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Marx's Grave

Marx’s Grave

HISTORICAL MATERIALISM CONFERENCE NEW YORK: RETURNS OF CAPITAL

New York University, April 24-26, 2015

http://hmny.org/

Capitalism is “back,” in more ways than one.  Since the crisis of 2008, academics and commentators beyond the usual confines of the Marxist left have once again begun discussing capitalism as a system.  Debates about class, exploitation, and inequality have assumed a prominence they have not seen in decades, exemplified in the media event surrounding the publication of Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the 21st Century.  Prompting these discussions is a capitalism that has “returned to form”. Austerity, casualization and precarity, and naked class aggression—attributes of capitalism proper rather than merely its neoliberal variant—have intensified. The years since the crisis have suggested that neoliberalism was no mere interlude, but rather a prelude to the “new normal.” But how “new” is this normalcy? Aspects of capitalism in the Victorian era are back—and for now, here to stay. Although this is in no way unprecedented, they represent new challenges to Marxist inquiry.

HMNY 2015 seeks to examine these twin returns.  What are the analytic  challenges of these returns within capitalism?  What have been the costs of the absence of Marxist answers?  In what ways has capitalism returned to form, while continuing to present novel problems?  And what does all of this mean for movements contesting capital?

The conference is part of an international project tied to the Historical Materialism journal and book series, published by Brill. The journal also sponsors conferences that take place in London, Toronto, Delhi, Rome and Australia. Please note: the HM conference is not a conventional academic conference, but rather a space for discussion, debate and the launching of collective projects. We strongly encourage speakers to participate in the whole of the conference.

For questions about submission policy and process, logistics, or anything else related to the conference, please email hmnewyork2014@gmail.com.

Abstracts may be submitted at http://hmny.org/ (Click on “CFP HMNY 2015”). Abstracts should be approximately 200 words, and the deadline for proposals is January 15, 2015. We especially welcome submissions and, in particular, panel proposals,  around the following conference themes:

TRACKS

  • Contemporary class formation
  • Capitalism, Ecology and Alternatives
  • New Research on the Socialist and Communist Tradition
  • Philosophical Foundations of Marxism
  • Politics and Philosophy of Gender
  • Circulation and Logistics
  • Revolution and Counterrevolution in the Middle East
  • The Economic and Political Logic of Austerity
  • Race, the State, and Capital
  • Marxism and Aesthetics
  • Capital and Sexuality
  • Debt and Finance in the Political Economy of Capitalism
  • Theories of Crisis
  • State Violence and Mass Incarceration
  • Social Protests: Riots, Revolt, Organization
  • Echoes of the Long 1970s: Wildcats and Rank and File Rebellion
  • Makings of the World Working Class
  • Revolution and Reform in Latin America

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

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AHE Conference

AHE Conference

ASSOCIATION OF HETERODOX ECONOMICS – 17th ANNUAL CONFERENCE

CALL FOR PAPERS

When: July 2-4th 2015
Where: Southampton Solent University, UK

Conference Theme: Growth, Cycles and Sustainability

The conference theme concerns growth. How to create it, sustain it and can we avoid the ups and downs of it. Is it good anyway given our environmental challenges, and if growth actually happens will it be even or increase inequality further. Finally, when will it end again in crisis?

Please send us abstracts, whether related to the conference theme or any other heterodox topic area, by 31st January 2015.

Refereed and non-refereed options will be available for your paper (details to follow).

Please send all communications to: nick.potts@solent.ac.uk and simon.mouatt@solent.ac.uk
Further detail on conference fees, accommodation options to follow in due course.

Association for Heterodox Economics: http://hetecon.net/

Southampton Solent University

Southampton Solent University

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Books

Books

JSPE-ROUTLEDGE BOOK PRIZE

The Japan Society of Political Economy (JSPE) is happy to announce the creation of the JSPE-Routledge Book Prize. The JSPE is an interdisciplinary association devoted to the study, development, and application of political economy to social problems. It has been the largest organization of heterodox economists in Japan since its founding in 1959, providing important occasions for developing and debating ideas about capitalism and its dynamics. The JSPE wishes to play a more active role in promoting political economy and heterodox economics internationally.

The Book prize is financially supported by Routledge, which is the world’s leading academic publisher in the Humanities and Social Sciences, serving scholars, instructors, and professional communities worldwide. The prize encourages members of the JSPE to publish their work in English and to challenge the growing dominance of orthodox neo-liberal economics among economists and policy-makers. It also promotes studies in heterodox economics all over the world. It is the hope of the members of the JSPE that this prize in political economy will become equivalent to other great international economic prizes, such as the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences, which is given only to mainstream economists. The winner of this prize in any given year will be invited to the JSPE annual conference in Japan and will receive an award certificate and monetary grant (sponsored by Routledge).

Further information: http://www.routledge.com/economics/articles/the_japan_society_of_political_economy_book_prize/

http://www.jspe.gr.jp/en_jspe-routledge_prize

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/jspe-announces-creation-of-the-jspe-routledge-book-prize

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Capitalist Crises

Capitalist Crises

CRISIS AND SOCIAL CHANGE: TOWARDS ALTERNATIVE HORIZONS

Cambridge Sociology Conference

September 26-27, 2014

Crisis and Social Change: Towards Alternative Horizons
Call for Papers: Deadline Monday July 21st.
Organized by the Department of Sociology, Cambridge University
Venue: Faculty of Human, Social, and Political Sciences, Free School Lane, Cambridge, CB2 3RQ

This conference moves beyond crisis as a category of diagnosis and critique to explore alternative horizons, raising fundamental questions about the nature and extent of ruptures and continuity in the contemporary social world.

Among the multiple horizons in view, we are motivated by the generational need to draw upon the legacies of critique, while shifting toward the production of alternative futures.

From diagnosis to treatment. From deconstruction to reconstruction. From negation to vision. From crisis to progress. Such is the responsibility of our Age, from which positive social change might rise.

We welcome contributions from researchers, activists, artists, and professionals from across the world on the following topics, though this list is by no means exhaustive, and we are keen to receive contributions on other topics aligned with the conference theme:

*   CRITICAL AND EMPANCIPATORY THOUGHT AND ACTION
*   SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION AND CITIES
*   ALTERNATIVE ECONOMIC PRACTICES
*   WORK AND LIFE
*   MEDIA
*   EDUCATION
*   REVOLUTIONS AND SOCIAL PROTEST
*   (POST) DEMOCRACY
*   ENVIRONMENT

We have also introduced a soapbox session within the Conference programme and encourage speakers to participate. For the natural orators out there, the soapbox session provides you with the opportunity to stand up for 2 minutes and air your fiery, risky, extravagant and controversial views on the following question: WHAT IS RADICALISM?

The conference is organized by PhD students from the Department of Sociology, University of Cambridge. To give attendees time to explore the city’s history and socialise, the conference will be held over two days.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS:
We are pleased to announce our three distinguished keynote speakers
– Professor Greg Philo (School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Glasgow),
– Professor Emeritus Goran Therborn (Faculty of Human, Social and Political Sciences, University of Cambridge)
– Professor Ted Benton (Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Essex)

PLENARY PANELS:
The conference will also host two plenary panels on the following themes:

Plenary panel 1: The Great Recession and Varieties of Social and Political Responses

Chair: Professor Andrew Gamble
Dr. Rowan Williams (tbc)(Master of Magdalene College, Cambridge), Professor Larry King (Dept. of Sociology, Cambridge), Professor John Kelly (Dept. of Management, Birkbeck), and Dr. Jeff Miley (Dept. of Sociology, Cambridge)

Plenary panel 2: Mobilisation, Social Change and Revolution
Chair: Barrister Dexter Dias QC
Professor P.G Klandermans (Dept. of Applied Psychology, University of Amsterdam), Emeritus Reader in Sociology Dr. David Lane (Dept. of Sociology, Cambridge), Professor Jane Wills (Dept. of Geography, Queen Mary University of London) and Dr. Manali Desai (Dept. of Sociology, Cambridge)

HOW TO SUBMIT:
Paper presentation: abstract (300 word max.) and biography (100 word max.)
Poster presentation: abstract (300 word max.) and biography (100 word max.)
Soap box presentation: abstract (100 word max.) and biography (100 word max.)

SUBMISSION DEADLINE:
The deadline for the submission of abstracts is Monday, July 21st 2014. There is no
registration fee.
All abstracts must be submitted by visiting the Ex Ordo abstract submission system (you will be required to setup an account first): http://csc2014.exordo.com/
Successful applicants will be informed by July 31st, 2014.
The selected applicants are expected to submit an outline of their presentation (or the power
point slides) by September 1st, 2014

PUBLICATION AND AWARDS:
Awards will be given for Best Paper, Best Poster and Best Soap Box Presentations at the end of the Conference in recognition of originality and excellence. The Organising Committee also plans to publish selected papers of the highest quality in a special issue of a UK journal or as an edited volume.

FURTHER INFORMATION:
For further details on our distinguished keynote speakers and plenary panelists please visit: http://www.towardsalternativehorizons.wordpress.com,

Email the organising committee at: towardsalternativehorizons@gmail.com

Or visit our Facebook page: www.facebook.com/events/850509748311055

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Green World

Green World

GREEN GROWTH: CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES

Call for Papers

We invite PhD students and early career-researchers based in Britain and in the member countries of the Asia-Pacific Network for Global Change Research (China, India, US, Australia, etc.) to submit papers for a symposium on ‘Green Growth,’ organized by the United Nations University Institute for the Advanced Study of Sustainability (UNU-IAS) Tokyo, on 25th and 26th July 2014. Funds are available to cover travel and accommodation expenses for accepted participants, from the Daiwa Foundation (for British-based participants) and from the APN-GCR.

Key Dates

Deadline for application, British-based participants: 14 June 2014

Deadline for application, APN-region participants: 31May 2014

Notification of acceptance, British-based participants: 16 June 2014

Notification of acceptance, APN-region participants: 10 June 2014

Draft papers due: 10 July 2014
The symposium will include plenary sessions as well as presentations by PhD students and early-career participants. Plenary speakers will include:

1.      Juan Martinez-Alier, Professor, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

2.      Ulrich Hoffmann, Senior Trade Policy Adviser to the Director of the International Trade Division UNCTAD

3.      Birgit Mahnkopf, Professor of Political Economy, Berlin School of Economics and Law

4.      Steffen Boehm, Professor and Director, Essex Sustainability Institute, University of Essex

5.      John Crowley, Team Leader for Global Environmental Change, Division of Ethics, Science and Society, UNESCO-Paris (tbc)

6.      John Byrne, Director and Distinguished Professor of Energy & Climate Policy, Centre for Energy and Environmental Policy, University of Delaware (tbc)

7.      Ricardo Abramovay, Professor, University of São Paulo

8.      Anne Posthuma, Senior Researcher at the International Institute for Labour Studies, ILO, Geneva

9.      Larry Lohmann, The Corner House (tbc)

10.    James Meadway, Senior Economist, New Economics Foundation

 

Application and Selection Criteria

Please include the following as part of your application:

a) Abstract of the paper to be presented (250 words);

b) Summary of research interests and/or engagement with relevant policy processes, policy advocacy and social movements (500 words)

c) Curriculum vitae (4-pages max.)

 

For British-based applicants, please email your applications by 14 June to: gareth.dale@brunel.ac.uk

For APN-area applicants, please email your applications by 31 May to: fueta@unu.edu

Alongside the quality of the abstract, selection criteria include:

·         Fit between the applicant’s research and/or policy engagement, broadly defined, and this project

·         Potential to benefit from and contribute to the symposium and follow-up activities

 

We look forward to receiving your applications,

Gareth Dale, Brunel University, London

Manu V. Mathai, UNU-IAS

Jose Puppim de Oliveira, UNU-IAS

 

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/green-growth-critical-perspectives-call-for-papers-funding-available

Harvesting

Harvesting

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Economics of the 1%

Economics of the 1%

ECONOMICS OF THE 1%

Economics of the 1%: How Economics Serves the Rich, Obscures Reality and Distorts Policy

John F. Weeks

Imprint: Anthem Press

Paperback

ISBN 9780857281081

January 2014 | 246 Pages | 216 x 140mm / 8.5 x 5.5 | 20+ graphs

http://www.anthempress.com/ economics-of-the-1-percent

Today’s ‘doctrine of choice’ assures adults that they are competent to make serious personal decisions about healthcare, education and retirement plans. At the same time, most people are convinced that they are so ignorant of economics that they are not capable of holding an informed opinion, and that economic issues must be left to experts. The so-called experts of the mainstream economics profession claim to have profound, inaccessible knowledge; in fact they understand little and obscure almost everything.

Understanding the economy is not simple, but it is no more complicated than understanding the political system sufficiently to cast a vote. In straightforward language, John F. Weeks exposes the myths of mainstream economics and explains why current economic policies fail to serve the vast majority of people in the United States, Europe and elsewhere. He demonstrates that austerity policies have little theoretical basis and achieve nothing but inequality and misery. He goes on to explain how the current deficit and debt ‘crises’ in the United States and Europe are ideologically manufactured, unnecessary and simple to overcome. Drawing on examples from around the world, this book provides a bold alternative to the economics of the 1%. Their failure to serve the interests of the many results from their devoted service to the few.

John Weeks, an American living in London, is professor emeritus of economics at SOAS, University of London. He has advised numerous governments and written and commented widely on economic and social issues in the United States, Europe and developing regions.

Book Launch Lecture (from YouTube), SOAS, University of London, 3rd February 2014: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_8xKikh_g1w&feature=c4-overview&list=UUwlZZGmE1e_6PI2e-HOPOQw

Other Links (including interviews with John Weeks): http://www.anthempress.com/economics-of-the-1-percent

“The recent crisis has exposed the weaknesses of not only the business models of the capitalist world but also the flaws in mainstream economic thought. John F. Weeks’ polemic on the ‘Economics of the 1%’ explores these intellectual blind alleys and takes no prisoners. Pointing out holes in the mainstream logic, Weeks aligns himself with the tradition(s) of Karl Marx, John Maynard Keynes and Thorstein Veblen, and with such contemporaries as James K. Galbraith, Ha-Joon Chang and Paul Krugman. And Weeks is right. We have to replace ‘fakeconomics’ with proper economic analysis to combat the social inequalities that have grown disproportionately and dangerously in recent decades.” —László Andor, Economist and Commissioner for Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion, European Commission

Economics

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‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Autonomia

Autonomia

ORGANIZING FOR THE POST-GROWTH ECONOMY

ephemera: theory & politics in organization

CALL FOR PAPERS: 15th February 2014: http://www.ephemerajournal.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/papers/EXTENDED_DEADLINE_ephemeraCFP_PostGrowth.pdf

Conference organizers: Ole Bjerg, Christian Garmann Johnsen, Bent Meier Sørensen and Lena Olaison

Conference date: 8-9 of May 2014

Conference venue: Copenhagen Business School, Denmark

 

Perpetual economic growth is an underlying assumption of the contemporary capitalist organization of society. The idea of growth is embedded not only in the corpus of economic thought but also in the institutions of the economy (Binswanger, 2013; Gorz, 2012). More recently, entrepreneurship, innovation and creativity have been seen as possible ways to solve the current economic and environmental crisis as well as to generate growth (Schaper, 2002). This is the case because entrepreneurship and innovation are portrayed as seeds of new initiatives and ideas that will boost economic development while simultaneously reduce its impact on the climate. Such a belief has produced new markets, such as carbon markets, and an emerging ‘climate capitalism’ (Böhm, Murtola and Spoelstra, 2012). At the heart of this logic is a faith in the individual economic actor, not least the entrepreneur, as a gifted individual with unique abilities (Shane, 2003). And it is evident that the current post-crisis discourse keeps its confidence in the emergent socially responsible economic actor who will contribute to the construction of a moral economy’ (Arvidsson, 2013).

This ephemera conference seeks to question the feasibility, moral legitimacy and sustainability of perpetual economic growth. Although contested, current political and popular beliefs tend to hold that the twin crises of economy and ecology are merely temporary, exceptional phenomena and that the global economy will soon bounce back to business as usual. However, others have suggested that we are in the midst of a paradigm shift in the nature of capitalism (Heinberg, 2011). Instead of using our energies to prevent this shift from happening it may be more fruitful to appreciate the opportunities for reflection that are offered by the crisis. On the one hand, we should learn from history and see that the history of capitalism is indeed the history of revolutions. This suggests that we indeed may be at the brink of a new phase in society where we experience a change in the underlying structures. On the other hand, we can explore new forms of economic organization that do not rest upon the condition of growth (Schumacher, 1973; Latouche, 2009; Eisenstein, 2011). Even though the prerequisite of growth has been subjected to criticism within economic theory (Herrera, 2011), we need to further explore its implications. Taken together, the challenge is, in other words, to imagine what a sustainable post-growth economy might look like (Gorz, 1999; Seidl, 2010; Paech, 2012).

If growth is intrinsic to the current capitalist organization of society, then we need to ask to what extent it is possible to image a system that does not presuppose perpetual growth. Is economy without growth a contradiction in terms? We can approach the seeming paradox of the post-growth economy by rethinking fundamental economic concepts in today’s capitalist society. Since the value of growth seems to be deeply embedded in many of the most basic economic concepts used today, we therefore need to reconsider from the perspective of a post-growth economy: What is a market without growth? What is the role of entrepreneurship? And consumption? What would constitute organization and work? What is money? And most importantly of all, what is economic growth? These questions may be approached theoretically by analysing their implicit assumptions connected with the paradigm of growth-oriented capitalism (e.g. Daly, 1996), or they may be explored empirically by studying actual practices of alternative economic organization (e.g. North, 2010), such as, for example, slow food movements and direct trade.

The aim of a conference on a post-growth economy is not solely or even primarily to produce new knowledge but instead to think about what to do with the knowledge that we already have. Certainly, the problem of growth is nothing new. Since at least the end of the 1960s, it has been known that the expansion of the capitalist economy would eventually run up against the natural boundaries of earth (Carson, 2000; Measows et al., 1972; Georgescu-Roegen, 1971). The most pressing problem today with regards to sustainability is not that we do not know what to do; rather, the problem is that even though we know very well what to do, we are still not doing it. In other words, we know very know that current level of pollution caused by fossil fuels is not sustainable from a long-term point of view. Yet, by maintaining the current level of production and consumption, we behave as if it is. There is therefore an aspect of cynicism, in Sloterdijk’s sense of the term, which needs to be addressed in relation to sustainability and contemporary capitalism.

The ambition of this conference is thus to bring together researchers, practitioners and activists who share an interest in the issue of economic growth and sustainability. We particularly welcome submissions that explore the paradoxes of a post-growth economy and the interrelated themes of sustainability and entrepreneurship, alongside an exploration of the cultural and political context out of which they have emerged.

 

Possible topics include but are not limited to the following:

* What is post-growth economy?

* What would count as work in a post-growth economy?

* What should management be like in a post-growth economy?

* What is the role of entrepreneurship in a post-growth economy?

* What constitute organization in a post-growth economy?

* What is the role of finance and debt in a post-growth economy?

* What would consumption be like in a post-growth economy?

 

Deadlines, conference fee and further information

The conference takes place at Copenhagen Business School, Denmark, 8-9 of May 2014. The conference is organized by the Department of Management, Politics and Philosophy. The conference is associated with the Sustainability platform and the Entrepreneurship platform at CBS.

The extended deadline for submitting abstracts is 15 February 2014. The abstracts, of no more than 500 words, should be submitted in the format of a Word document to the mail address: postgrowth2014 AT gmail.com. ephemera encourages contributions in a variety of formats including articles, notes, interviews, book reviews, photo essays and other experimental modes of representation. The conference fee has not been set yet, as it is dependent on the number of participants, but will be kept to a minimum, approximately €100. PhD candidates pay a reduced fee, most likely €50. Further information about the conference can be found on the conference website: http://www.ephemerajournal.org. If you have any queries, you can also contact one of the conference organizers: Ole Bjerg (ob.mpp AT cbs.dk), Christian Garmann Johnsen (cgj.mpp AT cbs.dk), Bent Meier Sørensen (bem.mpp AT cbs.dk), Lena Olaison (lo.mpp AT cbs.dk). Conference participants are encouraged to submit their contributions to the Special Issue on Post-growth economy in ephemera that will be published 2015.

 

References

Arvidsson, A. (2013) ‘The potential of consumer publics’, ephemera, 13(2): 367-391.
Binswanger, H.C. (2013) Die Wachstumsspirale: Geld, Energie und Imagination in der Dynamik des Marktprozesses. Marburg: Metropolis-Verlag.
Böhm, S., AM Murtola and S. Spoelstra (2012 eds.) ‘The atmosphere business’, ephemera, 12(1/2): 1-11.
Carson, R. (2000) Silent Spring. London: Penguin.
Daly, H. (1996) Beyond growth: The economics of sustainable development. Boston: Beacon Press.
Eisenstein, C. (2011) Sacred economics: Money, gift, & society in the age of transition. Berkeley, Calif.: Evolver Editions.
Georgescu-Roegen, N. (1971) The entropy law and the economic process. Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press.
Gorz, A. (1999) Reclaiming work: Beyond the wage-based society. Cambridge, UK; Malden, MA: Polity Pressl.
Gorz, A. (2012) Capitalism, socialism, ecology. New York: Verso.
Heinberg, R. (2011) The end of growth: Adapting to our new economic reality. Forest Row: Clairview.
Herrera, R. (2011) ’A critique of mainstream growth theory: Ways out of the neoclassical science (-fiction) and toward marxism’, in P. Zarembka and R. Desai (eds.) Revitalizing marxist theory for today’s capitalism (research in political economy, Vol 27). Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.
Latouche, S. (2009) Farewell to growth. Cambridge, MA: Polity.
Measows, D., H. Meadows, D.L. Meadows, J. Randers and W.W. Behrens III (1972) The limits to growth: A report for THE CLUB OF ROME’S project on the predicament of mankind. New York: Universe Books.
North, P. (2010) Local money: How to make it happen in your community. Totnes: Transition Books.
Paech, N. (2012) Befreiung vom Überfluss: auf dem Weg in die Postwachstumsökonomie. München: oekom verlag.
Schumacher, E.F. (1973) Small is beautiful: A study of economics as if people mattered. London: Vintage.
Shane, S. (2003) A general theory of entrepreneurship. The individual-opportunity nexus, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.
Seidl, I. (2010) Postwachstumsgesellschaft: neue Konzepte für die Zukunft. Marburg: Metropolis.

 

Website: http://www.ephemerajournal.org/content/organizing-post-growth-economy

 

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‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The New Left Book Club: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2014/01/05/the-new-left-book-club-call-for-papers/

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

The Old Economics

The Old Economics

IN PRAISE OF STUDENTS OF ECONOMICS AT MANCHESTER UNIVERSITY FOR RISING AGAINST NEO-CLASSICAL FUNDAMENTALISM

By Kamran Mofid

Dear Friends,

“Undergraduates at Manchester University are seeking to tear up the free-market syllabus and proposing an overhaul of orthodox teachings to embrace alternative theories”

What wonderfully good news! Once again, another group of brave students of economics at a university have risen against the “dismal science” and the madness of the neo-clasical economics, its ways and its teachings.

I am delighted to hear that the Manchester students have seen the light, like their fellow students at other universities, such as the class of 2000 at the Sorbonne.

The battles at Manchester, the Sorbonne and elsewhere are worthy causes and they must be supported. However, to win will not be easy. There are many self-serving and self-interested groups that will fight them, wishing to destroy the spirit of their opponents.

This is why I want to highlight the Manchester University students’ initiative. This is why I want to support them and why I am asking for your support too.

Read the full article at: http://www.gcgi.info/blog/479-in-praise-of-the-students-of-economics-at-manchester-university-for-rising-against-neo-classical-fundamentalis

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Old Economics

The Old Economics

POST-CRASH ECONOMICS SOCIETY

University of Manchester, UK

 

The Post-Crash Economics Society is determined to try and expand the range of economic theories taught to undergraduates. Following the 2008 recession we, like many people around the globe, feel that the economics taught cannot explain the world we live in, and so believe it is necessary to start looking at the alternatives. In February 2012, The Bank of England ran a conference subtitled ‘Are Graduate Economists Fit for Purpose?’ This society is about making sure economics graduates from the University of Manchester are fit for purpose and that we are able to explain how economics relates to the real world. If we can do this then we will be more employable, more competent and more confident that we can use what we learn in economics in our lives.

Our group does everything from organising events with dissenting economists, to trying to convince the University of Manchester’s economics department that they should change the syllabus. We want more critical theory and reflection to be included, because at the moment economics students are just told to accept a long list of supposedly self-evident truths, instead of being encouraged to truly understand the discipline.If you are also getting frustrated by the same old economics lectures, or just want to learn more about heterodox economics, then come along to one of our events and get involved!

Note – this society is not just for students studying purely economics. Those who are doing a joint honours including economics, or even those who do a totally different degree but still have a passion to understand these issues, are encouraged to get involved. For instance, if you wish to learn more about economic theory, why not come along to one of our self-education groups, where we meet and discuss some of the big questions within the discipline.

Statement of Aims

We are The Post-Crash Economics Society and we are a group of economics students at The University of Manchester who believe that the content of the economics syllabus and the way it is taught could and should be seriously rethought.

We were inspired to start this society when we heard about a Bank of England Conference called ‘Are Economics Graduates Fit for Purpose?’ At this event leading economists from the public and private sphere came together to discuss whether economics undergraduates were being taught the right things in the light of the 2008 Financial Crisis. This chimed with some of our frustrations about the economics we were learning and so we decided to set up a society that would through doing research, organising events and running workshops seek to bring this discussion to Manchester. That was at the start of the 2012/13 academic year.

As of today we have a fully-fledged society, a book club, an incredibly successful launch event lead by world class economists, many student and academic supporters, a petition that is constantly gaining signatures, links with a national network of economic societies and organisation and even more passion and determination to change the current state of economic education!

However, this is just the start. We will ensure that this society will become a permanent fixture on the Manchester economics landscape in the years to come, forever seeking to provoke discussion between students and staff about what economics is, what it should be and how it should be taught.

Society Constitution

1) The Post-Crash Economics Society has been set up to try and broaden the range of perspectives and the teaching methods used by the Manchester Economics Department.

2) We will run a campaign to build student support and engage in dialogue with the economics department.

3) We will run events, workshops and other activities.

4) We aim to be a society that is accessible to all students and staff with an interest in economics whatever their economic and political beliefs.

 

Contact – post.crasheconomics@gmail.com

Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/groups/220428964756799/?fref=ts

Post-Crash Economics Society: http://manchesterstudentsunion.com/groups/post-crash-economics

Report in ‘The Guardian’: http://www.theguardian.com/business/2013/oct/24/students-post-crash-economics

Post-Crash Economics website: http://www.post-crasheconomics.com/

 

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Economics

Economics

INTERNATIONAL INITIATIVE FOR THE PROMOTION OF POLTICAL ECONOMY TRAINING WORKSHOP IN MARXIST POLITICAL ECONOMY

Following the success of previous Training Workshops, the International Initiative for the Promotion of Political Economy will run a one-day introductory training workshop in Marxist Political Economy on 6 November 2013 at the School of Oriental and African Studies, London, the day before the start of the annual Historical Materialism Conference (also at SOAS).

We are seeking an audience of engaged participants, including undergraduate, postgraduate students, junior academics and activists, who have a particular interest in acquainting themselves with the basic principles of Marxian political economy.

As this is an introductory workshop, it will assume no prior knowledge and will be led by Simon Mohun and Alfredo Saad-Filho.

If you wish to attend the workshop, please send your name and occupation to Elisa Van Waeyenberge <ew23@soas.ac.uk> before 15th of October 2013.

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Crisis Theory

Crisis Theory

CONFERENCE OF SOCIALIST ECONOMISTS (CSE) SOUTH GROUP LAUNCH EVENT

CSE South Group Launch Event

Friday 25th October 13.30 – 16.30

Middlesex University, London

Hendon campus http://www.mdx.ac.uk/aboutus/Location/hendon/index.aspx

To attend please email me Phoebe Moore p.moore@mdx.ac.uk

 

The Conference of Socialist Economists (CSE) http://www.cseweb.org.uk/ is an international, democratic membership organisation committed to developing a materialist critique of capitalism, unconstrained by conventional academic divisions between subjects. CSE has organised and supported conferences and seminars and publishes the Sage journal Capital & Class http://cnc.sagepub.com/ three times a year.

The CSE South Group is a new network of researchers and activists mirroring the CSE Transpennine Group which runs across the north of Britain initiated by Capital and Class Editorial Board members Stuart Shields and Greig Charnock. We will be organising workshops where people present work and hold discussions on topics that concern the CSE and our journal.

The CSE South Group will hold a launch event on Friday the 25th October at MiddlesexUniversity. Our speakers will be Professor Martin Upchurch, who will present ‘Towards the New Workplace Dystopia’; Dr Owen Worth, Managing Editor for Capital & Class, who will speak about ‘The Crisis of Capital’ and Dr Phoebe Moore, Editorial Board member for Capital & Class and convenor for the CSE South Group who will speak about ‘Cognitive Capitalism and the Quantified Worker’.

We will also hold a Roundtable called ‘Contemporary Conditions of Capital’ where we will discuss and debate issues in contemporary conditions of capital including mental health and work, global production networks, commodification of education, safety at work, migration and much more. Speakers on the roundtable will include Peter Hough, author of ‘Valuing Culture by Ignoring it: Relativism and Human Rights’ and ‘Who’s Securing Whom? The need for International Relations to Embrace Human Security’; Elizabeth Cotton who has written Global Unions Global Business (with Richard Croucher) and initiator of: http://survivingwork.org/ ; and Clive Boddy, author of Corporate Psychopaths: Organisational Destroyers.

If you come along you will have the chance to meet individuals on the Capital & Class Editorial Board and a wide range of other researchers and activists.

This will be the first of many workshops run by the CSE South Group. These events will encourage networking across activists, trade unionists, newer researchers and the established cadre who can learn from one another, think together and act in solidarity toward a transformed world.

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Piero Sraffa

Piero Sraffa

POLITICAL ECONOMY RESEARCH GROUP SEMINARS

PERG Seminars (within the Economics Research Seminars)

Kingston University, London, 2012-13, second semester

 

13 February

Andrew Trigg

Department of Economics, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Open University

Pasinetti, Marx and the Possibility Theory of Crisis

Room JG3006, 16:00-17:30

 

6 March

Ben Fine

SOAS, University of London

Economics as Unfit for Purpose: With an Application to Financialisation and the Household.

Room JG3006, 16:00-17:30 

 

24 April

Gilles Christoph

École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, France.

More Neoliberalism to End Neoliberalism? The Intellectual Trajectory of Neoliberal Thought and Post-2008 Political Economy.

Room JG3006, 16:00-17:30 

 

15 May

Peter Flaschel

Bielefeld University, Bielefeld, Germany

Keynesian DSGD(isequilibrium) Modelling: A Basic Model of Real-Financial Market Interactions

with Heterogeneous Opinion Dynamics

Room JG2006, 16:00-17:30

 

How to find us:

The seminars take place at the Penrhyn Road Campus (Penrhyn Road, Kingston upon Thames, Surrey, KT1 2EE). Public transport: Take train from London Waterloo to Surbiton Station (20 min approx.) and buses 71, 281, K2, K3 to ‘KingstonUniversity’ (5 min) or 15 min walk. For driving directions: http://www.kingston.ac.uk/aboutkingstonuniversity/location/maps/documents/Penrhyn-Road-driving.pdf

 

Political Economy Research Group (PERG) The Political Economy approach highlights the role of effective demand, institutions and social conflict in economic analysis and thereby builds on Austrian, Institutionalist, Keynesian and Marxist traditions. Economic processes are perceived to be embedded in social relations that must be analysed in the context of historical considerations, power relations and social norms. As a consequence, a broad range of methodological approaches is employed, and cooperation with other disciplines, including history, law, sociology and other social sciences, is necessary. (http://fass.kingston.ac.uk/research/perg)

 

MA Economics (Political Economy) at KingstonUniversity

http://www.kingston.ac.uk/postgraduate/booklets/FASS/political-economy-MA.pdf

MA Politics, Philosophy, Economics at KingstonUniversity

http://www.kingston.ac.uk/postgraduate/booklets/FASS/PoliticsPhilosophyEconomics.pdf

 

First published in: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/perg-seminars-kingston-university-start-13-february

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski