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Raya Dunayevskaya

60 YEARS OF RAYA DUNAYEVSKAYA’S ‘MARXISM AND FREEDOM’: ON CLASS, RACE AND AUTOMATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Housmans Bookshop

5 Caledonian Road

London

N1 9DY

 

7th November 2018

7.00 pm.

Entry 3 pounds (redeemable against purchases)

 

Raya Dunayevskaya’s classic, ‘Marxism and Freedom’, was published in New York in 1958 with preface by Herbert Marcuse. There have since been several later editions and numerous translations.

 

Speaking at this event will be:

Kevin B Anderson, author of ‘Marx at the Margins’.

Paul Mason, author of ‘Postcapitalism: A Guide to Our Future’

Dana Naomi Mills, author of a critical study of Rosa Luxemburg (forthcoming with Reaktion Press).

David Black, author of ‘The Philosophical Roots of Anti-Capitalism’.

 

As Paul Mason wrote recently in the New Statesman:

“As Dunayevskaya understood, the impulse towards freedom is created by more than just exploitation: it is triggered by alienation, the suppression of desire, the humiliation experienced by people on the receiving end of systemic racism, sexism and homophobia. Everywhere capitalism follows anti-human priorities it stirs revolt – and it’s all around us. In the coming century, just as Marx predicted, it is likely that automation coupled with the socialisation of knowledge will present us with the opportunity to liberate ourselves from work. That, as he said, will blow capitalism ‘sky high’. The economic system that replaces it will have to be shaped around the goal he outlined in 1844: ending alienation and liberating the individual.”

 

Meeting sponsored by the International Marxist-Humanist Organisation

The IMHO Journal, The International Marxist-Humanist is @: https://www.imhojournal.org/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

 

Raya Dunayevskaya

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Glenn Rikowski

MARXISM AND EDUCATION: FRAGILITY, CRISIS, CRITIQUE

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have a new article out in Cadernos do GPOSSHE On-line, Vol.1 No.1 (2018): pp.142-170, Marxism and Education: Fragility, Crisis, Critique.

It now available at Academia, @ https://www.academia.edu/37616749/Marxism_and_Education_Fragility_Crisis_Critique

It is also available at ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/328428970_Marxism_and_Education_Fragility_Crisis_Critique

 

ABSTRACT

The article rests substantially on the work of John Holloway, especially his early articles in Common Sense: Journal of the Edinburgh Conference of Socialist Economists. On this foundation, it is argued, firstly, that the importance of Marxism resides in its capacity to pinpoint fragilities and weaknesses in the constitution, development and rule of capital in contemporary society. Understanding these fragilities sharpens the critical edge of any movements aimed at social transformation out of the madhouse of capital.

Glenn Rikowski

 

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Ruth Rikowski
Framlingham Castle

SUBVERSIVE MAGIC: LIBRARIES, EDUCATION AND CAPITALIST FUNCTIONALITY – PRESENTATION POWERPOINT

 

Ruth Rikowski, London South Bank University & Series Editor for the Chandos Information Professional Series

This is Ruth Rikowski’s presentation at the recent International Conference on Critical Education VIII, held at the University of East London, 25 – 28 July 2018.

The Presentation PowerPoint can be viewed at: http://www.academia.edu/37142301/Subversive_Magic_Libraries_Education_and_Capitalist_Functionality_Presentation_

 

 

ABSTRACT

A Magical Marxism – as writers such as Andy Merrifield and Derek Ford have noted – can illuminate the future whilst helping to shatter the shackles of the past. Shining this light on libraries and education in contemporary capitalism allows us to glimpse the subversive magic which, on the one hand is dreaded by representatives of capital, and on the other generates hope for humankind. A brief autobiographical account of how libraries hold a certain kind of personal magic is included. Then the notion of ‘subversive magic’ is outlined, with reference to ideas drawn from Giordano Bruno and his ‘Essays on Magic’ (1588). This is contrasted with Abstract Magic: a form of magic ground in the capitalist impulse. From these preliminary points and in the context of libraries in England, the first stop in the analysis is the Mechanics Institutes. This is followed by examining the capitalist state’s attempts to curtail, or at least control, their subversive magic through establishing constraining cultural spaces; that is, a public library system. The strange cases of John Passmore Edwards and Andrew Carnegie libraries are considered at this juncture: specifically, their effects in terms of possibilities for enchanting the public library system. The falling apart of the capitalist state’s paradigm for libraries is then taken up, with an examination of Thatcherism and neoliberalism from the 1980s. During the 1980s, and 1990s, but especially after the capitalist crisis of 2007-09, together with Tory austerity policies and related cuts, public libraries have faced a resulting atmosphere of disenchantment. Today, the state library system has given way to capitalist functionality, together with desperate local attempts to re-enchant them. This point is illustrated through developments in libraries in the London Borough of Newham. The paper ends by discussing prospects for a new subversive magic in libraries. It also explores whether it is possible for state-financed libraries to ever let the subversive magic that is required to flourish, and whether they can nourish the dangerous imaginative qualities required for nurturing the communist impulse.

 

The Paper is available at: http://www.academia.edu/37112556/Subversive_Magic_Libraries_Education_and_Capitalist_Functionality

 

***END***

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski at Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Ruth Rikowski

SUBVERSIVE MAGIC: LIBRARIES, EDUCATION AND CAPITALIST FUNCTIONALITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ruth Rikowski

London South Bank University & Series Editor for the Chandos Information Professional Series

 

Thisd is Ruth Rikowski’s paper that she will be presenting at the Internatioanl Conference on Critical Education VIII, at the University of East London, Stratford Campus, on Saturday 28th July 2018.

Ruth’s paper can be down loade at Academia, at:  http://www.academia.edu/37112556/Subversive_Magic_Libraries_Education_and_Capitalist_Functionality

 

ABSTRACT

A Magical Marxism – as writers such as Andy Merrifield and Derek Ford have noted – can illuminate the future whilst helping to shatter the shackles of the past. Shining this light on libraries and education in contemporary capitalism allows us to glimpse the subversive magic which, on the one hand is dreaded by representatives of capital, and on the other generates hope for humankind. A brief autobiographical account of how libraries hold a certain kind of personal magic is included. Then the notion of ‘subversive magic’ is outlined, with reference to ideas drawn from Giordano Bruno and his ‘Essays on Magic’ (1588). This is contrasted with Abstract Magic: a form of magic ground in the capitalist impulse. From these preliminary points and in the context of libraries in England, the first stop in the analysis is the Mechanics Institutes. This is followed by examining the capitalist state’s attempts to curtail, or at least control, their subversive magic through establishing constraining cultural spaces; that is, a public library system. The strange cases of John Passmore Edwards and Andrew Carnegie libraries are considered at this juncture: specifically, their effects in terms of possibilities for enchanting the public library system. The falling apart of the capitalist state’s paradigm for libraries is then taken up, with an examination of Thatcherism and neoliberalism from the 1980s. During the 1980s, and 1990s, but especially after the capitalist crisis of 2007-09, together with Tory austerity policies and related cuts, public libraries have faced a resulting atmosphere of disenchantment. Today, the state library system has given way to capitalist functionality, together with desperate local attempts to re-enchant them. This point is illustrated through developments in libraries in the London Borough of Newham. The paper ends by discussing prospects for a new subversive magic in libraries. It also explores whether it is possible for state-financed libraries to ever let the subversive magic that is required to flourish, and whether they can nourish the dangerous imaginative qualities required for nurturing the communist impulse.

 

***END***

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

 

 

Glenn Rikowski

INTERVIEW ON MARXISM, CRITICAL PEDAGOGY AND INCLUSIVE EDUCATION: DISCUSSIONS FOR A REVOLUTIONARY DISCOURSE

 

 

 

My interview with Aldo Ocampo Gonzalez, ‘Interview on Marxism, Critical Pedagogy and Inclusive Education: Discussions for a Revolutionary Discourse‘ is now available at Academia.

Aldo Ocampo Gonzalez is Director of the Center for Latin American Studies on Inclusive Education (CELEI), based in Santiago, Chile.

The website for CELEI is: http://www.celei.cl

The interview can be viewed on Academia at:  https://www.academia.edu/36752890/Interview_on_Marxism_Critical_Pedagogy_and_Inclusive_Education_Discussions_for_a_Revolutionary_Discourse

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Glenn Rikowski

Misrepresentations: Critical Notes on Commodities and Education

 

 

 

 

Glenn Rikowski

Visiting Fellow, College of Social Science, University of Lincoln, UK

 

This is a paper I wrote in response to a presentation I went to at the 2017 Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB) Annual Conference at Oxford, by David Bridges.

The paper was completed on 3rd October 2017, at is now available at Academia.

 

ABSTRACT

This paper argues that attempts to understand commodification in education and educational research without recourse to the greatest thinker on commodity forms – Karl Marx – inevitably leads to confusion and misrepresentation in educational theory. This is demonstrated through a critique of a recent paper by David Bridges (2017) where he focuses on commodification in education research. By ignoring the ideas of Marx, but also contemporary Marxist theorists writing on the commodity and commodification, Bridges fails to make crucial distinctions in the analysis of commodification, and also conflates and confuses concepts and their corresponding phenomena that should be kept separate. In the event, Bridges, and other mainstream educational theorists who avoid reference to Marx and Marxist theory, end up creating a host of misrepresentations in their analyses of educational commodification. Such approaches camouflage the capitalisation of education; that is, educational institutions ‘becoming capital’, the becoming of capital. These theorisations are superficial and politically misleading.

 

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

 

Dr. Glenn Rikowski

 

ICCE 8

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL EDUCATION VIII

University of East London, Stratford, London, England

25th – 28th July 2018

Critical Education and Activism Against Neoliberalism / Authoritarian Neoconservatism in Education, State and Society

The International Conference on Critical Education (ICCE), previously held in Athens (2011, 2012), Ankara (2013), Thessaloniki (2014), Wroclaw, Poland (2015), London (Middlesex University) (2016) and Athens (2017) is a forum for scholars, educators and activists committed to social and economic justice.  The 8th ICCE: Critical Education and Activism Against Neoliberalism/ Authoritarian Neoconservatism in Education, State and Society will take place at University of London (UEL), London, 25-28 July 2018.

At a time of economic crisis, when education is under siege by neoliberal capitalism and by neo-conservatism and aggressive nationalism, when teachers and academics are being proletarianized, youth criminalized, civilised and caring societies being stripped of welfare and benefits and rights, schools and universities turned into commodities, at such a time, critical education, as a theory and as a movement, as praxis, is clearly relevant. International communities of critical educators and activists are working together, and with other movements, to build active resistance to these processes and are engaged in fostering educational and social change leading to a more just, equal and fair society.

The current economic, social, and political crisis, that has been ongoing for 30 years, is manifesting more deeply in education on a global scale. The crisis- part of, and resulting from, dominant neoliberal and neoconservative politics that are implemented and promoted internationally as ‘the only solution’, under the slogan ‘there is no alternative’ (TINA), have substantially redefined the sociopolitical and ideological roles of education. Public education is shrinking. It loses its status as a social right. It is projected as a mere commodity for sale while it becomes less democratic, de-theorised, de-critiqued.

Understanding the causes of the crisis, the particular forms it takes in different countries and the multiple ways in which it influences education, constitute important questions for all those who do not limit their perspectives to the horizon of neoconservative, neoliberal and technocratic dogmas. Moreover, the critical education movement has the responsibility to rethink its views and practices in light of the crisis, and in the light of social, political and educational resistance in different countries – and the paths that this crisis opens for challenging and overthrowing capitalist domination worldwide.

The International Conference on Critical Education (ICCE) – regularly attended by between 300 and 400 participants, provides a vibrant and egalitarian, non-elitist, platform for scholars, educators, activists, students and others interested in critical education and in contesting the current neo-liberal/ neo-conservative/ nationalist hegemony, to come together and engage in a free, democratic and productive dialogue. At this time of crisis when public education is under siege by neoliberalism, neo-conservatism and nationalism, we invite you to submit a proposal and to attend the Conference. We especially welcome new and emerging scholars / scholar-activists.

 

Speakers invited include:

Grant Banfield (Australia)

Dennis Beach (Sweden)

Sara Carpenter (Canada)

Hana Cervinlova (Poland)

Polina Chrysochou (Greece /UK)

Christian Chun (USA)

Alessio d’Angelo (UK)

Sandra Delgado (Canada/ Colombia)

Mustafa Durmus (Turkey)

Agnieszka Dzieminowicz-Bak (Poland)

Gail Edwards (UK)

Ramin Farahmandpur (USA)

Derek Ford (USA)

Nathan Fretwell (UK)

Panayota Gounari (USA)

George Grollios (Greece)

Carly Guest (UK)

Julia Hall (USA)

Dave Hill (UK)

Lee Jerome (UK)

Wei Jin (Peoples Republic of China)

Gianna Katsiampoura (Greece)

Nurcan Korkmaz (Turkey)

Ravi Kumar (India)

Alpesh Mairsuira (UK)

Tristan McCowan (UK)

Gyuri Meszaros (Hungary)

Louise Prendergast (UK)

Lotar Rasinski (Poland)

John Rice (Australia)

Glenn Rikowski (UK)

Leena Robertson (UK)

Juan R. Rodriguez (Spain)

Wayne Ross (Canada)

Rachel Seoighe (UK)

Kostas Skordoulis (Greece)

Spyros Themelis (UK)

Tamas Toth (Hungary/Poland)

Paolo Vittoria (Italy)

Josefine Wagner (Poland)

Terry Wrigley (UK)

Ahmet Yidiz (Turkey)

 

Conference Organisers: Dave Hill (Institute for Education Policy Studies) and Alpesh Maisuria (University of East London)

Contact: dave.hill@ieps.org.uk

 

See the website: http://www.icce2018.wordpress.com/

 

UEL Stratford

 

 

 

 

***END***

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Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Glenn Rikowski

CRITIQUE OF THE CLASSICAL THEORY OF EDUCATION CRISIS

 

 

Glenn RikowskiVisiting Fellow, College of Social Science, University of Lincoln, UK

 

 

 

 

This is a paper prepared for the International Centre for Public Pedagogies (ICPuP), International Seminar for Public Pedagogies at the University of East London for 21st February 2018. See the post below for details.

The paper is now available on Academia, see: https://www.academia.edu/35164258/Critique_of_the_Classical_Theory_of_Education_Crisis

 

ABSTRACT

The Classical Theory of Education Crisis is the default theory utilised by educational theorists for understanding the constitution and explanation of education crises in contemporary society. Following a brief outline of the concept of crisis, and the histiography of the notion of education crisis from the Second World War to the neoliberal recession of 1980-82, there is a an outline of The Classical Theory of Education Crisis as most fully expressed in Madan Sarup’s classic Education, State and Crisis: A Marxist Perspective (1982). The key aspect of the Classical Theory is that education crises are derivative of economic crises. This is followed by the main event: critique of the Classical Theory. Its reliance on structuralist thought (with associated determinism, functionalism and reductionism) and the inflow of economics imperialism are some of its key deficiencies. The Conclusion outlines ground still to be covered and the need to move beyond the Classical Theory of Education Crisis.

 

***END***

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski

Fat Cat Food

NEOLIBERALISM AND ORDOLIBERALISM: ONE OR TWO CRITIQUES?

 

STAMP – Centre for the Study of States, Markets & People
School of Business & Law, University of East London, Annual Research Colloquium
On: “Neoliberalism and Ordoliberalism: One or Two Critiques?”

Tuesday 12 December 2017, 14.30pm – 19.30pm.
Venue: USS G.19/20, University of East London, 1 Salway Road, London, E15 1NF

(5 minutes’ walk from Stratford tube station)

Speakers and participants include: Professor Werner Bonefeld (York University), Dr. Gareth Dale (Brunel University), Professor Bülent Gökay (Keele University) Professor Bob Jessop (Lancaster University) and Dr. Mike Wilkinson (London School of Economics)

As the Euro-zone enters its ninth year of crisis and Britain posits itself for a hard Brexit, it is now widely accepted that German/Austrian ordoliberal policy principles — de-politicisation of central bank, deflationary policy and strong state — have long been institutionalised in the EU. But if the ordoliberal public policy in the Euro-zone and beyond manages EU processes, then what are its points of divergence and convergence with Anglo-American neo-liberalism — which some North American scholars identify as “New Constitutionalism”? If neo-liberal financialisation as a form of public policy could not arrest the slow and protracted decline of American Empire since the late 1960s, can German ordoliberalism re-launch the process of European integration, and on what policy basis? Was ordoliberalism a deliberate, post-war, policy plan to dominate Europe’s various state executives, or did it come about structurally and by way of France’s and Italy’s persistence to engage Germany in a currency union in order to control its superior industrial and monetary might? Under what forms of political governance, law and civic consciousness can neo-liberalism and ordoliberalism best operate? Last but not least, do we need one or two comprehensive critiques for these two separable, but not separate, public policies? These are some of the pertinent questions the STAMP Colloquium is proposing to address, launching a new research programme in the fields of global and European history, public policy, constitutional law and international
relations.

For further information about the workshop, please contact: Mr Seun Alele, e-mail: O.Alele@uel.ac.uk

Programme
14.30 – 14.45 Vassilis K. Fouskas (UEL) “Welcome and Opening Comments”
14.45 – 15.15 Gareth Dale (Brunel) “Ordoliberalism as a German Product: Origins, Evolution, Purposes”
15.15 – 15.45 Werner Bonefeld (York) “Stateless Money and State Power: Ordoliberal Insights and Capitalist Organisation”
15.45 – 16.30 Questions & Answers
16.30 – 17.00 Tea/Coffee
17.00 – 17.30 Bülent Gökay (Keele) “One neo-liberalism or many?”
17.30 – 18.00 Mike Wilkinson (LSE) “Authoritarian Liberalism: Exception or Norm?”
18.00 – 18.30 Questions & Answers
18.30 – 18.45 Bob Jessop (Lancaster) via skype “Financialization, Ordoliberalism, Neo-liberalization and the State of Permanent Austerity”
19.00 – 19.30 Conclusions and ideas about how to take this research programme forward. Bob Jessop to be engaged via skype

 

***END***

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Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Neoliberalism

CRISIS AND EDUCATION

 

Glenn Rikowski Visiting Fellow, College of Social Science, University of Lincoln, UK

 

 

International Centre for Public Pedagogies (ICPuP)

International Seminar for Public Pedagogies

UNIVERSITY OF EAST LONDON

Stratford Campus

Water Lane

London

E15 4LZ

 

21st February 2018

5.00 – 6.00pm

Room: 4.02

 

ABSTRACT

There are two parts to the presentation. Following a brief examination of the concept of ‘crisis’ the first part provides a critique of the Classical Theory of education crisis. This is the default theory of education crisis utilised by the majority of educational theorists and education activists today. Its starting point is that education crises are basically derivative of economic crises. The works of Marxists Brian Simon and Madan Sarup are important in fixing and consolidating the Classical Theory of education crisis. These will be explored in some depth.

The second part of the paper is more speculative. It seeks to pinpoint education crises as crises for capital. Thus, it is concerned with working on the weaknesses in the rule of capital (in education and in terms of its development) rather than focusing on how crises originating in the economy have deleterious effects for state-financed, public education. Two forms of education crises for capital are located, based on the mode of existence of commodity forms in educational institutions: crises of labour-power production; and crises in the ‘general class’ of commodities in educational settings. The implications for an anti-capitalist, anti-affirmationist politics of education based on this analysis are provided in conclusion.

 

Note: Two papers will be produced for this seminar: Critique of the Classical Theory of Education Crisis, and Education Crises As Crises for Capital. In the meantime, the following paper is useful: Crises, Commodities and Education: Disruptions, Eruptions, Interruptions and Ruptions, which is available at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/18511424/Crises_Commodities_and_Education_Disruptions_Eruptions_Interruptions_and_Ruptions

 

ADDENDUM – 22nd January 2018

The two papers for this ICPuP Seminar are now online at Academia:

Critique of the Classical Theory of Education Crisis  https://www.academia.edu/35164258/Critique_of_the_Classical_Theory_of_Education_Crisis

Education Crises As Crises For Capital  http://www.academia.edu/35730140/Education_Crises_As_Crises_For_Capital

 

***END***

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski 

Crisis

 

Capitalism: Concept & Idea

CAPITALISM: CONCEPT & IDEA

 

Friday 13 October – Saturday 14 October 2017

Time: 9.00am – 5.00pm
Price: £5 – £35

Book now > https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/capitalism-concept-idea-tickets-35934618411

Please note changing venues:

The Friday event will be held at Conway Hall, 25 Red Lion Square, WC1R 4RL
The Saturday event will be held at the Old Lecture Theatre, LSE, Houghton Street, WC2A 2AE

 

Capital: Concept & Idea

150 Years of Marx’s /Capital/: The Philosophy and Politics of Capital Today

As a counterpoint to the retreat of the concept of communism from history to ‘idea’, this conference will mark the 150th anniversary of the first volume of Karl Marx’s Capital: A Critique of Political Economy by asking the question of the meanings of ‘capital’ and ‘capitalism’ today as at once (explanatory structural-historical) concepts and (political) ideas.

In particular: What is the current standing of the different philosophical interpretations of Marx’s Capital? What light do they thrown on capitalism today? How have historical developments since Marx’s day changed the concept of capitalism? Has ‘neo-liberal’ capitalism rendered the concept of crisis redundant, for example? Is capitalism governable? Or is capital itself now the main form of governmentality? What is the precise character of Capital as a text – in terms of theory and in terms of literature? What does it mean to be ‘against capitalism’ today?

 

Speakers

Éric Alliez (CRMEP, Kingston University/University of Paris 8)
Cinzia Arruzza (New School for Social Research, NY)
Leigh Claire La Berge (CUNY)
Tithi Bhattacharya (Purdue University)
Werner Bonefeld (University of York)
Boris Buden (Bauhaus-Universität Weimar)
Michael Heinrich (Prokla, Berlin)
Anselm Jappe (Academy of Fine Arts, Sassari)
John Kraniasukas (Birkbeck, University of London)
Elena Louisa Lange (University of Zurich)
Maurizio Lazzarato (Paris)
Jason W. Moore (Binghamton University, NY)
Antonio Negri (Paris)
Peter Osborne (CRMEP, Kingston University)
Judith Revel (University of Paris 10)
Gayatri C. Spivak (Columbia University, NY)
Keston Sutherland (University of Sussex)

Sessions

Capital and Capitalism 1: Value-form and Politics
Capital and Capitalism 2: Capital, Science and Ecology
Capital, Feminism and Social Reproduction
Capitalism and Freedom
Subjectivation and War (Marx and Foucault)
Poetics of Capital/Capital
Capital’s Destinerrance: Event and Task
Marxian Ontology, Today

 

View the programme (subject to change) >
View the paper titles, abstracts and speakers’ biographies >

Booking is essential to attend this event.

The Failure of Capitalism

 

Further Information:

Conference website: http://kingston.ac.uk/cap17

Contact: Eric-John Russell
Email: k1543754@kingston.ac.uk

 

 

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Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Living Fire

Critique of Political Economy

KARL MARX READING GROUP – LONDON – CAPITAL VOLUME 2

 

As many scholars, critical thinkers, activists and interested parties as possible are invited to a new Reading Group in London UK beginning mid-October 2017 which will read Volume 2 of Capital by Karl Marx.

There are 3 founder members of the group: Dr. Pritam Singh – Professor of Political Economy at Oxford Brooks University Business School; Dr. Jon Hackett – Senior Lecturer in Film Studies at St. Mary’s University; and Biswadip Dasgupta, a lay student of Marx with extensive experience of Marx reading groups over the last few years.

Clearly the most suitable readers would be those who have already read Capital Volume 1 at least but others who have read other parts of Marx’s oeuvre or those who simply want a greater critical understanding of the capitalist economy are also welcome.

Looking forward to a great journey through Volume 2 of Marx’s great critique of political economy!

Please email farout.left@gmail.com for an invitation to join the Google group and discuss further details about the reading group.

Please circulate widely

Karl Marx

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Glenn Rikowski at ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski