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downloadWHY STUDY THE RICH?

Public Programme

April 23, 2016: 12.30-5.30pm, Free

Rabbits Roads Institute

Old Manor Park Library

835 Romford Road

Manor Park

London

E12 5JY
Map

An afternoon of talks and discussion

Refreshments served. Older children and young adults welcome.

Book via eventbrite.co.uk or email info@rabbitsroadinstitute.org

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‘Why study the Rich?’ is an event that brings together cross-disciplinary approaches to studying wealth in society. Come and listen to talks by activists, writers and artists whose scrutiny, investigation and differing perspectives attempt to challenge cultural narratives and societal structures that are intrinsically linked to the maintenance of power.

Open discussion with the audience is encouraged throughout the afternoon, as together we discuss how studies of ‘the rich’ might reveal a deeper understanding of the conditions of contemporary life and contribute to the debate about inequality in society.

 

Confirmed Speakers:

Roger Burrows, Professor of Cities at Newcastle University

Aditya Chakrabortty, senior economics commentator for The Guardian

Jeremy Gilbert, writer, researcher and activist & Professor of Cultural and Political Theory at UEL

Katharina Hecht, PhD student at LSE, on Economic Inequality

Jo Littler, Reader in Cultural Industries at City University London

Laure Provost, Artist, screening film ‘How to make money religiously

 

‘Why study the Rich?’ culminates a project called The Rich as a Minority Group by artists Ruth Beale and Amy Feneck in collaboration with GCSE Sociology students from Little Ilford School in Newham.

Rabbits Road Institute: http://createlondon.org/event/rabbits-road-institute/ and http://oldmanorparklibrary.org/rri/

Sign up to the Rabbits Road newsletter

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

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New Materialism

New Materialism

WHAT IS NEW MATERIALISM? MARXISMS, NEW MATERIALISMS AND THE NATURE / CULTURE DIVIDE

4th March 2016

Westminster Forum

5th Floor

University of Westminster

32-38 Wells Street

London

W1T 3UW
Tickets here 

Programme:

12 – 2: Plenary panel: David Chandler, Felicity Colman, Nicholas Kiersey, Phoebe Moore.
2.30 – 5.30: Speakers: Helen Palmer, Paul Rekret, Daniela Tepe–Belfrage, Michiel van Ingen. Discussant: Christian Fuchs

In response to a perceived prioritization of ‘mind over matter or culture over nature’ in the humanities and cultural studies, contemporary philosophers Braidotti and DeLanda separately named a shift in research that brings attention to the body or corporeal and explores immanence over transcendence in ontology as new materialism (or neo-materialism) in the 1990s. Since then, feminist, poststructuralist, historical materialist, science and technology, geography and critical realist researchers have begun to explore what it means to move away from the confines of discourse analysis and research that is limited to analysis of the cognitive, introducing research on human subjectivity as embodied, denying quantification of the affective field, rethinking categories of agency and causality and taking seriously questions around what it means to be human. New materialism is a critical ontological position that transcends thought traditions and advances studies that transgress mind-body dualism from the side of the mind and rejects research that eliminates possibilities for lived experiences except as efficient, rational, managed subjects.

The workshop ‘What is new in new materialism? Marxisms, new materialisms and the nature/culture divide‘ serves partly as an introduction to new materialism and partly as a space to critique and develop nascent work in this emerging area. We will ask, what is the difference between immanent, transcendental approaches and materialist ontology? Where do historical materialists stand on questions of nature and culture? What new questions of the human can we pose and what is the promise of the posthuman? Is this arena one where Marxist and poststr ucturalist agendas harmonise? What is the difference between mechanical materialism, historical materialism and new materialism? And, what is at stake in the connection between the human and materialism?

Co-organised with the Materialisms Reading Group run by David Chandler and & the CSE South Group run by Phoebe Moore and Martin Upchurch. (Capital & Class is the CSE journal.)

Conference of Socialist Economists (CSE): Two Spring Events: https://phoebevmoore.wordpress.com/2016/01/23/cse-south-group-two-spring-events/

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

New Materialism

New Materialism

Cultural Studies

Cultural Studies

INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL STUDIES: CULTURE, TECHNOLOGY AND POWER

A Free Course!

First Session: 23rd February 2016

OPEN SCHOOL EAST

 

Open School East
The Rose Lipman Building
43 De Beauvoir Rd
London N1 5SQ

 

Details of a free course in Cultural Studies at Open School East in London, starting next week, can be found at https://jeremygilbertwriting.wordpress.com/2016/02/10/free-course-introduction-to-cultural-studies-culture-technology-power/

Please disseminate to anyone who might be interested
Thanks
Jeremy Gilbert
http://www.jeremygilbert.org
@jemgilbert

 

Free Course! Introduction to Cultural Studies: Culture, Technology & Power

From February to June this year, I’ll be teaching on a free fortnightly course at Open School East in Dalston which will be be covering a number of key issues in contemporary cultural politics – race, gender, sexuality, technology, neoliberalism, music, money, the future, etc. I’ll be taking most of the sessions – Stephen Maddison will do the one on queer politics.

Anyone is welcome and it should be very interesting.

These lectures / seminar are technically the second part of a free course titled ‘Introduction to Cultural Studies: Culture, Technology & Power’, but they should be accessible and interesting whether you are completely new to these things, or an advanced cultural theory postgrad, or anything in between.

Please do pass on to anyone who might be interested.

For more details about the course, the context, etc. see HERE and HERE

 

Open School East: http://www.openschooleast.org/

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

images (9)SPACE, IDENTITIES AND MEMORY

Birkbeck Institutes of Social Research and the Humanities Graduate Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS

Space, Identities and Memory

Deadline for Submission of Abstracts: 11/03/2016.

Contact: bihbisrconference@gmail.com

We invite postgraduate researchers, academics, activists, artists, and practitioners from across disciplines to contribute to the Birkbeck Institutes’ (BIH/BISR) annual two day conference held from the 13th to the 14th  May 2016.

This year’s conference theme seeks to examine the interplay between identity, space and memory, exploring the ways in which identities may be created, formed and informed by spatial and temporal contexts. In particular, we seek to examine to what extent identities are performed in response to political, social and cultural pressures, including historical circumstances leading to the construction of acceptable and unacceptable identities.

The conference aims to capture the complex overlaying of identities in time and space, and the agency of individuals and communities as they address their own complex understandings of the temporality of identity. Conversely, we hope the conference will highlight how space and time are influenced and shaped by everyday life, sociabilities, mobilisations and processes of subjectivation. In particular we are seeking papers that engage with topics such as:

 

  • The built environment: how are housing, architecture, urbanity and concepts of public and private space harnessed in the self-fashioning of individual and communal identity?
  • Gender, sexuality and race, the politics of becoming and the deterritorialisation of the body;
  • ’Home’, domesticity and concepts of solitude and isolation across time and space;
  • Spaces of dissent and resistance: how is memory imbricated in public spaces as sites of encounters, direct action and creative practices?
  • Displacements and borders: constructing or disassembling boundaries from local to global;
  • Explorations in the use of maps, social cartography and critical geography;
  • Exclusion and inclusion in institutional spaces: how have institutionalised spaces cemented or challenged contemporary and past perspectives on identity?
  • Narrating the past: memorialisation, contestation and re-enactment
  • Innovative methods and approaches in the investigation of the intersections between space, identity and memory

 

Our first confirmed keynote speaker is Andy Merrifield. The conference will conclude with a round table bringing together activists, practitioners and academics.

This is an interdisciplinary conference, designed to foster creative thinking and new research agendas. To this end, we encourage papers from a diversity of disciplinary backgrounds that explore the interconnections of space, identity and memory.

We are particularly interested in receiving contributions from artists and practitioners in education, the heritage sector or related fields to participate in this interdisciplinary conference.

Proposals

We warmly welcome abstracts for 20-minute panel papers. Abstracts should be between 200-300 words in length. Please include a short biography with your submission.  The deadline for submission of abstracts is the 11/03/2016. Authors will be notified regarding the acceptance of their paper after submissions have been reviewed and no later than 31/03/2016.

Contact Details

Please send enquiries and proposals to Beth Hodgett, Calum Wright, Eva Lauenstein & Moniza Rizzini at:

bihbisrconference@gmail.com

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

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LONDON MATERIALISMS READING GROUP MEETINGS

We are very pleased to announce an exciting series of events co-sponsored/co-organised by the Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster:

1) The next London Materialisms Reading Group meeting is:

Thursday 3 December 2015 – Nick Srnicek (co-author of the Verso manifesto Inventing the Future: Postcapitalism and a World Without Work) will be introducing Graham Harman’s Bruno Latour: Reassembling the Political

Future dates for your diary:

21. Thursday 21 January 2016 – Philip Cunliffe (University of Kent) will be introducing Alexander Wendt’s Quantum Mind and Social Science: Unifying Physical and Social Ontology

22. Thursday 25 February 2016 – introduction (tbc) we will be discussing Chapter 1 ‘Introduction: Rhizome’ of Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari’s A Thousand Plateaus

23. Thursday 31 March 2016 – Michiel van Ingen (University of Westminster) will be introducing Kate Soper’s What is Nature: Culture, Politics and the Non-Human

Reading group meetings are open to all and take place Thursdays 6.30-8.00pm, Westminster Forum, Department of Politics and International Relations, 5th Floor, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW (5 minutes from Oxford Circus tube). Wine and nibbles are provided.

 

If you wish to be on the Materialisms Reading Group mailing list please email me at d.chandler@wmin.ac.uk. Further information available here: http://www.davidchandler.org/materialisms/.

2) The next in the Living in the Anthropocene series of workshops is:

Decolonising the Anthropocene
Friday 27 November, 1-5pm, Westminster Forum, Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW (5 minutes walk from Oxford Circus tube station)

Convenors: Olivia Rutazimbwa (University of Portsmouth), Angela Last (Glasgow University), Kathryn Yusoff (Queen Mary)

Speakers and roundtable discussants: Patricia Noxolo (Birmingham), Robbie Shilliam (Queen Mary), Kathryn Yusoff (Queen Mary), Olivia Rutazibwa (Portsmouth), Angela Last (Glasgow).

The concept of the Anthropocene involves the rejection of one of modernity’s most important tenets: the nature/culture divide. Yet from a post-western perspective this can hardly be seen as a ground-breaking discovery. The colonial experience has for long evidenced the destructive nature of this divide while indigenous cosmologies, religious worldviews as well as other (non-western) philosophies have provided alternatives to the nature/culture divide and continue to do so. Does the holistic and relational understanding of reality entailed in the idea of the Anthropocene present an opportunity to rethink the sources of our knowledge production and work towards a more inclusive and sustainable use and distribution of the available planetary resources; or is the ‘discovery’ of the Anthropocene yet another stage of Eurocentric knowledge production?

Who sets the agenda, which voices and topics continue to be silenced and do they consolidate or dissipate existing inequalities? How much space is there for the ‘pluriversality’ Walter Mignolo calls for in the potentially totalising proclamation of the Anthropocene? What does the attention to complexity and non-linearity mean for post- and decolonial understandings and attachment to issues of agency, autonomy and self-determination? This workshop will examine these and other questions, both theoretically and empirically, to explore the merits and challenges of the Anthropocene to decoloniality and vice versa. Understood as a triple invitation to de-mythologise, de-silence and de-colonise, decoloniality combines both a deconstructive toolbox for critique at the epistemological level and a constructive imperative to counter the colonial (material) forms of extreme power inequality.

Information and registration here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/decolonising-the-anthropocene-tickets-19330332545 further information on the series: http://rethinkingtheanthropocene.blogspot.co.uk/

3) Call for papers, Centre for the Study of Democracy and Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment joint University of Westminster workshop:

Design After Planning: Examining the Shift from Epistemology to Topology https://designafterplanning.wordpress.com/

10.00 – 17:30, Friday 5 February 2016, University of Westminster, London

Confirmed keynote speakers:  Filip de Boeck (KU Leuven) & Erik Swyngedouw (University of Manchester)

The question of how different types of ‘planning’ should deal with uncertainty has taken on fresh importance. On the one hand, existential threats such as climate change, overpopulation, and new forms of global conflict expand the temporal and spatial horizons of our sense of responsibility as never before. On the other, the world is constructed increasingly as emergent, complex and non-linear; the ‘wicked’ problems it throws up are not amenable to modernist, top-down solutions. The intelligence required to tackle contemporary problems is understood to be dispersed and enacted, rather than a pre-given object to be gathered by the state. In Mol’s (2002) formulation, epistemological questions (‘how can we be sure?’) are increasingly usurped by pragmatic ones (‘how can we live with doubt?’).

In this embrace of uncertainty, concerns over the limitations of representational ‘modelling’ are being dislodged by an ideal of unmediated, dynamic problem-resolution whereby the ‘topologies’ of complex reality continually reveal themselves. In practical terms, this has entailed a shift towards iterative processes of dispersed governance; policy makers no longer attempt to impose order on a chaotic outside, but rather attempt to ‘see’ through the emergent systems themselves. Thus, goals of international developmental aid are no longer determined from the centre so much as coproduced in specific locations with the aid of the internet of things and the citizen as sensor; top-down planning of the built environment has given way to localised, discursive decision-making alongside an embrace of informality; the residual modernism of sustainable development is increasingly inflected with ‘resilience’.

If the broad project here is to work with emerging, complex systems, rather than against or in spite of them, might it then be productive to conceptualise the role of governing and city-making in terms of ‘design’ rather than planning?  If so, is there value in retheorising design so as more explicitly to capture contemporary interactive logics of emergent causality and agency?  Or, alternatively, does linear planning have a newly important role to play? Might it function as a type of normative resistance to the ‘market logic’ with which these new forms of governance are perhaps aligned?

We plan to include three panels on: • disaster and risk design – examining the rise of topological approaches to international aid and disaster relief, digital humanitarianism, crowd-sourcing and citizens as sensors • designing with emergent urban systems – exploring the potential for iterative and decentred modes of governance and urban design to overcome the shortcomings of liberal-modernist planning • resilience versus sustainability – investigating the theoretical and practical purchase of resilience and sustainability in relation to the ‘topologies’ of complex reality, and the problematic theoretical interface between the two concepts.

Submitting abstracts: We invite papers relating to any of the panels above, which contribute to a theorisation of spatial planning and urban, national, or international governance as processes of design, as well as those which question this endeavour. Speakers from all academic disciplines are welcome to participate (and there will be no registration fee).Please send your abstract (c.350 words) to: Isis Nunez Ferrera (i.nunez-ferrera@psi.org.uk), Tudor Vilcan (tudorvilcan@gmail.com), and Rob Cowley (robert.cowley@kcl.ac.uk) by 1 December 2015.

Best wishes,
David Chandler, Professor of International Relations, Director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW. Tel: ++44 (0)776 525 3073.
Journal Editor, Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/resi20

Amazon books page: http://www.amazon.co.uk/David-Chandler/e/B001HCXV7Y/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Personal website: http://www.davidchandler.org/
Twitter: @DavidCh27992090

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

The City

The City

MEDIATED CITIES

Mediated Cities Book Series

Open Call for Contributions
Intellect Books will launch its Mediated Cities book series April 01-03, 2016 with three books.

Digital Futures and the City of Today:  New Technologies and Physical Spaces. ISBN: 978-1-78320-560-8
Filming the City: Urban Documents, Design Practices & Social Criticism Through the Lens. ISBN: 978-1-78320-554-7
Imaging the City: Art, Creative Practices and Media Speculations. ISBN: 978-1-78320-557-8

This is a call for chapter contributions for the following book in the series from the perspective of all disciplines that engage with issues of the city, its design, mediation, representation and experience.

Contributions are welcome from urban design, planning, cultural studies, digital art, emerging technologies, social media, film, photography  etc.

The next book in the series will be drawn from the conference: Digital-Cultural Ecology and the Medium-Sized City.

For details: http://architecturemps.com/bristol-uk/

ABSTRACT DEADLINE: 15th NOVEMBER, 2015

This conference is organised by the journal Architecture_MPS, Intellect Books, the University of the West of England and the Centre for Moving Image Research. The publication series is a joint AMPS / Intellect Books initiative. See: http://architecturemps.com/publications-2/

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Commons

Commons

AFFECTS AND AESTHETICS OF THE UNDERCOMMONS

Call for Papers: Affects & Aesthetics of the Undercommons
As part of the 8th Art of Management & Organization Conference
1st-4th September 2016 @ Bled, Slovenia
Conference theme: Empowering the intangible: exploring, feeling and expressing through the arts
See: http://www.artofmanagement.org/bled-slovenia-2016/

What affects circulate within the undercommons today (Harney & Moten, 2013)?

What is the relation between affective spaces and aesthetics in the construction of forms of collective intelligence and subjectivities, particularly in the ways this relation is worked with to expand forms of political action? The undercommons are organized through “engaging aesthetic rationality in the process of political transformation, of turning politics into art, everyday life into an aesthetically governed domain” (Katsiaficas 2001) – a “minor politics” (Thoburn 2003): one that is not based upon calling forth an already existing identity or position, but rather a politics based on a continual intensive and affective engagement of constant self-institution.

Might it be possible that we are already enmeshed in a world of unidentified autonomous organizations, a milieu of potential liberation that has remained imperceptible because of a narrow understanding of what organizations are? And might it not be that this imperceptibly, rather than being a condition to be addressed as a problem, could rather be part of building of what Robin D.G. Kelley and James Scott (2002) call an infrapolitical sphere: a space for politics coming out of people’s everyday experiences that do not express themselves as radical political organization at all.

As a conference stream “Affects & Aesthetics of the Undercommons” proposes to explore the these temporary and constantly shifting, yet always renewed, forms of organizing: the organizing that takes beneath and below as well as outside of formal organizations. These relations and their affectivity embody and express the movement of the social imaginary, or the constant process of becoming. Revolutions of everyday life, whether unseen or encoded in a hidden transcript, exists as a privileged location for political analysis and action precisely because it is where forms of collective intelligence, creativity, and social wealth are manifested.

Please send proposals / abstracts to s.shukaitis@essex.ac.uk by December 7th, 2015.
This stream is welcoming of non-standard forms of presentation, performance, and intervention.

Commons

Commons

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Dreamscape

Dreamscape

PRETERNATURAL ENVIRONMENTS: DREAMSCAPES, ALTERNATE REALITIES, LANDSCAPES OF DREAD

Call for Papers for a special issue of Preternature (Issue 6.1)

Preternatural Environments: Dreamscapes, Alternate Realities, Landscapes of Dread

Deadline for submissions: March 1, 2016.

This special issue of Preternature seeks papers that examine elements and/or depictions of the preternatural in all sorts of environments. Scholars are increasingly drawing attention to the importance of spaces and their contexts, the stories we tell about them, and our interactions with them. This volume focuses on preternatural aspects of natural and unnatural environments such as dreamscapes, alternate worlds, and eerie landscapes.

Papers should investigate the connections between preternatural environments and literary, historical, anthropological, and artistic forms of understanding. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • Defining the “preternatural environment” / preternatural aspects of an environment.
  • Superstition and spaces.
  • Demonic domains.
  • Artistic representations of preternatural environments across the ages.
  • Aspects of the uncanny in various physical settings.
  • The pathetic fallacy and narrative theory.
  • “Unnatural” landscapes and environments.
  • Bridging natural and preternatural spaces.
  • Preternatural ecology and ecocriticism.
  • Connections between material environments, literary narratives, and the preternatural.
  • Eerie landscapes as characters or significant presences in literature, history, and culture.
  • How preternatural environments inform human behaviour, or how behaviour informs preternatural environments.

Preternature welcomes a variety of approaches, including narrative theory, ecocriticism, and behavioural studies from any cultural, literary, artistic, or historical tradition and from any time period. We particularly encourage submissions dealing with non-Western contexts.

Contributions should be 8,000 – 12,000 words, including all documentation and critical apparatus.

For more information, see: http://www.psupress.org/journals/jnls_submis_Preternature.html or submit directly at: https://www.editorialmanager.com/preternature/default.aspx.

Preternature is published twice annually by the Pennsylvania State Press and is available through JSTOR and Project Muse. This periodical is also indexed in the ATLA Religion Database® (ATLA RDB®), http://www.atla.com.

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Preternature: Critical and Historical Studies on the Preternatural can be viewed at: https://muse.jhu.edu/journals/preternature/

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

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Materialisms

Materialisms

MATERIALISMS READING GROUP

16. Thursday 23 July 2015, we will be discussing McKenzie Wark’s ‘Molecular Red: Theory for the Anthropocene’ which will be introduced by Paul Rekret (Richmond University). For those interested, here is Zizek’s short review of the book: http://www.versobooks.com/blogs/2007-ecology-against-mother-nature-slavoj-zizek-on-molecular-redand Wark’s reply: http://www.publicseminar.org/2015/06/zizek3/#.VXLTrzY4nTa

17. Thursday 10 September 2015 – Miriam Tedeschi (University IUAV, Venice) will be introducing Gilles Deleuze’s ‘Spinoza: Practical Philosophy’

18. Thursday 8 October 2015 – Elisabetta Brighi (University of Westminster) will be introducing Deborah Cowen’s ‘The Deadly Life of Logistics: Mapping Violence in Global Trade’

19. Thursday 5 November 2015 – Graham Jones will be introducing John Protevi’s ‘Political Affect: Connecting the Social and the Somatic’

20. Thursday 3 December 2015 – Nick Srnicek will be introducing Graham Harman’s ‘Bruno Latour: Reassembling the Political’

Meetings are open to all and take place Thursdays 6.30-8.00pm, Westminster Forum, Department of Politics and International Relations, 5th Floor, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW (5 minutes from Oxford Circus tube).

Wine and nibbles will be provided, sponsored by the Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster and the Centre for Media & Culture Research, London South Bank University.

Suggestions for meetings after Xmas that we have on the table:

Michiel van Ingen (University of Westminster) introducing Kate Soper’s ‘What is Nature: Culture, Politics and the Non-Human’

Philip Cunliffe (University of Kent) introducing Alexander Wendt’s ‘Quantum Mind and Social Science: Unifying Physical and Social Ontology’

David Chandler (University of Westminster) introducing Louise Amoore’s ‘The Politics of Possibility: Risk and Security beyond Probability’

 

If you wish to be added to the Materialisms Reading Group mailing list please contact me at d.chandler@wmin.ac.uk

Best wishes,
David

 

David Chandler, Professor of International Relations, Director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Westminster, 32-38 Wells Street, London, W1T 3UW. Tel: ++44 (0)776 525 3073.
Journal Editor, Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/resi20

Amazon books page: http://www.amazon.co.uk/David-Chandler/e/B001HCXV7Y/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Personal website: http://www.davidchandler.org/
Twitter: @DavidCh27992090

STUFF

STUFF

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Stand-up

Stand-up

COMEDY ON STAGE AND PAGE

A cartoons and stand-up comedy conference

Call for Papers

UNIVERSITY OF KENT, CANTERBURY, 14-15 JANUARY 2016

We are pleased to announce a two-day conference to celebrate the British Stand-Up Comedy Archive and the British Cartoon Archive, both based at the University of Kent. We aim to bring together scholars, archivists, comedians, cartoonists and others who have donated materials to our archives.

The British Stand Up Comedy Archive and British Cartoon Archive, both based at the University of Kent, are pleased to announce a combined two day conference, to take place in January next year.

By its nature, stand-up is an ephemeral performance genre, built on the idea of liveness. Unlike play texts, which can be published and studied and revived years after the initial production, stand-up comedy exists in the moment, and can easily be forgotten once the performance ends. The British Stand-Up Comedy Archive collects what is left behind after the performance is finished including unpublished recordings (audio or video, in any format), set lists, scripts, publicity materials (e.g. posters, flyers, photos), booking diaries, con-tracts, and more unusual ephemera (e.g. props, costume items, etc.).

See: http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/standupcomedyarchive/

The British Cartoon Archive exists to encourage and facilitate the study of cartoons and caricatures published in the United Kingdom. Since 1973, the Cartoon Archive has built up a unique collection of over 140,000 pieces of cartoon artwork supported by a reference library of newspaper cuttings, books, catalogues and magazines, and it is widely used by researchers, authors, teachers, the media and students.

See: http://www.cartoons.ac.uk/

Papers are being solicited which may explore such issues as:

  • Public persona and comic identity
  • Comic timing and delivery
  • Relationship with readers and audiences
  • Visual and verbal references
  • Joke structure
  • Control, censorship & the boundaries of taste
  • Politics & satire
  • Stereotypes and symbols
  • Humour as a career

Papers might explore one or more of these issues in relation to stand-up comedy, or in relation to cartoons, but we would also be interested in papers which explore them in relation to both stand-up and cartoons. Abstracts of 300 words should be submitted by 5pm, Friday 2nd October 2015 to: standup@kent.ac.uk

Jane Gallagher | Senior Special Collections Assistant

Special Collections & Archives, Information Services, University of Kent

Templeman Library

Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NU, UK

Tel: +44 (0)1227 823127

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Social Movements

Social Movements

OCCUPATION CULTURE

New book on art & squatting released…
Occupation Culture: Art & Squatting in the City from Below
Alan W. Moore

Occupation Culture is the story of a journey through the world of recent political squatting in Europe, told by a veteran of the 1970s and ‘80s New York punk art scene. It is also a kind of scholar adventure story. Alan W. Moore sees with the trained eye of a cultural historian, pointing out pasts, connections and futures in the creative direct action of today’s social movements.

Occupation Culture is based on five years of travel and engaged research. It explicates the aims, ideals and gritty realities of squatting. Despite its stature as a leading social movement of the late twentieth century, squatting has only recently received scholarly attention. The rich histories of creative work that this movement enabled are almost entirely unknown.

PDF available freely online: http://www.minorcompositions.info/?p=684

“Reporting on close to forty years of exploits Alan W. Moore’s Occupation Culture is no academic treatise but a Picaresque adventure story filled with both detailed observations and broader reflections on the political and cultural significance of art and squatting that stretches across the Atlantic from the United States to Europe.” – Gregory Sholette, author of Dark Matter: Art and Politics in the Age of Enterprise Culture

“Occupy wasn’t just a movement, it is a long-standing strategy and, frankly, a form of living. Alan W. Moore has seen firsthand more squats and occupations than anyone, and he brings his sensibility to bear on this global phenomena. A must read for occupiers, whether artist, activist or renter.” – Nato Thompson, curator at Creative Time, editor of Living as Form: Socially Engaged Art from 1991-2011

Bio: Alan W. Moore worked with the artists’ groups Colab and helped start the cultural center ABC No Rio in New York City. He has published on artists’ groups, cultural districts and cultural economies, and is the author of Art Gangs: Protest and Counterculture in New York City (2011). He lives in Madrid.

Released by Minor Compositions, Wivenhoe / Brooklyn / Port Watson
Minor Compositions is a series of interventions & provocations drawing from autonomous politics, avant-garde aesthetics, and the revolutions of everyday life.

Minor Compositions is an imprint of Autonomedia
www.minorcompositions.info | minorcompositions@gmail.com

 

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Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

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images (5)DICTIONARY OF UNTRANSLATABLES

Book Launch

Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon, edited by Barbara Cassin, Princeton University press, Princeton and Oxford 2014.

Goldsmiths College, University of London

26th June 2015, 5pm

French philosopher and philologist Barbara Cassin visits Goldsmiths on 26 June to launch both her new book and our latest multi-disciplinary research centre, the Centre for Philosophy and Critical Thought (CPCT).

At the evening event organised by Dr Alberto Toscano (Co-Director, CPCT) and Filippo Del Lucchese (Brunel University), Barbara will be joined by Étienne Balibar (Kingston), Lucie Campos (Institut Français) and Jacques Lezra (NYU) for a panel discussion on Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon – an encyclopedic dictionary of 400 important philosophical, literary, and political terms and concepts that defy easy, or any, translation from one language and culture to another.

The Centre for Philosophy and Critical Thought was established in May 2015, based in Sociology, and run jointly with the Centre for Cultural Studies. Its Co-Directors are Alberto Toscano (Sociology) and Julia Ng (CCS). CPCT has anacademic membership and advisory board drawn from various departments across the college, and an international roster of external affiliates.

A home for philosophical inquiry and rigorous intellectual dialogue at Goldsmiths, the Centre’s work draws on those traditions which view the practices of critique and criticism as central to the definition of philosophy, and which consider reflection on philosophy’s complex relationships with other disciplines and forms of thought as constitutive of philosophical activity itself.

CPCT will provide teaching and learning support for the Philosophy modules on the new Politics, Philosophy & Economics (PPE) degree, based in Politics.

All are welcome to attend the launch event on 26 June (5pm-8pm, RHB 137a) – booking is not required.

For more information, visit www.gold.ac.uk/sociology/research-centres/cpct.

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/book-launch-dictionary-of-untranslatables-a-philosophical-lexicon-edited-by-barbara-cassin-princeton-university-press-princeton-and-oxford-2014

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/