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Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski

SOME ADDITIONS TO ACADEMIA: FEBRUARY 2015

 

Over the last month I have added quite a few items to my Academia site.

 

Here are the main additions that have not been included on other blogs:

 

 

 

PAPERS

 

The Confederation of British Industry and the Business Takeover of Schools (2007)

https://www.academia.edu/11138462/The_Confederation_of_British_Industry_and_the_Business_Takeover_of_Schools

 

Postmodernism in Educational Theory (with Peter McLaren, 2002)

https://www.academia.edu/11135246/Postmodernism_in_Educational_Theory

 

Prelude: Marxist Educational Theory After Postmodernism (2002)

https://www.academia.edu/11012712/Prelude_Marxist_Educational_Theory_After_Postmodernism

 

Time and Speed in the Social Universe of Capital (with Mike Neary, 2002)

https://www.academia.edu/10545768/Time_and_Speed_in_the_Social_Universe_of_Capital

 

Marxist Educational Theory Transformed (2000)

https://www.academia.edu/11086968/Marxist_Educational_Theory_Transformed

 

Working Schoolchildren in Britain Today (with Mike Neary, 1997)

https://www.academia.edu/11108460/Working_Schoolchildren_in_Britain_Today

 

 

 

VOLUMER ARTICLES

 

Post-Fordism and Schools in England (2008)

https://www.academia.edu/11048029/Post-Fordism_and_Schools_in_England

 

Forms of Capital: Critique of Bourdieu on Social Capital (2008)

https://www.academia.edu/11049106/Forms_of_Capital_Critique_of_Bourdieu_on_Social_Capital

 

Utopia and Education (2008)

https://www.academia.edu/11139021/Utopia_and_Education

 

Globalisation and Education Revisited (2008)

https://www.academia.edu/11109450/Globalisation_and_Education_Revisited

 

Snowballs and Risk in Schools (2008)

https://www.academia.edu/11027085/Snowballs_and_Risk_in_Schools

 

Nihilism and the Devaluation of Educational Values in England Today (2008)

https://www.academia.edu/11135945/Nihilism_and_the_De-valuation_of_Educational_Values_in_England_Today

 

Forms of Capital: Critique of Bourdieu on Cultural Capital (2008)

https://www.academia.edu/11048536/Forms_of_Capital_Critique_of_Bourdieu_on_Cultural_Capital

 

Playground Risks and Handcuffed Kids: We Need Safer Schools? (2007)

https://www.academia.edu/11074776/Playground_Risks_and_Handcuffed_Kids_We_Need_Safer_Schools

 

On Education Studies (2007)

https://www.academia.edu/11137286/On_Education_Studies

 

Education the HSBC Way (2007)

https://www.academia.edu/11109879/Education_the_HSBC_Way

 

The ‘Standards’ Language-game for Schools in England (2007)

https://www.academia.edu/11109014/The_Standards_Language-game_for_Schools_in_England_Today

 

Higher education and Confused Employer Syndrome (2006)

https://www.academia.edu/11075569/Higher_Education_and_Confused_Employer_Syndrome

 

On Tranhumanism and Education (2006)

https://www.academia.edu/11108794/On_Transhumanism_and_Education

 

 

Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

We Are the Crisis

We Are the Crisis

MARX AND PHILOSOPHY REVIEW OF BOOKS: FEBRUARY 2015

New reviews and an updated list of books for review recently published online in the Marx and Philosophy Review of Books

  • Jeff Noonan on Alain Badiou and Jean-Claude Milner, Controversies
  • Jay Starr on Wolfgang Streeck, Buying Time
  • Devin Lefebvre on Jacques Rancière, Figures of History
  • Bart Zantvoort on Slavoj Žižek, Absolute Recoil
  • Michael Arfken on Kieran Durkin on Erich Fromm
  • Claudia Wirsing on Michael Quante, Die Wirklichkeit des Geistes

To receive notification of new reviews and comments when they appear join the Marx and Philosophy Society’s email list or follow us on facebook or twitter.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Sean Sayers, Editor

Marx and Philosophy Review of Books

66 Havelock Street, Canterbury, Kent CT1 1NP, UK

http://www.marxandphilosophy.org.uk/reviewofbooks/

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/marx-and-philosophy-review-of-books-9

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

William Morris

William Morris

PARTICIPATE! CULTURAL TRANSFORMATION AND THE PARTICIPATORY AGENDA

CALL FOR PAPERS

Participate! Cultural Transformation and the Participatory Agenda, 2-3 October, 2015

The University of Southern Denmark (SDU), The Institute for The Study of Culture, in collaboration with Brandts and co-funded by the Velux Foundation.

 

The participatory agenda has been introduced in art and cultural policies in modern, post-welfare societies as a means of social transformation during the last decennial. The agenda has been driven forth by an entangled political, economic and social vision of democratisation, innovation and social integration. Now it is time to ask, what are the inherent paradoxes and ambiguities as this agenda is spelled out at different levels of cultural policies and in different types of art and cultural institutions? What are the dilemmas in real policy implications in and across institutions and in cultural communication practices in terms of professional principles such as arms’ length, quality and objectivity? How do we adapt inventive, collaborative methodologies from which to approach such questions and engage in the actual political rhetoric of ‘social impact’,‘value’ and ‘measurement’. The aim of the conference is to establish a dialogue between theoreticians, politicians, artists and professionals and raise questions of art and culture in relation to democracy, civic learning and empowerment.

 

Key note speakers:

Tony Bennett, Research Professor in Social and Cultural Theory at the Institute for Culture and Society, University of Western Sydney. Tony Bennett has written extensively on cultural sociology, on cultural policies and institutions, and on cultural/national heritage and the museum. Among his recent publications is Making Culture, Changing Society, 2013.

Gerald Raunig, Artist, philosopher, Director of Dpt. Kunst & Medien, Zürich University of the Arts and the EIPCP (European Institute for Progressive Cultural Policies), Vienna. Gerald Raunig has published on art, art institutions and cognitive capitalism, forthcoming is DIVIDUUM: Maschinischer kapitalismus und molekulare revolution, 2015.

Nina Möntmann, Professor and Head of The Department of Art Theory and the History of Ideas, The Royal Institute of Art, Stockholm. Nina Möntmann is an experienced curator, critic and academic engaged in new institutionalism and among her recent publications is Scandalous: A Reader on Art and Ethics, 2013.

Celia Lury, Professor and Director of Centre for Interdisciplinary Methodologies, University of Warwick. Celia Lury has been engaged in cultural policies in a broad sense, in global scaling and in inventive and performative methodologies. Among her recent books is Measure and Value (co-edited with Lisa Adkins), 2012.

 

Call for Papers:

Part of the conference will be organized in thematic workshops, and we invite cultural researchers and professionals to deliver an abstract (500 words) before April, 1 (to be proceeded before May, 1) and a final paper before September, 1. Workshops will include:

  • Governmentality and New Institutionalism
  • Participation, democracy und civic learning
  • Participation –challenges in commissioning, curating and facilitating participatory art/culture projects
  • Participation and/or/in Audience and Visitor Studies
  • Participatory practices in art, media and culture outside institutions
  • Critical/ethical practice and the performativity of research methodologies
  • Comparative/scaled cultural policies: EU, Nordic, national level etc.
  • Cognitive capitalism and creative commons

Contact: Professor Anne Scott Sørensen, Institute for the Study of Culture, SDU, annescott@sdu.dk

 

Abstracts to  be delivered to: participate@sdu.dk

See: http://static.sdu.dk/mediafiles//C/9/6/%7BC9622F11-7352-42A7-A751-551B9D0B0CBF%7DKULT.pdf

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Social Imaginaries

Social Imaginaries

SOCIAL IMAGINARIES

A NEW JOURNAL AT: http://www.zetabooks.com/journals/social-imaginaries.html

Issue 1 (May, 2015)

 

Table of Contents (with Abstracts)

 

1. Editorial by the Social Imaginaries Editorial Collective

 

2Social Imaginaries in Debate by Suzi Adams, Paul Blokker, Natalie J Doyle, John Krummel, and Jeremy C A Smith

Investigations into social imaginaries have burgeoned in recent years. From ‘the capitalist imaginary’ to the ‘democratic imaginary’, from the ‘ecological imaginary’ to ‘the global imaginary’ – and beyond – the social imaginaries field has expanded across disciplines and beyond the academy. The recent debates on social imaginaries and potential new imaginaries reveal a recognisable field and paradigm-in-the-making. We argue that Castoriadis, Ricoeur, and Taylor have articulated the most important theoretical frameworks for understanding social imaginaries, although the field as a whole remains heterogeneous. We further argue that the notion of social imaginaries draws on the modern understanding of the imagination as authentically creative (as opposed to imitative). We contend that an elaboration of social imaginaries involves a significant, qualitative shift in the understanding of societies as collectively and politically-(auto)instituted formations that are irreducible to inter-subjectivity or systemic logics. After marking out the contours of the field and recounting a philosophical history of the imagination (including deliberations on the reproductive and creative imaginations, as well as consideration of contemporary Japanese contributions), the essay turns to debates on social imaginaries in more concrete contexts, specifically political-economic imaginaries, the ecological imaginary, multiple modernities and their inter-civilisational encounters. The social imaginaries field imparts powerful messages for the human sciences and wider publics. In particular, social imaginaries hold significant implications for ontological, phenomenological and philosophical anthropological questions; for the cultural, social, and political horizons of contemporary worlds; and for ecological and economic phenomena (including their manifest crises). The essay concludes with the argument that social imaginaries as a paradigm-in-the-making offers valuable  means by which movements towards social change can be elucidated as well providing  an open horizon for the critiques of existing social practices.

 

3. Introduction to Castoriadis’s “The Imaginary As Such” by Johann P Arnason

 

4. The Imaginary As Such by Cornelius Castoriadis (translated by Johann P Arnason)

This text is a draft introduction to a planned work on imagination in society and history. It begins with reflections on the abilities and activities that set human subjects apart from other living beings and thus at the same time enable the ongoing creation of society and history. This is to be understood as an exploration within the “order of facts”, on the level of anthropological preconditions. The most elementary precondition is the human capacity to add an “unreal extension” to reality, and thus to put the latter at a distance; considered as an activity, this is what defines the imagination, but considered as a dimension of human existence, it is the realm of the imaginary. The two concepts are strictly complementary. To clarify their role in the proposed rethinking of social-historical being, we must link them to closer analysis of the latter’s two main components, representing and doing. On both sides, Castoriadis emphasizes the imaginary element as a decisive point against empiricist and rationalist reductions. Representing is as irreducible to perception as it is to thinking, and taking the argument one step further, both perception and thinking can be shown to be dependent on the imaginary. Similarly, on the level of doing, human action can neither be understood as a response to given needs nor as an application of pre-given representations; its creative potential presupposes an imaginary horizon. Finally it is argued that language – closely related to both representing and doing- has an imaginary dimension, central to the emergence and the enduring innovative capacity of meaning. The basic flaw of structural linguistics was its refusal to take the imaginary source into account.

 

5. Introduction to Nakamura Yūjirō and his Work by John Krummel

 

6. “The Logic of Place” and Common Sense by Nakamura Yujiro (translated by John Krummel)

The essay is a written version of a talk Nakamura Yūjirō gave at the Collège International de Philosophie in Paris in 1983.  In the talk Nakamura connects the issue of common sense in his own work to that of place in Nishida Kitarō and the creative imagination in Miki Kiyoshi. He presents this connection between the notions of common sense, imagination, and place as constituting one important thread in contemporary Japanese philosophy. He begins by discussing the significance of place (basho) that is being rediscovered today in response to the shortcomings of the modern Western paradigm, and discusses it in its various senses, such as ontological ground or substratum, the body, symbolic space, and linguistic or discursive topos in ancient rhetoric. He then relates this issue to the philosophy of place Nishida developed in the late 1920s, and after providing an explication of Nishida’s theory, discusses it further in light of some linguistic and psychological theories. Nakamura goes on to discuss his own interest in the notion of common sense traceable to Aristotle and its connection to the rhetorical concept of topos, and Miki’s development of the notion of the imagination in the 1930s in response to Nishida’s theory.  And in doing so he ties all three—common sense, place, and imagination—together as suggestive of an alternative to the modern Cartesian standpoint of the rational subject that has constituted the traditional paradigm of the modern West.

 

7. Interpreting the Present – a Research Programme by Peter Wagner

Sociologists have increasingly adopted the insight that “modern societies” undergo major historical transformations; they are not stable or undergoing only smooth social change once their basic institutional structure has been established. There is even some broad agreement that the late twentieth century witnessed the most recent one of those major transformations leading into the present time – variously characterized by adding adjectives such as “reflexive”, “global” or simply “new” to modernity. However, neither the dynamics of the recent social transformation nor the characteristic features of the present social constellation have been adequately grasped yet. Rather than assuming a socio-structural or politico-institutional perspective, as they dominate in sociology and political science respectively, this article concentrates on the way in which current social practices are experienced and interpreted by the human beings who enact them as parts of a common world that they inhabit together. It will be suggested that current interpretations are shaped by the experience of the dismantling of “organized modernity” from the 1970s onwards and of the subsequent rise of a view of the world as shaped by parallel processes of “globalization” and “individualization”, signalling the erasure of historical time and lived space, during the 1990s and early 2000s. In response to these experiences, we witness today a variety of interconnected attempts at re-interpretation of modernity, aiming at re-constituting spatiality and temporality. The re-constitution of meaningful time concerns most strongly questions of historical injustice, in terms of the present significance of past oppression and exclusion and in terms of the unequal effects of the instrumental transformation of the earth in the techno-industrial trajectory of modernity. The re-constitution of meaningful space focuses on the relation between the political form of a spatially circumscribed democracy and the economic practices of expansionist capitalism as well as on the spatial co-existence of a plurality of ways of world-interpretation.

 

8. Introduction to Johann P Arnason’s “The Imaginary Dimensions of Modernity” by Suzi Adams

 

9. The Imaginary Dimensions of Modernity by Johann P Arnason (translated by Suzi Adams)

This paper discusses the formation of Castoriadis’s concept of imaginary significations and relates it to his changing readings of Marx and Weber. Castoriadis’s reflections on modern capitalism took off from the Marxian understanding of its internal contradictions, but he always had reservations about the orthodox version of this idea. His writings in the late 1950s, already critical of basic assumptions in Marx’s work, located the central contradiction in the very relationship between capital and wage labour: Labour power was not simply transformed into a commodity, as Marx had argued; rather, the instituted attempt to treat it as a commodity was a contradiction in itself, between the subjectivity and the objectification of labour. Castoriadis then moved on to link this claim to Weber’s analysis of  the interconnections between capitalism and bureaucracy. The main contradiction of modern capitalism, whether wholly bureaucratized as in the Soviet model or increasingly bureaucratized as in the West, now seemed to be a matter of  incompatible systemic imperatives: the need to control and to mobilize the workforce. Finally, difficulties with this model – and with the revolutionary expectations based on it – led to a more decisive break with classical theories and to the formulation of a bipolar image of modernity, where the vision of an autonomous society is opposed to the logic of calculation and domination, embodied in capitalist development. On both sides there is an imaginary component, irreducible to empirical givens or systemic principles. In this regard, Castoriadis remained closer to Weber than to Marx, but he also anticipated, in a distinctive way, later emphasis on the cultural dimension of modernity, and more specifically the notion of modernity as a new civilization.

 

10. Introduction to Marcel Gauchet’s “Democracy: From One Crisis to Another” by Natalie J Doyle

 

11. Democracy: From One Crisis to Another by Marcel Gauchet (translated by Natalie J Doyle)

Democracy is in crisis. This crisis is the paradoxical outcome of its triumph over its erstwhile rivals. Having prevailed over the totalitarian projects of the first half of the 20th Century it has developed in such a way that it is now undermining its original goals of individual and collective autonomy. Modern liberal democracy – the outcome of an inversion of the values of tradition, hierarchy and political incorporation – is a mixed regime. It involves three different dimensions of social existence, political, legal, historical/economic, and organizes power around these. A balance was achieved after the upheaval of World War II in the form of liberal democracy, on the basis of reforms which injected democratic political power into liberalism and controlled the new economic dynamics it had unleashed. This balance has now been lost. Political autonomy, which accompanied modern historicity and its orientation towards the future, has been overshadowed by economic activity and its pursuit of innovation. As a result, the very meaning of democracy has become impoverished. The term used to refer to the goal of self-government, it is now taken to be fully synonymous with personal freedom and the cause of human rights. The legal dimension having come to prevail over the political one, democratic societies see themselves as “political market societies”, societies that can only conceive of their existence with reference to a functional language borrowed from economics. This depoliticisation of democracy has facilitated the rise to dominance of a new form of oligarchy.

 

12. Modern Social Imaginaries: A Conversation by Craig Calhoun, Dilip Gaonkar, Benjamin Lee, Charles Taylor and Michael Warner (edited by Dilip Gaonkar)

The conversation seeks to extend and complicate Charles Taylor’s (2004) account of three constitutive formations of modern social imaginaries: market, the public sphere, and the nation-state based on popular sovereignty in two critical respects. First, it seeks to show how these key imaginaries, especially the market imaginary, are not contained and sealed within autonomous spheres. They are portable and they often leak into domains beyond the ones in which they originate. Second, it seeks to identify and explore the new incipient and/or emergent imaginaries vying for recognition and demanding consideration in the constitution (as well as analysis) of contemporary social life, such as the risk-reward entrepreneurial culture.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Joy Heroe

Joy Heroe

JOY FOREVER: POLITICAL ECONOMY OF SOCIAL CREATIVITY

Edited by Michał Kozłowski, Agnieszka Kurant, Janek Sowa, Krystian Szadkowski, Kuba Szreder

Joy Forever refers to the false promise of a common happiness, constantly played out by the proponents of the creative class and creative economy – the very promise that since Romanticism has been ascribed to art itself, a vow which remains unfulfilled. The aim of Free/Slow University’s publication is to scrutinize the false promises of distributed creativity as an ideology of cognitive capitalism. The authors devote themselves to critical examination of the structural links between art, creativity, labour and the creation of value under contemporary relations of production. Some of them do not stop at a critical diagnosis but go further, reflecting upon potential alternatives to the status quo.

The book covers more than the issues of a narrowly understood art world, despite the fact that it pays a lot of attention to them. Art is conceived here as a social lab, where innovative ways of organizing of
labour, socializing both for labour and through labour, as well as different types of production, speculation, generation and accumulation and appropriation of value are experimented with and tested.

Authors: Hans Abbing, Joanna Bednarek, Luc Boltanski, Isabelle Bruno, Neil Cummings, Diedrich Diederichsen, Freee Art Collective, Isabelle Graw, Alex Neumann, Precarious Workers Brigade, John Roberts, Gigi Roggero, Martha Rosler, Stevphen Shukaitis, Massimiliano Tomba, Marina Vishmidt.

Electronic version freely accessible at: http://mayflybooks.org/?page_id=107

Publishers: Free/Slow University of Warsaw (http://www.wuw-warsaw.pl), MayFly Books (http://www.mayflybooks.org) and Bęc Zmiana Foundation (http://www.funbec.pl)

Print version is available from MayFly Books and other distributors.

Joy

Joy

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Heroes

Heroes

HEROES: MASS MURDER AND SUICIDE – FRANCO “BIFO” BERARDI, BOOK LAUNCH EVENTS

OUT NOW: Heroes: Mass Murder and Suicide

BY FRANCO “BIFO” BERARDI

What is the relationship between capitalism and mental health?

See: http://www.versobooks.com/books/1746-heroes

————

LAUNCH EVENTS:

 

Wednesday February 25th 2015, 7.00pm – 8.30pm

At Foyles, 107 Charing Cross Road, London, WC2H 0DT

Franco Berardi in conversation with Paul Mason and Emma Dowling. For more information and to book: http://www.foyles.co.uk/event-bifo

 

Friday February 27th 2015, 1pm-2pm

At Institute of Contemporary Art, The Mall, London, SW1Y 5AH

Culture Now: Franco “Bifo” Berardi will discuss HEROES with Professor Benjamin Noys. For more information and to book: https://www.ica.org.uk/whats-on/culture-now-franco-bifo-berardi

————

What is the relationship between capitalism and mental health? In his most unsettling book to date, Franco “Bifo” Berardi embarks on an exhilarating journey through philosophy, psychoanalysis and current events, searching for the social roots of the mental malaise of our age.

Spanning an array of horrors – the Aurora “Joker” killer; Anders Breivik; American school massacres; the suicide epidemic in Korea and Japan; and the recent spate of “austerity” suicides in Europe – Heroes dares to explore the darkest shadow cast by the contemporary obsession with relentless competition and hyper-connectivity. In a volume that crowns four decades of radical intellectual work, Berardi develops the psychoanalytical insights of his friend Felix Guattari and proposes dystopian irony as a strategy to disentangle ourselves from the deadly embrace of absolute capitalism.

————

HEROES: MASS MURDER AND SUICIDE is part of our new FUTURES series.

VERSO FUTURES is a brand-new series of essay-length philosophical and political interventions by both emerging and established writers and thinkers from around the world. Each title in the series addresses the outer limits of political and social possibility. Other books in the series include ISABELL LOREY, MARC AUGE and PAOLO VIRNO: http://www.versobooks.com/series_collections/113-futures

“The law of the innermost form of the essay is heresy”—Theodor Adorno

————

FRANCO “BIFO” BERARDI, founder of the famous Radio Alice in 1976 and one of the most prominent members of Autonomia, is a theorist and media activist. His recent books in English include The Soul at Work: From Alienation to Autonomy; The Uprising: On Poetry and Finance; and After the Future.

————

“As a diagnostician, Berardi is among the sharpest.” – Slate

“Bifo is a master of global activism in the age of depression. His mission is to understand real existing capitalism. Sense the despair of the revolt, enjoy this brilliant ‘labour of the negative’!” – Geert Lovink, Founding Director of the Institute of Network Cultures

————

PAPERBACK: FEBRUARY 2015 / 240 pages / ISBN: 9781781685785 / £7.99 / $12.95 / $15.95 (Canada)

HARDBACK: FEBRAURY 2015 / 240 pages / ISBN: 9781781685778 / £55 / $95 / $108 (Canada)

HEROES is available at a 40% discount (30% hardback) on our website, with free shipping and bundled ebook. Purchasing details here: http://www.versobooks.com/books/1746-heroes

————

Visit Verso’s website for information on our upcoming events, new reviews and publications and special offers: http://www.versobooks.com

Sign up for the Verso mailing list:

https://www.versobooks.com/users/sign_up

Follow us online:

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**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Knowledge

Knowledge

CAPITAL AS COMPUTATION & COGNITION

 

Capital as Computation & Cognition: From Babbage’s Factory to Google’s Algorithmic Governance

Seminar syllabus [draft, in progress]

New Centre for Research and Practice, 3-24 March 2015.

Enroll –› thenewcentre.org/seminars/capital-as-computation-cognition

Instructor: Matteo Pasquinelli –› matteopasquinelli.org

 

Since the times of Smith, Ricardo and Marx, if not for even longer, capital has functioned as a form of computation constituted by and as a complex mathematical system. As Simondon noticed, the industrial machine was already an informational relay, that was separating the source of energy (nature) from the source of information (the human). After WWII the numeric essence of capital has been coupled with the informational dimension of cybernetics and computing machines, while also subsuming emergent forms of augmented intelligence. Capitalism, as a form of accounting and as an exterior mnemonic technique, is in itself a form of transhuman intelligence. Cognitive capitalism, Specifically, on the basis of its infonumeric procedures, from layman’s accounting to sophisticated algotrading, as well as from immaterial labour to scientific research, is an institution of computation.

The aim of the seminar is twofold: on the one hand, it will provide an introduction to some critical keywords (such as abstract labour, general intellect, cybernetic loop, calculation problem, immaterial labour, cognitive capitalism, augmented intelligence, computational limit, etc.) and to more recent debates around the technological form (on Accelerationism and algorithmic governance, for instance). On the other hand, the seminar wants to provide a compact and accurate bibliography about the canonical approaches to the relation between capital, technology, knowledge and labour. A specific attention will be given to the precise historical contexts in which fundamental ideas were originated and crucial books published. All the bibliographies are therefore compiled in chronological order to make genealogies and the circulation of ideas more comprehensible (and to clarify also epic misunderstandings, weak intepretations and harsh criticism).

The seminar in structured in four parts that correspond roughly to four different historical periods and to their relative types of machinic assemblage. The seminar aims to illuminate each historical moment according to a specific composition of the three variables: capital, computation and cognition. The first technological assemblage to be covered is Marx’s industrial machine, that inaugurated the bifurcation between energy and information. The second one is the cybernetic machine, distinguished by the feedback loop system and by the first experiments at the scale of national economy. Third, the Turing machine more in general will be taken as the basic diagram of cognitive capitalism and the network society and as the terrain of a further bifurcation, that is of the split between data and metadata. Fourth, algorithms for data mining will be discussed as models of the last stage of capitalism and its algorithmic governance, marking the passage from metadata to a global machinic intelligence.

Each seminar presents two or three historical and fundamental texts that are selected from a general bibliography. Documents that will be discussed during the seminar are underlined in bold and marked with an arrow (it is mandatory to read only the texts marked with an arrow: titles in bold are highly recommended). At the end of the seminar, students will be asked to pick up one text or more and to reconstruct how the diagram of the composition of capital/computation/cognition emerges in a specific author or historical moment, or to propose new trajectories of analysis.

 

As a general introduction to the seminar is recommended the reading of:

➡ Pasquinelli, Matteo (2014) “Italian Operaismo and the Information Machine“, Theory, Culture

and Society, first published 2 February 2014. http://matteopasquinelli.com/operaismo-informationmachine

➡ Pasquinelli, Matteo (2014) “Augmented Intelligence”, in: Critical Keywords for the Digital

Humanities, Lüneburg: Leuphana university, 2014.

http://cdckeywords.leuphana.com/augmented_intelligence

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

PosthumanALIEN LIFE: MARX AND THE FUTURE OF THE HUMAN

My article, Alien Life: Marx and the Future of the Human, is now available at Academia.

It was published as:

Rikowski, G. (2003) Alien Life: Marx and the Future of the Human, Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory, Volume 11 Issue 2, pp.121-164.

The article can be viewed on Academia at: http://www.academia.edu/10986589/Alien_Life_Marx_and_the_Future_of_the_Human

It was a polished and heavily edited version of a paper I presented a few years earlier at one of the Birkbeck College Seminars on Marx, Individuals & Society, run by the late Cyril Smith: Marx and the Future of the Human (2000).

This paper is also on Academia, at: http://www.academia.edu/6043714/Marx_and_the_Future_of_the_Human

For those interested in the interface of Marxism and Post/Trans-humanism, my article Education, Capital and the Transhuman may also be of value.

This article is also at Academia, at:

http://www.academia.edu/9033532/Education_Capital_and_the_Transhuman

Also of interest on this theme is Planet of the Capitorg

This can also be found at Academia:

https://www.academia.edu/6921390/Planet_of_the_Capitorg

Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski

@ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Posthuman

Posthuman

POSTHUMANISM & SOCIETY

Call For Papers

Glocal Symposium

“POSTHUMANISM & SOCIETY”

NYU, New York City, May 8th 2015

In collaboration with the New York Posthuman Research Group we are delighted to announce the first Glocal Symposium, to be held at the Program of Liberal Studies, New York University (NYC)

In contemporary scholarship, “posthuman” has emerged as a key term in the effort to redefine the human in light of multiple and profound impacts of twentieth and twentyfirst century social, philosophical and technological trends.

On one hand, the biotechnological possibility of human enhancement, the growing significance of virtuality as an extension of the self, the scientific and cultural expectations of space migration have raised crucial questions which require the input of society as a whole.

On the other hand, the cumulative impact of anthropocentrism has become so massive that geologists have dubbed the present era the “Anthropocene” since human actions have had a profound systemic affect, leading to an ecological point of no return.

Capitorg

Capitorg

The New York Posthuman Research Group invites multiple perspectives to converge on these and related questions.

Keynote Speaker: Professor Rosi Braidotti

Connecting live from the University of Utrecht (Holland)

There will be parallel events in different International Universities around the world.

*Glocal: The survival of local specificities in a globalized world.

 

SUBMISSIONS & DEADLINES

We invite abstracts of up to 150 words and a short bio, to be sent to:

NYposthuman@gmail.com

Abstracts should be received by February 28th 2015.

*Presentations should be no longer than 10 minutes. Each presentation will be given 10 additional minutes each for questions and discussions with the audience, for a total of 20 minutes.

 

The Academic Committee:

Francesca Ferrando

Farzad Mahootian

Yunus Tuncel

Posthuman

Posthuman

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THOUGHT CONFERENCE 2015

FEMINISM & CRITICAL THEORY

SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THOUGHT CONFERENCE

UNIVERSITY OF SUSSEX, JUNE 20-21, 2015

In the face of enforced austerity, rampant and increasing inequality, systemic crises of political, economic and environmental organisation, and violence and injustice on a global scale, there has been a resurgence of interest in both feminism and critical theory, as ways of understanding and criticising the world as it is. That such disasters disproportionately affect women is not, of course, new, nor are they differentiated solely through gender – race, sexuality, dis/ability, class and nationality also come into play. Yet many have detected an increase in violence, both (and often simultaneously) material and symbolic, directed against women and gender non-conformists across the world. Examples range from the ‘pornification’ of an increasingly misogynist popular culture (and equally misogynist ‘moral panics’ about the threat posed to society by deviant sexualities), to brutal cuts to already embattled women’s services, to continued institutional discrimination and institutionalised abuse (Yarl’s Wood is just one site).

This has been met with resistance in a variety of forms, on the ground in social movements and protests, and in many recent theoretical developments both scholarly and popular, including: the republication of many classic Marxist and socialist feminist texts of the 1970s and 80s; important contemporary debates, situated within both analytic and continental philosophy, on how to challenge the patriarchal nature of philosophy as a discipline and as disciplinary ideology; the emergence of innovative new journals such as the materialist feminist LIES; and scholarly reappraisals of radical twentieth-century figures like Shulamith Firestone, Claudia Jones and Rosa Luxemburg.

This year’s Social and Political Thought conference will investigate ? the relationship between feminism and other critical social theories in light of these developments. We begin by recognising that the different schools (and historical ‘waves’) of feminist thought are themselves often divergent and opposed. Furthermore, we recognise that there is a certain level of ambivalence attached to the term ‘critical theory’. In the narrow sense, it can refer to theory influenced by the Frankfurt School and the work of Adorno, Horkheimer, and Marcuse (and, on some interpretations, Habermas and Honneth). In the broad sense, on the other hand, it can refer to a group of interrelated, sometimes competing, social theories directed against the status quo, of which feminist thought is one strand. We view this ambivalence and its relationship to feminist theory and practice as potentially productive, and encourage submissions that deal with all kinds of feminism and their relationship to critical theory in both the narrow and broad senses of the term, including feminism as critical theory.

Possible approaches include but are not limited to: Marxist feminism or feminist thought engaging with Marxism; feminism, materiality, and ‘new materialisms’; feminist social movements and the politics of popular protest; feminism, police, and prisons; feminism and problems of universality; feminism and psychoanalysis; feminism and autonomism; anarchist feminism; post-crisis masculinities and feminism; postcolonialism and feminism; black British feminism; sexual, racial and social contracts; feminism and the politics and theory of intersectionality; feminism and nationalism; feminism and orientalism in the war on terror; ‘third wave’ feminism; feminism and new forms of slavery; feminism in the global South; feminism and poststructuralism;  feminism and communisation theory; feminism and LGBTQI struggles; feminism and sex-work; feminism and social reproduction; feminism and revolution.

 

Keynote Speakers:

Stella Sandford (Kingston University)

Lorna Finlayson (University of Cambridge)

 

We encourage submissions for both individual and full-panel presentations. Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be sent to ssptreviews@sussex.ac.uk by March 15 2015. In order to facilitate a double-blind review process, please send two separate attachments, one containing a short biographical note, and another containing your abstract with no identifying information.

See: https://ssptjournal.wordpress.com/social-and-political-thought-conference-june-20-21-2015/

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

 

Time and Space in the Social Universe of Capital’ – by Michael Neary and Glenn Rikowski, now at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/10545768/Time_and_Speed_in_the_Social_Universe_of_Capital

 

ROME

ROME

REVOLUTION AND RESTORATION

Historical Materialism Rome Conference 2015

17-18-19 September 2015, Roma Tre University

CALL FOR PAPERS

D​EADLINE: 26.03.2015

Details: https://hmrome2015.wordpress.com

Two hundreds years after the Vienna Congress, a new strategy of restoration has imposed itself at the core of Europe. The process of reorganization of class power, which started in the 1970s, has stabilised after the 2007-2008 crisis on the basis of austerity policies, the dismantling of workers’ rights and the welfare state , the contraction of democratic space, and punitive restrictions on the right to protest. We know the 1815 restoration was a reaction to the revolutionary conquests of 1789; can we say something analogous about this new restoration? Does this latter amount merely to a response to the attack launched by the subaltern classes in the ’60 -’70? Can we define neoliberalism, as David Harvey suggests, as the ‘restoration of class power?’.

What deserves further exploration is the extent to which neoliberal restoration has acquired the offensive and constitutive dynamic traditionally linked to the concept of ‘revolution’. The interrelation between restoration and revolution emerges, in part, from the composition, nature and unfolding of the struggles that characterize our times: urban movements claim ing a ‘right to the city’, border conflicts, migrant struggles, the constellation of Arab ‘springs’, independent and conflictual trade unionism, experiments in workers’ self-management, feminist, queer and decolonial movements, rural, indigenous and environmental struggles .

Can these new struggles contrast the neoliberal manipulation of those democratic forms that emerged from the post-war compromise between labour and capital, and between direct and representative democracy? Can new subjectivities, new rights from below, new institutions offer any foothold for detaching the idea of ‘revolution’ from its absorption by the mechanism of ‘restoration’? Within this complex and stratified framework, it is crucial to take-up the traditions of Marxist theory – from the in-depth analysis of Bonapartism by Marx and Engels to Workerism, passing through Gramsci and the reflections on the appropriation and subordination of anti-colonial movements – that have distinguished themselves by their capacity to interrogate the deep connection between revolution and restoration in the history of the capitalist social totality.

Separate calls go out for the following streams (click on titles for full CFPs):

Marxism and Philosophy: The Italian Debate and its International Effects

New World Disorder: Crisis, Conflicts and Transformations of Class Struggles 

Powers, Organizational forms, New Institutions

​T​he Right to the City

We welcome abstract proposals on these themes or any others, in all disciplines, from all continents and from all perspectives within Marxism.

Please send your 200 words abstracts to: hmrome2015@gmail.com

IMPORTANT: if you apply to any of the 4 strands listed above, add the title of the strand in your email subject.

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/historical-materialism-rome-conference-2015-call-for-papers

Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

 

Time and Space in the Social Universe of Capital’ – by Michael Neary and Glenn Rikowski, now at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/10545768/Time_and_Speed_in_the_Social_Universe_of_Capital

 

Stuff

Stuff

WORKING WORLDS

Call for Papers:

Working Worlds explores the world-making capacities of the work of art. The conference seeks to reimagine the artwork as a space of compossibility in which multiple worlds, both real and potential, past and future, coexist. The present conference invites papers to intermix different scales of worlds, from the world in miniature to a world in collapse. Recent debates in art history have emphasised the artwork’s potential to represent global phenomena: conflict, ecological catastrophe and the flows of capital. Lost in these discussions is the fact that the artwork may also be understood as a world in and of itself. The artwork is of this world, but it is not reducible to it. From the sculptural practice of Camille Henrot to the performances of Marvin Gaye Chetwynd, attention paid to the particularity of the artwork reveals its potential to actualize speculative fictions in which worlds are formed and collapsed. Though the period addressed by the conference finds its beginnings with the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, an event that for many heralds the era of globalisation, Working Worlds also invites papers that draw lines of continuity between the modern and the post-modern, and thereby seek to challenge existing narratives that draw too firm a line between these historical periods.

 

Working Worlds proposes three panels with topics not exclusively related to:

  1. The work of the artwork / worldmaking / the artwork as theory
  2. Artistic labour / digital labor / artwork as situation / artwork as event / cognitive mapping
  3. Institution / artworld / capitalism as global process

 

Speakers should be prepared to present papers for 25 min followed by a discussion. Please send 300 word abstracts by February 26th to: Andrew Witt and Rye Holmboe, workingworlds2015@gmail.com The conference will be held on the 16th of May, 2015.

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/call-for-papers-working-worlds-may-16-2015-university-college-london

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

 

Time and Space in the Social Universe of Capital’ – by Michael Neary and Glenn Rikowski, now at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/10545768/Time_and_Speed_in_the_Social_Universe_of_Capital

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