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imagesHIGH NOON SHOWDOWN ON BLACK METAL THEORY

TOPICS IN THE AESTHETICS OF MUSIC AND SOUND

SEMINAR SERIES

Thursday, October 1, 2015

3:15-5 p.m. in U67

Institute for the Study of Culture (IKV) University of Southern Denmark (SDU) Campusvej 55, Odense

Panel discussion (Via Skype):

High Noon Showdown on Black Metal Theory

With …

Karl Spracklen is Professor of Leisure Studies at Leeds Beckett University, UK. He is the Editor of Metal Music Studies and the Secretary of the International Society for Metal Music Studies. He has extensive research interests relating to leisure spaces and leisure identities, and has contributed to debates regarding leisure theory. He has over seventy publications, including three research monographs, the most recent of which is Whiteness and Leisure (2013), published by Palgrave Macmillan.

Niall Scott is Senior Lecturer in Ethics at the University of Central Lancashire. He is editor of Helvete: A Journal of Black Metal Theory and Co-Editor of Metal Music Studies. He is one of the founders and Chair of the Society for Metal Music Studies, and has published over 40 pieces in the fields of metal studies, black metal theory, political philosophy, cultural theory, ethics and bioethics.

Edia Connole is co-author with Nicola Masciandaro of Floating Tomb: Black Metal Theory (Mimesis, 2015), and co-editor with Gary J. Shipley of Serial Killing: A Philosophical Anthology (Schism, 2015). With Scott Wilson, Edia Connole is also the co-founder of MOUTH, an actionist art project in culinary divinomics. mmmouth.wordpress.com

Black Metal Theory

Black Metal Theory

Abstract: In this seminar defenders and critics will debate the epistemic value of black metal theory (BMT). An amorphous “metallectual” movement initiated in 2009 with the symposium Hideous Gnosis, BMT has developed in the form of a distributed and vexed forum for trans-disciplinary intellectual work committed to thinking “with” rather than “about” black metal. For defenders of the discipline, its value lies in its ability to destroy creatively the boundary between black metal and theory—constituting itself in the space of their shared negativity, as stated on its inaugural website: “Not black metal. Not Theory. Not not black metal. Not not theory. Black metal theory. Theoretical blackening of metal. Metallic blackening of theory. Mutual blackening. Nigredo in the intoxological crucible of symposia.” For critics of the discipline, this trans-disciplinary approach is devoid of purpose and meaning, and makes the work of critically exploring black metal more difficult.

 

All are welcome – also via Skype

Outland

Outland

 

***END***

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

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313111_coverETHICS, EDUCATION AND TEACHING: PERSPECTIVES ON THE TEACHER IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY

Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain

Edinburgh Branch

Ethics, Education and Teaching: Perspectives on the Teacher in Contemporary Society

Moray House School of Education, University of Edinburgh
October 2nd – 3rd, 2015

Keynote Speakers:
Nel Noddings, Professor Emerita, Stanford University
Penny Enslin, Professor, University of Glasgow
Paul Standish, Professor, Institute of Education, UCL
Tom Hamilton, Director of Education, Registration and PLD, The General Teaching Council for Scotland

This conference invites academics, teachers in schools, students and policy makers to come together to discuss the future of teaching and how philosophy can contribute to shared understandings of the teacher’s role in contemporary society.

Draft Programme
Day 1: Friday, October 2 2015
15:30 – 16:30
Registration and Coffee/Tea + Blackwell Bookstand (10% off for delegates)
16:30 – 16:45
Welcome Address: Andrea English
16:45 – 18:15 Keynote: Penny Enslin, “The Ethics of Charity”
Chair: Morwenna Griffiths

Day 2: Saturday, October 3, 2015
9:00 -10:00 Coffee/ Tea + Blackwell Bookstand
10:00 -10:15 Opening Address: Robbie Nicols
10:15-11:45 Keynote: Nel Noddings, “Care Ethics and Teaching. Teaching involves more
than instruction”
Chair: Andrea English
11:45 – 12:45 Lunch
12:45 – 2:15
Keynote: Paul Standish, “Teaching exposed: Education in Denial”
Chair: TBA
2:15 – 2:30 Coffee/Tea
2:30 – 4:00
Keynote: Tom Hamilton, “Ethics, Integrity and Professional Standards for
Teachers in Scotland”
Chair: TBA
4:00 – 4:30
Closing Discussion Panel: Teacher Education in the UK and Beyond
Panelists: Morwenna Griffiths, Holly Linklater, Natasa Pantic
4:30 End

REGISTER NOW – Space is Limited: http://www.etouches.com/126005 
Fees: (incl. registration, coffee/tea and Sat. lunch, accommodation not included)
£35 standard; £29 registered teachers; £17 concessions (students/unwaged)

Organized and supported by the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB) in collaboration with the Moray House School of Education, University of Edinburgh

Conference Organizer:
Dr Andrea R. English
Chancellor’s Fellow in Philosophy of Education
Institute for Education, Teaching and Leadership
Moray House School of Education
The University of Edinburgh
Holyrood Road
Edinburgh, EH8 8AQ
Scotland
tel: +44 (0)131 651 6172
email: andrea.english@ed.ac.uk

 

***END***

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

debunking-economicsWILL WE CRASH AGAIN? WHY CAPITALISM NEEDS DEBT WRITE-OFFS TO SURVIVE

Conway Hall Ethical Society & London Futurists presents:

London Thinks – Will We Crash Again? Why Capitalism Needs Debt Write-offs to Survive

With STEVE KEEN

Tuesday 1st September @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm | £5 – £10

CONWAY HALL

25 Red Lion Square, London, WC1R 4RL United Kingdom

Website: http://conwayhall.org.uk/

Booking: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/will-we-crash-again-why-capitalism-needs-debt-write-offs-to-survive-tickets-17879762852

Mainstream economists failed to anticipate the great financial crash of 2007-8. In this talk, Professor Steve Keen will share his view on the bigger picture – including recent financial developments around the world. He will review options for the future of economics, highlight the little-understood importance of debt, and argue that significant debt write-downs are needed in order to limit future financial crashes.

Steve Keen is a Professor of Economics & Head of the School of Economics, History & Politics at Kingston University. He was one of the handful of economists to realise that a serious economic crisis was imminent, and to publicly warn of it, from as early as December 2005.

A staunch critic of mainstream economics, his book Debunking Economics is now in its 2nd edition and has been translated into Chinese, French and Spanish.

The event will be moderated by David Wood, Chair of London Futurists. The talk will be followed by audience Q&A.

A cash bar will be available at the event. Afterwards, there will be the chance to continue the discussion at a nearby pub.

Organised in partnership with the London Futurists

London Futurists hold regular speaker events to explore radical scenarios for the next 3-40 years.

For more details, see http://londonfuturists.com/.

***END***

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

London Anarchist Bookfair 2015

London Anarchist Bookfair 2015

LONDON ANARCHIST BOOKFAIR 2015

Saturday 24th October 10am to 7pm

Central Saint Martins, Granary Building, 1 Granary Square, King’s Cross, London, N1C 4AA

Books, pamphlets, magazines, meetings, films, discussions, crèche and older kids space, food and much more…

We have finally found a venue suitable for this year’s Bookfair. Central St. Martin’s is a huge building behind Kings Cross train station. It is a fantastic space for us all to display why anarchism is just such a bloody good idea. In these days of hyper capitalism an alternative is needed. That alternative can only be anarchism. Come and find out why.

If you want to book a stall or meeting or want an advert in the bookfair programme go to the bookings page.

What is anarchism?

Like all really good ideas, anarchy is pretty simple when you get down to it – human beings are at their very best when they are living free of authority, deciding things among themselves, rather than being ordered about. That’s what the word means: without government. Read on…

Anarchism and the bookfair

Bookfairs provide a space where like-minded people can come together to re-affirm old friendships, make new ones, discuss all things anarchist and anticapitalist and start planning the future revolution. They’re also one of the public faces of anarchism. Anyone unfamiliar with the ideas or wanting to know more about the politics can come along, look through books, sit in or get involved in meetings, workshops and discussions or just chat to the groups and organisations having stalls there.

It is also a space where we counter the rubbish talked about anarchism by sections of the media and our opponents. Bookfairs are one small element of making anarchism a threat to the present political system.

We need people to help us publicise the event to every nook and cranny in London. If you are new to anarchism, check out the pages websitesand bookfairs. There are links to anarchist and campaigning groups around the country and anarchist bookfairs throughout the world.

Access issues

If you have any access requirements, please let us know so we can try and meet your needs. If you are Deaf and require BSL interpreting and/or speech-to-text provision, please give us as much notice as possible and we will do our best to organise these. To discuss any specific access needs, please contact us at access at anarchistbookfair.org.uk.

Dogs

To make the bookfair a safe environment for children and adults alike, we ask people do not bring dogs to the event, except guide dogs. Thanks.

Cameras

Please don’t take photographs – it’s not necessary and it can annoy or concern some people.

 

See: http://anarchistbookfair.org.uk/

 

***END***

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Living Fire

Living Fire

ROSA LUXEMBURG AND THE CONTEMPORARY: IMPERIALISM, NEOLIBERALISM, REVOLUTION

Call for Papers

This issue of New Formations will propose a rethinking of the legacy of revolutionary socialist Rosa Luxemburg in the twenty-first century. In particular, essays included in the issue will draw on Luxemburg’s writings in order to address pressing issues of the contemporary world. At a time when neoliberal policies strengthen the smooth running of imperialist dispossession and continue to break the oppressed classes through new forms of precariat, debt, marginalisation, militarism and impoverishment, Luxemburg’s inheritance seems to acquire an unexpected poignancy. Luxemburg’s uncompromising commitment to socialism as only alternative to the violence of capitalism can inspire engaged movements fighting social justice in many contexts of the globe. In particular, the issue will focus on Luxemburg’s reflections on imperialism as the forcing of trade relations with non-capitalist surroundings as antidote to the ‘standstill of accumulation’ inherent to the unfolding of capitalism’s history.

Theories of imperialism through the twentieth and twenty-first centuries have contended with Luxemburg’s proposition by emphasising its limitations, errors and blind-spots. Yet, do Luxemburg’s theories on imperialism retain any meaning or validity in a postcolonial era? Can Luxemburg’s legacy help redefine the struggle against contemporary forms of neoliberalism, imperialism and accumulation? Can a debate on Luxemburg shed light on the meaning of the postcolonial as historical category and its political and social implications? Can Luxemburg’s thought help to redefine the meaning of social engagement today? The twenty-first century seems to confirm Rosa Luxemburg’s prediction that capitalism would be incapable of becoming universal without damaging the environments, societies and forms of life that are necessary for its reproduction. Contemporary wars, ecological crises, social unrest and the violence of neoliberal economy testify to the paradox that Luxemburg examined in her work: the full domination of capitalism on the planet would correspond to a scenario verging on total destruction and hence the breakdown of capitalism itself. According to Rosa Luxemburg, this ‘barbaric’ aspect of capitalism requires the re-opening of history through active revolutionary intervention.

 

Confirmed contributors

Stephen Morton

Paul LeBlanc

Peter Hudis

Helen Scott

Rory Castle

Filippo Menozzi

Kanishka Chowdhury

Rosa Luxemburg

Rosa Luxemburg

We welcome contributions from all disciplines. Final essays will be expected to be 7,000-9,000 words in length.

For more information about New Formations see http://www.newformations.co.uk

 

Deadline for abstracts 30 September 2015

Contributors will be told if their abstracts have been accepted by October 30th 2015

Deadline for full essays: May Day 2016

Please submit all abstracts to: nfsubmissions@me.com

 

***END***

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Postanarchism

Postanarchism

POSTANARCHISM

A new book by Saul Newman

Published by Polity

October 2015 | 160 Pages

Hardback: 9780745688732 | £50.00/€68.97

Paperback: 9780745688749| £12.99/€17.91

 

 

 

Praise For Postanarchism:

“For those on the left who despair about the ongoing power of neoliberalism, Saul Newman offers a powerful insight. Whereas older models of resistance are based on revolution and opposition to the state, Newman notes that the state is no longer the key problem of our time. Postanarchism is his response; it is based on autonomy, insurrection and the recuperation of politics. This book is critical for those who wish to think and act beyond our contemporary condition.” — James Martel, San Francisco State University

“Beautifully written, Newman’s book is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the dynamics of contemporary capitalism, the nature of political contestation and the choices we can exercise as political actors. It’s a fearless and provocative work, unafraid not only to challenge cherished nostrums of both left and right but to work creatively with “dangerous” concepts: insurrection, violence, servitude. In sum, this is a thoughtful and invigorating text for understanding our times.” — Simon Tormey, University of Sydney

 

In this book, Newman develops an original political theory of postanarchism; a form of anti-authoritarian politics which starts, rather than finishes, with anarchy. He does this by asking four central questions: who are we as subjects; how do we resist; what is our relationship to violence; and, why do we obey? By drawing on a range of heterodox thinkers including La Boétie, Sorel, Benjamin, Stirner and Foucault, the author not only investigates the current conditions for radical political thought and action, but proposes a new form of politics based on what he calls ontological anarchy and the desire for autonomous life. Rather than seeking revolutionary emancipation or political hegemony, we should affirm instead the non-existence of power and the ever-present possibilities of freedom.

As the tectonic plates of our time are shifting, revealing the nihilism and emptiness of our political and economic order, postanarchism’s disdain for power in all its forms offers us genuine emancipatory potential.

 

Book Details at Polity: http://www.polity.co.uk/book.asp?ref=9780745688732

The Politics of Postanarchism: http://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/saul-newman-the-politics-of-postanarchism

***END***

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Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

images (2)DE-NATURALISING DISASTERS

A WORKSHOP

The ‘De-Naturalising Disasters’ workshop, is part of the ‘Living in the Anthropocene: Rethinking the Nature/Culture Divide’ series.

The event is convened by David Chandler (University of Westminster) and Camilla Royle (King’s College, London).

Further information is available here: http://rethinkingtheanthropocene.blogspot.co.uk/
Date: Friday 18th September, 2015
Venue: Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster, Westminster Forum, 5th floor, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW (5 minutes walk from Oxford Circus tube station)
Time: 4.00pm-8.00pm

Programme: De-Naturalising Disasters

Introduction: Bruno Latour argues that we should love our ‘monsters’. Nothing illustrates this demand better than how disasters are becoming increasingly central to the political imagination. From the late Ulrich Beck’s views of ’emancipatory catastrophism’ to the UN Post-2015 Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, disasters are becoming a subject of ethical care. Disasters are no longer excluded from politics and seen as external or natural events but are instead seen as enabling agents of political change. The United Nations, for example, is forwarding a new paradigm suggesting that disaster risk should be embedded within everyday governance and development processes and managed through taking responsibility for social and environmental outcomes. In this way, disasters – as outcomes of social processes – enable learning, reflection and potentially emancipatory outcomes. This workshop seeks to discuss how disasters have overcome the nature/culture divide and what is at stake in learning how to love them.

4.00-5.30 “Grand Strategies for Anthropocene Challenges: Can we Learn in Time?” Speaker: Jamie MacIntosh (Professorial Venture Research Fellow & Director of the Institute for Security & Resilience Studies, University College, London) Chair: David Chandler (University of Westminster)

The UK’s recently elected government has now revved up the Whitehall policy machine to distil the 2015 batch of strategies. Ministerial speeches and fanfares are not far off. The UK Government is one among many major and minor bodies that drafts strategies. There were 51 state signatories to the UN Charter in 1945; there are now 193 sovereign bodies. The financial power of several non-state bodies far exceeds that of many UN Leviathans. Nevertheless, after the post-Cold War unipolar moment and Washington Consensus, we are all – for better or worse – immersed in a multipolar world. Moreover, it’s a multipolar world that within a few years and decades will have to face up to the challenges of the Anthropocene with our productivity still flat and inequality growing. There is little evidence that we are developing healthy appetites for the systemic risks and radical uncertainties that abound. Whether you look to elites or the multitudes, the competencies, capabilities and capacity necessary for the species to make it to the 22nd Century cannot be taken for granted. Can we learn in time how to make grand strategies work or are they myths to numb the hapless? Do universities have anything pragmatic to offer?

5.30-6.00 break

6.00-7.30 “Can Disaster Risk Management be Emancipatory?” Speaker: Mark Pelling (Professor of Geography, Centre for Integrated Research on Risk and Resilience, King’s College, London) Chair: Camilla Royle (King’s College, London)

Disaster risk management science has a long critical tradition including work by Hewitt, Wisner and Watts. The advent of climate change adaptation has opened new policy relevance for disaster risk management, but without taking on board this critical viewpoint. The result has been an adaptation science framed around stability seeking. Resilience has come to symbolise this conservative vision for risk management. One response has been to call for Transformative Adaptation. The paper will examine the advent and rise of transformation and its current positioning in the emerging post-2015 development agenda.

7.30 wine reception

Many thanks,
David Chandler and Camilla Royle

David Chandler, Professor of International Relations, Director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW. Tel: ++44 (0)776 525 3073.
Journal Editor, Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/resi20
Amazon books page: http://www.amazon.co.uk/David-Chandler/e/B001HCXV7Y/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0
Personal website: http://www.davidchandler.org/
Twitter: @DavidCh27992090

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

SDC13941ASHBRITTLE

Ruth Rikowski traces her Vickery family roots in her latest blog, ‘Ashbrittle’.

We visited Ashbrittle, Somerset, on Friday 17th July 2015. This is where Ruth’s great grandfather – Charles Palmer Vickery – was born, in 1853. Ruth gives a detailed account of our visit and the aftermath

Ruth’s blog includes pictures of me (Glenn) and herself and of course many pictures of Ashbrittle itself – with a blog commentary.

See Ashbrittle at: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/2015/08/ashbrittle.html

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Fat Cat Food

Fat Cat Food

LESSONS FROM GREECE: CRISIS OF THE ECONOMY AND THE LEFT RESPONSE

SUNDAY, AUGUST 23, 2015

6:30-9:30 PM

Westside Peace Center

3916 Sepulveda Blvd., near Venice Blvd. (free parking in rear)

Suite 101-102, press #22 at door to get into building

Culver City (LA area)

 

SPEAKERS:

Ali Kiani, Iranian Marxist activist and translator

With a comment by Hamid A., environmental and anti-racist activist

 

Having experienced the harshest type of capitalist austerity, which has featured depression level unemployment, the Greek people voted first for the anti-austerity leftist Syriza Party, which includes several Marxists among its leaders.  Then, in July, they voted overwhelmingly in a referendum to support Syriza in its determination not to bow to further austerity measures from the country’s international creditors.  In response, the creditors, led by Germany, seemed to want to make an example of this small country that had dared to challenge austerity from the left.  The creditor nations doubled down, threatening Greece with banishment from the Eurozone and even worse economic privation.  In response to these threats, which even the US seemed to consider excessive, Syriza’s leadership agreed to the very austerity measures the referendum vote had opposed a few days before. Syriza is splitting, but its majority has now voted to support austerity. What is the meaning of these events for Greece, for global capitalism, for the struggle to abolish it, and for the left?

Suggested readings (all from IMHO site):

“Two Strands in Syriza, the Euro, and the Dictatorship Of Capital” — by Karel Ludenhoff

“Syriza’s Stormy Greek Spring” — by David Black

“Further Reflections on Yanis Varoufakis’s ‘Erratic Marxism'” — by Karel Ludenhoff

“From the Economic Crisis to the Transcendence of Capital” — by Peter Hudis

 

Sponsored by the West Coast Chapter, International Marxist-Humanist Organization

More information: arise@internationalmarxisthumanist.org and http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/

Here is URL for meeting for Facebook, Twitter, etc.: http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/events/los-angeles-lessons-from-greece-crisis-of-the-economy-and-the-left-response

Join our Facebook page: “International Marxist-Humanist Organization” https://www.facebook.com/groups/imhorg/

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

313111_coverWHAT IS GOOD TEACHING? COMPETING PHILOSOPHICAL PERSPECTIVES

Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain

Roehampton Branch – PESGB@50
Anniversary Conference

What is good teaching? Competing philosophical perspectives

 

Panel includes:
Jan Derry (IoE, University College London);
Joris Vlieghe (University of Edinburgh);
Janet Orchard (University of Bristol);
Gert Biesta (University of Luxembourg)
Wednesday 2 September 2015 
School of Education, University of Roehampton
Froebel College, London, SW15 5PJ
2 – 6pm
To book please click here.
For more information email: kristal.oakes@roehampton.ac.uk and http://roehampton.ac.uk/Courses/Education/Calendar—Education/What-is-good-teaching–Competing-philosophical-perspectives/

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

RESIRESILIENCE AND THE ANTHROPOCENE: THE POLITICAL ECOLOGIES OF COMPLEXITY

Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses

Call for Special Issue Abstracts

Deadline: 1 March 2016

The Anthropocene signals a new geological epoch in which humans have become a geophysical force. The possibility that human activity now produces the environments on which it depends destabilizes the image of a stable Earth that has grounded Western philosophy and politics for two millennia. Critical scholars assert that Anthropocene thinking can provoke new understandings of spatiality, temporality, ethics, responsibility and politics. As Simon Dalby (2013) suggests, a new kind of politics becomes possible when we begin to consider that the stakes include (de)forming the world we inhabit. However, Brad Evans and Julian Reid (2014) argue that the Anthropocene just as easily presents a dangerous, vengeful Earth teetering on the brink of systemic collapse – a catastrophic discourse that creates fearful subjects who desire resilience in order to survive a calamitous future. The Anthropocene’s world-deforming vision leads into a reactionary bio-politics of resilience that fashions adaptive neoliberal subjects capable of surviving whatever surprises complexity has in store.

Thus two concepts have been central to the shifting dynamics of power and agency under the political ecology of complexity: the Anthropocene and resilience. And yet, resilience techniques do not produce uniform effects. The deployment of resilience always occurs within particular socio-ecological contexts striated by multiple conflicts and tensions. Resilience intervenes in, and is inflected by, these contextually-specific relations. Ben Anderson’s (2015: 62) call to recognize that ‘‘resilience’ names a fractured, multiple, empirical field rather than a series of generic characteristics’ means that not only will resilience be something different in different times and places, it will also produce uneven and potentially unintended effects as well. Thus, there is no guarantee that resilience interventions will necessarily reinforce neoliberal order; they could just as well catalyze new ways of harnessing complex life’s potentiality. The bio-politics of resilience may attempt to constrain and regulate adaptability, but these constraints are plastic, malleable, and can thus be broken, cast aside or even re-molded into weapons.

This special issue of Resilience: Policies, Practices and Discourses will explore the indeterminate political ecologies opened by the Anthropocene and resilience. It takes seriously the call from Dalby, Evans and Reid, Anderson and others to think through the different ways politics might be thought, practiced, and analyzed through the malleable worlds of the Anthropocene and the complex life of resilience thinking. We invite abstracts from across the disciplines that offer empirically driven, theoretically informed papers that engage with the Anthropocene and resilience to explore the shifting forms of geo-politics and bio-politics that reinforce and challenge neoliberal political ecologies. Abstracts may touch on these themes in any number of fields, including but not limited to climate change adaptation, disaster management and development, international relations, environmental security, or urban development and security.

 

References

Anderson B (2015) What kind of thing is resilience? Politics 35(1): 60-66.

Dalby S (2013) Biopolitics and climate security in the Anthropocene. Geoforum 49: 184-192.

Evans B and Reid J (2014) Resilient Life: The Art of Living Dangerously. Cambridge: Polity Press.

 

Submission Instructions

Abstracts of no more than 500 words should be submitted to Kevin Grove (Aberystwyth University, kevinjgrove@gmail.com) and David Chandler (University of Westminster, D.Chandler@westminster.ac.uk) by 12 October 2015.

Deadline for invited full submissions will be 1 March 2016.

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

The Failure of Capitalism

The Failure of Capitalism

MARX AND PHILOSOPHY REVIEW OF BOOKS – JULY 2015

New reviews and an updated list of books for review recently published online in the Marx and Philosophy Review of Books

Chris Arthur on Carver and Blank on “The German Ideology”

Hans Despain on David Weil, The Fissured Workplace

Mike Wayne on Walter Benjamin, Radio Benjamin

Bart Zantvoort on David Graeber, The Utopia of Rules

Joshua Moufawad-Paul on The FBI’s Secret War on America’s Maoists

Gary Roth on Richard Sennett, Together

To receive notification of new reviews and comments when they appear join the Marx and Philosophy Society’s email list or follow us on facebook or twitter.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Sean Sayers, Editor
Marx and Philosophy Review of Books
66 Havelock Street, Canterbury, Kent CT1 1NP, UK
http://www.marxandphilosophy.org.uk/reviewofbooks/ 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/marx-and-philosophy-review-of-books-13

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

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