Skip navigation

Category Archives: New Media

images (8)EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

The SoJo Journal: Educational Foundations and Social Justice

Call for Papers

Special Issue on Educational Technology and Social Justice

The SoJo Journal: Educational Foundations and Social Justice Education is soliciting manuscripts for a special issue on educational technology and social justice.

The relationship between educational technology and social justice is an abundant and important conversation in educational literature, particularly in critical scholarship, where the perpetuation through technology of social reproduction, authoritarianism, the neo-liberal agenda, and environmental atrocities are exposed and interrogated.  For this special issue, we invite contributions that may incorporate but also move beyond such critiques to explore how educational technology is or can be utilized toward social justice goals.  These goals may include liberation, transformation, experiencing voice, and recognizing as well as challenging dominant discourses, hegemonic constructs, and oppressive conditions.

Contributors may consider questions including:

  • What is the meaning of social justice in relation to educational technology?
  • How do these two concepts intersect in current educational research and practice?
  • How is educational technology being utilized by teachers, teacher-educators, students, and researchers to achieve social justice aims?
  • What is required for technology to disrupt social conditions for marginalized individuals and groups?
  • What do educational administrators and policymakers need to do to contribute to these changes?

 

Manuscripts for publication consideration for this special issue should address the journal’s mission: to prepare and influence bold, socially responsible leaders who will transform the world of schooling.  Submissions for this issue may include research studies as well as conceptual, theoretical, philosophical, and policy-analysis essays that advance educational practices that challenge the existing state of affairs in society, schools, and (in)formal education.

Style Guidelines

All manuscripts must adhere to APA sixth edition format, include an abstract of 100-150 words, and range between 20 – 30 pages in length (including camera ready tables, charts, figures, and references). Two copies of the manuscript should be attached: a master copy including a title page and a blind copy with the title page and all other author-identifying information removed (including citations and references pertaining to any of the contributing authors’ works). Attachments should be in Microsoft Word.
Submissions should be submitted electronically via email by attachment by April 30, 2016 to SoJo Associate Editor, Julie Ficarra: jmficarr@syr.edu.

The SoJo Journal website: http://www.infoagepub.com/the-sojo-journal

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Advertisements
The City

The City

MEDIATED CITIES

Mediated Cities Book Series

Open Call for Contributions
Intellect Books will launch its Mediated Cities book series April 01-03, 2016 with three books.

Digital Futures and the City of Today:  New Technologies and Physical Spaces. ISBN: 978-1-78320-560-8
Filming the City: Urban Documents, Design Practices & Social Criticism Through the Lens. ISBN: 978-1-78320-554-7
Imaging the City: Art, Creative Practices and Media Speculations. ISBN: 978-1-78320-557-8

This is a call for chapter contributions for the following book in the series from the perspective of all disciplines that engage with issues of the city, its design, mediation, representation and experience.

Contributions are welcome from urban design, planning, cultural studies, digital art, emerging technologies, social media, film, photography  etc.

The next book in the series will be drawn from the conference: Digital-Cultural Ecology and the Medium-Sized City.

For details: http://architecturemps.com/bristol-uk/

ABSTRACT DEADLINE: 15th NOVEMBER, 2015

This conference is organised by the journal Architecture_MPS, Intellect Books, the University of the West of England and the Centre for Moving Image Research. The publication series is a joint AMPS / Intellect Books initiative. See: http://architecturemps.com/publications-2/

download (1)

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Work

Work

WORK AND PEER PRODUCTION

CALL FOR PAPERS

Journal of Peer Production

Work and Peer Production
Editors: Phoebe Moore (Middlesex University London), Mathieu O’Neil (University of Canberra), Stefano Zacchiroli (University Paris Diderot)

The rise in the usage and delivery capacity of the Internet in the 1990s has led to the development of massively distributed online projects where self-governing volunteers collaboratively produce public goods. Notable examples include Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) projects such as Debian and GNOME, as well as the Wikipedia encyclopedia. These distributed practices have been characterised as peer production, crowdsourcing, mass customization, social production, co-configurative work, playbour, user-generated content, wikinomics, open innovation, participatory culture, produsage, and the wisdom of the crowd, amongst other terms. In peer production, labour is communal and outputs are orientated towards the further e xpansion of the commons, an ecology of production that aims to defy and resist the hierarchies and rules of ownership that drive productive models within capitalism (Moore, 2011); while the commons, recursively, are the chief resource in this mode of production (Söderberg & O’Neil, 2014).

Peer projects are ‘ethical’ as participation is primarily motivated by self-fulfillment and validated by a community of peers, rather than by earning wages. Their governance is ‘modular’, understood in a design sense (decomposable blocks sharing a common interface), but also in political-economy terms: participants oppose restricted ownership and control by individually socializing their works into commons. Conflicting interpretations of their societal impact have been articulated (O’Neil, 2015). Skeptics view the abjuration of exclusive property rights over the goods they produce as irrelevant, and ethical-modular projects as increasing w orker exploitation: participants’ passionate labour occurs at the expense of less fortunate others, who do not have the disposable income, cultural capital, or family support to engage in unpaid labour (Moore & Taylor, 2009; Huws, 2013). In contrast, reformists, often hailing from a management perspective, suggest that the co-optation of communal labour by firms will improve business practices and society (Arvidsson, 2008; Demil et al., 2015). Finally activists celebrate the abjuration of exclusive property rights, and present ethical-modular projects as key actors in a historical process leading to the supersession of capitalism and hierarchy (Kostakis & Bauwens, 2014).

This last perspective raises a central challenge, which is the avoidance of purely utopian thinking. In other words, how can commons-based peer production reach deeply into daily life? How can ‘already existing non-capitalist economic processes’ be strengthened, ‘new no n-capitalist enterprises’ be built, and ‘communal subjects’ be established (Gibson-Graham, 2003: 157)? An increasingly large free public goods and services sector could well cohabit in a plural economy with employment in cooperatives, paid independent work, and the wage-earning of the commercial sector. However analysis of peer production typically eschews mundane considerations such as living wages, benefits, job security, working conditions, work-induced medical conditions, and debates on labour organization. How can peer production operate as a sustainable practice enabling people to live, if labour and work issues are not formally addressed?

To advance this agenda, the tenth issue of the Journal of Peer Production, titled Peer Production and Work, calls for papers in two linked areas:

*Peer production in a paid work society*
Nowadays firms attempt to monetize crowdsourced labour. The paradigmatic example is Amazon’s Mechanical Turk labourers (popularly known as ‘Turkers’, ‘cloud workers’ or ‘click workers’) who accomplish micro-tasks such as tagging and labeling images, transcribing audio or video recordings, and categorizing products. This extreme modularization of work results in their status being that of independent contractors rather than employees with rights, necessitating novel means of protection and redress (Irani & Silberman, 2013). The so-called ‘sharing economy’ also uses peer production methods, such as the self-selection of modular and granular tasks, to extract ever-more value from the labour of volunteer ‘prosumers’ (Frayssé & O’Neil, 2015). Capitalist firms are also increasingly engaging with ethical-modular organizations, in some cases paying wages to participants. Such labour is thus both ‘alienated’, or sold, and ‘communal’, as workers freely cooperate to produce commons. Do traditional categories such as exploitation and alienation still apply?
Topics may include, but are not limited to:

* Peer production and the global political economy
* Peer production and the rise of precarious work
* Peer workers and possibilities for worker organisation
* Does the autonomy of peer workers cause conflict in firms, and how is it resolved?
* What strategies do firms adopt to co-opt peer production (e.g., ‘hackhathons’)?
* Do tensions around property rights emerge?
* Subjectivity in peer production
* Peer production and intellectual property, coded work

*Paid work in peer production projects*
How does paid labour affect ethical P2P projects? Mansell and Berdou (2010) argue that firms supporting the work of programmers who contribute to volunteer projects, to the commons, will not affect the ‘cooperative spirit’ of projects; nor can this support prevent the results of labour from being socialized into commons. Is this always the case?
Topics may include, but are not limited to:
* How do peer projects deal with the presence of paid or waged labour?
* Is this topic discussed within peer production projects? In what way?
* What benefits do paid or waged workers enjoy in peer projects?
* How does paid labour affect peer production projects?

*Timeline*
300-500 word abstract due: 30 July 2015
Notification to authors: 30 August 2015
Submission of full paper: 31 December 2015
Reviews to authors: 15 February 2016
Revised papers: 30 April 2016
Signals due: 30 May 2016
Issue release: June/⁠July 2016

*Submission guidelines*
Submission abstracts of 300-500 words are due by July 30, 2015 and should be sent to work@peerproduction.net

All peer reviewed papers will be reviewed according to Journal of Peer Production guidelines. See http://peerproduction.net/peer-review/process/
Full papers and materials are due by December 31, 2015 for r eview.
Peer reviewed papers should be around 8,000 words; personal testimonies or ‘tales of toil’ in the Processed World tradition should be up to 4,000 words.

*References*
Arvidsson, A. (2008). The ethical economy of consumer coproduction. Journal of Macromarketing, 8, 326-338.

Demil, B., Lecoq. X. & Warnier, E. (2015). The capabilities of bazaar governance: Investigating the advantage of business models based on open communities. Journal of Organizational Change Management, in press.

Frayssé, O. & O’Neil, M. (2015) Digital labour and prosumer capitalism: The US matrix. Basingstoke: Palgrave, in press.

Gibson-Graham, J.K. (2003). Enabling ethical economies: Cooperativism and class. Critical Sociology, 29, 123-164.

Huws, U. (2013). The underpinnings of class in the digital age: Living, labour and value. Socialist Register, 50, 80-107.

Irani, L. & Silberman, M. (2013). Turkopticon: Interrupting worker invisibility in Amazon Mechanical Turk. Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems.

Kostakis, V. & Bauwens, M. (2014) Network society and future scenarios for a collaborative economy. Basingstoke: Palgrave.

Mansell, R. & Berdou, E. (2010). Political economy, the internet and FL/OSS development. In Hunsinger, J., Allen, M. & Klastrup, L. (Eds.) International handbook of Internet research (pp. 341-362). Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Springer.

Moore, P. (2011). Subjectivity in the ecologies of P2P Production. The Journal of Fibreculture FCJ-119. Online.

Moore, P. & Taylor, P. A. (2009). Exploitation of the self in community-based software production: Workers’ freedoms or firm foundations? Capital & Class, 99-117.

O’Neil, M. (2015). Labour out of control: The political economy of capitalist and ethical organizations. Organization Studies, 1-21.

Söderberg, J. & O’Neil, M. (2014). ‘Introduction’. Book of Peer Production (pp. 2-3). Göteborg: NSU Press.

****

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-journal-of-peer-production-work-and-peer-production

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Even Bigger Data

Even Bigger Data

iFUTURES POSTGRADUATE CONFERENCE

A reminder that the call for papers for iFutures closes on Friday 5th June.

iFutures is a one-day conference organised by doctoral students for doctoral students in the Information Science community on Tuesday, July 7th, at the University of Sheffield.

This conference aims to give a welcoming platform for early career researchers to present their work to their peers.

This year the theme is “Open Information Science: exploring new landscapes”

Students are invited to present research papers, Pecha Kucha sessions, and posters.

More details, including a tentative programme for the day and registration, can be found on the conference website: http://ifutures.group.shef.ac.uk/

We are inviting the following types of submissions:
a) Papers: Intended as a means of introducing your current research in a 15 minute presentation followed by 5 minutes for questions and answers. Abstracts should be no more than 500 words; final papers should be no more than 1500 words.
b) Posters: Display your research for discussion with fellow PhD students. Abstracts should be no more than 300 words; final papers are optional (no more than 1000 words).
c) Pecha Kucha Presentations: How do you envision your research, or IS research in general, impacting openness in society or science? You have 20 slides lasting 20 seconds each to address this question. For more information about the Pecha Kucha format, see http://www.pechakucha.org/. Abstracts should be no more than 300 words; final papers are optional (no more than 1000 words).

Authors are requested to submit abstracts by Friday, June 5th. Abstracts are being reviewed by a panel of PhD students, and accepted submissions will be notified by Friday 12th June.  Successful authors of papers will be invited to submit a short paper of up to 1500 words, for publication in our open access conference proceedings. Poster and Pecha Kucha presenters will also have the option of submitting a paper for publication.

To begin the submissions process, go to:
https://conferencepapers.shef.ac.uk/index.php/iFutures/if2015/about/submissions
N.B. When creating a profile please be sure to tick “Author” at the bottom of the registration page. Once you have created a profile, clicking on the User Home tab will allow you to begin a New Submission.

For more information please contact the iFutures team (ifutures@sheffield.ac.uk).

Big Data

Big Data

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

The Failure of Capitalism

The Failure of Capitalism

CYBER-PROLETARIAT: GLOBAL LABOUR IN THE DIGITAL VORTEX

NEW FROM PLUTO PRESS:

Cyber-Proletariat: Global Labour in the Digital Vortex

By Nick Dyer-Witheford

http://bit.ly/1AeNq5z

—————–

Praise for CYBER-PROLETARIAT:

‘Cyber-Proletariat tracks the eddies and flows of the perfect storm that is contemporary capitalism. This panoramic work reveals the relentless force of material destruction and brutal violence concealed by the sleek surfaces of digital culture’ – Benjamin Noys, Professor of Critical Theory, University of Chichester and author of Malign Velocities: Accelerationism and Capitalism

—————–

Coltan mines in the Congo; electronics factories in China; devastated neighbourhoods in Detroit. Cyber-Proletariat shows us the dark-side of the information revolution; an unsparing analysis of class power and computerisation.

Nick Dyer-Witheford reveals how technology facilitates growing polarisation between wealthy elites and precarious workers. He reveals the class domination behind everything from expanding online surveillance to intensifying robotisation. At the same time he looks at possibilities for information technology within radical movements; contemporary struggles are cast in the blue glow of the computer screen.

Cyber-Proletariat brings heterodox Marxist analysis to bear on modern technological developments. The result will be indispensable to social theorists and hacktivists alike and essential reading for anyone who wants to understand how Silicon Valley shapes the way we live today.

—————–

ON THE PLUTO BLOG: http://bit.ly/1HsH55Z

READ THE BOOK ONLINE: http://bit.ly/1K0fr0B

—————–

Want an inspection copy for your course? Visit www.plutobooks.com/lecturers.asp for more details.

Want a book for review? Email our publicity team at publicity@plutobooks.com.

Sign up to our newsletter for special offers, news and events: www.plutobooks.com/subscribe.asp.

Follow us online:

Twitter: @plutopress

Facebook: facebook.com/PlutoPress

Blog: plutopress.wordpress.com

YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCQoo96QH1KmyUkVc_Fd6ieg

Instagram: instagram.com/plutopress/

Flickr: flickr.com/photos/95999817@N02/

—————–

Paperback | 9780745334738 | £18.99 / $30 / €23
Hardback | 9780745334745 | £60 / $100 / €75

Kindle | 9781783712830 | £18.99 / $30 / €23
EPUB | 9781783712823 | £18.99 / $30 / €23
PDF | 9781783712816 | £60 / $99

Even Bigger Data

Even Bigger Data

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Information

Information

CREATIVE COMMONS AND EDUCATION – ARE WE THERE YET?
A UKSG event

Website: http://www.uksg.org/webinars/creativecommons
Date: Tuesday 9 June 2015
Time: 1400 BST
Duration: 45 minutes including Q&A (up to 60 minutes maximum if there is sufficient demand for an extended Q&A)

Speaker:
Joscelyn Upendran, Co-founder of Zilpa

Join Joscelyn for a look at Creative Commons licences, their impact and use in education.
This is a free webinar and open to all. If you are interested, but unable to join the live event, please register anyway as a recording will be made available to all who register.

For more information and to register, please visit http://www.uksg.org/webinars/creativecommons

Feedback from May’s webinar: “Open Access is a complex and potentially very contentious area, e.g. academic freedom to publish.  So amongst all the conflicting mandates and policies it was really useful to have the institutional role so clearly delineated – and an action plan to follow up on.” – Candace Guite, University of Stirling
92% of survey respondents would recommend May’s webinar.

Thank you for your attention. I do hope you can join us.
Maria
Maria Campbell
Digital Communications Associate, UKSG
E: maria@uksg.org
UKSG webinars: www.uksg.org/webinars

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Big Data

Big Data

THE POLITICS OF DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY

Call for Papers: ‘The Politics of Digital Technology’
Panel Proposal for the International Studies Association 57th Annual Conference, Atlanta Georgia, 16-19 March 2016
Convenors: Linda Monsees and David Chandler

The importance of technology, especially digital technologies, for world politics has increasingly caught the attention of IR-scholars. The so-called digital revolution asks us to rethink the role of technology in our current times and to consider how its specific characteristics might challenge traditional political ontologies. It is now widely acknowledged that technology is more than a residual category for theorizing world politics but in the centre of ongoing transformations. These transformations can be observed in real-world political debates and policy-making (Wikileaks and data gathering, the rule of the algorithm, digital humanitarianism, Big Data and the Internet of Things) and also in a growing theoretical interest in science and technology studies (STS) and the ‘material-turn’.

Contributing to this debate, this panel seeks to rethink the possibilities for theorizing the relationship between technology and politics. The current challenge lies in meaningfully conceptualizing technology and its relation to politics in a way that does not reduce technology to just another variable determining the outcome of policies. However, assuming that all technology is always already political might hinder us from understanding the specific linkages between technology and politics or the distinct characteristics enabling technology to be political. Insights from science and technology studies might help to engage with the social role of technology, but the question of how technology is political remains open. Adapting STS to political science might need additional tools for thoroughly engaging with the political aspects of technology. That is why we would like to bring scholars together who work from different theoretical perspectives and use a variety of approaches.

We welcome contributions that ask how we can grasp the distinct characteristics of the relationship between politics and technology. Theoretical and/or empirical contributions that aim at understanding the above outlined questions are welcomed. Possible contributions might ask about the politics of certain technologies, the specificities of digital technologies or how technologies might challenge traditional categories of International Relations.

Please send proposals with a title (limited to 50 words) and an abstract (limited to 200 words), three tags, and at least one author to Linda Monsees (lmonsees@bigsss.uni-bremen.de) and David Chandler (d.chandler@wmin.ac.uk) by 15 May 2015.

Best wishes,
Linda and David

David Chandler, Professor of International Relations, Director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW. Tel: ++44 (0)776 525 3073.
Journal Editor, Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/resi20
Amazon books page: http://www.amazon.co.uk/David-Chandler/e/B001HCXV7Y/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0
Personal website: http://www.davidchandler.org/
Twitter: @DavidCh27992090

Knowledge

Knowledge

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

SALVAGE

SALVAGE

SALVAGE

Salvage is a new quarterly magazine of politics, arts, culture and polemic. But magazines don’t come cheap…

For Issue 1 we’re asking for your help. For more information visit:

Salvage: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/salvage–3

—————

Issue 1 featuring Laura Oldfield Ford, Trish Kahle, Magpie Corvid, Rosie Warren, Joana Ramiro, Benjamin Kunkel, Alberto Toscano, Neil Davidson, China Mieville and more.

£10 / ISSN 2058-6361 / 1st May 2015

—————

The crisis of capitalism has been a crisis of its opposition. We stand in the rubble of the post-Left. The implosion has brought no victors but the predators…

With the financial crisis of 2008, it appeared to many that the neoliberal project would finally be laid to rest. The early signs – from Iceland to Greece, the Arab uprisings to Occupy – pointed to a renewed and reinvigorated left with the potential to break free from the ossified dogmas of the past and challenge the economic and political orthodoxy. Yet, seven years later and the neoliberal corpse staggers on while the Left, notwithstanding a few real glimmers of embattled hope, such as Syriza’s victory, lurches from one catastrophe to the next

Salvage Magazine is a new quarterly magazine of politics, art, culture and polemic aimed to debris neoliberalism. Founded in 2014 by Editors Rosie Warren and Jamie Allinson, Art Editor China Miéville, and Contributing Editors Richard Seymour, Charlotte Bence and Magpie Corvid, Salvage has drawn inspiration from the rise of intellectually, politically and culturally engaged publications on both sides of the Atlantic in the past decade,including Jacobin, Strike, n+1, New Inquiry and The White Review. ‘Intellectual and committed without being academic, dogmatic or philistine – and believing that serious content deserves the best design – its aim is to engage with the most pressing political and cultural questions of the day while advancing engagement and discussion on the left

Stridently internationalist and fearlessly political, Salvage issue 1 will feature a range of new and established writers, poets, activists and artists. It will include essays from some of the biggest names on the left: Magpie Corvid whores Marxism; Joana Ramiro reports from Greece; Jamie Allinson accelerates; Benjamin Kunkel defends the money-form; Rosie Warren objectifies women; China Miéville waxes Dystopian; Richard Seymour dissects Farrageism; Trish Kahle damns Missouri; Pablo Mukherjee submerges Modi; Alberto Toscano translates the forgotten genius of Salvage-Marxism; Kunle Wizeman is interviewed about the Nigerian political scene; Neil Davidson uncovers the Neoliberal gravediggers of capital; Morgan Merteuil builds the industrial struggle; Gareth Brown and Nicholas Beuret walk with the dead; Mark Bould roasts Milton Friedman; Mary Robertson rehouses Engels; Daniel Hartley communizes the Anthropocene.

With the poetry of:

Caitlin Doherty

Kunle Wizeman

With the artwork of:

Season Butler

Karen Mirza

Laura Oldfield Ford

With future projects by:

Jordan/a Rosenberg, Rob Knox, Charlotte Bence and many more.

—————

Of the £10,000:

£5000 will go on our first print run

£800 will pay our writers and artists

£3000 will pay our designer, Rupa, our accountant, Sylvia, and our videographer, Becky.

£1000 will pay the wages for a part-time admin assistant, John, at London living wage

£200 will pay for tote bags and merchandise

Anything we raise above £10,000 will help to pay for our launch and future events, and allow us to subsidise the next print run so that we can sell Salvage at the lowest price possible.

 

We will give you things for your donations.

 

£10 gets you

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on our website

 

£15 gets you

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on our website

& a tote bag

 

£20 gets you

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

 

£25 gets you

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

 

£35 gets you

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

& a Salvage keyring

 

£60 gets you

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

& Salvage keyring

& named thanks on the inside

& a one year subscription to Salvage (four issues)

 

£150 gets you

(x 50)

The first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

& named thanks on the inside

& lifetime subscription to Salvage

or

(x 3)

The first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

& named thanks on the inside

& a one year subscription to Salvage (four issues)

& one of three dirty stories written by Magpie Corvid written for and about YOU

 

£300 gets you (x 3)

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

& named thanks on the inside

& a one year subscription to Salvage (four issues)

& one advance copy of Three Moments of an Explosion, China Miéville’s forthcoming short-story collection (publishing in July 2015)

 

£1000 gets you (x 1)

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

& named thanks on the inside

& a one year subscription to Salvage (four issues)

& a one-of-a-kind copy of the Subterranean Press limited edition of Perdido Street Station personally ‘Salvaged’ by China Miéville

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/salvage-new-magazine-of-left-politics-art-culture-looking-for-funding

Salvaging, Steven Wilson: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gl2OJe5TwdQ

Salvage Too

Salvage Too

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

 

THE GLASS FORTRESS

THE GLASS FORTRESS

THE GLASS FORTRESS

A free adaptation of Zamyatin’s prospective novel “We”, this concept album will take you in the wake of D–503 and I–330, two freedom-and-passion loving people.

A Dystopia tinged with Revolutionary Romanticism, first of its kind.

Album available from January 15th 2015

 

Rémi Orts

Brave New World, 1984, The Wall, Equilibrium and more recently The Hunger Games, modern culture is haunted by the spectre of extremely well-organized societies whose apparent perfection conceals dark dictatorial worlds.

If this formal exercise is known to all, what is the intimate origin, the true source of its inspiration?
In fact, everything comes from a small Russian sci-fi novel published in 1920 by Yevgeny Zamyatin, “We “.

Rémi Orts Project and Alan B wish to pay tribute to this counter-utopia, first of its kind, by revisiting it in their concept album, “The Glass Fortress”.

Let yourself be taken in the wake of Daniel and Iris, two human beings opposed in every way, that nonetheless will rejoin in the same destiny, the choice of Life, even at their own peril…

Adapted from this album, a short film, innovative and moving, will be released in April 2015 with the collaboration of the talented photographer, Fanny Storck.

Lyrics : Alan B
Music : Rémi Orts
Photos : Fanny Storck
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cPuAwNUSLI8&list=PL5KtMvKvWwKDcTibMWVLeKg5YoHuCsZZ-&index=1

See: http://www.remiorts.com/index.php/albums-remiorts/41-remi-project/96-the-glass-fortress

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Big Data

Big Data

CRITICAL APPROACHES TO BIG DATA

Critical Approaches to Big Data

Part of the Living in the Anthropocene series: http://rethinkingtheanthropocene.blogspot.co.uk/
School of Arts & Creative Industries, London South Bank University
Friday 5 June 2015

The rise of Big Data is changing how we think about the world, or so it is claimed. The advent of ‘algorithmic regulation’ spells the death of politics, but might also allow us to ‘stop wars before they happen’. Datafication enables the rise of new paradigms in the sciences and humanities, but may also entail the ‘end of theory’. Does the rise of data-driven knowledge underscore the need for human interpretation and judgement, or does it confirm the post-humanist rejection of modernist assumptions about how we understand and act to transform the world? Big Data is still an emerging concept and its future uses and implications remain unclear, but this makes the development of critical perspectives more, rather than less, important.

With:

Prof David Chandler: Big Data & Posthumanism
Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster

Dr Mark Coté: Critically Engaging Big Social Data
Department of Culture, Media & Creative Industries, King’s College London

Prof Phil Hammond: From Computer-Aided to Data-Driven: Journalism & Big Data
School of Arts & Creative Industries, London South Bank University

Dr Athina Karatzogianni: Datafication as Resistance?
Department of Media & Communication, University of Leicester

Dr Nathaniel Tkacz: The Performance Platform
Centre for Interdisciplinary Methodologies, University of Warwick

 

This event is free and open to all but places are limited. Click here to book a free ticket: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/critical-approaches-to-big-data-tickets-15633371836

Bigger Data

Bigger Data

David Chandler, Professor of International Relations, Director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW. Tel: ++44 (0)776 525 3073.
Journal Editor, Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/resi20

Amazon books page: http://www.amazon.co.uk/David-Chandler/e/B001HCXV7Y/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Personal website: http://www.davidchandler.org/
Twitter: @DavidCh27992090

Even Bigger Data

Even Bigger Data

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

A World To Win

A World To Win

DEMOCRACY AND CITIZENSHIP

A WORLD TO WIN

This Monday evening, March 9th, starting at 7.00 pm, we have a critical webinar concerning Democracy and Citizenship, coming just two months before the general election.

It discusses how we can become active citizens and make democracy work for us.

The presenter, Cormac Russell, lectured for eight years on active citizenship and democracy at the National College of Ireland.

There is no charge for taking part.

Here’s the link:

Try to log is about five minutes before the webinar starts and you can test the link right now.

Please make every effort to partake and feel free to pass on this information to all your contacts.

 

Visit awtw network at: http://aworldtowin.ning.com/?xg_source=msg_mes_network

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Knowledge

Knowledge

CAPITAL AS COMPUTATION & COGNITION

 

Capital as Computation & Cognition: From Babbage’s Factory to Google’s Algorithmic Governance

Seminar syllabus [draft, in progress]

New Centre for Research and Practice, 3-24 March 2015.

Enroll –› thenewcentre.org/seminars/capital-as-computation-cognition

Instructor: Matteo Pasquinelli –› matteopasquinelli.org

 

Since the times of Smith, Ricardo and Marx, if not for even longer, capital has functioned as a form of computation constituted by and as a complex mathematical system. As Simondon noticed, the industrial machine was already an informational relay, that was separating the source of energy (nature) from the source of information (the human). After WWII the numeric essence of capital has been coupled with the informational dimension of cybernetics and computing machines, while also subsuming emergent forms of augmented intelligence. Capitalism, as a form of accounting and as an exterior mnemonic technique, is in itself a form of transhuman intelligence. Cognitive capitalism, Specifically, on the basis of its infonumeric procedures, from layman’s accounting to sophisticated algotrading, as well as from immaterial labour to scientific research, is an institution of computation.

The aim of the seminar is twofold: on the one hand, it will provide an introduction to some critical keywords (such as abstract labour, general intellect, cybernetic loop, calculation problem, immaterial labour, cognitive capitalism, augmented intelligence, computational limit, etc.) and to more recent debates around the technological form (on Accelerationism and algorithmic governance, for instance). On the other hand, the seminar wants to provide a compact and accurate bibliography about the canonical approaches to the relation between capital, technology, knowledge and labour. A specific attention will be given to the precise historical contexts in which fundamental ideas were originated and crucial books published. All the bibliographies are therefore compiled in chronological order to make genealogies and the circulation of ideas more comprehensible (and to clarify also epic misunderstandings, weak intepretations and harsh criticism).

The seminar in structured in four parts that correspond roughly to four different historical periods and to their relative types of machinic assemblage. The seminar aims to illuminate each historical moment according to a specific composition of the three variables: capital, computation and cognition. The first technological assemblage to be covered is Marx’s industrial machine, that inaugurated the bifurcation between energy and information. The second one is the cybernetic machine, distinguished by the feedback loop system and by the first experiments at the scale of national economy. Third, the Turing machine more in general will be taken as the basic diagram of cognitive capitalism and the network society and as the terrain of a further bifurcation, that is of the split between data and metadata. Fourth, algorithms for data mining will be discussed as models of the last stage of capitalism and its algorithmic governance, marking the passage from metadata to a global machinic intelligence.

Each seminar presents two or three historical and fundamental texts that are selected from a general bibliography. Documents that will be discussed during the seminar are underlined in bold and marked with an arrow (it is mandatory to read only the texts marked with an arrow: titles in bold are highly recommended). At the end of the seminar, students will be asked to pick up one text or more and to reconstruct how the diagram of the composition of capital/computation/cognition emerges in a specific author or historical moment, or to propose new trajectories of analysis.

 

As a general introduction to the seminar is recommended the reading of:

➡ Pasquinelli, Matteo (2014) “Italian Operaismo and the Information Machine“, Theory, Culture

and Society, first published 2 February 2014. http://matteopasquinelli.com/operaismo-informationmachine

➡ Pasquinelli, Matteo (2014) “Augmented Intelligence”, in: Critical Keywords for the Digital

Humanities, Lüneburg: Leuphana university, 2014.

http://cdckeywords.leuphana.com/augmented_intelligence

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/