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Category Archives: Crisis

debunking-economicsWILL WE CRASH AGAIN? WHY CAPITALISM NEEDS DEBT WRITE-OFFS TO SURVIVE

Conway Hall Ethical Society & London Futurists presents:

London Thinks – Will We Crash Again? Why Capitalism Needs Debt Write-offs to Survive

With STEVE KEEN

Tuesday 1st September @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm | £5 – £10

CONWAY HALL

25 Red Lion Square, London, WC1R 4RL United Kingdom

Website: http://conwayhall.org.uk/

Booking: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/will-we-crash-again-why-capitalism-needs-debt-write-offs-to-survive-tickets-17879762852

Mainstream economists failed to anticipate the great financial crash of 2007-8. In this talk, Professor Steve Keen will share his view on the bigger picture – including recent financial developments around the world. He will review options for the future of economics, highlight the little-understood importance of debt, and argue that significant debt write-downs are needed in order to limit future financial crashes.

Steve Keen is a Professor of Economics & Head of the School of Economics, History & Politics at Kingston University. He was one of the handful of economists to realise that a serious economic crisis was imminent, and to publicly warn of it, from as early as December 2005.

A staunch critic of mainstream economics, his book Debunking Economics is now in its 2nd edition and has been translated into Chinese, French and Spanish.

The event will be moderated by David Wood, Chair of London Futurists. The talk will be followed by audience Q&A.

A cash bar will be available at the event. Afterwards, there will be the chance to continue the discussion at a nearby pub.

Organised in partnership with the London Futurists

London Futurists hold regular speaker events to explore radical scenarios for the next 3-40 years.

For more details, see http://londonfuturists.com/.

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Fat Cat Food

Fat Cat Food

LESSONS FROM GREECE: CRISIS OF THE ECONOMY AND THE LEFT RESPONSE

SUNDAY, AUGUST 23, 2015

6:30-9:30 PM

Westside Peace Center

3916 Sepulveda Blvd., near Venice Blvd. (free parking in rear)

Suite 101-102, press #22 at door to get into building

Culver City (LA area)

 

SPEAKERS:

Ali Kiani, Iranian Marxist activist and translator

With a comment by Hamid A., environmental and anti-racist activist

 

Having experienced the harshest type of capitalist austerity, which has featured depression level unemployment, the Greek people voted first for the anti-austerity leftist Syriza Party, which includes several Marxists among its leaders.  Then, in July, they voted overwhelmingly in a referendum to support Syriza in its determination not to bow to further austerity measures from the country’s international creditors.  In response, the creditors, led by Germany, seemed to want to make an example of this small country that had dared to challenge austerity from the left.  The creditor nations doubled down, threatening Greece with banishment from the Eurozone and even worse economic privation.  In response to these threats, which even the US seemed to consider excessive, Syriza’s leadership agreed to the very austerity measures the referendum vote had opposed a few days before. Syriza is splitting, but its majority has now voted to support austerity. What is the meaning of these events for Greece, for global capitalism, for the struggle to abolish it, and for the left?

Suggested readings (all from IMHO site):

“Two Strands in Syriza, the Euro, and the Dictatorship Of Capital” — by Karel Ludenhoff

“Syriza’s Stormy Greek Spring” — by David Black

“Further Reflections on Yanis Varoufakis’s ‘Erratic Marxism'” — by Karel Ludenhoff

“From the Economic Crisis to the Transcendence of Capital” — by Peter Hudis

 

Sponsored by the West Coast Chapter, International Marxist-Humanist Organization

More information: arise@internationalmarxisthumanist.org and http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/

Here is URL for meeting for Facebook, Twitter, etc.: http://www.internationalmarxisthumanist.org/events/los-angeles-lessons-from-greece-crisis-of-the-economy-and-the-left-response

Join our Facebook page: “International Marxist-Humanist Organization” https://www.facebook.com/groups/imhorg/

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

RESIRESILIENCE AND THE ANTHROPOCENE: THE POLITICAL ECOLOGIES OF COMPLEXITY

Resilience: International Policies, Practices and Discourses

Call for Special Issue Abstracts

Deadline: 1 March 2016

The Anthropocene signals a new geological epoch in which humans have become a geophysical force. The possibility that human activity now produces the environments on which it depends destabilizes the image of a stable Earth that has grounded Western philosophy and politics for two millennia. Critical scholars assert that Anthropocene thinking can provoke new understandings of spatiality, temporality, ethics, responsibility and politics. As Simon Dalby (2013) suggests, a new kind of politics becomes possible when we begin to consider that the stakes include (de)forming the world we inhabit. However, Brad Evans and Julian Reid (2014) argue that the Anthropocene just as easily presents a dangerous, vengeful Earth teetering on the brink of systemic collapse – a catastrophic discourse that creates fearful subjects who desire resilience in order to survive a calamitous future. The Anthropocene’s world-deforming vision leads into a reactionary bio-politics of resilience that fashions adaptive neoliberal subjects capable of surviving whatever surprises complexity has in store.

Thus two concepts have been central to the shifting dynamics of power and agency under the political ecology of complexity: the Anthropocene and resilience. And yet, resilience techniques do not produce uniform effects. The deployment of resilience always occurs within particular socio-ecological contexts striated by multiple conflicts and tensions. Resilience intervenes in, and is inflected by, these contextually-specific relations. Ben Anderson’s (2015: 62) call to recognize that ‘‘resilience’ names a fractured, multiple, empirical field rather than a series of generic characteristics’ means that not only will resilience be something different in different times and places, it will also produce uneven and potentially unintended effects as well. Thus, there is no guarantee that resilience interventions will necessarily reinforce neoliberal order; they could just as well catalyze new ways of harnessing complex life’s potentiality. The bio-politics of resilience may attempt to constrain and regulate adaptability, but these constraints are plastic, malleable, and can thus be broken, cast aside or even re-molded into weapons.

This special issue of Resilience: Policies, Practices and Discourses will explore the indeterminate political ecologies opened by the Anthropocene and resilience. It takes seriously the call from Dalby, Evans and Reid, Anderson and others to think through the different ways politics might be thought, practiced, and analyzed through the malleable worlds of the Anthropocene and the complex life of resilience thinking. We invite abstracts from across the disciplines that offer empirically driven, theoretically informed papers that engage with the Anthropocene and resilience to explore the shifting forms of geo-politics and bio-politics that reinforce and challenge neoliberal political ecologies. Abstracts may touch on these themes in any number of fields, including but not limited to climate change adaptation, disaster management and development, international relations, environmental security, or urban development and security.

 

References

Anderson B (2015) What kind of thing is resilience? Politics 35(1): 60-66.

Dalby S (2013) Biopolitics and climate security in the Anthropocene. Geoforum 49: 184-192.

Evans B and Reid J (2014) Resilient Life: The Art of Living Dangerously. Cambridge: Polity Press.

 

Submission Instructions

Abstracts of no more than 500 words should be submitted to Kevin Grove (Aberystwyth University, kevinjgrove@gmail.com) and David Chandler (University of Westminster, D.Chandler@westminster.ac.uk) by 12 October 2015.

Deadline for invited full submissions will be 1 March 2016.

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

KRISIS

KRISIS

CRISIS TO INSURRECTION: NOTES ON THE ONGOING COLLAPSE

A new book from Mikkel Bolt Rasmussen on ongoing crises and insurrections…
Crisis to Insurrection: Notes on the ongoing collapse
Mikkel Bolt Rasmussen
The crisis runs deep. The economies of the US and Europe are in profound crisis and the developing economies are also beginning to feel its effects. Everywhere it is workers who are paying the price. The crisis is being socialized and austerity is the order of the day; the crisis is used as a pretext for further savings and cuts. In other words, capital has intensified the class war. But the proletariat has started moving. The revolts in North Africa and the Middle East have challenged the neoliberal world order and its division of the world, and the ‘movement of the squares’ in Southern Europe and Occupy in the US have picked up the baton and joined the new protest cycle. Even though dictators have been toppled in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya, the protests continue. This is also the case in Greece, Spain and Portugal where people reject the austerity programs. There are protests in Bulgaria and Bosnia. In Syria the civil war is raging. In China the number of strikes continue to rise. In Turkey the youth reject Erdogan’s neoliberal ‘success’ and urban restructuring and in Brazil ‘the dangerous classes’ have taken to the streets. There are a variety of protests going on – the ones in the West are defensive, the ones in the rest of the world offensive and reformist – but together they are knocking a hole in the neoliberal world order. The old mole is back.

Bio: Mikkel Bolt Rasmussen is Associate Professor at the Department of Arts and Cultural Studies, University of Copenhagen.
PDF available freely online: http://www.minorcompositions.info/?p=678
Released by Minor Compositions, Wivenhoe / Brooklyn / Port Watson
Minor Compositions is a series of interventions & provocations drawing from autonomous politics, avant-garde aesthetics, and the revolutions of everyday life.
Minor Compositions is an imprint of Autonomedia
www.minorcompositions.info | minorcompositions@gmail.com

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

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Ideal Home?

Ideal Home?

HOUSED BY CHOICE, HOUSED BY FORCE – HOMES, CONFLICT AND CONFLICTING INTERESTS

Interdisciplinary – International Conference

Details:  http://architecturemps.com/cyprus

The need to be housed is basic and yet, the forces that produce it in any city of the world multiple, contradictory and often conflictive.

Whilst inherently complicated in any context, housing delivery is even more difficult in sites of inherent social, cultural, political and economic sensitivity such as the one that hosts this event, Nicosia, the capital of Cyprus.

Taking as its starting point the social, political, cultural and economic complexity of its host city – the world’s last remaining divided capital – this conference seeks to understand the range of conflicting interests and factors that shape the housing of our towns and cities in both normal and extreme scenarios.

It is interested in cases from around the world, from politically charged environments of military conflict zones to the socially conflictive contexts of developer led gentrification. It welcomes resident perspectives and planner led solutions, sociological analysis and ideas for inclusionary design.

It seeks to better understand how we safeguard the right to choose appropriate housing for all our citizens; how we ensure residents have a voice in design and development; how we guarantee adequate housing is always an option; and how we overcome conflicts and conflicting interests to do this.

Location: University of Cyprus; The Cyprus Institute, Cyprus.

Dates: 21 – 22nd January, 2016

Abstract Deadline: 01st October, 2015

Details:  http://architecturemps.com/cyprus

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Political Economy

Political Economy

IIPPE CONFERENCE 2015

International Initiative for Promoting Political Economy (IIPPE)

Website: http://iippe.org/wp/

6th Annual Conference in Political Economy (The Call for Papers is now CLOSED)

9–11 September 2015  / University of Leeds, U.K.

Rethinking Economics: Pluralism, Interdisciplinarity and Activism

The Sixth Annual Conference in Political Economy aims at fostering a reflection on positive alternatives to the mainstream by examining political economy from the complementary angles of pluralism, inter-disciplinarity and activism.

The economic crisis that started in 2007, while remaining a crisis for huge parts of the world’s population, has officially morphed into a “recovery” – albeit the slowest and weakest in recent history.

Mainstream economics is broadly discredited, with even some voices from some of its major bastions calling for its rejuvenation. But heterodox economics appears as theoretically and institutionally splintered as before the crisis, with its only solid point of agreement being the rejection of the dominant mainstream. Hence it continues to be unable to offer any positive alternative that can command broad acceptance even among heterodox economists, not to speak of making inroads into the orthodox teaching, researching and popularization of economics. Similarly, heterodox economists have made little new progress since the crisis toward their long held goal of linking to progressive forces in sociology, geography, political science, and other social disciplines.

The Sixth Annual Conference in Political Economy aims at fostering a reflection on positive alternatives to the mainstream by examining political economy from the complementary angles of pluralism, interdisciplinarity and activism. Papers on all aspects of political economy are welcome, while those focused on these topics are especially encouraged, whether relating to the current crisis or otherwise.

 

Conference Registration: http://iippe.org/wp/?page_id=2655

Deadline for Conference Registration: 1st July 2015

download (1)

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Bonuses for Some

Bonuses for Some

IIPPE TRAINING WORKSHOPS (LONDON, ABERDEEN and LEEDS)

International Initiative for Promoting Political Economy

Website: http://iippe.org/wp/

The IIPPE announces three Training Workshops (in London, Aberdeen and Leeds)

 

London: Monday June 22, SOAS (Vernon Square campus)
Simon Mohun and Photis Lysandrou, on The Marxist theory of finance, contemporary accounts of financialization and the causes of the financial crisis of 2007-8
Details at http://iippe.org/wp/?cat=19
Register with Simon Mohun < s.mohun@qmul.ac.uk >

 

Aberdeen: Thursday 25 June and Friday 26 June, University of Aberdeen (Fraser Noble Building), jointly with Aberdeen Political Economy Group (APEG) and IIPPE Financialisation Working Group
Simon Mohun, John Weeks, Joseph Choonara, James Foley, James Meadway and Neil Davidson on Neoliberalism and the political economy of money and finance in Scotland and the UK
Details from and registration with Keith Paterson < keithpaterson@abdn.ac.uk >

 

Leeds: Tuesday 8 September, University of Leeds (room tba)
Simon Mohun, John Weeks and Alfredo Saad-Filho, on Rate of Profit and Crisis
Details at http://iippe.org/wp/?cat=19
Register on the IIPPE Conference Registration Form http://iippe.org/wp/?page_id=2655 or with Simon Mohun < s.mohun@qmul.ac.uk >

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/iippe-announces-three-training-workshops-london-aberdeen-and-leeds

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Critique of Political Economy

Critique of Political Economy

MARX AND UTOPIA CONFERENCE

The Marx and Philosophy Society’s annual conference will take place on Saturday 13th June 2015 at the UCL Institute of Education, 20 Bedford Way, London.

This year’s theme is ‘Marx and Utopia’
Main speakers:
Lea Ypi (LSE)

Revolutionary Partisanship

David Leopold (Oxford)
Marx’s Critique of Utopia

Gregory Claeys (Royal Holloway)
Marx, Marxism and Utopia

Plus two graduate panels.

For full details, including conference abstracts and programme, see http://www.marxandphilosophy.org.uk.

Attendance is free, and open to all, but please email Meade McCloughan at meade.mccloughan@gmail.com to reserve a place.

Please feel free to forward this email to others who may be interested.

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/marx-and-utopia-conference-london-13th-june-2015

Karl Marx

Karl Marx

 

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Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

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Outland

Outland

CORPORATE CARE: MIGRANT LABOUR AND THE CARE INDUSTRY IN TIMES OF (NON) CRISIS

CALL FOR PAPERS

Corporate Care: Migrant labour and the care industry in times of (non) crisis

A one-day conference at Goldsmiths College, New Cross, London, 29 October 2015

Deadline: June 12, 2015

Though unsurprisingly hitting the low-income and unemployed harder than ever, the 2007-2011 Global Economic Crisis and subsequent politics of austerity have also revealed the emergence of new and unexpected trends in the West: in the immediate aftermath of the crisis, both non-migrant and migrant women in numerous Western countries were less affected than men in terms of jobs losses, though their working conditions might have not improved. Subsequent austerity policies, on the other hand, seem to have disadvantaged women in terms of working conditions, though they also appear to have reinforced their commitment to paid work (Karamessini and Rubery, ed., 2013; Farris, 2015).

The intertwined fate of non-migrant and migrant women during and after the crisis is due to their position vis-à-vis care, or social reproduction. The assumption that care is a “woman’s job” remains firmly in place, while public state care provision continues to shrink. But while non-migrant women’s rate of participation in the workforce means that they do less unpaid care work in comparison to previous periods, migrant women from ‘post-socialist’ countries and the Global South take on the bulk of the social reproductive tasks in paid form in the booming care industry.

But what is the care industry? How did the crisis change its configuration?

Studies conducted across Europe and the West in the last ten years show that the care industry was not negatively affected by the crisis. On the contrary, the demand for care and domestic service has grown rather than decreased. Moreover, a process of polarization appears to be impacting upon migrant workers employed in the care industry: on the one hand, a proliferation of domestic and care placement agencies as well as so-called ‘non-profit’ organisations (particularly in Southern Europe) is increasingly meeting the growing demand for carers and housekeepers by individual households. Effectively functioning as corporations, many of these organisations are making enormous profits out of mediating for, or directly exploiting, the hugely needed work of migrants in the care sector. On the other hand, anti-immigration policies at the national level and the refusal of numerous states to issue visas for care and domestic workers (particularly during the first years of the crisis) have pushed migrants working in this sector into the underground. But rather than being discouraged to employ migrants, more and more families in fact rely upon “word of mouth” to hire them as carers and housekeepers, as they remain the most cost-effective solution for their caring needs. Yet even in the underground, illegal agencies and organisations profiting from this flourishing industry begin to emerge.

With the crisis and austerity politics in the background, this one day conference aims to analyse this new set of dynamics by focusing upon the care industry, the emergence of corporate care and (female) migrant labour in particular.

While the employment of migrant women in the care industry has been widely studied, the impact of the recent crisis and austerity politics on female migrant labour in the care sector and the boom of care placement agencies have remained largely under-scrutinized.

This conference thus aims to fill a gap in this field of studies by seeking papers that address the following questions in particular:

  • How does the increasing presence of corporations and also non-profit organisations in the care industry in a period of crisis and austerity affect the sector?
  • How does the profitability of care impact upon our understanding of social reproduction theory in particular?
  • How do care and domestic placement agencies change conceptions and cultures of care and domestic work?
  • How have the crisis and austerity politics transformed the working conditions of migrants in the care sector in different countries?

Abstracts should be 300 words long and clearly state the question they address. Preference will be given to papers that seek to combine theoretical and empirical work.

Deadline for submission is June 12, 2015. Please send abstracts and any inquiries to s.farris@gold.ac.uk

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-corporate-care.-migrant-labour-and-the-care-industry-in-times-of-non-crisis.-goldsmiths-college-29-october-2015

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Crisis

Crisis

DANGEROUS TIMES FESTIVAL 2015

Ways to Change the World

Saturday 27th & Sunday 28th June

Rich Mix

35-47 Bethnal Green Road

LONDON E1 6LA

Website: http://dangeroustimes.net

Dangerous Times is an annual festival of radical discussion, debate, music, comedy, art.

Participants include: David Harvey, Lindsey German, Natalie Bennett, Tariq Ali, Owen Jones, John Rees, Francesca Martinez, Danny Dorling, Jeremy Corbyn, Clare Solomon, Kate Hudson, Chris Nineham, Ava Vidal, Kate Hudson, Katherine Connelly, James Meadway, Sam Fairbairn

Registration: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/dangerous-times-festival-2015-tickets-15710379167

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Social Movements

Social Movements

SOCIAL MOVEMENTS, RESISTANCE AND SOCIAL CHANGE II: POSSIBILITIES, IDEAS, DEMANDS

Second Annual Conference and Social Change Forum
University of Auckland, New Zealand, 2-4 September 2015

Call
Elites are delighted to be reassured that there never was a crisis and indeed there never will be. No financial crisis, which might interrupt profitability. No ecological crisis, which might despoil their inner compounds. No housing crisis, which might involve them becoming permanent tenants. No food crisis, which might mean that their plates and cups were not brimming over. If there was a crisis then it was a crisis for others, which as usual for the callous meant no crisis at all.

At the same time, we have seen the rise of radical new possibilities, ideas and demands. Democratically elected states contested the technocratic puppets governing them; those who had built nations asked that they no longer be routinely murdered in t he streets; students reclaimed their universities from their twisted administrators; tribunal deliberations confirmed that tangata whenua had never ceded rangatiratanga; mass demonstrations rose against ‘austerity’; economists demanded confiscatory taxes on capital; novelists called the bluff on their illiterate rulers; socialist and feminist parties confronted arms traders.

This conference and social change forum invites participants to share their learning about the possibilities, ideas and demands actually existing in present economic, political and cultural arrangements. The event will be equally scientific and programmatic, combining the most important ideas and analyses of the present with concrete programmes for social change. Rejecting the alternatives of academic conference, political rally and direct action, this meeting intends to be none of these but all, and more.

This meeting will build on the 2014 Social Movements, Resistance and Social Change conference which brought together and provided a mapping of social movements locally and globally. That meeting provided a valuable overview of resistance and social change on behalf of responsibility, sustainability and social equality, the results of which will appear in a forthcoming issue of Kōtuitui: New Zealand Journal of Social Sciences Online. The 2014 conference created sustained relationships across the left including the establishment of an eSocSci social movements network for developing and continuing these conversations. The 2015 event will extend this work of mapping and understanding social movements, resistance and social change. Beyond this, it invites discussion around questions of what is possible, what can be thought and what can be demanded today.

Participation
We invite participation in a variety of forms. The three days will provide considerable time for open discussion and debate. We therefore welcome particip ants who would rather not present a formal academic paper but can instead share their experience and learning with others. Participants wishing to attend but not present a paper are invited to email with an indication of interest.

At the same time, we invite formal theoretical and scientific contributions that will provide rigorous analyses of our present conjuncture. Formal papers can deal with any aspect of questions relating to social movements, resistance and social change, but we particularly invite considerations on questions of the new possibilities, ideas and demands that present themselves today. Papers might address, but are not restricted to, the following themes:

  • Founding political acts
  • The shapes and forms of politics
  • Struggles for sovereignty
  • The rise of social movements in Aotearoa and beyond
  • New logics of emancipation
  • Contesting power, contesting knowledge
  • The role of the academy in social movements and activism
  • Why thought matters
  • Logical revolts
  • Science, knowledge, truths
  • The fragility of power
  • Legal struggles and change at the level of the state
  • Art and politics – the aesthetics of politics
  • What ideas can do
  • What we do when we win
  • Thinking beyond capitalism, patriarchy and racism
  • Possibilities for new political subjects
  • Actually existing alternatives within economy and society today
  • Counterhistories and counterfutures

We invite submissions from presenters in the form of an abstract of no more than 500 words. Abstracts are due 15 June 2015 and notification of acceptance will be made by the end of June.

Please email submissions as a document attachment to resistanceandsocialchange@gmail.com

Outcomes
We envisage four principal results of the conference and forum:

To strengthen existing relations and develop new forms of collaboration. Working on social bonds amongst those in resistance movements is our first objective.

To develop concrete programmes for social change, whether in the form of new ideas, social practices, laws and/or institutions. Our goal is to develop all of these, in part and in whole, ultimately in concert together .

Scholarly papers presented at the conference and forum will be invited for consideration for publication in a special issue of the journal New Zealand Sociology. Full length papers should be prepared for the September meeting, after which there will an opportunity to take on board feedback. The deadline for final submissions for the special issue is 31 October 2015.

Conference participants are also invited to consider publishing their work in the new journal Counterfutures: Left Thought and Practice Aotearoa. For further details visit: http://counterfutures.blogspot.co.nz.

Contact
To make an indication of interest in participation, to submit a paper, or for any queries please email resistanceandsocialchange@gmail.com

Nathalie Jaques, Campbell Jones and Shannon Walsh
School of Social Sciences, University of Auckland

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/social-movements-resistance-and-social-change-ii-2013-auckland-2-4-september-2015

Movemets of the Social

Movemets of the Social

 

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

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imagesPOST-SOCIALIST ECONOMIES, NATIONALISTIC CONFLICTS AND LABOUR IN CENTRAL-EASTERN EUROPE AND THE FORMER SOVIET UNION

One Day Workshop at Middlesex University, Hendon, London NW4 4BT

Hosted by the Business School and the Post-Socialist Labour Studies Group.
Friday May 29 2015, from 9.30am to 6pm

For further information, and to register at the workshop, please contact:
Claudio Morrison (c.morrison@mdx.ac.uk) or Elena Karoullas (E.Karoullas@mdx.ac.uk)

A workshop is jointly sponsored by the Royal Economic Society and the London Region of BUIRA (British Universities Industrial Relations Association) will be held under the auspices of the Post Socialist Labour Studies Group at Middlesex University on Friday May 29th 2015. The workshop focuses on ethno-national conflicts in post-socialist and post-soviet states and the political economy of the region, explorin g links between emergent neoliberal forms of capitalism and the rise of radical nationalism. Guest speakers will include practitioners in labour and industrial relations and economic policy from the region as well as academic specialists and labour representatives from countries gravely affected by present and past conflicts such as Ukraine, Russia, Serbia and Bosnia-Herzegovina.

Confirmed participant speakers include:
Dr Claudio Morrison (LWO, Middlesex University); Professor Martin Upchurch (LWO, Middlesex University); Professor John Grahl (Economics, Middlesex University); Dr Daryna Grechyna (Economics, Middlesex University); Kiril Buketov (IUF Uniting Food, Farm and Hotel Workers Worldwide); Volodymyr Ishenko (Center for Social and Labour Research, Kiev); Goran Markovic (East Sarajevo University, Sarajevo Plenum); Filip Ilkowski (Institute of Political Science, Warsaw) Petr Bizyukov (Centre for Social and Labour Rights, Moscow); Veronika Biziukova (Levada analy tical centre, Moscow); Professor Vera Trappmann (University of Leeds) Dr. Jelena Timotijevic (University of Brighton); Dr Jan Fidrmuc (Economics, Brunel University).

Directions to the Hendon Campus
http://www.mdx.ac.uk/get-in-touch/directions-london
Facebook Event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1577293192531879/

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/post-socialist-economies-nationalistic-conflicts-and-labour

Modernism

Modernism

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

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