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Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski

RECENT ADDITIONS TO ACADEMIA – JULY 2015

I have added a number of papers to Academia in the last few weeks.

Recent additions of mine to Academia include:

 

Working for Leisure? Part-time and Temporary Working Amongst A-Level and BTEC National Students at Epping Forest College

https://www.academia.edu/13451288/Working_for_Leisure_Part-time_and_Temporary_Working_Amongst_A-Level_and_BTEC_National_Students_at_Epping_Forest_College

 

Nietzsche, Marx and Mastery: The Learning Unto Death

https://www.academia.edu/13122031/Nietzsche_Marx_and_Mastery_The_Learning_Unto_Death

 

GNVQ

https://www.academia.edu/13451785/GNVQ

 

Our World, Our Schools: Not for Sale

https://www.academia.edu/13087860/Our_World_Our_Schools_Not_for_Sale

 

Schools + Business Takeover + GATS = Globally Tradable Commodities 

https://www.academia.edu/12965042/Schools_Business_Takeover_GATS_Globally_Tradable_Commodities

 

Wolf on Marx Without Sparks

https://www.academia.edu/12965872/Wolf_on_Marx_without_Sparks

 

The Capitalisation of Schools: Federations and Academies

https://www.academia.edu/13328500/The_Capitalisation_of_Schools_Federations_and_Academies

 

Rethinking Education and Democracy: A socialist alternative for the 21st century

https://www.academia.edu/12798178/Rethinking_Education_and_Democracy_A_socialist_alternative_for_the_twenty_first_century

 

 

If you have any problems downloading these documents then just click onto the Green ‘Download’ button and it should work.

Best wishes

Glenn Rikowski

London, 1st July 2015

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Social Movements

Social Movements

OCCUPATION CULTURE

New book on art & squatting released…
Occupation Culture: Art & Squatting in the City from Below
Alan W. Moore

Occupation Culture is the story of a journey through the world of recent political squatting in Europe, told by a veteran of the 1970s and ‘80s New York punk art scene. It is also a kind of scholar adventure story. Alan W. Moore sees with the trained eye of a cultural historian, pointing out pasts, connections and futures in the creative direct action of today’s social movements.

Occupation Culture is based on five years of travel and engaged research. It explicates the aims, ideals and gritty realities of squatting. Despite its stature as a leading social movement of the late twentieth century, squatting has only recently received scholarly attention. The rich histories of creative work that this movement enabled are almost entirely unknown.

PDF available freely online: http://www.minorcompositions.info/?p=684

“Reporting on close to forty years of exploits Alan W. Moore’s Occupation Culture is no academic treatise but a Picaresque adventure story filled with both detailed observations and broader reflections on the political and cultural significance of art and squatting that stretches across the Atlantic from the United States to Europe.” – Gregory Sholette, author of Dark Matter: Art and Politics in the Age of Enterprise Culture

“Occupy wasn’t just a movement, it is a long-standing strategy and, frankly, a form of living. Alan W. Moore has seen firsthand more squats and occupations than anyone, and he brings his sensibility to bear on this global phenomena. A must read for occupiers, whether artist, activist or renter.” – Nato Thompson, curator at Creative Time, editor of Living as Form: Socially Engaged Art from 1991-2011

Bio: Alan W. Moore worked with the artists’ groups Colab and helped start the cultural center ABC No Rio in New York City. He has published on artists’ groups, cultural districts and cultural economies, and is the author of Art Gangs: Protest and Counterculture in New York City (2011). He lives in Madrid.

Released by Minor Compositions, Wivenhoe / Brooklyn / Port Watson
Minor Compositions is a series of interventions & provocations drawing from autonomous politics, avant-garde aesthetics, and the revolutions of everyday life.

Minor Compositions is an imprint of Autonomedia
www.minorcompositions.info | minorcompositions@gmail.com

 

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Fuzziology

Fuzziology

FUZZIOLOGY

The 2nd Conference on Operations Research and Fuzziology (ORF 2016)

January 14-16, 2016   Bangkok, Thailand

The 2nd Conference on Operations Research and Fuzziology (ORF 2016) will be held from January 14 to 16, 2016 in Bangkok, Thailand. This Conference will cover issues on Operations Research and Fuzziology. It dedicates to creating a stage for exchanging the latest research results and sharing the advanced research methods.

Topics (not limited to):

  • Linear and Non-linear Programming
  • Integer Programming
  • Combinatorial and Discrete Optimization
  • Stochastic Models and Optimization Scheduling
  • Fuzzy logic techniques & Algorithm Fuzzy mathematics
  • Fuzzy analysis, Fuzzy topology and geometry
  • Fuzzy mathematical programming
  • Fuzzy numerical methods, Fuzzy scientific computing

We cordially invite you to submit or recommend papers to our conference through paper submission system. To be considered for an oral presentation, you may simply submit an abstract.

Important Dates

Conference: January 14-16, 2016

Paper or Abstract Submission Due: September 17, 2015

Early Bird Registration due for Abstract: 10 days after acceptance notification

Early Bird Registration due for Audience: October 14, 2015

Call for Speakers and TPC Members

If you wish to serve the conference as an invited speaker or a TPC member, please send email to us with your CV and photo.

*Benefits of Invited Speakers

  • Your latest research results will be shared and acknowledged by scholars around the world
  • The title and abstract of your speech will be posted on the conference website and program booklets.
  • The title and abstract of your speech will be published in the journal.
  • You can enjoy a free registration.

*Benefits of TPC Members

Your CV will be posted on the conference website

You can enjoy a 50% discount on the regular registration.

It will be highly appreciated if you can accept the invitation and we believe your participation will be very essential to the success of our conference.

Contact Us

E-mail: math.jan@engii.org

Tel: +86 132 6470 2250

QQ: 3025797047

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David Mabb

David Mabb

DAVID MABB

At the William Morris Gallery
Lloyd Park, Forest Road
Walthamstow, London, E17 4PP
020 8496 4390
London, United Kingdom
27 June to 27 September 2015

Open Wednesday to Sunday, 10am – 5pm; free

William Morris and Russian artist El Lissitzky both wanted to change people’s lives through their art. Whilst Morris saw beauty in the past, Lissitzky sought a new visual language for the future.

In his latest work, British artist David Mabb celebrates the utopian ideas of these two men through their seminal book designs: Morris’s Kelmscott Chaucer and Lissitzky’s For the Voice, a revolutionary book of poems by Vladimir Mayakovsky considered one of the finest achievements in Russian avant-garde bookmaking.

Comprising 30 canvasses, Announcer takes over the gallery space, interweaving and contrasting the two designs so that Morris and Lissitzky’s graphic s are never able to fully merge or separate.

William Morris Gallery: http://www.wmgallery.org.uk/

WMimages

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The Usual Suspects

The Usual Suspects

RADICAL HISTORIES / HISTORIES OF RADICALISM

CALL FOR PAPERS

RADICAL HISTORIES/HISTORIES OF RADICALISM

A MAJOR CONFERENCE AND PUBLIC HISTORY FESTIVAL

1-3 July 2016, Queen Mary University of London

This international event commemorates twenty years since the death of the leftwing social historian Raphael Samuel and forty years since the founding of History Workshop Journal. The event will explore radical approaches to the past and histories of radical ideas and action through lectures, panels, performances, screenings, workshops and exhibitions.

The event is hosted by Queen Mary University of London and organised by the Raphael Samuel History Centre (www.raphael-samuel.org.uk). It is intended to engage a diverse audience, and to bring together practitioners of many varieties of historical research, curatorship, writing and performance, from both inside and outside the academy. Other venues and partners for the event include Bishopsgate Institute, the London Metropolitan Archives and Tower Hamlets Local Studies Library.

The event will open on the evening of Friday 1st July with a plenary session ‘Radical history then and now’ involving radical historians, historians of radical movements and movement activists, past and present. It will close with a panel discussion on ‘Raphael Samuel and his Legacies’. In between these plenary sessions, there will be papers, film screenings, workshops, meetings and performances, all exploring a wide range of themes and ideas in radical history.

We have grouped these themes as follows:

  1. Radical movements:
    History of radical movements and organisations; parties; left-wing activism; working-class radicalisms; national liberation struggles; popular mobilisations, past and present.
  2. Diversity, difference and beyond:
    Histories of feminism, gender and sexuality; histories and activism of race and ethnicity; disability politics.
  3. Local and global histories:
    Radical London; migration/movement of peoples; empire/post-colonial histories; globalisation; internationalism in a global age.
  4. Culture, art and environment:
    Heritage and public history; radical arts; environmental activism; housing politics.
  5. History, policy, and the idea of politics:
    Europe; government; elites; the move to the right; austerity; neo-liberalism; the politics of the academy

How to contribute:
Contributions that reflect on any of these themes in relation to any period of history are invited from academic and non-academic historians, and from those working or practising in the arts, education, heritage and culture, as well as activists campaigning in any of these areas.

The themes are indicative only, and we will consider proposals that fall outside them so long as these relate to the overall conference theme. We welcome offers of traditional academic papers but would particularly like to encourage proposals for other session formats likely to engage a varied audience, for example panel discussions, interactive hands-on workshops (for example, around primary source materials), photo-essays, exhibitions and performances. Contributions that focus on any period of history are welcome, as are contributions that offer reflections on methodologies (whether of the historian or the activist).

Please send a 250 – 500 word proposal, including a description of the format and content of the proposed paper, session, workshop, meeting, screenings, or performance. Include an abstract if appropriate, and the names of any other speakers or participants. AT THE TOP OF YOUR PROPOSAL PLEASE INDICATE THE CONFERENCE STRAND (A –E above) TO WHICH YOU THINK YOUR PROPOSAL RELATES MOST CLOSELY.

Please submit your proposal to Katy Pettit, Raphael Samuel History Centre administrator (k.pettit@uel.ac.uk) by Monday September 14th. Proposers will be notified by November 30th.

***

About the Raphael Samuel History Centre (RSHC)
Originally founded by the historian Raphael Samuel at the University of East London in 1996 as the Centre for East London History, and renamed after him in 2008, the Raphael Samuel History Centre has since expanded into a partnership between UEL, Birkbeck College University of London, Queen Mary University of London and Bishopsgate Institute in the City of London.

An extensive range of events, projects and research activities operates under our umbrella as we seek to stimulate debate about the continuing force of the past in the present. Our dynamic and engaged approach to history goes beyond the limits of the academy to include people of all ages and backgrounds.

The Centre is recognised nationally and internationally as the hub for intelligent debate that links history to present-day concerns and crosses boundaries between academic and public/popular history. We aim to put history in conversation both with other disciplines, and with contemporary activism and politics. In the spirit of Raphael Samuel and more broadly of the History Workshop movement, we are committed to a democratic, non-elitist and inclusive approach to history. We aim to support, nurture and encourage both new-career academic historians and those working in history outside academia. We provide a forum for debate about the place of history in public life, in schools, heritage organizations and the media. We enter into partnership with other organizations – large and small – in order to stimulate interest in and discussion of history.

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-radical-histories-histories-of-radicalism

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pid_25513THE EMOTIONAL LOGIC OF CAPITALISM

New Book:  The Emotional Logic of Capitalism: What Progressives Have Missed.

Please find a brief description below, and you can find more information on the publisher’s page: http://www.sup.org/books/title/?id=25513 .

The book is available in an affordable paperback version, and the flyer offers an additional 20% discount (by ordering directly from Stanford University Press with the code LOGIC).

Those not located in the US can get a 20% discount by ordering from http://www.combinedacademic.co.uk/the-emotional-logic-of-capitalism , using the code CSL515EMOT.

 

The Emotional Logic of Capitalism: What Progressives Have Missed

MARTIJN KONINGS

The capitalist market, progressives bemoan, is a cold monster: it disrupts social bonds, erodes emotional attachments, and imposes an abstract utilitarian rationality. But what if such hallowed critiques are completely misleading? This book argues that the production of new sources of faith and enchantment is crucial to the dynamics of the capitalist economy. Distinctively secular patterns of attraction and attachment give modern institutions a binding force that was not available to more traditional forms of rule. Elaborating his alternative approach through an engagement with the semiotics of money and the genealogy of economy, Martijn Konings uncovers capitalism’s emotional and theological content in order to understand the paradoxical sources of cohesion and legitimacy that it commands. In developing this perspective, he draws on pragmatist thought to rework and revitalize the Marxist critique of capitalism.

“This extraordinarily incisive and provocative book goes a long way toward explaining the tenacious grip of money on the American moral imagination.” —Eugene McCarraher, Villanova University

“A unique and original rethinking of the conceptual and affective armature of economy, both in its emergence as a distinct domain of social life and object of analysis over the past century and in its new salience under the sign of neoliberalism.” —Randy Martin, New York University

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-book-the-emotional-logic-of-capitalism

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Annihilate Creativity!

Annihilate Creativity!

COSMONAUTS OF THE FUTURE

A first ever English-language anthology of the Scandinavian Situationists
Cosmonauts of the Future: Texts from the Situationist Movement in Scandinavia and Elsewhere
Edited by Mikkel Bolt Rasmussen & Jakob Jakobsen

This is the first ever English-language anthology collecting texts and documents from the still little-known Scandinavian part of the Situationist movement. The book covers over three decades of writing, from Asger Jorn’s Luck and Chance published in 1953, to the statements of the Situationist Antinational set up by Jens Jørgen Thorsen and J.V. Martin in 1974. The writings collected gravitate around the year 1962 when the Situationist movement went through it’s most dynamic and critical moments, and the disagreements about the relationship between art and politics came to a culmination, resulting in exclusions and the split of the Situationist International.

The Situationists did not win, and the almost forgotten Scandinavian fract ions even less so. The book broadens the understanding of the Situationist movement by bringing into view the wild and unruly activities of the Scandinavian fractions of the organisation and the more artistic, experimental, and actionist attitude that characterised them. They did, nevertheless, constitute a decisive break with the ruling socio-economic order through their project of bringing into being new forms of life. Only an analysis of the multifaceted and often contradictory Situationist revolution will allow us to break away from the dull contemplation of yet another document of Debord’s archive or yet another drawing by Jorn. There is a lot to be learned from the history of revolutionary failure. It is along these lines that this book points forward beyond the crisis-ridden capitalist order that survives today.

Texts by: Asger Jorn, Jørgen Nash, Jens Jørgen Thorsen, Bauhaus Situationniste, Jacqueline de Jong, Gordon Fazakerley, Gruppe SPUR, Dieter Ku nzelman, J.V. Martin, and Guy Debord.
Translated by: Peter Shield, James Manley, Anja Buchele, Matthew Hyland, Fabian Tompsett, and Jakob Jakobsen.

Bio: Mikkel Bolt Rasmussen is an art historian and political theorist. He is associate professor at the University of Copenhagen and has published books and articles on the revolutionary tradition and modern art. Jakob Jakobsen is an artist and political organizer. He ran the Copenhagen Free University, cofounded the artist run TV station tvtv and has participated in exhibitions all over the world.

PDF available freely online: http://www.minorcompositions.info/?p=666

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cosmonauts-of-the-future-book-on-scandinavian-situationists-releases

2001

2001

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CLR James

CLR James

RADICAL THINKERS: SET 10

OUT NOW: RADICAL THINKERS: SET 10

The tenth set in the series features four books on the history and development of psychoanalysis and psychiatry.

 

THE DIALECTICS OF LIBERATION edited by DAVID COOPER

http://www.versobooks.com/books/1933-the-dialectics-of-liberation

 

FREUD: THEORY OF THE UNCONCIOUS by OCTAVE MANNONI

http://www.versobooks.com/books/1937-freud

 

READ MY DESIRE: LACAN AGAINST THE HISTORICISTS by JOAN COPJEC

http://www.versobooks.com/books/1939-read-my-desire

 

THE WEARY SONS OF FREUD by CATHERINE CLEMENT

http://www.versobooks.com/books/1935-the-weary-sons-of-freud

 

————

LONDON EVENT

DIALECTICS OF LIBERATION

A contemporary revisiting of the now legendary 1967 Congress, with guest speakers including Selma James and Lynne Segal

15th July, 7pm, Roundhouse, Chalk Farm Road, NW1 8EH

The Dialectics of Liberation Congress was held at the Roundhouse in July 1967. The now legendary meeting of minds was a unique expression of the politics of modern dissent. Existential psychiatrists, Marxist intellectuals, anarchists and political leaders met to discuss the key social issues of the next decade.

Against the backdrop of rising student frustrations, racism, class inequality, and environmental degradation, this conference aimed to create genuine revolutionary momentum by fusing ideology and action on the levels of the individual and of mass society.

Taking ‘the demystification of violence’ in all its expressions, and bridging theory and practice, speakers included Herbert Marcuse and Lucien Goldmann to represent the theoretical pole, and Stokely Carmichael on Black Power as an activist, and Carol Schneeman, Allen Ginsberg and R.D. Laing in between.

Verso Books presents an event revisiting some of the issues discussed in light of the sweeping political, economic and technological changes that the world has seen since, on the 48th anniversary of the congress and the publication of a new edition of The Dialectics of Liberation, compiling interventions from contributors as part of Verso’s Radical Thinkers series.

Join Selma James, Lynne Segal, Nina Power, Ewa Jasiewicz, Benjamin Noys and Mark Fisher to discuss the legacy of the meeting and contemporary social issues surrounding the forms of struggle, feminism and anti-racism, sexuality, mental health, education, the environment and climate change and activism.

Tickets are £5 (with £1.95 fee per transaction) and available from the Roundhouse website – https://tickets.roundhouse.org.uk/booking/production/bestavailable/17555?performance=

————

THE DIALECTICS OF LIBERATION edited by DAVID COOPER

http://www.versobooks.com/books/1933-the-dialectics-of-liberation

A revolutionary compilation of speeches which produced a political groundwork for many of the radical movements in the following decades, featuring Stokely Carmichael, Herbert Marcuse, R. D. Laing, Paul Sweezy, and others.

DAVID COOPER (1931-1986) was a South African–born theorist and existential psychiatrist.

FREUD: THEORY OF THE UNCONCIOUS by OCTAVE MANNONI

http://www.versobooks.com/books/1937-freud

A clearly written and highly organized introduction of the work of one of the twentieth century’s greatest thinkers.

OCTAVIO MANNONI (1898-1989) was a leading thinker in the French psychoanalytical tradition inspired by Jacques Lacan.  After travelling to Africa and residing for more than twenty years in Madagascar, where he held various positions while working as an ethnologist, Mannoni returned to France to develop his influential work on colonization.

READ MY DESIRE: LACAN AGAINST THE HISTORICISTS by JOAN COPJEC

http://www.versobooks.com/books/1939-read-my-desire

Pits the psychoanalytic theory of Jacques Lacan against the historicist approach of Michel Foucault to develop a profound critique of historicism.

JOAN COPJEC is a Professor of Modern Culture and Media at Brown University.  She has written or edited eleven books, including ‘Supposing the Subject’ and ‘Radical Evil’

THE WEARY SONS OF FREUD by CATHERINE CLEMENT

http://www.versobooks.com/books/1935-the-weary-sons-of-freud

A Communist, feminist, and analysand asks what the social function of psychoanalysis should be and condemns what it has become.

CATHERINE CLEMENT is a prominent French philosopher, novelist, feminist, and literary critic. After studying at the Ecole normale superieure under Claude Levi-Strauss and Jacques Lacan, she became a leading member of the school of French feminism and ecriture feminine.

————

Verso, originally founded in 1970 to publish continental theory in translation for the first time, brought the work of radical thinkers such as Jacques Lacan and Jean-Paul Sartre to a wider English-speaking audience. The Radical Thinkers series continues to bring philosophy to new audiences as part of Verso’s broader intellectual and political project. The series of beautifully designed and affordable editions of classic works of theory now exceeds 100 published titles and counts over 300,000 copies sold.  This tenth set in the series features four books on the history and development of psychoanalysis and psychiatry.

“A golden treasury of theory.”—Eric Banks, Bookforum

“Verso’s beautifully designed Radical Thinkers series, which brings together seminal works by leading left-wing intellectuals, is a sophisticated blend of theory and thought.”—Ziauddin Sardar, New Statesman

————

All books are PAPERBACK, priced £9.99/$16.95/$19.95CAN

————

Visit Verso’s website for information on our upcoming events, new reviews and publications and special offers: http://www.versobooks.com

Sign up for the Verso mailing list:

https://www.versobooks.com/users/sign_up

Follow us online:

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/VersoBks

Twitter: http://twitter.com/VersoBooks

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/out-now-radical-thinkers-set-10-four-books-on-the-history-and-development-of-psychoanalysis-and-psychiatry

 

***END***

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

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THINGPROTEST AND ACTIVISM WITH(OUT) ORGANISATION

SPECIAL ISSUE CALL FOR PAPERS

The Journal for International Sociology and Social Policy

Guest Editors:

Richard J White – Sheffield Hallam University, UK

Patricia Wood – York University, Canada

The economic, political, social, cultural and environmental crises of our time continue to provoke and inspire a remarkable range of social movements into existence. These multiple forms of protest and activism express and embody a politics of hope – captured both in alternative narratives that envisage new post-crisis possibilities, and through the physicality of collective and popular resistance. In this context, the Special Issue of The International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy is particularly intend on interrogating the socio-spatial forms of ‘organisation’ that underpin protest and activism. When taking a closer look at the organisational nature across these activist landscapes for example, it becomes apparent that resistance led through membership-based, co-ordinated hierarchical organisations (e.g. Trade Unions, NGOs) still retains an important visibility and influence in agitating for change. However, in addition perhaps, and in some meaningful way beyond, these more traditional forms of organised resistance, there exists important diverse and spontaneous forms of everyday activism, one, perhaps, consistent with a more horizontal and anarchistic praxis of self-organisation.

Questioning the relationship between activism with – and without – organisation throws up some interesting and important inter-disciplinary questions. At the most fundamental level it gives us cause to interrogate the very idea of activism: where does activism begin and end? Who gets to be an activist? Seeking to engage a more nuanced understanding of the differences between organized and unorganized forms of activism, provokes the question of how informal experiences of activism, encourage engagement with more organised forms of activism (and vice versa). Is the relationship between the two antagonistic, competitive or complementary to each other? How are organisational forms of activism dictated to by specific social and spatial temporalities, particularly at a time of crisis? Indeed in these (post)modern times is it meaningful to frame the organisation of activism within a binary relationship (either formal or informal)? Rather should we be encouraged to consider them on an organisational spectrum of difference (more formal, less formal and so on)? If desirable, how can a more informed complex understanding of the organisational natures of activism allow us to better recognise, value, strengthen and link up different types of patterns of activism and resistance?

To these ends we welcome papers of up to 8000 words addressing empirical or theoretical aspects focused on organisation of activism and protest, past and present, situated in any part of the world and at any scale.

Timeline

Please send 250-300 word abstracts directly to the Guest Editors, Richard White (richard.white@shu.ac.uk)  and Tricia Wood (pwood@yorku.ca ) by 15 August 2015.

We aim to let authors know as to whether their papers have been accepted for inclusion in the Special Issue within two weeks of this deadline.

Completed papers – between 5,000 to 8,000 words – must be submitted on-line to the IJSSP journal by 01 December 2015.

More information about The Journal for International Sociology and Social Policy can be found here: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=ijssp .

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images (5)DICTIONARY OF UNTRANSLATABLES

Book Launch

Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon, edited by Barbara Cassin, Princeton University press, Princeton and Oxford 2014.

Goldsmiths College, University of London

26th June 2015, 5pm

French philosopher and philologist Barbara Cassin visits Goldsmiths on 26 June to launch both her new book and our latest multi-disciplinary research centre, the Centre for Philosophy and Critical Thought (CPCT).

At the evening event organised by Dr Alberto Toscano (Co-Director, CPCT) and Filippo Del Lucchese (Brunel University), Barbara will be joined by Étienne Balibar (Kingston), Lucie Campos (Institut Français) and Jacques Lezra (NYU) for a panel discussion on Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon – an encyclopedic dictionary of 400 important philosophical, literary, and political terms and concepts that defy easy, or any, translation from one language and culture to another.

The Centre for Philosophy and Critical Thought was established in May 2015, based in Sociology, and run jointly with the Centre for Cultural Studies. Its Co-Directors are Alberto Toscano (Sociology) and Julia Ng (CCS). CPCT has anacademic membership and advisory board drawn from various departments across the college, and an international roster of external affiliates.

A home for philosophical inquiry and rigorous intellectual dialogue at Goldsmiths, the Centre’s work draws on those traditions which view the practices of critique and criticism as central to the definition of philosophy, and which consider reflection on philosophy’s complex relationships with other disciplines and forms of thought as constitutive of philosophical activity itself.

CPCT will provide teaching and learning support for the Philosophy modules on the new Politics, Philosophy & Economics (PPE) degree, based in Politics.

All are welcome to attend the launch event on 26 June (5pm-8pm, RHB 137a) – booking is not required.

For more information, visit www.gold.ac.uk/sociology/research-centres/cpct.

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/book-launch-dictionary-of-untranslatables-a-philosophical-lexicon-edited-by-barbara-cassin-princeton-university-press-princeton-and-oxford-2014

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Work

Work

WORK AND PEER PRODUCTION

CALL FOR PAPERS

Journal of Peer Production

Work and Peer Production
Editors: Phoebe Moore (Middlesex University London), Mathieu O’Neil (University of Canberra), Stefano Zacchiroli (University Paris Diderot)

The rise in the usage and delivery capacity of the Internet in the 1990s has led to the development of massively distributed online projects where self-governing volunteers collaboratively produce public goods. Notable examples include Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) projects such as Debian and GNOME, as well as the Wikipedia encyclopedia. These distributed practices have been characterised as peer production, crowdsourcing, mass customization, social production, co-configurative work, playbour, user-generated content, wikinomics, open innovation, participatory culture, produsage, and the wisdom of the crowd, amongst other terms. In peer production, labour is communal and outputs are orientated towards the further e xpansion of the commons, an ecology of production that aims to defy and resist the hierarchies and rules of ownership that drive productive models within capitalism (Moore, 2011); while the commons, recursively, are the chief resource in this mode of production (Söderberg & O’Neil, 2014).

Peer projects are ‘ethical’ as participation is primarily motivated by self-fulfillment and validated by a community of peers, rather than by earning wages. Their governance is ‘modular’, understood in a design sense (decomposable blocks sharing a common interface), but also in political-economy terms: participants oppose restricted ownership and control by individually socializing their works into commons. Conflicting interpretations of their societal impact have been articulated (O’Neil, 2015). Skeptics view the abjuration of exclusive property rights over the goods they produce as irrelevant, and ethical-modular projects as increasing w orker exploitation: participants’ passionate labour occurs at the expense of less fortunate others, who do not have the disposable income, cultural capital, or family support to engage in unpaid labour (Moore & Taylor, 2009; Huws, 2013). In contrast, reformists, often hailing from a management perspective, suggest that the co-optation of communal labour by firms will improve business practices and society (Arvidsson, 2008; Demil et al., 2015). Finally activists celebrate the abjuration of exclusive property rights, and present ethical-modular projects as key actors in a historical process leading to the supersession of capitalism and hierarchy (Kostakis & Bauwens, 2014).

This last perspective raises a central challenge, which is the avoidance of purely utopian thinking. In other words, how can commons-based peer production reach deeply into daily life? How can ‘already existing non-capitalist economic processes’ be strengthened, ‘new no n-capitalist enterprises’ be built, and ‘communal subjects’ be established (Gibson-Graham, 2003: 157)? An increasingly large free public goods and services sector could well cohabit in a plural economy with employment in cooperatives, paid independent work, and the wage-earning of the commercial sector. However analysis of peer production typically eschews mundane considerations such as living wages, benefits, job security, working conditions, work-induced medical conditions, and debates on labour organization. How can peer production operate as a sustainable practice enabling people to live, if labour and work issues are not formally addressed?

To advance this agenda, the tenth issue of the Journal of Peer Production, titled Peer Production and Work, calls for papers in two linked areas:

*Peer production in a paid work society*
Nowadays firms attempt to monetize crowdsourced labour. The paradigmatic example is Amazon’s Mechanical Turk labourers (popularly known as ‘Turkers’, ‘cloud workers’ or ‘click workers’) who accomplish micro-tasks such as tagging and labeling images, transcribing audio or video recordings, and categorizing products. This extreme modularization of work results in their status being that of independent contractors rather than employees with rights, necessitating novel means of protection and redress (Irani & Silberman, 2013). The so-called ‘sharing economy’ also uses peer production methods, such as the self-selection of modular and granular tasks, to extract ever-more value from the labour of volunteer ‘prosumers’ (Frayssé & O’Neil, 2015). Capitalist firms are also increasingly engaging with ethical-modular organizations, in some cases paying wages to participants. Such labour is thus both ‘alienated’, or sold, and ‘communal’, as workers freely cooperate to produce commons. Do traditional categories such as exploitation and alienation still apply?
Topics may include, but are not limited to:

* Peer production and the global political economy
* Peer production and the rise of precarious work
* Peer workers and possibilities for worker organisation
* Does the autonomy of peer workers cause conflict in firms, and how is it resolved?
* What strategies do firms adopt to co-opt peer production (e.g., ‘hackhathons’)?
* Do tensions around property rights emerge?
* Subjectivity in peer production
* Peer production and intellectual property, coded work

*Paid work in peer production projects*
How does paid labour affect ethical P2P projects? Mansell and Berdou (2010) argue that firms supporting the work of programmers who contribute to volunteer projects, to the commons, will not affect the ‘cooperative spirit’ of projects; nor can this support prevent the results of labour from being socialized into commons. Is this always the case?
Topics may include, but are not limited to:
* How do peer projects deal with the presence of paid or waged labour?
* Is this topic discussed within peer production projects? In what way?
* What benefits do paid or waged workers enjoy in peer projects?
* How does paid labour affect peer production projects?

*Timeline*
300-500 word abstract due: 30 July 2015
Notification to authors: 30 August 2015
Submission of full paper: 31 December 2015
Reviews to authors: 15 February 2016
Revised papers: 30 April 2016
Signals due: 30 May 2016
Issue release: June/⁠July 2016

*Submission guidelines*
Submission abstracts of 300-500 words are due by July 30, 2015 and should be sent to work@peerproduction.net

All peer reviewed papers will be reviewed according to Journal of Peer Production guidelines. See http://peerproduction.net/peer-review/process/
Full papers and materials are due by December 31, 2015 for r eview.
Peer reviewed papers should be around 8,000 words; personal testimonies or ‘tales of toil’ in the Processed World tradition should be up to 4,000 words.

*References*
Arvidsson, A. (2008). The ethical economy of consumer coproduction. Journal of Macromarketing, 8, 326-338.

Demil, B., Lecoq. X. & Warnier, E. (2015). The capabilities of bazaar governance: Investigating the advantage of business models based on open communities. Journal of Organizational Change Management, in press.

Frayssé, O. & O’Neil, M. (2015) Digital labour and prosumer capitalism: The US matrix. Basingstoke: Palgrave, in press.

Gibson-Graham, J.K. (2003). Enabling ethical economies: Cooperativism and class. Critical Sociology, 29, 123-164.

Huws, U. (2013). The underpinnings of class in the digital age: Living, labour and value. Socialist Register, 50, 80-107.

Irani, L. & Silberman, M. (2013). Turkopticon: Interrupting worker invisibility in Amazon Mechanical Turk. Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems.

Kostakis, V. & Bauwens, M. (2014) Network society and future scenarios for a collaborative economy. Basingstoke: Palgrave.

Mansell, R. & Berdou, E. (2010). Political economy, the internet and FL/OSS development. In Hunsinger, J., Allen, M. & Klastrup, L. (Eds.) International handbook of Internet research (pp. 341-362). Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Springer.

Moore, P. (2011). Subjectivity in the ecologies of P2P Production. The Journal of Fibreculture FCJ-119. Online.

Moore, P. & Taylor, P. A. (2009). Exploitation of the self in community-based software production: Workers’ freedoms or firm foundations? Capital & Class, 99-117.

O’Neil, M. (2015). Labour out of control: The political economy of capitalist and ethical organizations. Organization Studies, 1-21.

Söderberg, J. & O’Neil, M. (2014). ‘Introduction’. Book of Peer Production (pp. 2-3). Göteborg: NSU Press.

****

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-journal-of-peer-production-work-and-peer-production

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

KRISIS

KRISIS

CRISIS TO INSURRECTION: NOTES ON THE ONGOING COLLAPSE

A new book from Mikkel Bolt Rasmussen on ongoing crises and insurrections…
Crisis to Insurrection: Notes on the ongoing collapse
Mikkel Bolt Rasmussen
The crisis runs deep. The economies of the US and Europe are in profound crisis and the developing economies are also beginning to feel its effects. Everywhere it is workers who are paying the price. The crisis is being socialized and austerity is the order of the day; the crisis is used as a pretext for further savings and cuts. In other words, capital has intensified the class war. But the proletariat has started moving. The revolts in North Africa and the Middle East have challenged the neoliberal world order and its division of the world, and the ‘movement of the squares’ in Southern Europe and Occupy in the US have picked up the baton and joined the new protest cycle. Even though dictators have been toppled in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya, the protests continue. This is also the case in Greece, Spain and Portugal where people reject the austerity programs. There are protests in Bulgaria and Bosnia. In Syria the civil war is raging. In China the number of strikes continue to rise. In Turkey the youth reject Erdogan’s neoliberal ‘success’ and urban restructuring and in Brazil ‘the dangerous classes’ have taken to the streets. There are a variety of protests going on – the ones in the West are defensive, the ones in the rest of the world offensive and reformist – but together they are knocking a hole in the neoliberal world order. The old mole is back.

Bio: Mikkel Bolt Rasmussen is Associate Professor at the Department of Arts and Cultural Studies, University of Copenhagen.
PDF available freely online: http://www.minorcompositions.info/?p=678
Released by Minor Compositions, Wivenhoe / Brooklyn / Port Watson
Minor Compositions is a series of interventions & provocations drawing from autonomous politics, avant-garde aesthetics, and the revolutions of everyday life.
Minor Compositions is an imprint of Autonomedia
www.minorcompositions.info | minorcompositions@gmail.com

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

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