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Monthly Archives: June 2009

THE ROUGE FORUM UPDATE RESTORED TO LIFE

A message from Rich Gibson

Dear Friends

Following the Rouge Forum Conference at Eastern Michigan, health issues interrupted the updates. But we’re restored to life.

The conference was a terrific success with more than 150 people attending, folks of all ages. Thanks especially to Joe Bishop and the EMU gang for pulling together a great conference. Conference videos and papers are linked here: http://www.richgibson.com/rouge_forum/2009/index.html

What follows is from RF Community Coordinator Adam Renner:

• “We are actively working on a site for the 2010 conference (sounds like we might be onto something with Faith Wilson at Aurora) and a location for the fall Steering Committee retreat (sounds like we might be onto something with Joe in Antioch)

• Two calls for papers are out for the RF News. Issue 14 will compile papers and keynotes from this year’s conference (and we are considering, perhaps, turning this in to an edited text). Issue 15 proposals are due August 15.

• We will be sending out a call for nominations for the 09-10 Steering Committee, requesting a paragraph as to why you would like to serve. We will vote on those nominations, subsequently. This call will follow the July 4 holiday.

• This steering committee will be crucial toward the formation of more intentional regional chapters. We would like to see regular meetings of the regional chapters and work toward some type of coordinated action (e.g., a one day freedom school, a teach-in, a one-day retreat for teachers, an evening panel/speaker on a coordinated topic, a protest action, etc. as a lead up to the 2010 conference and as a preview of more focused, coordinated, and regular actions in the future)

• We are working on an online program as an outlet for RF members to help shape/teach

• We are building toward a 15th anniversary conference in Vancouver, BC in 2013 (perhaps with a one day preview in 2011 as a pre-conference session to AERA which will be held there that year).”

I will be covering the National Education Association annual representative assembly here in San Diego beginning on July 2. If you are a delegate, or attending, please email me and let me know what’s up from your viewpoint.

Good luck to us, every one.

Rich Gibson

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

 The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

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THE JOURNAL FOR CRITICAL EDUCATION POLICY STUDIES

ISSN 1740-2743

The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies is a free e-journal published by The Institute for Education Policy Studies (IEPS)

IEPS is an independent Radical Left/ Socialist/ Marxist institute for developing policy analysis and development of education policy. It is at: http://www.jceps.com

The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies (JCEPS) seeks to develop Marxist and other Left analysis of education.

The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies seeks and publishes articles that critique global, national, neo-liberal, neo-conservative, New Labour, Third Way, postmodernist and other analyses of policy developments, as well as those that attempt to report on, analyse and develop Socialist/ Marxist transformative policy for schooling and education from a number of Radical Left perspectives. JCEPS also addresses issues of social class, ‘race’, gender, sexual orientation, disability and capital/ism; critical pedagogies; new public managerialism and academic / non-academic labour, and empowerment/ disempowerment. JCEPS welcomes articles from academics and activists throughout the globe. It is a refereed / peer reviewed/ peer juried international journal.

Volume 7, Number 1:
June 2009

Michael Viola, University of California Los Angeles, USA
The Filipinization of Critical Pedagogy: Widening the Scope of Critical Educational Theory

Mike Cole, Bishop Grosseteste University College, Lincoln, England
On ‘white supremacy’ and caricaturing, misrepresenting and dismissing Marx and Marxism: a response to David Gillborn’s ‘Who’s Afraid of Critical Race Theory in Education’

Guy Senese, Northern Arizona University, USA
‘Like the Other Kings Have:’ a theory of sovereignty and the persistence of inequality in education

Helena Sheehan, Dublin City University, Ireland
Contradictory transformations: observations on the intellectual dynamics of South African universities

Anastasia Liasidou, Roehampton University, London, England
Critical Policy Research and Special Education Policymaking: A Policy Trajectory Approach

Antoinette Errante, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA
Structure, Agency and Cultural Capital as Control over Knowledge Production in Policy Formation: Mozambique’s Education Sector Strategic Plan

Angela C. de Siqueira, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Brazil
Higher Education Reform in Brazil: Reinforcing Marketization

Pierre W. Orelus, New Mexico State University, USA
Beyond Political Rhetoric and Discourse: What type of educational, socio- economic, and political change should educators expect of President Barack Obama?

Sara Zamir, Ben-Gurion University at Eilat, Israel, and Sara Hauphtman, Achva Academic College of Education, Israel
The portrayal of the Jewish figure in Literary Texts Included in the Present Matriculation Curriculum in Hebrew for Students of the Arab Sector in Israel

Phoebe Moore, University of Salford, England
UK Education, Employability, and Everyday Life

Rebecca A. Goldstein, Montclair State University, New Jersey, USA, and Andrew R. Beutel, Ramapo Ridge Middle School, Mahwah, New Jersey, USA
‘Soldier of Democracy’ or ‘Enemy of the State’? The rhetorical construction of teacher through ‘No Child Left Behind’

Stephen Philion, St. Cloud State University, Minnesota, USA
Is Race Really Controversial in the University Classroom?

Michelle Early Torregano and Patrick Shannon, Penn State University, Pennsylvania, USA
Educational Greenfield: A Critical Policy Analysis of Plans to Transform New Orleans Public Schools

Dennis Beach and Margata Carlen, University College Borås, Sweden
New partnerships – New interests: An ethnographic investigation some of the effects of employer involvement in trade union education

Rodolfo Leyva, Kings College London, University of London, UK
No Child Left Behind: A Neoliberal Repackaging of Social Darwinism

Ioannis Efstathiou, Institute of Education, University of London, UK
Enhancing Students’ Critical Awareness in a Second Chance School in Greece: Reality or Wishful Thinking?

Mompati Mino Polelo, University of Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana
The Small State, Markets and Tertiary Education Reform in a Globalised Knowledge Economy: Decoding Policy Texts in Botswana’s Tertiary Education Reform

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Incident

The Incident

PORCUPINE TREE – ‘THE INCIDENT’

 

My favourite band, Porcupine Tree, will be releasing their tenth studio album on 21st September.  It will be a double CD on Roadrunner Records. The title track takes up the whole of the first CD!

You can find out more about this at: http://www.roadrunnerrecords.co.uk/page/News?news_id=78705

On the titles for the various sections on the first CD, see: http://blogs.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.view&friendId=61819211&blogId=495769004

Porcupine Tree official website: http://www.porcupinetree.com/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

MICHAEL JACKSON – SHAME ON SOCIETY

Ruth Rikowski’s reaction to the death of Michael Jackson on her blog ‘Serendipitous Moments’, see: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.com/2009/06/michael-jacson-shame-on-society.html

Following the death of my father last February, the music of Michael Jackson has helped my youngest son, Gregory, to move beyond the aftermath and to move on.  Michael Jackson’s music also helped Ruth too in this respect.

Greg and Ruth had tickets to see Michael at the O2. They are both shocked and saddened at the death of Jackson.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

READING FROM THE LEFT

NEW WEBSITE PROVIDES FREE DOWNLOADS OF CURRENT SOCIALIST BOOKS AND PAMPHLETS

Online Now: http://www.readingfromtheleft.com

READING FROM THE LEFT is a new website, created to promote and distribute contemporary socialist books and pamphlets.

It will feature free PDF downloads of pamphlets, reviews and announcements of socialist books,  free PDF downloads of book chapters, and in some cases entire books.

This is a non-commercial project: the website links to places where titles can be purchased, but it does not sell pamphlets or books directly.

The initial response from publishers has been excellent. The site already includes free downloads from:

**Monthly Review Press
**Resistance Books (Australia) 
**Resistance Books (UK) 
**Socialist Voice 
**Socialist Project

More titles are in preparation.

Please take a look — http://www.readingfromtheleft.com

Comments and suggestions are very welcome.

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

BIO/GEO POLITICS OF RELIGION

2009-10 Seminar at Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, New York, NY

Bio/Geo Politics of Religion
Co-Directors:  Lee Quinby and Sylvia Tomasch

Macaulay Honors College at CUNY invites applications from New York area faculty and doctoral students for the second annual Macaulay Seminar to be held during the 2009-10 academic year.  The Macaulay Seminar seeks to generate lively discussion on a topic vital to our time, to enrich teaching, and to help facilitate research toward publication.

The seminar will meet once per month on Monday evenings throughout the year.  Each member of the seminar will be expected to participate fully in the Seminar and present a paper at the conference on the same topic to be held April 16-18, 2010 at Macaulay.  Participants will be selected from departments across academic divisions to encourage wide-ranging discussion.  All full-time faculty members and graduate students are eligible.  (Other interested parties are welcome to apply).  A stipend of $750 will be awarded to participants.

This seminar will explore what Michel Foucault called “biopolitics,” the relations of power that focus on the management of life, with specific regard to organized religions and practices of religious conduct.  Although recently religion has been widely recognized as a leading force in contemporary life, with movements of both faith-based solidarity and conflict being played out on the world stage, the present context has a long history through which these movements may be understood.  Relevant topics might include themes of apocalypticism and millennialism, the economics of evangelicalism, fundamentalist movements over time and space, the policing of bodies and souls, textual literalism and interpretation, bio- and geo-political conjunctions, manuals of guidance and techniques of surveillance, utopian religious communities in life and literature, and connections between ecos, bios, power, and justice.  Readings will be selected to accommodate the specific interests and expertise of the participants.

The Co-Directors:

Lee Quinby is the inaugural Visiting Professor at Macaulay Honors College at the City University of New York City.  The author of three books, Millennial Seduction (1999), Anti-Apocalypse (1994), and Freedom, Foucault, and the Subject of America (1991), she is also editor of Genealogy and Literature (1995) and co-editor of Feminism and Foucault (1988) and Gender and Apocalyptic Desire (2006).

Sylvia Tomasch is Associate University Dean of Academic Affairs at Macaulay Honors College and Professor of English at Hunter College, both in the City University of New York. Recent publications include articles on the history of medieval studies, Chaucer, medieval antisemitism, historical cartography, and medieval postcoloniality.

Application deadline:  July 30, 2009.  To request an application or for further information, email: lee.quinby@mhc.cuny.edu or sylvia.tomasch@mhc.cuny.edu

Macaulay Honors College
35 W. 67th Street
New York, NY 10016
t: (212) 729-2919
f: (212) 530-8130

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF EDUCATION AND WORK – UPDATE 22nd JUNE 2009

OUR MANDATE: The Centre for the Study of Education and Work (CSEW) brings together educators from university, union, and community settings to understand and enrich the often-undervalued informal and formal learning of working people. We develop research and teaching programs at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (UofT) that strengthen feminist, anti-racist, labour movement, and working-class perspectives on learning and work.

To change your subscriptions settings, visit: http://listserv.oise.utoronto.ca/mailman/listinfo/csewbroadcast

For more information about CSEW, visit: http://www.csew.ca

TABLE OF CONTENTS

•    AVAILABLE IN SUMMER 2009! EDUCATION & JOBS: EXPLORING THE GAPS
•    JOBS & JUSTICE: DRIVE TO WORK CARAVAN
•    WORKERS ARTS AND HERITAGE CENTRE – EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR (PERMANENT FULL TIME)
•    CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS – WORKPLACE ACTIVISM, THE LABOUR MOVEMENT AND THE ECONOMIC CRISIS (Briarpatch Magazine)
•    FORUM – TIME FOR A BOLD REVIEW: MAKING SOCIAL ASSISTANCE MEET THE POVERTY REDUCTION TEST   
•    OUR TIMES LABOUR MAGAZINE SUMMER ISSUE
•    TEN+ YEARS LATER – WE ARE VISIBLE REPORT AVAILABLE ONLINE
•    COURSE – POPULAR EDUCATION: LEARNING TO ORGANIZE FOR CHANGE
•    ARTICLE – COMMUNITY GROUPS FIGHT FOR BETTER LIVING, WORKING CONDITIONS FOR TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS AND LIVE-IN CAREGIVERS
•    ONLINE PUBLICATIONS

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AVAILABLE IN SUMMER 2009! EDUCATION & JOBS: EXPLORING THE GAPS
D.W. Livingstone (Editor)
ISBN: 978-1-44260-050-8
Paperback $32.95 US & CDN

“Education and Jobs is a profound contribution to our understanding of modern economies and education systems. Edited by one of the world’s leading educational sociologists, based on national survey data and close-focus case studies, this book makes a powerful case for new policy, industrial, and educational thinking.” – Raewyn Connell, University of Sydney

The Education-Job Requirement Matching (EJRM) Research Project team, including M. Lordan, S. Officer, K.V. Pankhurst, M. Radsma, M. Raykov, J. Weststar, and O. Wilson worked closely together for several years conducting and analyzing both survey and case study data. Education and Jobs is the most thorough exploration to date of relations between workers and jobs. The book develops a new paradigm intended to reshape future studies of learning and work.

D.W. Livingstone is Canada Research Chair in Lifelong Learning and Work at the University of Toronto, Head of the Centre for the Study of Education and Work at OISE/UT, and Director of the SSHRC national research network on “The Changing Nature of Work and Lifelong Learning” (see http://www.wallnetwork.ca).

For more information, please visit http://www.utphighereducation.com

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JOBS & JUSTICE: DRIVE TO WORK CARAVAN

The Ontario Coalition for Social Justice’s choice of a campaign on Jobs & Justice is especially apt for the continuing economic crisis affecting so many people. Talking about the public need for good jobs and in general, about  everyone’s need to be treated with justice, is a clear contrast to the sheer greed by a few persons, who seem to be able to get “bailouts” to add to the wealth they already have. The OCSJ and allies and partners advocate different goals:

+++DRIVE TO WORK CARAVAN

The Ontario Federation of Labour (OFL) is completing its caravan next week, continuing to visit communities in all regions of Ontario, to encourage people to speak out about how the economy is affecting them. Supporters of the OCSJ in numerous communities are joining union members at events in the remaining days:

June 22    At 10:00 a.m. a rally in London will be held outside London City Hall, to reinforce the points made yesterday at a rally with the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers, and Grain Millers’ picket-line at Kellogg’s in that city.

June 23    From 4:15 – 7:00 p.m. a rally will be held at the CAW Local 1999 Hall in St. Catharine’s at 124 Bunting Rd.

June 23    A rally will also take place at 4:30 p.m. in Hamilton at the Hamilton General Hospital at 237 Barton St. E.

June 25    The caravan’s final rally will take place in Toronto at 2:00 p.m. outside the Legislature at Queen’s Park.

The OFL website at http://www.ofl.ca has a link to this campaign named Join the DRV2WRK on a licence plate, with more detail for the events of the caravan. As well, at the bottom of the opening page for the Drive to Work link, you can “have your say” – that is, you can add an anecdote of how you are affected by the economic crisis.

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WORKERS ARTS AND HERITAGE CENTRE – EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR (PERMANENT FULL TIME)

The Workers Arts and Heritage Centre, located in Hamilton, Ontario is seeking a dynamic, creative and motivated individual to fill the position of Executive Director. This is a permanent position which will start no later than September 1, 2009. The purpose of the job is to provide professional competency and effective strategic leadership for the Workers Arts and Heritage Centre. The Executive Director reports to the Board of Directors through the Executive Committee of the Board. 

Located in the Historic Custom House in Hamilton, Ontario, WAHC works collaboratively with others to engage in artistic activity, preserving the historical, cultural and contemporary experiences of working people in their diverse identities. WAHC performs a number of services including education, research, exhibits, facility rental and a virtual museum. We have a diverse market including workers, their unions and organizations, politicians, youth, heritage supporters, newcomers, aboriginal artists, women and the public. At a provincial and national level we work in a network of labour and community arts practitioners and organizations to produce, support and otherwise engage communities in exchanges and production of cultural events, activities and projects.

For more information, visit: http://www.wahc-museum.ca/w-jobs.php

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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS – WORKPLACE ACTIVISM, THE LABOUR MOVEMENT AND THE ECONOMIC CRISIS (Briarpatch Magazine)

Striking Back: Workplace activism, the labour movement and the economic crisis

The economic crisis is taking a grim toll on working people and on the labour movement. Is labour condemned to watch decades of hard-fought gains undone, or can it organize an effective response and go on the offensive?

In our November/December issue, “Striking Back: Workplace activism, the labour movement and the economic crisis,” Briarpatch will assess the impact of the global economic crisis on working people and on the labour movement, and investigate the opportunities for advancing a new vision of economic wellbeing grounded in workplace democracy, respect for human rights and an equitable distribution of resources.

If you’ve got something to contribute to this discussion, then we want to hear from you. We are looking for articles, essays, investigative reportage, news briefs, project profiles, interviews with luminary thinkers, reviews, poetry, humour, artwork & photography that shed light on the current situation.

Queries are due by July 6. If your query is accepted, first drafts are due by August 10.

For more information, visit: http://briarpatchmagazine.com/2009/06/11/call-for-submissions-5/

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FORUM – TIME FOR A BOLD REVIEW: MAKING SOCIAL ASSISTANCE MEET THE POVERTY REDUCTION TEST   

June 23, 2009
9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Multi-Faith Centre Auditorium, Koffler Institute Building
University of Toronto, 569 Spadina Avenue

In December 2008, the Ontario government committed to review the province’s social assistance system. This commitment was part of Ontario’s new Poverty Reduction Strategy and was restated in the 2009 budget.

765,000 people rely on Ontario Works and the Ontario Disability Support Program. And thousands of newly unemployed Ontarians will soon be forced to turn to these programs. We are all entitled to a system that gives real assistance when we need it. Social assistance must provide adequate income and meaningful supports to ensure recipients can live lives marked by dignity, decency and opportunity.

Our four insightful and powerful panellists will discuss why we need a bold Social Assistance Review, and how this kind of significant change can take place:

Crystal Chin- Crystal is currently a recipient of ODSP and an active advocate on the Barrier Free Council at Ann Johnston Health Station. Crystal has recently become involved with the ODSP Action Coalition and is a long-time volunteer at Bloorview Kids Rehab.

Marion Overholt- Marion is Staff Lawyer at Legal Assistance of Windsor and a long time poverty law activist and social justice advocate. She is the Social Justice Representative on the Windsor and District Labour Council and chairs the Ford/CAW Local 200 Workplace Adjustment Committee.

Angela Robertson- Angela is the Executive Director of Sistering — A Woman’s Place, and a dedicated community advocate with a commitment to anti-racism, feminism, community-based research, and social justice. Angela is the 2009 YWCA award recipient for social change.

Judy Rebick- Judy is a well-known social justice activist, educator, writer and speaker, and holds the Sam Gindin chair in Social Justice and Democracy at Ryerson University. She is also the founder of rabble.ca, Canada’s most popular independent online news and discussion site.

Join us to make a clear and compelling call for a bold and broad Social Assistance Review- one that leads to economic security for all Ontarians.
 
For more information about this event: email isac@lao.on.ca or call 416-597-5820.

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OUR TIMES LABOUR MAGAZINE SUMMER ISSUE

“In Cornwall, a high school teacher told us that while they used to raise funds for school trips and sports teams, now they raise money to buy food, because too many students are too hungry to learn.”- Irene Harris, Ontario Federation of Labour’s Drive to Work Caravan

Our Times’ summer issue (Vol. 28 No.3) will be heading to the printer shortly. In this issue, we’re highlighting the courageous struggle of migrant agricultural workers for safe and healthy working conditions and the right to unionize. We’re also featuring the recent historic union stewards’ assembly in Toronto. Plus we’ve got some great creative fiction and non-fiction, including Part 2 of Newfoundland writer Mike Heffernan’s story about a deadly explosion aboard an oil tanker. It’s a great issue, geared to building solidarity in hard times.

If you think you may want to order extra copies of this issue as an education resource for your workshops, schools, or to include in your conference or convention kits, please contact our business manager by June 25 at the latest. Telephone: 416-703-7661. Toll-free: 1-800-648-6131. E-mail: office@ourtimes.ca. Discounted prices are available for bulk orders.

For more information, visit: http://www.ourtimes.ca/index.php

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TEN+ YEARS LATER – WE ARE VISIBLE REPORT AVAILABLE ONLINE

Ten+ Years Later – We Are Visible: Ethno-cultural/racialized women with disabilities speak out about health care issues was launched on June 5, 2009 at the People in Motion Exhibition, Toronto.

Project Partners: Ethno-Racial People with Disabilities Coalition of Ontario (ERDCO) and Ontario Women’s Health Network (OWHN)

Ten+ Years Later – We Are Visible updates the innovative community-based research project, We are Visible, conducted in 1996, and highlights the experiences of health and health care of ethno cultural/racialized women with disabilities in Toronto. Through community-based research and a literature review, this project works to understand the barriers to health and health care that ethno-cultural/racialized women with disabilities face and whether any progress has been made to address the issues discussed by the women in the original We Are Visible project.

Both Ten+ Years Later – We Are Visible and the original We are Visible report are available online at http://owhn.on.ca/wearevisible.htm and http://erdco.ca

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COURSE – POPULAR EDUCATION: LEARNING TO ORGANIZE FOR CHANGE

‘Popular Education: Learning to Organize for Change’ is designed to build your understanding and experience in processes to lead groups in social justice education and activist organizing. If you are an educator, community organizer or worker looking for an experiential process to help you build greater consciousness in groups and lead others to act, this course could be for you.

After exploring an overview of popular education and feminist popular education principles, you will participate in hands-on approaches and tools for; bringing groups together, creating spaces for dialogue, analysing the situation you hope to change, planning and taking action and evaluating group processes.
In the final part of the course you will apply these approaches to the work you are doing (or hope to do). All participants will have the opportunity to present possible workshop processes, activities or dilemmas so that the group can offer their ideas and support.

No experience necessary, but experience is welcome.

Facilitator: Christine McKenzie is a popular educator who has developed and facilitated anti-oppression organizing processes with diverse groups in Canada and Central America over the past 15 years. She has led popular education trainings with groups such as the Canadian Auto Workers Union, Equitas International Centre for Human Rights Education, and the Girls Action Foundation, among others.

Dates and Times: (attendance at each day & evening required for the certificate)
Sat July 25 (10:00-6:00), Sun July 26 (10:00-6:00), Tues July 28 (6:00-9:00 pm) and Wed July 29 (6:00-9:00 pm)
Location: OISE – 252 Bloor St W. Toronto, Ont.
Cost: $175 (Cdn).  sliding scale available – please ask!

To Register:  Fill out and mail in the registration form on the Transformative Learning Centre website – http://tlc.oise.utoronto.ca/wordpress/si2008/registration/registration-form/ Course Code: SI09 –C04

For questions contact Christine at: c-mckenzie@sympatico.ca.

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ARTICLE – COMMUNITY GROUPS FIGHT FOR BETTER LIVING, WORKING CONDITIONS FOR TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS AND LIVE-IN CAREGIVERS

by John Bonnar (reprinted from rabble.ca)
June 11, 2009

Eleven o’clock Tuesday morning at the Workers’ Action Centre. Media and supporters are jam-packed into a room to listen to representatives of the newly formed Caregivers Action Centre, comprised of former and current caregivers working for change in Temporary Foreign Worker programs including the Live-In Caregiver Program and the Seasonal Agricultural Worker Program.

To read more, visit: http://rabble.ca/blogs/bloggers/johnbon/2009/06/community-groups-fight-better-living-working-conditions-temporary-for

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ONLINE PUBLICATIONS

Social Services, Faith-Based Organizations, and the Poor
Marci B. Littlefield
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly published 8 June 2009, 10.1177/0899764009337627
http://nvs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0899764009337627v1

The outsourcing of social care in Britain: what does it mean for voluntary sector workers?
Ian Cunningham and Philip James
Work Employment Society 2009;23 363-375
http://wes.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/23/2/363

Book Review: Gay W. Seidman Beyond the Boycott: Labor Rights, Human Rights, and Transnational Activism New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 2007, $26.00 hbk (ISBN: 0871547619) xvi + 176 pp
David Bartram
Work Employment Society 2009;23 385-387
http://wes.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/23/2/385

Community Service Among A Panel of Beginning College Students: Its Prevalence and Relationship to Having Been Required and to Supporting “Capital”
James Griffith
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly published 18 June 2009, 10.1177/0899764009338218
http://nvs.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/0899764009338218v1

****END****

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Twenty Years after the “Collapse of Communism”: Legacy, lessons, towards an emancipatory communism for the 21 Century

Uncaptive Minds Discussion Forum

Twenty years ago a revolutionary wave on the scale of 1848 and 1919 swept across Eastern Europe and the USSR.  It brought down the state-socialist   regimes, which called themselves “communist”. Western capitalism declared the “collapse of communism” and   some spoke of the “end of history” with a new era of liberal democracy. Instead the era of neo-liberal globalisation brought a new phase of war and recessions, in  Eastern Europe the optimism of 1989 gave way to economic shock-therapy and widespread impoverishment,  in the former USSR the old elite has been replaced by the rule of exploitative oligagarchs.

What happened to the radical ideals of the freedom movements of workers and intellectuals which challenged the old regimes, which called for workers self-management, and end to all forms of oppression and alienation, which opposed the ruling bureaucracy and the restoration of capitalism.   The legacy of totalitarian “communism” still hangs over us all; amidst the worse crisis of capitalism in decades there remains a real crisis of confidence in a viable alternative to this system.  

Did communism really collapse? Can we develop a vision of an emancipatory communism in the 21st century?

Uncaptive Minds is hosting a forum to address these questions, speakers are:

Marko Bojcun, a writer and a leading activist in the collectives which published the journals Dialoh and META which stood for “democracy and socialism in an independent Ukraine”.

Allan Armstrong is a member of the National Council of the Scottish Socialist Party and is a member of the Republican Communist Network, a platform of the SSP.

Chris Kane, is a member of The Commune, he was a solidarity activist with workers in the Eastern Bloc in the 1980’s and writes on Ukrainian labour history and politics.

Thursday 25th June 7:00 PM

The meeting is on Thursday 25th June from 7pm at the Artillery Arms, 102 Bunhill Row, near London’s Old Street station 

The Commune: http://www.thecommune.co.uk

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

CAUSES AND IMPLICATIONS OF THE ECONOMIC CRISIS

The Hobgoblin: http://www.thehobgoblin.co.uk/

Public Meeting, July 8 in London:

Andrew Kliman on ‘Causes and Implications of the Economic Crisis’

Wednesday 8 July, Lucas Arms (upstairs room), 245a Grays Inn Road St Pancras, London (Kings Cross tube) from 8 to 10 pm.

Andrew Kliman is author of ‘Reclaiming Marx’s Capital’ and a member of the Marxist-Humanist Initiative (US). Meeting sponsored jointly by The Hobgoblin and The Commune.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Forum for Promoting 3-19 Comprehensive Education – Issue 51

Just published online at
http://www.wwwords.co.uk/forum/content/pdfs/51/issue51_2.asp [printed copies will be posted at the end of June]
FORUM: for promoting 3-19 comprehensive education
Volume 51 Number 2 2009     ISSN 0963-8253

 

Clyde Chitty. Editorial. A Game of Snakes and Ladders

Susanne Wiborg. The Enduring Nature of Egalitarian Education in Scandinavia: an English perspective

Anna Traianou. The Uncertain Character of Recent Educational Reform in Greece

Derek Gillard. Short and Fraught: the history of primary education in England

Michael Armstrong. Playful Words: the educational significance of children’s linguistic and literary play

Patrick Yarker. Happy Fiasco! The National Curriculum Tests of 2008, and After

Richard Pring. Education Cannot Compensate for Society: reflections on the Nuffield Review of 14-19 Education and Training

Richard Harris. Southampton: a case study on why Academies are not the answer

Clyde Chitty. Opposition Education Policies

Chris Searle. Mandela, Manchester: a response to establishment pessimism

Emma Snowden. Enjoy and Achieve: finding opportunities to action the Every Child Matters framework to provide opportunities for children and adults to work collaboratively on an outdoor learning project

Clive Griggs. The Switch to Private Pension Plans for Teachers, 1982-2002: a case of freedom of choice or financial scandal?

Clyde Chitty. Initial Teacher Training or Education? ITT or ITE?

BOOK REVIEW
The Professionals: better teachers, better schools (Phil Revell), reviewed by Derek Gillard

 

Access to the full texts of articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription. However, all articles become free-to-view 18 months after first publication.

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION. Subscription to the 2009 issues (this includes access to ALL PAST ISSUES) is available to private individuals at a cost of US$70.00 (approximately £40.00). If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/subscribeFORUM.asp  

For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact the Editor, Professor Clyde Chitty, 19 Beaconsfield Road, Bickley, Bromley BR1 2BL, United Kingdom (c.chitty@gold.ac.uk).

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

CONFRONTING CAPITALISM’S ECONOMIC CRISIS

Meeting & 4-part Seminar

All events at TRS, 44 East 32nd St., 11th floor, New York, NY, from 7 pm to 9 pm

Sponsored by Marxist-Humanist Initiative

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TUESDAY, JUNE 23: PUBLIC MEETING

“The economic crisis and left responses,” a talk by Andrew Kliman, author of Reclaiming Marx’s “Capital”: A refutation of the myth of inconsistency

“A new organization for a time of crisis,” a talk by Anne Jaclard, National Secretary, Marxist-Humanist Initiative

Talks followed by open discussion. Donation requested.

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SEMINAR SERIES

Tuesday June 30. Introduction: purpose of seminar series; overview of crisis theories; definition of “crisis”; history of
capitalist crises; why crisis theory? Led by Josh Skolnik

Tuesday July 14. Underconsumptionism: does paying workers more boost profit? Led by Seth Weiss

Tuesday July 21. Marx’s law of the tendential fall in the rate of profit. Led by Andrew Kliman

Tuesday July 28. The crisis of the free market and the turn to state-capitalist ideology. Led by Anne Jaclard

As the worst economic slump since the Great Depression calls into question the viability of the capitalist system, and as people increasingly doubt whether capitalism is desirable or even necessary, we need to unite theory with practice and an understanding of the current crisis in order to respond effectively. We invite everyone seriously interested in this task to join us in the seminar series. Participants will be expected to have done the readings prior to each session.
Donations are requested, but no one will be turned away because of inability to pay.

Please call us at (888) 579-2245 or write to us at mhi@marxisthumanistinitiative.org in order to register for the seminar series and obtain the syllabus.

Our website contains continuing analysis and discussion of the economic crisis: http://www.marxist-humanist-initiative.org
You can find a printable flyer on the website, or link to it here:
http://marxisthumanistinitiative.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/crisis_series.pdf

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

CRITICAL SOCIOLOGY CONFERENCE

Monday August 10th, 9:00am – 6:15pm, The Stanford Court Hotel, 905 California Street, San Francisco

 

PROGRAM:

9:00 – 9:15
Welcome and Introductions
David Fasenfest, Editor and Richard Dello Buono, Latin American and Caribbean Editor, Critical Sociology

9:15 – 11:00 Plenary
SACRIFICING NEOLIBERALISM TO SAVE CAPITALISM? PROSPECTS AND OPPORTUNITIES IN A MULTI-DIMENSIONAL GLOBAL CRISIS
Ximena de la Barra, International Development Consultant and Social Policy Analyst, Former Public Policy Advisor, United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF)
Discussants:
NEOLIBERALISM AND THE GLOBAL CRISIS AS A SOCIAL PROCESS
Raewyn Connell, University of Sydney
WOMEN, GENDER AND NEOLIBERALISM
Joan Acker, University of Oregon

11:15 – 12:30
California Blue Room
Moderator: Victoria Carty, Chapman University
Participatory planning in a rural Mexican village: Lessons for community development and professional education
Mercedes Arce, la Universidad Autónoma de la Ciudad de México, Marie Kennedy, Chris Tilly, UCLA
The Geography of the Family of Anti-systemic Movements: Activists at the World Social Forum
Chris Chase-Dunn, Rick Niemeyer, Preeta Saxena, Matheu Kaneshiro, James Love and Amanda Spears, UC-Riverside

California Gold Room
Moderator: Vida Bajc, Queens University
Exploitation, Capital’s Innovations, and the Obscuring of Social Class:  Notes on an Intellectual History of the Labor Theory of Value
Stephen Adair, Central Connecticut State University
A Progressive Vision of Interpersonal Racial Inequality Theory
Chavella T. Pittman
Of Innovations and Fluctuations: A Critique of the Philippine Criminal Justice System and Restorative Justice Movement
Diana Veloso
Secularization and the Iranian Revolution
Warren Goldstein

12:30 – 1:45 Lunch Break

2:00 – 3:15 Plenary
RACE AND POLITICS IN THE OBAMA ERA
Bob Newby, Central Michigan University
Discussant
Martha Gimenez, University of Colorado

3:30 – 5:00
California Blue Room
Moderator: Gregory Pratt, University of Illinois-Chicago:
‘Change We Can Believe In,’ You Better Not Believe It: Politics as Usual in a Different Style
Johnny E. Williams, Trinity University
Corporate Status, Neo-liberalism and the Obama Administration
Christopher Doran, University of Newcastle
The Changing of the Guard 2006-2009: The Rise of the Immigration Industrial Complex and the Prospects for Progressive Immigration Reform Under the Obama Administration
Jesse Díaz, Jr., University of California, Riverside
Luisa Heredia, University of California, Riverside
Civil Rights after Obama
Suzanne Goodney Lea, Trinity University

California Gold Room
Movements and Visions for the 21st Century: The US Social Forum and World Social Forum
Walda Katz-Fishman, Howard University
Thomas Ponniah, Harvard University
Rose Brewer, University of Minnesota
Jackie Smith, University of Notre Dame
Lauren Langman, Loyola University
Melanie L. Bush, Adelphi University
Rod Bush, St. Johns University
Jerome Scott, League of Revolutionaries for a New America

5:15 – 6:15 * * * * * * SPECIAL LABOR WORKSHOP * * * * * *
The Crisis in the Newspaper Industry: Possible Responses of Organized Labor
Carl Hall, Local Representative California Media Workers Guild, Local 39521, TNG-CWA

 —
Professor David Fasenfest
Dept of Sociology
Wayne State University
Editor, Critical Sociology
http://www.crs.sagepub.com
Series Editor
Studies in Critical Social Science
http://www.brill.nl/scss

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com