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Celestial Dome Inverted

Celestial Dome Inverted

EMBRACING THE RANDOM: ESSAYS ON THE MUSIC OF TOOL, ESOTERICISM AND CREATIVE EXPRESSION

REMINDER – CALL FOR PAPERS

Essays are invited which examine themes of the esoteric in the interconnected areas of popular culture which include the musical projects of Maynard James Keenan, visionary artwork (especially that inspired by N,N-Dimethyltryptamine (DMT or N,N-DMT)), and spiritual worldviews. This is a collection that proposes to explore these creative forms of expression, with a focus on how they manifest in contemporary Western contexts. Such scholarly analyses of this area of popular culture will add new perspectives and insights into subcultures and lifestyles as well as into the specific art and music scenes.

 

Topics could include, but are not limited to:

 Occult and mystical symbology in the music of Tool

 Essays on Maynard James Keenan’s other bands, A Perfect Circle and Puscifer

 Dreams, visions, and DMT

 Visionary art and spirituality (in Western contexts)

 Entheogens and artistic expression (in indigenous Amazonian Amerindian cultural contexts)

 Judeo-Christianity and the lyrics of Tool

 Mathematics, sacred geometry, the physical universe, cosmology, and the music of Tool

 Analysis of the artwork of Alex Grey

 Lachrymology and pseudo-religions

 Esotericism, altered states of consciousness, and music subcultures

New Materialism

New Materialism

 

Essays are invited from scholars in the disciplines of ethnomusicology, music studies, cultural studies, study of religions, art history, philosophy, psychology, and related disciplines. Cross-disciplinary analysis is welcome. Proposals should take the form of an approximately 300-500 word abstract, a provisional title, as well as a short biography (50-100 words).

All proposals must be received via email by June 15, 2015. Please send all proposals and questions to the editor, Dr Jenny Butler at j.butler@ucc.ie and cc. to butler.jennifer@gmail.com

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

TOOL

TOOL

 

Smoke Monster

MONSTERS OF THE MARKET

Please get your library to order this title!

http://www.brill.nl/monsters-market

Monsters of the Market: Zombies, Vampires and Global Capitalism
David McNally

Monsters of the Market investigates the rise of capitalism through the prism of the body-panics it arouses. Drawing on folklore, literature and popular culture, the book links tales of monstrosity from early-modern England, including Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, to a spate of recent vampire- and zombie-fables from sub-Saharan Africa, and it connects these to Marx’s persistent use of monster-metaphors in his descriptions of capitalism. Reading across these tales of the grotesque, Monsters of the Market offers a novel account of the cultural and corporeal economy of a global market-system. The book thus makes original contributions to political economy, cultural theory, commodification-studies and ‘body-theory’.

Biographical note:
David McNally, Ph.D (1983) is Professor of Political Science at York University, Toronto. He is the author of five previous books and has published widely on political economy, Marxism, and contemporary social justice movements.

Readership
All those interested in Marxism, cultural studies, global political economy, as well as students of literature, folklore and popular culture.

Table of Contents:
Acknowledgements
Introduction

1. Dissecting the Labouring Body: Frankenstein, Political Anatomy and the Rise of Capitalism
‘Save my body from the surgeons’
The culture of dissection: anatomy, colonisation and social order
Political anatomy, wage-labour and destruction of the English commons  
Anatomy and the corpse-economy
Monsters of rebellion
Jacobins, Irishmen and Luddites: rebel-monsters in the age of Frankenstein
The rights of monsters: horror and the split society

2. Marx’s Monsters: Vampire-Capital and the Nightmare-World of Late Capitalism
Dialectics and the doubled life of the commodity
The spectre of value and the fetishism of commodities
‘As if by love possessed’: vampire capital and the labouring body
Zombie-labour and the ‘monstrous outrages’ of capital
Money: capitalism’s second nature  
‘Self-birthing’ capital and the alchemy of money
Wild money: the occult economies of late-capitalist globalisation
Enron: case-study in the occult economy of late capitalism
‘Capital comes into the world dripping in blood from every pore’

3. African Vampires in the Age of Globalisation
Kinship and accumulation: from the old witchcraft to the new Zombies, vampires, and spectres of capital: the new occult economies of globalising capitalism  
African fetishes and the fetishism of commodities
The living dead: zombie-labourers in the age of globalisation
Vampire-capitalism in Sub-Saharan Africa   
Bewitched accumulation, famished roads, and the endless toilers of the Earth

Conclusion: Ugly Beauty: Monstrous Dreams of Utopia
References
Index
Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Age of Austerity

CRITICAL THEORY IN AN AGE OF AUSTERITY

Critical Theory in an Age of Austerity
Brunel University, London

Tuesday June 21st
Brunel Lecture Centre
Room 207
12.00-4.30

Critical Theory is closely associated with the work of a generation of postwar social theorists. Figures such as Theodor Adorno drew on earlier critical traditions, most notably Marxism, to provide an original and sophisticated critique of society that included groundbreaking work on popular culture, politics and philosophy. Since then, new and exciting strands of critical theory have emerged to take account of the changing nature of (global) societies.

The aim of this workshop is to explore various strands of critical theory in order to help us make sense of our current age of austerity. We will also discuss the possibilities of establishing a critical theory research network at Brunel.

The workshop brings together academics from across the social sciences and humanities at Brunel and will cover both empirical and theoretical issues such as neoliberalism and culture, the Big Society, refugees, queer theory, deconstruction, politics of in/difference, law and critique, structures of feeling, and critical media studies.

All are welcome!

For further information, contact:

John Roberts (Sociology and Communications): John.Roberts@brunel.ac.uk
Gareth Dale (Politics and History): Gareth.Dale@brunel.ac.uk
Peter D. Thomas (Politics and History): PeterD.Thomas@brunel.ac.uk

Travel directions: http://www.brunel.ac.uk/about/campus/directions/directions

Critical Theory in an Age of Austerity
Programme Sessions:

Tea/coffee – available from 12.00

Introduction – 12.15
Gareth Dale (Politics & History)
John Roberts (Sociology & Communications)
Peter Thomas (Politics & History)

Session 1 – 12.30-1.30
Big, Little, Local, or Global Society? (Chair: John Roberts)
Nadine El-Enany (Law)
Fiona Cullen (Social Work)
Milly Williamson (Screen Media)

Break: 1.30-1.45

Session 2 – 1.45-2.45
Theory in the Humanities: Palintropes, Indifference, Queer (Chair: Gareth Dale)
William Watkin (English)
William Spurlin (English)
Sean Gaston (English)

Break: 2.45-3.00

Session 3 – 3.00-4.00
Critical Media Studies, Social Structures, and Law (Chair: Peter Thomas)
Julian Petley (Journalism)
Mike Wayne (Screen Media)
Craig Reeves (Law)

Conclusion:
Critical Theory at Brunel: Prospects for a Research Network/Centre (general discussion)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Ghosts

ON HAUNTOLOGY \ CAPITALIST REALISM – TWO TALKS BY MARK FISHER

THE COLLOQUIUM FOR UNPOPULAR CULTURE AND NYU’S ASIAN/ PACIFIC/ AMERICAN STUDIES PROGRAM present:

TWO TALKS BY MARK FISHER

What are grey vampires and how do they retard the insurrectionary potential of digital  discourse?  How does Derrida’s notion of hauntology contribute to an understanding of dubstep artist Burial?  Is ‘Basic Instinct 2’, routinely derided as a cine-atrocity, a Lacanian reworking of Ballard, Baudrillard and Bataille in service of the creation of a ‘phantasmatic, cybergothic London’?  What is interpassivity and in what ways has it come to define the corporatized incarceration of modern academia?

Over the last decade, Mark Fisher has established a reputation as one of the exhilarating cultural theorists in Britain.  A co-founder of the Cybernetic Culture Research Unit (CCRU) at Warwick University ­and described by Simon Reynolds as the academic equivalent of Apocalypse Now’s Colonel Kurtz ­ he brings together psychoanalysis, political analysis and speculative fiction to create an extraordinary body of rogue scholarship, a theory-rush with few parallels.

Fisher is the author of ‘Capitalist Realism’, the editor of ‘The Resistible Demise of Michael Jackson’ (both Zer0 Books, 2009), and writes regularly for Sight and Sound, Film Quarterly, The Wire and Frieze, as well as maintaining a well-known blog at http://k-punk.abstractdynamics.org.  He teaches at the University of East London, Goldsmiths, University of London, and the City Literary Institute.

The Colloquium for Unpopular Culture and NYU’s Asian/ Pacific/ American Studies program are pleased to be hosting Fisher’s first talks inAmerica.

See ‘ The Metaphysics of Crackle’, at: http://pontone.pl/pontones-special-guest-mix-k-punk-the-metaphysics-of-crackle/

***

MARK FISHER, THESE ARE NON-TIMES AS WELL AS NON-PLACES: REFLECTIONS ON HAUNTOLOGY
 
WHEN: Wednesday 4 May 2011, 6:30pm
WHERE: Room 471, 20 Cooper Square [East 5th and Bowery]
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

”Through their generic and transient qualities ­ workstations devoid of personal effects, relations with colleagues as fleeting as those with passengers on a commuter journey ­ many workplaces now resemble non-places, either literally, as in the case of a hotel, corporate coffee chain or out-of-town supermarket, or symbolically, in the form of temporary assignments for faceless employers (dis)located in anonymous buildings, where the worker-commuter then follows the same global timetables, navigates the same software applications and experiences the same sense of placelessness, the feeling of being mere data in the mainframe.”

So writes Ivor Southwood in his analysis of precarious labour, ‘Non-Stop Inertia’ (2011). In the last decade, the proliferation of corporate non-places has been accompanied by the spread of cyberspace-time, or Itime, a distributed or unpunctuated temporality. It’s no coincidence that, as this unmarked time increasingly came to dominate cultural and psychic space, Derrida’s concept hauntology (re)emerged as the name for a paradoxical zeitgeist.  In ‘Specters of Marx’, Derrida argued that the hauntological was characterised by ‘a time out of joint’, and this broken time has been expressed in cultural objects that return to a wounded or distorted version of the past in flight from a waning sense of the present. Sometimes accused of nostalgia, the most powerful examples of hauntological culture actually show that nostalgia is no longer possible.

In conditions where pastiche has become normalised, the question has to be: nostalgia compared to what? James Bridle has recently argued that ‘the opposite of hauntology … [is] to demand the radically new’, but hauntology in fact operates as a kind of thwarted preservation of such demands in conditions where – for the moment at least – they cannot be met. Whereas cyberspace-time tends towards the generation of cultural moments that are as interchangeable as transnational franchise outlets, hauntology involves the staining of particular places with time – albeit a time that is out of joint. In this lecture, Fisher will explore the hauntological culture of the last few years in relation to the question of place, using examples from music (Burial, The Caretaker, Ekoplekz, Richard Skelton), film (Chris Petit, Patrick Keiller) and fiction (Alan Garner, David Peace).

MARK FISHER, DEPACIFICATION PROGRAM: FROM CAPITALIST REALISM TO POST-CAPITALISM

WHEN: Thursday 5 May 2011, 6:30pm
WHERE: Room 471, 20 Cooper Square [East 5th and Bowery]
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

”It would be best, perhaps, to think of an alternate world – better to say the alternate world, our alternate world – as one contiguous with ours but without any connections or access to it. Then, from time to time, like a diseased eyeball in which disturbing flashes of light are perceived or like those baroque sunbursts in which rays from another world suddenly break into this one, we are reminded that Utopia exists and that other systems, other spaces, are still possible” (Fredric Jameson, ‘Valences of the Dialectic’).

In his 2009 book ‘Capitalist Realism’, Mark Fisher started to explore some of the affective, psychological and political consequences of the deeply entrenched belief that there is no alternative to capitalism. After 1989, capital seemed to enjoy full spectrum dominance of both global space and the unconscious. Every imaginable future was capitalist.  What has been mistaken for post-political apathy, Fisher argued, was a pervasive sense of reflexive impotence in the face of a neoliberal ideological program which sought to subordinate all of culture to the imperatives of business. The subject of post-Fordist capitalism is no passive dupe; this subject actively participates in an ‘interpassive’ corporate culture which solicits our involvement and encourages us to ‘join the debate’.

As Fisher argues in the book, education has been at the forefront of this process, with teachers and lecturers locked into managerialist self-surveillance, and students induced into the role of consumers.

In the eighteen months since ‘Capitalist Realism’ was published, the neoliberal program has been seriously compromised, but capitalist realism has intensified – with austerity programs pushed through on the basis that it is unthinkable that capitalism should be allowed to fail. At the same time, this new, more desperate form of capitalist realism has also faced unexpected challenges from a militancy growing in Europe, the Middle East and even in the heartlands of neoliberalism such as the UK and the US. Now that history has started up again, and Jameson’s ‘baroque sunbursts’ flare brighter than they have for a generation, we can begin to pose questions that had receded into the unimaginable during the high pomp of neoliberal triumphalism: what might a post-capitalism look like,
and how can we get there?

Fisher will argue that the Left will only succeed if it can reclaim modernity from a neoliberal Right that has lost control of it. This entails understanding how the current possibilities for agency are contoured and constrained by the machinery of what Deleuze and Foucault called the Control Society, including cyberspace, the media landscape, psychic pathologies and pharmacology – failures to act are not failures of will, and all the will in the world will not eliminate capitalism. It also entails recognising that neoliberalism’s global hegemony arose from capturing desires which it could not satisfy. A genuinely new Left must be shaped by those desires, and not be lulled, once again, by the logics of failed revolts.

Queries: ss162@nyu.edu

***END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

 

The 1960s

THE SOCIALIST 1960s: POPULAR CULTURE AND THE CITY IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE

Program and Schedule
Fisher Forum 2010

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
June 24-26

The Socialist 1960s: Popular Culture and the City in Global Perspective

THURSDAY, JUNE 24

7-8:30  Film showing: “Wings” (dir. Larisa Shepitko, 1966) (101 Armory Building, 505 E. Armory Ave., Champaign)

8:30-9:30  Panel discussion (101 Armory)

*Chair*: Anne E. Gorsuch (History, University of British Columbia)
Lilya Kaganovsky (Slavic Languages and Literatures, and Comparative Literature, University of Illinois)
Eugénie Zvonkine (Cinema, University of Paris 8)

*FRIDAY, JUNE 25*

**Third Floor, Levis Faculty Center, 919 W. Illinois St., Urbana
9-9:30  Welcome and introductions (Diane Koenker, History, University of Illinois)

9:30-11:  *Panel One: Socialist Spaces*

*Chair*: Anne E. Gorsuch

Lewis H. Siegelbaum (History, Michigan State University), “Togliatti: A Sixties Socialist City in the Seventies”

Susan Reid (Art History, Sheffield University, UK), “Making Oneself At Home in the Soviet Sixties”

Joao Goncalves (Anthropology, University of Chicago), and Marial Iglesias (History and Philosophy, University of Havana, Cuba) “Bring in the Sputnik, Topple the Eagle: The Birth of Socialist Havana in the Early 1960s*”*

*Discussant*: Christine Varga-Harris (History, Illinois State University)

1-2:30: *Panel Two: Youth Cultures*
*Chair*: Padraic Kenney (History, Indiana University)

Anne Luke (History, Wolverhampton University, UK), “Listening to /Los Beatles/:  Being Young in 1960s Cuba”

Rossen Djagalov (Comparative Literature, Yale University), “Musical Counterpublics: Guitar Poetry and International Socialism with a Human Face in the 1960s”

*Discussant: * Donna Buchanan (Ethnomusicology, University of Illinois)

3-5:  *Panel Three: Contact Zones*

*Chair*: Lilya Kaganovsky

Shawn Salmon (History, University of California), “Building Out: the Soviet Hotel in the 1960s”

Polly Jones (Literature, University College London School of Slavonic and East European Studies), “The “Thaw” Goes International: Soviet Literature in Translation and Transit in the 1960s ”

Nicholas Rutter (History, Yale University), “Missionary Tourism at the World Youth Festivals of the 1960s”

*Discussant:* Anne E. Gorsuch

*SATURDAY, JUNE 26*

9:30-11:30. *Panel Four: Television*

*Chair*: Roshanna Sylvester (History, DePaul University)

Heather Gumbert (History, Virginia Polytechnic University), “Sixties Television: Redefining Socialist Womanhood in the GDR”

Christine Evans (History, University of California, Berkeley), “The 1960s Soviet Television Game Show as Cold War Genre”

Robert Edelman (History, University of California, San Diego), “From Soccer Tourism to Cosmopolitan Hooliganism: The Consequences of International Club Football inside the USSR, 1965-1975”

*Discussant*: James Brennan (History, University of Illinois)

1-3: *Panel Five: Tourism*

*Chair: *George Gasyna (Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of Illinois)

Christian Noack (History, National University of Ireland), “Unchained Melodies? The Soviet Tourist Song Movement between Bard Poetry and Soviet Mass Culture”

Mark Keck-Szajbel (History, University of California, Berkeley), “The Popularity and Peril of Hitchhiking in 1960s People’s Poland”

Rachel Applebaum (History, University of Chicago), “Detour on the Friendship Train: Soviet Tourism to Czechoslovak Cities and the Prague Spring, 1964-1969”

*Discussant: *Diane Koenker

3:30-5:00: *Closing Roundtable*

/The Socialist Sixties in Global Perspective: Questions and Research Agenda/**

**Chair: Diane Koenker

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

A great video and song, ‘Daystar’ by Will Roberts: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s6f_pA5XUPk

Porcupine Tree - The Incident

Porcupine Tree - The Incident

FIRST AS TRAGEDY, THEN AS FARCE

 

Verso Books and the Brecht Forum welcome

Zizek: First as Tragedy, Then as Farce

7:00 PM / Wednesday October 14, 2009, the Cooper Union, Great Hall, New York

Advance Registration: http://www.brechtforum.org/zizek  

Pay what you can: $10 / $15 ($15 admission includes a copy of Zizek’s newly-released First as Tragedy, Then as Farce

Called “the most dangerous philosopher in the West,” Slavoj Žižek is today’s most controversial public intellectual. His work traverses the fields of philosophy, psychoanalysis, theology, history and political theory, taking in film, popular culture, literature and jokes—all to provide acute analyses of the complexities of contemporary ideology as well as a serious and sophisticated philosophy. The author of over 50 books, his forthcoming First as Tragedy, Then As Farce will be published in October.

Slavoj Žižek’s provocative prose has challenged a generation of activists and intellectuals. Now “the Elvis of cultural theory” will make a major New York City appearance on October 14 at the Great Hall in Cooper Union. Zizek’s talk—“FIRST AS TRAGEDY, THEN AS FARCE”—will frame the current global crisis, with an accessible analysis of how we moved from the tragedy 9/11 to the farce of the financial meltdown.

First as Tragedy, Then As Farce (Verso Books; $12.95; Pub October 19, 2009) asks whether we are prepared now that history has forced itself upon us, first with the attacks of September 11, 2001 and more recently with the financial meltdown of 2008. While figures on the Right and Left alike now descry the years of irrational exuberance that propped up the housing bubble, few have come to understand the deadlock that binds us. A call for the Left to reinvent itself in the light of our desperate historical situation, First as Tragedy, Then As Farce declares that “the time for liberal, moralistic blackmail is over.”

VISIT ZIZEK’S NEWLY LAUNCHED WEBSITE: http://zizek.us/

BUY THE BOOK: http://zizek.us/tragedy/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski