Skip navigation

Critique of Political Economy

MARX & PHILOSOPHY SOCIETY ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2017

Marx and the Concept of Labour
24th June 2017
Room 822, University College London Institute of Education, 20 Bedford Way, London WC1H 0AL
Conference poster (pdf)
Conference abstracts

 

Main speakers:
Mike Neary (Lincoln)
Critical theory as a critique of labour, featuring academic work; or, how do revolutionary teachers teach?
Sara Farris (Goldsmiths)
A Marxist-feminist approach to the theory of the reserve army of labour

Anselm Jappe (Sassari)
Marx and the ‘two-fold nature’ of labour: the ‘pivot’ of his critique of capitalism

Graduate panel:
Alastair Hemmens (Cardiff)
Labour, a ‘rational abstraction’? Robert Kurz’s substance of capital and resolving the labour aporia in Marx
Sean Winkler (Leuven)
The Hessen-Grossmann-Lukács Thesis: A Marxist Study of the emotions in early modern philosophy’
Michael Lazurus (Monash)
The standpoint of labour and Marx’s method

Directions: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/maps/ioe
Admission is free but please reserve a place in advance by emailing Eric John Russell at johndavid.correspondence@gmail.com

 

Marx & Philosophy Society: http://marxandphilosophy.org.uk/society

 

***END***

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Marx’s Grave

BOOKS LAUNCH – TWO NEW BOOKS BY PROFESSOR MIKE COLE

 

Critical Race Theory and Education: a Marxist Response (Revised 2nd Edition)

And

New Developments in Critical Race Theory and Education: Revisiting Racialized Capitalism and Socialism in Austerity

Both books are published by Palgrave Macmillan: Marxism and Education Serieshttps://www.palgrave.com/br/series/14811

Professor Mike Cole (ICPuP)

Cass School of Education and Communities

University of East London

Stratford Campus, UEL, ED.2.02

25 May 2017

17:00-19:00

With an introduction from Professor John Preston (University of East London)

The books address the nature of Critical Race Theory, including its origins, its varieties and its major strength. This is accompanied by a Marxist critique. Particular attention is paid to two of CRT’s major tenets, its prioritising of “race” over class and its use of “white supremacy”. Also discussed is the perceived decline of “BritiCrit.” Racialized neoliberal capitalism in the era of austerity and immiseration is also addressed as are CRT and Marxist visions of the future. With respect to educational practice, there is a consideration of multicultural and antiracist education in the UK and the US, and of CRT and Marxist suggestions for classroom practice. Moving to the global perspective, it is argued that the world has become polarised and that while discussion of democratic socialism has become more mainstream, fascistic rhetoric and narratives and neo-fascism are becoming normalised. Anything, it is concluded, is now possible.

The launch will be followed by a beer and wine reception

RVSP: Diane Sharrier @ D.Sharrier@uel.ac.uk

Dr Mike Cole is Professor in Education, University of East London, Emeritus Research Professor in Education and Equality, Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln and Visiting Research Fellow, Centre for Social Sciences, Zaman University, Phnom Penh, Cambodia. His other recent and forthcoming books include Racism: A Critical Analysis (Pluto Press, 2016) and the edited collection, Education, Equality and Human Rights: Issues of Gender, “Race”, Sexuality, Disability and Social Class 4th Edition (Routledge, forthcoming, 2017).

Mike Cole

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

***END***

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

 

 

 

Partenope

SIREN SONG

Saturday 20 May 2017

Performances at 5.00pm and 6.30pm

The Mulberry and Bigland Green Centre, Bigland Street, London, E1 2LG

 

This short performance is the culmination of an ENO Baylis Community Project inspired by ENO’s production of Handel’s Partenope 

The project brings together adult women of all ages from across London, and takes the central female characters in the opera as a starting point from which to explore contemporary perspectives on being a woman. The performance will combine original text and music created by the group alongside extracts from Partenope.

The group will be joined by ENO principal cast member Patricia Bardon and female members of the ENO Baylis Opera Works programme, with lighting design by ENO lighting technician Christina Smith.

This is a free event and places are limited.

To confirm your place please RSVP baylis@eno.org by Thursday 18th April, stating your preferred performance time and the name of up to two guests.

We hope to see you there.

From the team at ENO Baylis.

 

ENO Baylis 

Learning and Participation Team

+44 (0)20 7632 8484 | Baylis@eno.org
ENGLISH NATIONAL OPERA | St Martin’s Lane, London, WC2N 4ES

 

Click to support English National Opera online today

 

ENO Partenope: https://www.eno.org/operas/partenope-3/ and https://www.eno.org/whats-on/partenope/

 

***END***

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

EDUCATION FROM BREXIT TO TRUMP … CORBYN AND BEYOND?

Marxism and Education: Renewing Dialogues (MERD – 19) Seminar

This coming Wednesday 3rd May 2017

10am-4pm

University of East London

Stratford Campus

Cass School of Education

Room ED4.02

At this 19th MERD seminar on Wednesday, we will review the emergent contemporary crises of capitalism. In this context, we will focus on education and educating across the social spectrum of institutional and wider social formation to progress class struggle, critique and action. Our four speakers have provided the following blurbs about their presentations:

 

Tony Green (UCL Institute of Education)

Educating the Educators and the Emergent Secular Crises of Contemporary Capitalism: From Brexit to Trump and Corbyn … to Snap Election … and Beyond?

The introduction aims to draw attention to a collection of issues and themes likely to occupy us during the day.  The broad and open-ended agenda is intended to be suggestive of potentially ‘educative’ contexts about how exchange values dominate use values, and where systemic shifting of value and power upwards in support of structures of global oligarchy and plutocratic elite class hegemony, is concurrent with ongoing secular crises of capitalism.   Is the apparent ever-rising tide of ‘prosperity’ contributing to human emancipation and flourishing?  We need to address the global capitalist system, and metabolism in its, tensions and contradictions, with complex and dynamic ramifications at local, regional, national and international levels.  The aim of these introductory remarks is to remind ourselves of current events and possible underlying dynamics that set analytic, strategic and tactical challenges… not least, the performative … during these ever-interesting times. Huge and urgent questions have to be addressed in specific and local contexts: Are all the cards being thrown into the air?  Are there inbuilt legitimation crises playing out across the institutional forms of politics? What are the prospects for the anthropocene? Time to act … now! What is to be done…?

 

Hillary Wainwright (Red Pepper Magazine Editor)

The importance of practical knowledge to the possibility of a new politics from the left

I’ll draw on themes associated with socialist humanist work of Gramsci, Williams and, Thompson, and against a background of recognising that evocations of the organised working class were thwarted too many times, including by leaderships that did not actually believe in the capacity of the supporters, to convince me. Radical social change is surely more than workplace organisation, radical leadership and a conventional political party of the left.  

 

Terry Wrigley (Visiting Professor at Northumbria University, editor International Journal Improving Schools, and co-coordinator of the Reclaiming Schools network)

England is an epicentre and laboratory for neoliberal education policy in advanced economies, with a unique mix of neoconservative ingredients. It has the tightest accountability framework (tests, league tables, Ofsted, performance pay etc.), extensive privatisation, a curriculum which systematically excludes critical social knowledge, and hegemonic discourses around ‘choice’, ‘standards’, ‘leadership’ and ‘social mobility’. 

For critical educators, the pressing challenges include:

  • Making critical theory and research knowledge available to a teaching profession increasingly restricted to short-term pragmatics;
  • Rethinking curriculum, assessment and pedagogy beyond binaries of ‘academic / vocational’ and ‘knowledge / practice’;
  • Protecting spaces for critical understanding and creativity; 
  • Critiquing the distortions of ‘social mobility’ and ‘closing the gap’ in socially just ways;
  • Finding educative responses to the social futures facing young people (Austerity, precarity, migration, militarism). 

 

Richard Hall (De Montfort University)

On the alienation of academic labour and the possibilities for mass intellectuality

As one response to the secular crisis of capitalism, higher education is being proletarianised. Its academics and students, encumbered by precarious employment, overwhelming debt, and new levels of performance management, are shorn of any autonomy. Increasingly the labour of those academics and students is subsumed and re-engineered for value production, and is prey to the vicissitudes of the twin processes of financialisation and marketization. At the core of understanding the impact of these processes and their relationships to higher education is the alienated labour of the academic, as it defines the sociability of the University. This paper examines the role of alienated labour in academic work, and relates this to feelings of hopelessness, in order to ask what might be done differently. The argument centres on the role of mass intellectuality, or socially-useful knowledge and knowing, as a potential moment for overcoming alienated labour.

Organised by Tony Green and Alpesh Maisuria

The seminar is free and open to all, no registration required. Please circulate widely and feel free to attend as much of the day as you possibly can.

Stratford campus is walkable from the nearest stations: Stratford (TfL line) / Stratford International, and Maryland (TfL line).

More travel information can be found here: https://www.uel.ac.uk/About/Finding-us

 

***END***

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

 

 

Philosophy

THE 4th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL PEDAGOGIES AND PHILOSOPHIES OF EDUCATION

27th – 28th July 2017
University of Winchester, UK

Conveners: Dr Alex Guilherme (PUCRS, Brazil) and Dr Emile Bojesen (Winchester, UK)
Keynote Speakers:
Professor Ruth Irwin, University of Aberdeen.
Professor Marc Depaepe, University of Leuven.
Professor Aislinn O’Donnell, University of Maynooth.
Professor John Petrovic, University of Alabama.

Building on the successes of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd International Conferences on Critical Pedagogies and Philosophies of Education, this conference will bring together international scholars in philosophy of education to consider the significance of critical pedagogy and philosophy of education to international contemporary debates across educational theory and practice.

We welcome proposals for 20 minutes papers (plus 10 minutes discussion) on any aspect of critical pedagogies and philosophies of education from any discipline, including, Philosophy, Ethics, Educational Studies, Cultural Studies, Social Theory, Theology, Sociology and History.
The deadline for receiving abstracts is 27th May 2017
Please send proposals for individual papers (250 words) and a short CV to Alexandre Guilherme
(alexandre.guilherme@pucrs.br)

Costs:
£150 conference fee without accommodation.
£270 conference fee with two nights of on-campus accommodation.

To book your place, copy the link below:
http://store.winchester.ac.uk/conferences-and-events/academic-conferences/faculty-of-education-healthsocial-care/the-4th-international-conference-on-critical-pedagogies-and-philosophies-of-education

Enquiries:
emile.bojesen@winchester.ac.uk
Poster available here – or here: https://gallery.mailchimp.com/884bd4ab8bd9964e2855c7409/files/71949ca4-3ef5-4a1b-b3fd-81d9a3d8fe59/4th_International_Conference_poster.01.pdf

 

***END***

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

bIOdownload

 

New College, Oxford

AUTOGENOUS THEORIES OF EDUCATION CRISIS

 

A paper prepared for the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB) Annual Conference, New College, Oxford, 31st March – 2nd April, 2017

Glenn Rikowski, Visiting Fellow, College of Social Science, University of Lincoln, UK

Abstract: ‘Crisis’ is a concept increasingly used in media reports on education. This paper argues that philosophers of education have a unique contribution to make regarding the nature and constitution of education crisis. Thus, they have a responsibility to take up the challenge of developing perspectives on education crises. Following examinations of the concept of crisis and The Marxist-oriented Classical Theory of Education Crisis (where education crises are derivative of economic ones), the paper forges an autogenous theory of education crisis through Robin Barrow’s (2011) précis of R.S. Peters’s concept of education. Some education crises are crises of education; not necessarily crises in education with origins elsewhere in society. For these forms of crisis, the concept of education itself should be the starting point for analysis. The paper opens up a new field of study for educational philosophers by indicating how education crises can emerge from within education institutions and settings.

 

My paper is now available at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/32222291/Autogenous_Theories_of_Education_Crisis and also at ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/315646975_Autogenous_Theories_of_Education_Crisis

 

Glenn Rikowski at ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski Framlingham Castle

Ruth Rikowski
Framlingham Castle

WHY LIBRARY IS NOT A DIRTY WORDPRESENTATION SLIDES

The presentation slides for Ruth Rikowski’s talk at The Froud Centre, Manor Park, London, on 10th June 2016 –are now available at Academia.

Why Library Is Not  A Dirty Word: Reclaiming Its Power And Possibility

Presentation slides @ http://www.academia.edu/30467128/Why_Library_is_Not_a_Dirty_Word_Reclaiming_its_Power_and_Possibility_Presentation_

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski

In addition, Glenn Rikowski also has a new post at Academia: The Woodhead Federation? The Business Takeover of Schools in England

This can be viewed at: http://www.academia.edu/31544770/The_Woodhead_Federation_The_Business_Takeover_of_Schools_in_England_Presentation_

 

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

Dr. Glenn Rikowski

Dr. Glenn Rikowski

Dr. Glenn Rikowski

Dr. Glenn Rikowski

PRESENTATIONS @ ACADEMIA

 

I have recently uploaded a number of Presentations and Presentation Notes to Academia.

These are as follows:

 

 

 

 

Crises, Commodities and Education: Disruptions, Eruptions, Interruptions and Ruptions (Presentation): https://www.academia.edu/29675223/Crises_Commodities_and_Education_Disruptions_Eruptions_Interruptions_and_Ruptions_Presentation_

Crises in Education, Crises of Education (Presentation): https://www.academia.edu/29674786/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education_Presentation_

Education and Crisis (Presentation): https://www.academia.edu/29681835/Education_and_Crisis_Presentation_

Crisis and Education (Presentation): https://www.academia.edu/29674444/Crisis_and_Education_Presentation_

The Seed: Critical Educators for Social Transformation (Presentation): https://www.academia.edu/29718073/The_Seed_Critical_Educators_for_Social_Transformation_Presentation_

Higher Education in Crises of Capital and Labour (Presentation Notes): https://www.academia.edu/29737945/Higher_Education_in_Crises_of_Capital_and_Labour_Presentation_Notes_

Value, Labour Power and Gender Inequality in the Capitalist Labour Market (Presentation): https://www.academia.edu/29675727/Value_Labour_Power_and_Gender_Inequality_in_the_Capitalist_Labour_Market_Presentation_

Rethinking Higher Education: Students As Producers Against the Culture Machine (Presentation): https://www.academia.edu/29717220/Rethinking_Higher_Education_Students_As_Producers_Against_the_Culture_Machine_Presentation_

Capitalisation by Stealth: The Business Takeover of Schools in England (Presentation): https://www.academia.edu/29673995/Capitalisation_by_Stealth_The_Business_Takeover_of_Schools_in_England_Presentation_

Ten Points on Marx, Class and Education (Presentation): https://www.academia.edu/29713518/Ten_Points_on_Marx_Class_and_Education_Presentation_

Adventures in Marxism and Education: An Autobiographical Report (Presentation): https://www.academia.edu/29696961/Adventures_in_Marxism_and_Education_An_Autobiographical_Report_Presentation_

The Business Takeover of Schools in England (Presentation): https://www.academia.edu/29696101/The_Business_Takeover_of_Schools_in_England_Presentation_

Karl Marx’s Social Time (Presentation): https://www.academia.edu/29674114/Karl_Marxs_Social_Time_Presentation_

The Evolution of Federations of Schools in England (Presentation): https://www.academia.edu/29695981/The_Evolution_of_Federations_of_Schools_in_England_Presentation_

Education Rights in Global Capitalism Today (Presentation): https://www.academia.edu/29695869/Education_Rights_in_Global_Capitalism_Today_Presentation_

Profits in Chains? The Capitalisation of Schools in England and the White Paper (Presentation): https://www.academia.edu/29694955/Profits_in_Chains_The_Capitalisation_of_Schools_in_England_and_the_White_Paper_Presentation_

Night Thoughts on the Education White Paper (Presentation): https://www.academia.edu/29694841/Night_Thoughts_on_the_Education_White_Paper_Presentation_

New Labour, the Knowledge Economy and Education (Presentation): https://www.academia.edu/29684663/New_Labour_the_Knowledge_Economy_and_Education_Presentation_

The Business Takeover of Schools: Exploring Explanations (Presentation Notes): https://www.academia.edu/29698427/The_Business_Takeover_of_Schools_Exploring_Explanations_Presentation_Notes_

 

To see the full list of Presentations and Presentation Notes, and further details, go to: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski/Presentations

 

To see all my postings to Academia, go to: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

 

To see my posting at ResearchGate, go to: http://www.researchgate.com/profile/GlennRikowski

 

 

i284008264513270570-_szw1280h1280_SOCIAL PATHOLOGIES OF CONTEMPORARY CIVILIZATION

7th CONFERENCE

CALL FOR PAPERS
Social Suffering in an Era of Resilience

October 19th & 20th 2017

Goethe-University Frankfurt, in co-operation with the Institute for Social Research
The seventh international conference on The Social Pathologies of Contemporary Civilization once again explores the nature of contemporary malaises, diseases, illnesses and syndromes in their relation to cultural pathologies of the social body. Usually these conditions are interpreted clinically in terms of individualized symptoms and framed in demographic and epidemiological profiles. They are represented and responded to discretely, as though for the most part unrelated to each other; each having their own professional discourses of etiology, diagnostics, therapeutics, as well as their task forces developing health strategy and policy recommendations and interventions. However, these diseases also have a social and cultural profile, one that transcends the particularity of their symptomology and their discrete etiologies. These pathologies are diseases related to cultural pathologies of the social body and disorders of the collective esprit de corps of contemporary society.
Multi-disciplinary in approach the conference addresses questions of how these conditions are manifest at the level of individual bodies and minds, as well as how the ‘bodies politic’ are related to the hegemony of reductive biomedical and psychologistic perspectives. Rejecting such a reductive diagnosis of contemporary problems of health and well-being, the central research hypothesis guiding the conference is that contemporary epidemics are to be analysed in the light of radical changes in our civilization and of the social hegemonization of the biomedical and psychiatric perspective. They arise from individual and collective experiences of profound and drastic social changes and cultural shifts.
More specifically – but not exclusively – this conference will focus on the social dynamics of suffering. In times where an increasing neglect of society is only asking for one’s resilience, we want to focus on the understanding how social and cultural conditions moderate the experience of suffering. Social Suffering as a concept comprises two things: first, collective suffering, for instance as a result of war or natural catastrophes; and second, individual suffering, insofar as it has primarily societal causes.

• The so called refugee crisis brings in also questions of morality: is the focus on resilience in light of collective suffering of any help? Could resonance as a concept on the other side help to a better understanding of the suffering?
• Psychic suffering and social inequality
• Due to the transformation of work and the psychosocial costs associated with these changes, as well as the increasing tendencies towards social exclusion, the issue of social suffering has entered the agenda of industrialized nations as well. The notion of social suffering highlights the fact, then, that the suffering in question is caused by structural conditions and remains embedded in them. It is suffering in society and because of it.
• Psychologization of Suffering. Is the notion of “social Pathologies” as well as the ongoing question for a diagnostic potential of the social sciences already part of an neglect of society itself and playing into the hands of psychology? What role plays therapy culture in this development?
• Common to all contributions to this field is both the interpretation of social suffering as an increasing effect of neoliberal capitalist socialization and its determination as a theoretical reference point for social critique. Whilst attending to the particular ways in which individuals struggle to make ‘the problem of suffering’ productive for thought and action, it also works to understand how, through to the level of collective experience, this contributes to wider dynamics of social change. Is the concept of resonance a starting point maybe?

The conference invites papers offering analyses, discussions and perspectives of the overall theme (and related themes) from faculty, students and researchers in fields such as psychiatry, philosophy, sociology, social theory, psychology, anthropology etc.

Abstracts (300 words) please, by Friday, December 23rd 2016, to: socialpathologies2017@gmx.de

Web: http://socialpath.simplesite.com/

screamy-2

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

 

 

Ruth Rikowski Framlingham Castle

Ruth Rikowski
Framlingham Castle

ADDITIONS TO ACADEMIA POSTS: OCTOBER 2016 – RUTH RIKOWSKI

 

Ruth Rikowski has posted some new papers to Academia. These are as follows:

Rikowski, Ruth (2001) GATS:  private affluence and public squalor? Implications for libraries and information, Managing Information, Vol.8 No.10, December, pp.8-10, online at: http://www.academia.edu/27814491/GATS_private_affluence_and_public_squalor_Implications_for_libraries_and_information

Rikowski, R. (2002) The Corporate Takeover of Libraries, Information for Social Change, No.14, winter 2001/02, online at: http://www.academia.edu/27807996/The_Corporate_Takeover_of_Libraries

Rikowski, R. (2002) The WTO/GATS Agenda for Libraries, Talk prepared for a public meeting at Sussex University, 23rd May 2002, online at: http://www.academia.edu/27815712/The_WTO_GATS_Agenda_for_Libraries_Talk_prepared_for_public_meeting_at_SUSSEX_UNIVERSITY

Rikowski, R. (2002) A First-Time in Glasgow: impressions of the IFLA Conference, 2002, IFLA Journal, Vol.28 Nos.5/6, pp.278-280, online at: http://www.academia.edu/27807485/A_First_Timer_In_Glasgow_Impressions_of_the_IFLA_Conference_2002

Rikowski, R. (2003) Globalisation and Libraries – House of Lords Paper, in: Report by House of Lords, Select Committee on Economic Affairs, Session 2002-03, 1st Report, Volume of Evidence, Part 2, HL Paper 5-11, London: The Stationary Office, online at: http://www.academia.edu/27807221/Globalisation_and_Libraries_House_of_Lords_Paper

Rikowski, R. (2003) The Significance of WTO Agreements for the Library and Information World, Managing Information, January / February, Vol.16 No.1, p.43, online at: http://www.academia.edu/27814793/The_Significance_of_WTO_Agreements_for_the_Library_and_Information_Profession

Rikowski, R. (2003) Tripping Along With TRIPS? The World Trade Organization’s agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) and its implications for the library and information world, Managing Information, Vol.10 No.3, April, pp10-12, online at: http://www.academia.edu/27814936/Tripping_Along_with_TRIPS_The_World_Trade_Organizations_agreement_on_Trade-Related_Aspects_of_Intellectual_Property_Rights_TRIPS_and_its_implications_for_the_library_and_information_world

Rikowski, R. (2003) The Role of the Information Professional in Knowledge Management: The Beginning of the End or the End of the Beginning for the Library and Information Profession? Managing Information, Vol.10 No.4, pp.44-47, online at: http://www.academia.edu/27814711/The_Role_of_the_Information_Professional_in_Knowledge_Management_The_Beginning_of_the_End_or_the_End_of_the_Beginning_for_the_Library_and_Information_Profession

Rikowski, R. (2004) Creating Value from Knowledge in the Knowledge Revolution, Information for Social Change, No.20, winter 2004, online at: http://www.academia.edu/27807687/Creating_Value_from_Knowledge_in_the_Knowledge_Revolution

Rikowski, R. (2008) Digital Libraries and Digitalisation: an overview and critique, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.6 No.1, pp.5-21, online at: http://www.academia.edu/27815559/Digital_Libraries_and_Digitisation_an_overview_and_critique

Rikowski, R. (2008) Computers / Information and Communications Technology, the Information Profession and the Gender Divide: Where are we going? Policy Futures in Education, Vol.6 No.4, pp.482-506, online at: http://www.academia.edu/27815632/Computers_Information_and_Communications_Technology_the_Information_Profession_and_the_Gender_Divide_where_are_we_going

 

For all of Ruth Rikowski’s papers at Academia, see: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

For all of Glenn Rikowski’s papers at Academia, see: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

 

Social Science Centre

Social Science Centre

REVIEWING OUR HISTORY AND MAKING PLANS

THE SOCIAL SCIENCE CENTRE

LINCOLN

Saturday 27th August 2016

10.00 – 4.00

St. Swithin’s Community Centre

Croft Street

Lincoln

LN2 5AZ

 

Location: https://goo.gl/5Q5NNl

St. Swithin’s Community Centre: http://www.stswithinscroftstreet.org.uk/

 

The Social Science Centre (SSC), Lincoln is hosting an event to look back at its activities since it was founded in 2011 and to make plans for its future.

 

10:00–12:00: SSC on Reflection, 2011–2016 (SSC members only)

 

A chance for all past and present members of the Social Science Centre to reflect on their experiences in the Centre, our activities, roads we have not taken, changes we should make and hopes for the future. Highlights to be shared with others later in the day.

 

12:30–1:30: Lunch (Public, everyone welcome)

 

Please join us for lunch!

 

1:30–4:00: Co-operative Higher Education in Lincoln (Public, all welcome)

 

Ideas and making plans for the term/year. It has already been suggested we run courses on Brexit and the co-operative movement in Lincoln and the UK

 

What is the SSC?

The SSC  organises higher education that explores the everyday experiences of its members – who are both students and teachers – through concepts and ideas developed in the social sciences. This includes making critical sense of social problems (like ‘austerity’, racism and nationalism or the privatisation of schools) and important local and global events like ‘Brexit’, learning how they affect us and how we might have an effect on them. Our past courses – The Social Science Imagination, Co-operation and Education, and Know How: Do-It-Ourselves Higher Education – all offered different approaches to this learning.

We are a co-operative organisation that is owned and run by our members. This means that we not only have an experience of higher education, but can decide together what this education should be, how it works and why it matters. All our members can help run the Centre by taking part in democratic decision-making processes and collective ownership and responsibility. No one pays for learning or gets paid for teaching at the SSC because we do not believe knowledge should be for sale. Members with financial means make small monthly contributions to the co-operative to pay for room hire and other running costs.

For more information about the SSC, visit our website: http://socialsciencecentre.org.uk

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

 

Richmond, River Thames, May 2016

Richmond, River Thames, May 2016

NEW ACADEMIA POSTS – RUTH RIKOWSKI

 

Ruth Rikowski has posted some new papers to Academia. These are as follows:

 

Rikowski, R. (2005) Traditional Knowledge and TRIPS, Information for Social Change, winter, Issue No. 22, at: http://www.academia.edu/27738384/Traditional_Knowledge_and_TRIPS

 

Rikowski, R. (2004) On the impossibility of determining the length of the working-day for intellectual labour, Information for Social Change, summer, Issue No.19, at: http://www.academia.edu/27738919/On_the_impossibility_of_determining_the_length_of_the_working_day_for_intellectual_labour

 

Rikowski, R. (2003) TRIPS into the Unknown: libraries and the WTO Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, IFLA Journal, Vol.29 No.2, pp.141-151, at: http://www.academia.edu/27738723/TRIPS_into_the_Unknown_libraries_and_the_WTO_Agreement_on_Trade-Related_Aspects_of_Intellectual_Property_Rights

 

Rikowski, R. (2003) Library Privatisation: Fact or Fiction? Information for Social Change, summer, Issue No.17, at: http://www.academia.edu/27765073/Library_Privatisation_Fact_or_Fiction

 

Rikowski, R. (2002) Globalisation and Libraries – Summary Paper, House of Lords, Select Committee on Economic Affairs, Inquiry into the Global Economy, 22nd January, London, at: http://www.academia.edu/27768077/Globalisation_and_Libraries_-_Summary_Paper

 

Rikowski, R. (2002) The WTO, the GATS and the meaning of ‘services’, Public Library Journal, Vol.17 No.2, summer, pp.48-50, at: http://www.academia.edu/26196746/The_WTO_the_GATS_and_the_meaning_of_services

 

For all of Ruth Rikowski’s papers at Academia, see: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

 

Glenn Rikowski also has a new post at Academia:

 

Rikowski, G. (2002) The great GATS buyout, Red Pepper, No.101, November, pp.25-27, at: https://www.academia.edu/27735716/The_great_GATS_buyout

 

For all of Glenn Rikowski’s papers at Academia, see: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski