerji
Part Two: Marxist-feminist keywords

5 Democracy
Sara Carpenter

6 Financialization
Jamie Magnusson

7 Ideology
Himani Bannerji

8 Imperialism and primitive accumulation
Judith Whitehead
9 Intersectionality
Delia D. Aguilar

10 Labour-power
Helen Colley

11 Nation and nationalism
Amir Hassanpour

12 Patriarchy/patriarchies
Kumkum Sangari

13 Reproduction
Michelle Murphy

14 Revolution
Maryam Jazayeri

15 Standpoint theory
Cynthia Cockburn

16 Epilogue: gender after class
Teresa L. Ebert

Recommended reading
About the authors
Index

Critique of Political Economy

Critique of Political Economy

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Feminism

Feminism

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

VIOLENCE, REPRESENTATIONS AND SEXUALITY

FIFTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE INTERNATIONAL NETWORK FOR SEXUAL ETHICS AND POLITICS – INSEP

CALL FOR PAPERS – INSEP2015

13th ‐ 15th July, 2015, Ghent University, Belgium
Hosted by CEVI – Centre for Ethics and Value Inquiry
Faculty of Arts and Philosophy
Ghent University, Blandijnberg 2
9000 Ghent – Belgium
See: http://www.insep.ugent.be/insep2015/
General Conference Theme – Violence, Representations and Sexuality

The relationship between violence and sexuality is one of the most critical areas of engagement for sex and sexuality research and activism. There continues to be an epidemic of violence against women and children – rape, sexual assault, sexual harassment and abuse – across the globe, manifest in different cultural customs and practices, authority structures, hetero‐patriarchal and hetero‐normative regimes at both national (and supranational in the case of trafficking) and everyday micro levels. This epidemic is often met with: limited regulatory responses suffused with heterosexist assumptions; legal authorities that fail to prioritise or regard it is less important than other criminal activity; indifference; and/or claims that the prevalent cultural milieu makes it impossible to act. While some efforts have been made in North America, Europe and Australasia to effect change, in many parts of the globe sexual subjection and suffering continues to be seen as a normal state of affairs.

Equally, across the globe sexual difference and departures from heterosexuality are met by varying degrees of violence, ranging from physical attack and murder, to prejudicial and pathological assumptions that are present even in the social context of equality and rights discourses. To be different is still to be ‘othered’ to varying degrees, and that ‘othering’ often takes damaging forms of practice against those who present themselves as different.

The cultural and representational contexts are of particular importance here. It is in the representational form that we most saliently see the cultural demarcations of legitimacy and illegitimacy for sex and sexuality. Through representations, tensions are played out in the public arena that are sometimes manifest only in inter‐subjective or hetero‐normative meaning making. In societies where gay men and lesbians are formally recognised, there remains a dichotomy between the ‘respectable’ different that operates within homonormative constraints and lives without troubling heteronormative assumption, and the ‘queer’ whose personal practices challenge or disrupt cultural and social norms as a feature of being themselves. Likewise, the representation of sex in mainstream medias often reinforces particular understandings and meanings suffused with power, presumption and prejudice. Against that, alternate forms of media can play an important role in promote constructive understandings of the relationship between desire, pleasure and healthy satisfaction.

Violence and sexuality also creates a nexus of troubling contradictions. Recently, the fetishisation of ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’, e.g., normalises a commodified and limited exploration of sexual imagination, whilst BDSMers and others who wish to move beyond difference as an adjunct to genito‐centric and penetrative sex remain culturally prejudiced against and subject to different and sometimes punishing pathologies and legal regulatory regimes. Pornography and prostitution represent other areas of contestation. Is pornography or prostitution inherently violent? Or is there room for sufficient levels of agency and choice? The juxtaposition of pain, violence and sex, whether in practice or in representation, whether consenting or not, splits those radical voices who often support sexual freedom. Does violence and sexuality represent a fault‐line for disagreement? Is that disagreement one of language and representation or of power, degradation and its effects? We welcome papers that explore any aspect of the relationship between violence, representation, sexuality and sex. As always, we also welcome other papers that reflect innovative, creative and thought‐provoking work on sexual ethics and politics in general. For this purpose we retain open streams at the conference. Please feel free to email the conference organisers for further inquiries.

Acceptance Policy

The fifth international conference of INSEP welcomes papers, presentations and panels focusing on conceptual and theoretical debates, cultural and political analysis and empirical studies from which conceptual, ethical and political conclusions are drawn.

INSEP seeks to provide a critical and dynamic space for cutting edge thinking, new research and key discussions and debates about issues of sexual ethics or politics, whether conceptual and theoretical discourse, analytical studies or aesthetically or empirically constituted insights. INSEP sees the value in the fullest range of approaches to the study of sexual ethics and politics, including: gendered and feminist perspectives; distinctive lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and transsexual perspectives; queer perspectives; and approaches from more general positions such as liberalism, Marxism and democratic theory.

The 2015 conference seeks to be an inclusive space for discussion, welcoming dialogue and vigorous debate, but not sectarianism. We consider paper proposals and panel proposals from any disciplinary field, and are willing to consider expositions that take less orthodox forms.

To facilitate funding applications ‐ please note INSEP has no funds of its own – we operate a ‘rolling’ process of abstract review and acceptance or rejection, and can provide documentation where it is required to facilitate funding. Our turnaround time for refereeing is 10 days.

Submission & Timeline: Submissions for papers (250 words), panels or workshops (500 word stipulating participants) should reach us by Monday 15 June at the latest. Earlier of course, is better.

Normal acceptance/rejection notification ‐ 10 days. All delegates/paper‐givers must register by Monday 23 June, and we encourage earlier registration when acceptances have been communicated.

Please send abstracts to: insep.network@gmail.com

The conference fee for the full three days is 150 Euros, which includes the conference pack and refreshments. A concessionary rate of 100 Euros is available to students and postgraduates.

INSEP publishes a journal and a book series with Barbara Budrich Publishers. We would anticipate commissioning publications from the conference and, dependent on quality and coherence, may publish a collection based on themes emerging from the conference. INSEP also welcomes submissions to the journal and proposals to the Book Series.

About INSEP

Sexual ethics and politics lie at the heart of how we understand and practice our sexual lives. They form the basis from which we understand and engage with diverse and different sexualities. Both, however, are currently open to question. On the one hand, discussion of sexual ethics has previously been confined to the auspices of an abstract intellectual discourse, effectively separating it from practice. Sexual politics, on the other hand, has seen progressive advances through world‐wide activism by grass‐roots movements, NGOs and national and international agents, but in the push for progress, the space for self‐critique and reflexivity is often eradicated. INSEP wants to activate a critical dialogue between sexual ethics and politics by connecting them and exploring the ways they can contribute to each other. The sexual is political and just as sexual politics could be enriched by emancipatory ethical thinking, sexual ethics should connect with contemporary sexual activism, politics and practices aiming for the realisation of sexual equalities and justice.
For more info on INSEP & the 2015 conference please visit:

INSEP2015: http://www.insep.ugent.be/insep2015/
INSEP – http://www.insep.ugent.be/
Journal INSEP – http://budrich‐journals.de/index.php/insep
Paul Reynolds
Reader in Sociology and Social Philosophy
Edge Hill University, UK
reynoldp@edgehill.ac.uk
Tom Claes
Associate Professor of Ethics
Ghent University, Belgium
Tom.Claes@UGent.be

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THOUGHT CONFERENCE 2015

FEMINISM & CRITICAL THEORY

SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THOUGHT CONFERENCE

UNIVERSITY OF SUSSEX, JUNE 20-21, 2015

In the face of enforced austerity, rampant and increasing inequality, systemic crises of political, economic and environmental organisation, and violence and injustice on a global scale, there has been a resurgence of interest in both feminism and critical theory, as ways of understanding and criticising the world as it is. That such disasters disproportionately affect women is not, of course, new, nor are they differentiated solely through gender – race, sexuality, dis/ability, class and nationality also come into play. Yet many have detected an increase in violence, both (and often simultaneously) material and symbolic, directed against women and gender non-conformists across the world. Examples range from the ‘pornification’ of an increasingly misogynist popular culture (and equally misogynist ‘moral panics’ about the threat posed to society by deviant sexualities), to brutal cuts to already embattled women’s services, to continued institutional discrimination and institutionalised abuse (Yarl’s Wood is just one site).

This has been met with resistance in a variety of forms, on the ground in social movements and protests, and in many recent theoretical developments both scholarly and popular, including: the republication of many classic Marxist and socialist feminist texts of the 1970s and 80s; important contemporary debates, situated within both analytic and continental philosophy, on how to challenge the patriarchal nature of philosophy as a discipline and as disciplinary ideology; the emergence of innovative new journals such as the materialist feminist LIES; and scholarly reappraisals of radical twentieth-century figures like Shulamith Firestone, Claudia Jones and Rosa Luxemburg.

This year’s Social and Political Thought conference will investigate ? the relationship between feminism and other critical social theories in light of these developments. We begin by recognising that the different schools (and historical ‘waves’) of feminist thought are themselves often divergent and opposed. Furthermore, we recognise that there is a certain level of ambivalence attached to the term ‘critical theory’. In the narrow sense, it can refer to theory influenced by the Frankfurt School and the work of Adorno, Horkheimer, and Marcuse (and, on some interpretations, Habermas and Honneth). In the broad sense, on the other hand, it can refer to a group of interrelated, sometimes competing, social theories directed against the status quo, of which feminist thought is one strand. We view this ambivalence and its relationship to feminist theory and practice as potentially productive, and encourage submissions that deal with all kinds of feminism and their relationship to critical theory in both the narrow and broad senses of the term, including feminism as critical theory.

Possible approaches include but are not limited to: Marxist feminism or feminist thought engaging with Marxism; feminism, materiality, and ‘new materialisms’; feminist social movements and the politics of popular protest; feminism, police, and prisons; feminism and problems of universality; feminism and psychoanalysis; feminism and autonomism; anarchist feminism; post-crisis masculinities and feminism; postcolonialism and feminism; black British feminism; sexual, racial and social contracts; feminism and the politics and theory of intersectionality; feminism and nationalism; feminism and orientalism in the war on terror; ‘third wave’ feminism; feminism and new forms of slavery; feminism in the global South; feminism and poststructuralism;  feminism and communisation theory; feminism and LGBTQI struggles; feminism and sex-work; feminism and social reproduction; feminism and revolution.

 

Keynote Speakers:

Stella Sandford (Kingston University)

Lorna Finlayson (University of Cambridge)

 

We encourage submissions for both individual and full-panel presentations. Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be sent to ssptreviews@sussex.ac.uk by March 15 2015. In order to facilitate a double-blind review process, please send two separate attachments, one containing a short biographical note, and another containing your abstract with no identifying information.

See: https://ssptjournal.wordpress.com/social-and-political-thought-conference-june-20-21-2015/

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

 

Time and Space in the Social Universe of Capital’ – by Michael Neary and Glenn Rikowski, now at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/10545768/Time_and_Speed_in_the_Social_Universe_of_Capital

 

Panopticon

Panopticon

WRITING AND RESISTANCE

New Formations

We are pleased to announce the publication of New Formations Issue 83: ‘Writing and Resistance’
For online details see http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/issue/nf83.html

[Please note that the deadline for the next general issue of New Formations is May 31st 2015. For  contributors guidelines see http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/contributors.htm]

Details for this issue:
This issue of New Formations presents a range of exciting new work which spans and connects the fields of cultural studies, literary theory and radical political philosophy. Two contributors are concerned with the specificities of contemporary sexual politics. Three others address the relationships between writing, disclosure and interpretation. A further two texts offer radical philosophical interpretations of emergent political currents in Greece, Spain, Turkey and beyond. While there is no single theme, all the contributions share a concern to bring the most sophisticated theoretical tools available to bear upon the analysis of a range of urgent and emergent political questions. This continues to be the overriding purpose of New Formations: to explore the intersections between culture, theory and politics in order to understand the changing nature of each in the twenty-first century.

CONTENTS

Jeremy Gilbert: Editorial
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_editorial.pdf

David Alderson: Acting Straight: Reality TV, Gender Self-Consciousness and Forms of Capital

Clare Birchall: Aesthetics of the Secret
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_birchall.pdf

Naomi Booth: ‘Bathetic masochism and the shrinking woman’

Elizabeth Coles: ‘Psychoanalysis and the Poem: On Reading in Sándor Ferenczi and D.W. Winnicott’

Costas Douzinas: ‘Notes Towards an Analytics of Resistance’
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_douzinas.pdf

Sarah Kember: Why ‘Write? Feminism, publishing and the politics of communication’

Serhat Karakayali and Özge Yaka: ‘The Spirit of Gezi: The Recomposition of Political Subjectivities in Turkey’

REVIEWS:

James Penney Better tables
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_reviews_penney.pdf

Dhanveer Singh Brar Hieroglyphics of the flesh
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_reviews_singh_brar.pdf

Jade Munslow Ong Women, Crime and Sexual Transgression
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_reviews_munslow_ong.pdf

Caspar Melville Can sociologists write?
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_reviews_melville.pdf

Joseph Darlington That Dawn to Be Alive
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_reviews_darlington.pdf

Elena Tzelepis    Again Antigone
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_reviews_tzelepis.pdf

Jeremy Gilbert
http://www.jeremygilbert.org
@jemgilbert

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Siobhan Brown

Siobhan Brown

A REBEL’S GUIDE TO ELEANOR MARX

A Bookmarks Shop Event

Friday 16 January, 6.30pm

With Siobhan Brown

Bookmarks Bookshop
1 Bloomsbury Street, London, WC1B 3QE

Admission £2, Reserve your place here or call 020 7637 1848
Eleanor Marx was an agitator, an organiser and a writer. At a time of extraordinary upheaval, she was at the heart of world-changing movements. Whether organising support for refugees fleeing France after the crushing of the Paris Commune, or galvanising support for the new unionism in the 1880s, her belief in the power of workers to organise and change the world for the better remained central. Her words and actions have helped change our world.

A passionate writer and translator, her texts crackled with outrage at the desperate living and working conditions of London’s poor. She was inspired by the thousands of women workers who struck back and she developed new and important insights on questions of sexual equality and socialism.

Much more than the daughter of Karl Marx or the lover of a feckless academic, Eleanor Marx was a remarkable and revolutionary woman. This addition to the popular Rebel’s Guide series places her back alongside other revolutionary leaders, where she belongs.

A Rebel’s Guide to Eleanor Marx

Siobhan Brown

Published By Bookmarks Publications

ISBN: 9781909026773

See: http://www.bookmarksbookshop.co.uk/events

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Vampyrica John-Paul Van-Huysse

Vampyrica
John-Paul Van-Huysse

SUBREALISM

Subrealism:  One Day Conference on Ettingerian Studies, Friday 10 October 2014, Aula Maxima, Maynooth University, National University of Ireland

Details: http://subrealismtheworkofbrachalichtenbergettinger.wordpress.com/conference/

This one-day conference features invited presentations on recent shifts in Ettingerian studies focusing particularly on gender studies, sexuality studies, queer theory, literature, ethics, aesthetics, art practice, psychoanalytic practice, political science  and philosophy.

 

For information on the work of Bracha L. Ettinger, see:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bracha_L._Ettinger

http://www.mamsie.bbk.ac.uk/documents/Giffney_Mulhall_ORourke.pdf

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Bracha-L-Ettinger/46707662527

 

For more on Speculative Realism see Michael O’Rourke’s introduction, Specrealisms, at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/9566568/Specrealisms

 

CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

Session 1: 10.00-11.15am

Graham Price: ‘Deconstruction and the Art-Encounter-Event’

Moynagh Sullivan: ‘An Ear to the Earth’:Matrixial Gazing in Tim Robinson’s Walk-Art-Text Practice’

Tea Break: 11.15-11.30am

Session 2: 11.30am-12.45pm

Noirin MacNamara: ‘Matrixial Theory and la démocratie à-venir’

Michael O’Rourke: ‘Specrealisms’

Lunch: 12.45-1.45pm

Session 3: 1.45-3.15pm

Medb Ruane: ‘Writing Art, Talking Psychoanalysis: sketches from a Bracha Ettinger notebook’

Paula McCloskey: ‘Artificial intelligence, art and affect: Exploring the matrixial possibilities in Micha Cárdenas Becoming-Dragon and Lise Autogena and Joshua Portway, Black Shoals Stock Market Planetarium’

Elena Marchevska: ‘The last place where we were together…’

Tea Break: 3.15-3.45pm

Session 4: 3.45-5.00pm

Dimitra Douskos: ‘Translating into French, translating into language’

Tina Kinsella: ‘Surrealism to Subrealism’

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rosa Luxemburg

Rosa Luxemburg

CONFERENCE ON MARXIST-FEMINISM IN BERLIN

An historic conference on Marxist-Feminism that will be taking place in collaboration with the Rosa Luxemburg Foundation in Berlin next March 20-22, 2015.

The draft programme has just been posted: www.rosalux.de/marxismus-feminismus

 

Speakers include (among others) Frigga Haug, Gayatri Spivak, Saskia Sassen, Lynn Segal, Nira Yuval-Davis, Zilla Eisenstein, Helen Colley, Shahrzad Mojab, Cynthia Cockburn, Erica Burman.

The event will also include the launch of the new book from Zed Press, Marxism and Feminism, with Shahrzad Mojab, Helen Colley, Cynthia Cockburn, and Frigga Haug.

Registration is via the ‘Anmeldeformular’ in red at the bottom of the conference page.

Please distribute to all your interested networks.  This will be a very important event to discuss the resurgence of Marxist-Feminist thought in recent years.

Best wishes

Helen

Helen Colley, MA (Oxon), PhD
Professor of Lifelong Learning and Director of Graduate Education, SEPD, University of Huddersfield
Visiting Professor of Adult Education, OISE, University of Toronto.

 

The strength of Critique: Trajectories of Marxism – Feminism

International Congress

More than 40 years ago, feminists among Marxists in many countries spoke out. They criticized the concept of labour that was then commonly used in Marxism, they criticized value theory, views on domestic labour and the family, the way of dealing and interacting with each other and with the nature around us, on the economy and wars, visions of the future and the urge for liberation.
They triggered passionate debates – their criticism wasn’t totally ignored. But the work they have carried out on an international scale is far from complete. For some decades feminist Marxist debates subsided because neoliberalism, stumbling from one crisis to another, had brought other issues into focus.
Next year, in March 2015, we intend to pick up the threads. Many of those voices — and many who have since joined — will come together at a congress in order to investigate what has been left undone. We will discuss successes and defeats as well as new projects with the intention of finding out together what has been gained so far, what we need to continue working on, what new issues are on the agenda, and how we can bundle our energies to achieve worldwide resonance to our demand to intervene.
What remains as fundamental as almost half a century ago is that socialist feminists join forces internationally.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Educating from Marx

Educating from Marx

 

Capitorg

Capitorg

POSTHUMANISMS

Call for Papers

Symploké: A journal for the intermingling of theoretical scholarship

Symploké: http://www.symploke.org/

Posthumanisms (Vol. 23, No. 1-2 [2015])

Welcome are papers that engage posthumanism in ways that avoid flattening “the human” into a monolithic or homogenous problematic. We are especially interested in papers that take up posthumanism in relation to the crisis of the humanities and the ongoing crises faced by marginalized “humans” around the globe. How might posthumanist thought be symptomatic of the crisis of the humanities and (higher) education more broadly? How has posthumanist inquiry ignored the lived heterogeneities of humanness distributed across raced, classed, gendered, and differently abled bodies? How can posthumanism’s critical political project benefit from being brought into intimate connection with critical race, queer, feminist, anti-colonial, and disability theories?(Deadline: 31 December 2014.)

Manuscripts must be received by December 31, 2014.

Submissions of any length which are appropriate to the aims of symplokē will be considered, although those between 4,000 and 6,500 words (approximately 16-26 typed, double-spaced pages) are preferred. Please keep in mind that submitted manuscripts need not be intended for an upcoming special issue; general submissions of high quality are encouraged. The editors reserve the right to make stylistic alterations in the interest of clarity. Authors will receive a complementary issue of the journal. All submissions must strictly follow the guidelines for copy preparation listed below. Articles not conforming to these guidelines may be sent back to the author for revision.

Preparation of Copy:
1. All submissions must provide a complete listing of references and use footnotes rather than endnotes.
2. Footnotes should generally consist only of references and are to be consecutively numbered throughout the manuscript.
3. References must include the names of publishers as well as places of publication. Also include full names and a complete listing of translators and editors.
4. The format of the manuscript must conform to the current MLA Style Manual.
5. All manuscripts must be submitted in duplicate. If the manuscript was word-processed, include a copy of your IBM- or Macintosh-compatible disk. Microsoft word or ASCII files are preferable.
6. All quotations, titles, names and dates must be checked for accuracy.
7. All articles must be written in English.
8. This journal has a policy of blind peer reviewing; thus the author’s name should not appear on the manuscript and a separate title page must be provided.
9. Material not kept for publication will be returned if accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope.

Address submissions to:

symplokē
Jeffrey R. Di Leo, Editor-in-Chief
University of Houston-Victoria
3007 North Ben Wilson
Victoria, TX 77901.

Or send attached files to the Editor-in-Chief at: editor@symploke.org.

All materials published in this journal are copyrighted by symplokē. Submission of an article to this journal entails the author’s agreement to assign copyright to symplokē. Articles appearing in symplokē may be reproduced for research purposes, personal reference, and classroom use without special permission and without fee payment. This permission does not extend to other kinds of reproduction such as copying for general distribution, for the creation of collected works or anthologies, for advertising or promotional purposes, or for resale. These and all other rights are reserved.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Glenn Rikowski’s article, Education, Capital and the Transhuman – can also now be found at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/9033532/Education_Capital_and_the_Transhuman

 

No Future

No Future

NO PRESENT: NEW ENCOUNTERS IN FRENCH AND ITALIAN THOUGHT

March 13-14, 2015

Villanova University

Keynote: Jason E. Smith

The negotiation between French and Italian activists and intellectuals in the latter part of the twentieth century (marked by 1968 in France and 1977 in Italy) opened a field of theoretical experimentation, the effects of which pose a challenge for contemporary politics. This encounter materialized through various collectives, traversing the neat intellectual and practical boundaries of the academy. Whether through the images of intellectuals in the streets or through radical activist groups extending from the Situationist International to Tiqqun, the laboratory of French and Italian thought poses a constellation of conceptual weapons that remain vital for any contestation with the state of things. These implements have been successful in intervening within contemporary struggles on the level of theory, practice, and the construction of history in the present.

Under the inheritance of this tradition, this conference invites submissions from the interstices and margins of recent French and Italian philosophy. Possible paper topics include feminist recapitulations of post-workerism, the theoretical legacy of biopolitics as it is taken up in Agamben and Esposito, and the ongoing challenges for theory and practice posed by social movements extending from Latin America to the Mediterranean in the wake of events such as Mohamed Bouazizi’s self-immolation.

Other topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Post-Althusserian philosophy
  • Decolonial challenges to eurocentric thought and strategies
  • Wages for Housework and care economies
  • Realism and contemporary cntologies
  • Re-interpretations of the Gramscian legacy
  • Philosophies of life and the problem of vitalism
  • Lacanian psychoanalysis and its heritage
  • French and Italian receptions of Spinoza, Hegel, and Marx
  • Affect theory and imagination in cultural productions (e.g. film and media)
  • Left Heideggarian reflections on community between Nancy and Agamben

 

The Philosophy Graduate Student Union at Villanova University welcomes graduate students and junior faculty to submit any of the following to be considered for our conference: paper abstracts of 250-350 words, papers of approximately 3000 words (including co-authored work) suitable for a 20 minute presentation, or proposed panels. Authors of accepted abstracts should send completed papers by March 1, 2015.

Please send submissions, prepared for blind review, by Dec. 21, 2014 to YUcont2015@gmail.com

This conference is committed to accommodating people with disabilities. Conference participants and attendees are encouraged to contact the above email address to discuss accommodations.

Villanova University (About): http://www1.villanova.edu/content/main/about.html

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

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