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Social Imaginaries

Social Imaginaries

SOCIAL IMAGINARIES

A NEW JOURNAL AT: http://www.zetabooks.com/journals/social-imaginaries.html

Issue 1 (May, 2015)

 

Table of Contents (with Abstracts)

 

1. Editorial by the Social Imaginaries Editorial Collective

 

2Social Imaginaries in Debate by Suzi Adams, Paul Blokker, Natalie J Doyle, John Krummel, and Jeremy C A Smith

Investigations into social imaginaries have burgeoned in recent years. From ‘the capitalist imaginary’ to the ‘democratic imaginary’, from the ‘ecological imaginary’ to ‘the global imaginary’ – and beyond – the social imaginaries field has expanded across disciplines and beyond the academy. The recent debates on social imaginaries and potential new imaginaries reveal a recognisable field and paradigm-in-the-making. We argue that Castoriadis, Ricoeur, and Taylor have articulated the most important theoretical frameworks for understanding social imaginaries, although the field as a whole remains heterogeneous. We further argue that the notion of social imaginaries draws on the modern understanding of the imagination as authentically creative (as opposed to imitative). We contend that an elaboration of social imaginaries involves a significant, qualitative shift in the understanding of societies as collectively and politically-(auto)instituted formations that are irreducible to inter-subjectivity or systemic logics. After marking out the contours of the field and recounting a philosophical history of the imagination (including deliberations on the reproductive and creative imaginations, as well as consideration of contemporary Japanese contributions), the essay turns to debates on social imaginaries in more concrete contexts, specifically political-economic imaginaries, the ecological imaginary, multiple modernities and their inter-civilisational encounters. The social imaginaries field imparts powerful messages for the human sciences and wider publics. In particular, social imaginaries hold significant implications for ontological, phenomenological and philosophical anthropological questions; for the cultural, social, and political horizons of contemporary worlds; and for ecological and economic phenomena (including their manifest crises). The essay concludes with the argument that social imaginaries as a paradigm-in-the-making offers valuable  means by which movements towards social change can be elucidated as well providing  an open horizon for the critiques of existing social practices.

 

3. Introduction to Castoriadis’s “The Imaginary As Such” by Johann P Arnason

 

4. The Imaginary As Such by Cornelius Castoriadis (translated by Johann P Arnason)

This text is a draft introduction to a planned work on imagination in society and history. It begins with reflections on the abilities and activities that set human subjects apart from other living beings and thus at the same time enable the ongoing creation of society and history. This is to be understood as an exploration within the “order of facts”, on the level of anthropological preconditions. The most elementary precondition is the human capacity to add an “unreal extension” to reality, and thus to put the latter at a distance; considered as an activity, this is what defines the imagination, but considered as a dimension of human existence, it is the realm of the imaginary. The two concepts are strictly complementary. To clarify their role in the proposed rethinking of social-historical being, we must link them to closer analysis of the latter’s two main components, representing and doing. On both sides, Castoriadis emphasizes the imaginary element as a decisive point against empiricist and rationalist reductions. Representing is as irreducible to perception as it is to thinking, and taking the argument one step further, both perception and thinking can be shown to be dependent on the imaginary. Similarly, on the level of doing, human action can neither be understood as a response to given needs nor as an application of pre-given representations; its creative potential presupposes an imaginary horizon. Finally it is argued that language – closely related to both representing and doing- has an imaginary dimension, central to the emergence and the enduring innovative capacity of meaning. The basic flaw of structural linguistics was its refusal to take the imaginary source into account.

 

5. Introduction to Nakamura Yūjirō and his Work by John Krummel

 

6. “The Logic of Place” and Common Sense by Nakamura Yujiro (translated by John Krummel)

The essay is a written version of a talk Nakamura Yūjirō gave at the Collège International de Philosophie in Paris in 1983.  In the talk Nakamura connects the issue of common sense in his own work to that of place in Nishida Kitarō and the creative imagination in Miki Kiyoshi. He presents this connection between the notions of common sense, imagination, and place as constituting one important thread in contemporary Japanese philosophy. He begins by discussing the significance of place (basho) that is being rediscovered today in response to the shortcomings of the modern Western paradigm, and discusses it in its various senses, such as ontological ground or substratum, the body, symbolic space, and linguistic or discursive topos in ancient rhetoric. He then relates this issue to the philosophy of place Nishida developed in the late 1920s, and after providing an explication of Nishida’s theory, discusses it further in light of some linguistic and psychological theories. Nakamura goes on to discuss his own interest in the notion of common sense traceable to Aristotle and its connection to the rhetorical concept of topos, and Miki’s development of the notion of the imagination in the 1930s in response to Nishida’s theory.  And in doing so he ties all three—common sense, place, and imagination—together as suggestive of an alternative to the modern Cartesian standpoint of the rational subject that has constituted the traditional paradigm of the modern West.

 

7. Interpreting the Present – a Research Programme by Peter Wagner

Sociologists have increasingly adopted the insight that “modern societies” undergo major historical transformations; they are not stable or undergoing only smooth social change once their basic institutional structure has been established. There is even some broad agreement that the late twentieth century witnessed the most recent one of those major transformations leading into the present time – variously characterized by adding adjectives such as “reflexive”, “global” or simply “new” to modernity. However, neither the dynamics of the recent social transformation nor the characteristic features of the present social constellation have been adequately grasped yet. Rather than assuming a socio-structural or politico-institutional perspective, as they dominate in sociology and political science respectively, this article concentrates on the way in which current social practices are experienced and interpreted by the human beings who enact them as parts of a common world that they inhabit together. It will be suggested that current interpretations are shaped by the experience of the dismantling of “organized modernity” from the 1970s onwards and of the subsequent rise of a view of the world as shaped by parallel processes of “globalization” and “individualization”, signalling the erasure of historical time and lived space, during the 1990s and early 2000s. In response to these experiences, we witness today a variety of interconnected attempts at re-interpretation of modernity, aiming at re-constituting spatiality and temporality. The re-constitution of meaningful time concerns most strongly questions of historical injustice, in terms of the present significance of past oppression and exclusion and in terms of the unequal effects of the instrumental transformation of the earth in the techno-industrial trajectory of modernity. The re-constitution of meaningful space focuses on the relation between the political form of a spatially circumscribed democracy and the economic practices of expansionist capitalism as well as on the spatial co-existence of a plurality of ways of world-interpretation.

 

8. Introduction to Johann P Arnason’s “The Imaginary Dimensions of Modernity” by Suzi Adams

 

9. The Imaginary Dimensions of Modernity by Johann P Arnason (translated by Suzi Adams)

This paper discusses the formation of Castoriadis’s concept of imaginary significations and relates it to his changing readings of Marx and Weber. Castoriadis’s reflections on modern capitalism took off from the Marxian understanding of its internal contradictions, but he always had reservations about the orthodox version of this idea. His writings in the late 1950s, already critical of basic assumptions in Marx’s work, located the central contradiction in the very relationship between capital and wage labour: Labour power was not simply transformed into a commodity, as Marx had argued; rather, the instituted attempt to treat it as a commodity was a contradiction in itself, between the subjectivity and the objectification of labour. Castoriadis then moved on to link this claim to Weber’s analysis of  the interconnections between capitalism and bureaucracy. The main contradiction of modern capitalism, whether wholly bureaucratized as in the Soviet model or increasingly bureaucratized as in the West, now seemed to be a matter of  incompatible systemic imperatives: the need to control and to mobilize the workforce. Finally, difficulties with this model – and with the revolutionary expectations based on it – led to a more decisive break with classical theories and to the formulation of a bipolar image of modernity, where the vision of an autonomous society is opposed to the logic of calculation and domination, embodied in capitalist development. On both sides there is an imaginary component, irreducible to empirical givens or systemic principles. In this regard, Castoriadis remained closer to Weber than to Marx, but he also anticipated, in a distinctive way, later emphasis on the cultural dimension of modernity, and more specifically the notion of modernity as a new civilization.

 

10. Introduction to Marcel Gauchet’s “Democracy: From One Crisis to Another” by Natalie J Doyle

 

11. Democracy: From One Crisis to Another by Marcel Gauchet (translated by Natalie J Doyle)

Democracy is in crisis. This crisis is the paradoxical outcome of its triumph over its erstwhile rivals. Having prevailed over the totalitarian projects of the first half of the 20th Century it has developed in such a way that it is now undermining its original goals of individual and collective autonomy. Modern liberal democracy – the outcome of an inversion of the values of tradition, hierarchy and political incorporation – is a mixed regime. It involves three different dimensions of social existence, political, legal, historical/economic, and organizes power around these. A balance was achieved after the upheaval of World War II in the form of liberal democracy, on the basis of reforms which injected democratic political power into liberalism and controlled the new economic dynamics it had unleashed. This balance has now been lost. Political autonomy, which accompanied modern historicity and its orientation towards the future, has been overshadowed by economic activity and its pursuit of innovation. As a result, the very meaning of democracy has become impoverished. The term used to refer to the goal of self-government, it is now taken to be fully synonymous with personal freedom and the cause of human rights. The legal dimension having come to prevail over the political one, democratic societies see themselves as “political market societies”, societies that can only conceive of their existence with reference to a functional language borrowed from economics. This depoliticisation of democracy has facilitated the rise to dominance of a new form of oligarchy.

 

12. Modern Social Imaginaries: A Conversation by Craig Calhoun, Dilip Gaonkar, Benjamin Lee, Charles Taylor and Michael Warner (edited by Dilip Gaonkar)

The conversation seeks to extend and complicate Charles Taylor’s (2004) account of three constitutive formations of modern social imaginaries: market, the public sphere, and the nation-state based on popular sovereignty in two critical respects. First, it seeks to show how these key imaginaries, especially the market imaginary, are not contained and sealed within autonomous spheres. They are portable and they often leak into domains beyond the ones in which they originate. Second, it seeks to identify and explore the new incipient and/or emergent imaginaries vying for recognition and demanding consideration in the constitution (as well as analysis) of contemporary social life, such as the risk-reward entrepreneurial culture.

 

**END**

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Panopticon

Panopticon

WRITING AND RESISTANCE

New Formations

We are pleased to announce the publication of New Formations Issue 83: ‘Writing and Resistance’
For online details see http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/issue/nf83.html

[Please note that the deadline for the next general issue of New Formations is May 31st 2015. For  contributors guidelines see http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/contributors.htm]

Details for this issue:
This issue of New Formations presents a range of exciting new work which spans and connects the fields of cultural studies, literary theory and radical political philosophy. Two contributors are concerned with the specificities of contemporary sexual politics. Three others address the relationships between writing, disclosure and interpretation. A further two texts offer radical philosophical interpretations of emergent political currents in Greece, Spain, Turkey and beyond. While there is no single theme, all the contributions share a concern to bring the most sophisticated theoretical tools available to bear upon the analysis of a range of urgent and emergent political questions. This continues to be the overriding purpose of New Formations: to explore the intersections between culture, theory and politics in order to understand the changing nature of each in the twenty-first century.

CONTENTS

Jeremy Gilbert: Editorial
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_editorial.pdf

David Alderson: Acting Straight: Reality TV, Gender Self-Consciousness and Forms of Capital

Clare Birchall: Aesthetics of the Secret
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_birchall.pdf

Naomi Booth: ‘Bathetic masochism and the shrinking woman’

Elizabeth Coles: ‘Psychoanalysis and the Poem: On Reading in Sándor Ferenczi and D.W. Winnicott’

Costas Douzinas: ‘Notes Towards an Analytics of Resistance’
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_douzinas.pdf

Sarah Kember: Why ‘Write? Feminism, publishing and the politics of communication’

Serhat Karakayali and Özge Yaka: ‘The Spirit of Gezi: The Recomposition of Political Subjectivities in Turkey’

REVIEWS:

James Penney Better tables
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_reviews_penney.pdf

Dhanveer Singh Brar Hieroglyphics of the flesh
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_reviews_singh_brar.pdf

Jade Munslow Ong Women, Crime and Sexual Transgression
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_reviews_munslow_ong.pdf

Caspar Melville Can sociologists write?
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_reviews_melville.pdf

Joseph Darlington That Dawn to Be Alive
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_reviews_darlington.pdf

Elena Tzelepis    Again Antigone
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_reviews_tzelepis.pdf

Jeremy Gilbert
http://www.jeremygilbert.org
@jemgilbert

**END**

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Things Aint Wot They Used T'be

Things Aint Wot They Used T’be

THING THEORY, MATERIAL CULTURE, AND OBJECT-ORIENTED ONTOLOGY

Call For Papers: Issue 27, Transformations

Thing Theory, Material Culture, and Object-Oriented Ontology

Transformations is calling for submissions for Issue 27, which is dedicated to the topic of Things.

The investigation of things is an important subject across many disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. In The Social Life of Things (1988), Arjun Appadurai provided an innovative exploration of how things, as commodities, shaped their human agents, rather than the other way around — an idea that would have important repercussions for a new scholarly interest in material culture. In attempting to illuminate the problematic notion of a “Thing Theory” (2001), Bill Brown has pointed to the complex relationship between objects and things, arguing that things lie outside a simple subject-object framework, leading a multifaceted “life” that humans only glimpse rather than truly see. More recently, in Vibrant Matter (2010), Jane Bennett has investigated the political ecology of things and scholars such as Gay Hawkins (2009) and Gillian Whitlock (2010) have taken up this rich field of enquiry in their explorations of topics as diverse as cultural detritus, the posthuman, the consumption of water and plastic, and the production, dissemination and reception of testimony and artifacts concerned with asylum seekers’ life narratives.

We welcome expressions of interest in submitting articles addressing, but not restricted to, the following research themes:

How can we understand “things” in relation to shifting technological and social contexts, to works of art or literature, or in relation to the cultural biographies or “lives” of things themselves?

Where are the lines that divide the sentient from the non-sentient, the human from the non-human, and what are their consequences?

Transformations invites proposals for academic journal articles on any aspect of the theme of “Things.”

Articles should be between 3,500 and 5,000 words and should conform to the style guide and submission guidelines on the Transformations website.

Please submit an abstract (200 words) as well as a succinct author biography (two sentences) and contact details via email to Associate Professor Jane Stadler at the University of Queensland (j.stadler@uq.edu.au) by 13 March 2015. Complete articles will be due by Monday 15 June 2015.

Stuff

Stuff

 

**END**

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Social Alternatives

Social Alternatives

SOCIAL ALTERNATIVES – CALL FOR THEMATIC ISSUES

Dear Colleagues

Social Alternatives is seeking proposals from Guest Editors for Thematic Issues

Social Alternatives: http://socialalternatives.com/contributions

Social Alternatives is an independent, quarterly refereed journal which aims to promote and inform public debate, commentary and dialogue about contemporary social, political, economic and environmental issues.

Social Alternatives analyses, critiques and reviews contemporary social issues and problems. The journal seeks to generate insight, knowledge, and understanding of contemporary circumstances in order to determine local, national, and global implications. We are committed to the principles of social justice and to creating spaces of dialogue intended to stimulate social alternatives to current conditions.

Social Alternatives values the capacity of intellectual and artistic endeavour to prompt imaginative solutions and alternatives and publishes refereed articles, review essays, commentaries and book reviews as well as short stories, poems, images and cartoons.

The journal has grappled with matters of contemporary concern for three decades, publishing articles and themed issues on topics such as: peace and conflict, racism, Indigenous rights, social justice, human rights, inequality and the environment.

If you are interested please send expressions of interest to: julie.matthews@adelaide.edu.au or julie@socialalternatives.com

 

**END**

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Black Metal Theory

Black Metal Theory

POLITICS AND BLACK METAL

Helvete: A Journal of Black Metal Theory

ISSUE 4 “POLITICS AND BLACK METAL” CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Call for Papers and Art

Proposals due August 1 2015.
Expectant publication, winter 2015

The complex subject of politics and black metal, directly and para-musically, has long been brushed up against within black metal theory work, but rarely unfolded at length. We would like to reserve this issue of Helvete as a forum to begin to address and perhaps even articulate some of these discussions.

While some may insist that black metal (as a diverse field of culture and music) exists outside of politics or cannot be described politically, it frequently sparks political repercussions, and its history courts political controversy. These include headline grabbing moments such as Varg Vikernes’s arrest in 2013 by the French government on accounts of suspicion of planning a terrorist attack; Norway’s implementation in 2011 of black metal education within its foreign diplomats; Nachtmystium’s forced cancellation in 2009 of a concert at Scion Rock Fest in Atlanta, Georgia; Inquisition’s forced cancellation in 2014 of their Vienna, Austria concert due to alleged connections to NSBM; and the complete ban on black metal in Malaysia in 2006. Most recently, Behemoth‘s recent encounter with Polish and Russian authorities has been well documented in the mainstream press. It may seem that the proposition that black metal is apolitical is itself a (privileged) political position.

The editors of Helvete are accepting proposals for essays that focus on politics and black metal. Contributors are encouraged to suggest topics such as Black Metal’s interactions with nation, race, linguistic, gender, religion, and culture. Special consideration will be given to the explorations of the negotiations that the individual makes within the city or community, using black metal as a verb rather than a noun.

In honor of this issue’s intent, and the innate politics of language, starting with Issue 4, Helvete will begin taking multi-lingual submissions. Please contact the editors for more details.

Helvete is an open access electronic and print journal dedicated to continuing the mutual blackening of metal and theory inaugurated by the Black Metal Theory Symposia. Not to be confused with a metal studies, music criticism, ethnography, or sociology, black metal theory is a speculative and creative endeavor, one which seeks ways of thinking that “count” as black metal events—and, indeed, to see how black metal might count as thinking. Theory of black metal, and black metal of theory. Mutual blackening. Black metal as a language of contemporary art practices a transmodality between sound and vision, mutually blackening both art and metal, and thus pushing the limits of contemporary academic genres by definition.

Essay proposals may be sent to the editors at helvetejournal@gmail.com
Art proposals may be sent to helvetejournalart@gmail.com
For detailed guidelines, see the Submission Checklist on our website: http://helvetejournal.org/forthcoming/submission-checklist/

Helvete

Helvete

Helvete: http://helvetejournal.org/

 

**END**

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Black Metal Theory

Black Metal Theory

 

Occupy London

Occupy London

KRITIKOS – VOLUME 11, APRIL – SEPTEMBER 2014

Apocalypse Not, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Machine…(d.gunkel and b.cripe)

Apocalypse Not, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Machine…by David Gunkel and Billy Cripe, Kritikos V.11, April-Sept.2014

 

H.L.A. Hart on International Law…(a.h.lesser)

H.L.A. Hart on International Law…by Anthony H. Lesser, Kritikos V.11, April-Sept.2014

 

Kritikos Reviews: http://intertheory.org/reviews.htm
Intertheory Press, new books 2014:

Order now: Art After the Avant-Garde: Baudrillard’s Challenge
http://intertheory.org/coulter-baudrillard-avant-garde.htm
By Gerry Coulter

Product Description
After we have read Jean Baudrillard it is difficult to see the world as we previously did. Baudrillard offered a strong challenge to art and artists, as he did everyone else. Many believe that Baudrillard was against art when he was really against the majority of things which some person or group has attempted to pass off as art. Baudrillard’s significance for art however, is that he wipes the decks clear and allows us to think anew about the art we love, and the art we do not. One of the implications of this book – a book about seeing art after taking Baudrillard seriously – is that we learn art never had a better friend, than Jean Baudrillard.

About the Author
Gerry Coulter is the founding editor of the International Journal of Baudrillard Studies, and the author of Jean Baudrillard: From the Ocean to the Desert, or the Poetics of Radicality. He has received Bishop’s University’s highest award for teaching – the William and Nancy Turner Prize.

 

**END**

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We Are the Crisis

We Are the Crisis

CAPITAL & CLASS – CALL FOR PAPERS

Submit your article to Capital & Class

Looking to publish critiques on global capitalism, Marxist theory, domestic labour or any other area in the study of capital and class? Have you considered the Capital & Class?

Capital & Class is the journal of the Conference of Socialist Economists (CSE) and since 1977 has been the main, peer-reviewed, independent source for a Marxist critique of global capitalism. Pioneering key debates on the state, value theory, domestic labour, and all other relevant areas, Capital & Class reaches out into the labour, trade union, anti-racist, feminist, environmentalist and other radical movements.

To find out more about if your article would be suitable for Capital & Class and to submit your paper please visit: http://bit.ly/CNCAcademia

The Conference of Socialist Economists (CSE) is an international, democratic membership organisation committed to developing a materialist critique of capitalism, unconstrained by conventional academic divisions between subjects. CSE runs multiple events every year alongside publishing Capital & Class three times a year.

Capital & Class: http://cnc.sagepub.com/

 

**END**

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The Capitorg

The Capitorg

CYBORGIAN IMAGES

First Issue Call for Articles

Yearbook of Moving Image Studies

Cyborgian Images: The moving image between apparatus and body

Deadline for Articles: December 31, 2014

The double-blind peer-reviewed Yearbook of Moving Image Studies (YoMIS) is now accepting articles from scientists, scholars, artists and film makers for the first issue entitled »Cyborgian Images: The moving image between apparatus and body.

YoMIS will be enriched by disciplines like media and film studies, image science, (film) philosophy, art history, game studies and other research areas related to the moving image in general. Modern perspectives on the structure of moving images exemplify a complex multimodal mechanism that interacts in specific ways with the recipient and various levels of the perception of images. In this case neither moving images nor the subjective reception are passive processes. Movement, time, space and different modalities interact with senses, memories and anticipation and create a complex hybrid structure of medium, recipient and sensory stimulus processing. This refers to the fact, that on the one hand the technological structure of displays and interfaces are relevant, and that on the other hand the role of the lived-body and mind is crucial for an understanding of the effects of the moving images. It is the interaction between the image, the dispositive and the recipient which brings the pictures to life and unfolds its meaning in diverse dimensions. This remark becomeS obvious when looking at the recent evolution in media technologies. New displays and interfaces like the Cinemizer (Zeiss), Oculus Rift (OculusVR) or Kinect (Microsoft) promote the progressive embodiment of the recipient or user by the medium, and, in doing so, they force the amalgamation of the subject of perception with the moving image.

Therefore »Cyborgian Images« addresses the broad field of the relationship between the technological dimension of the medium, its aesthetic and structural impact on the representational status of the moving image and the effect on the bodily level of the recipient, including affective and somatic reactions.

Contributions should be 5000 to 8000 words in length.

Please send your abstract, biographical informations, contact details and your article to Dr. Lars C. Grabbe and Prof. Dr. Patrick Rupert-Kruse via: kontakt@bewegtbildwissenschaft.de.

The official deadline for articles is the December 31, 2014.

If you are interested in contributing an article you will find a style sheet online: http://www.movingimagescience.com

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the managing editors via mail.

YoMIS: http://www.buechner-verlag.de/index.php/programm/yearbook-moving-image-studies

 

**END**

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Marx's Grave

Marx’s Grave

HISTORICAL MATERIALISM 22.2

Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory

HM 22.2 is Now Online

See: http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/journals/1569206x/22/2

 

CONTENTS:

 

The Blood of the Commonwealth

Author: David McNally

pp.: 3–32 (30)

 

Editorial Introduction

Author: Giorgio Cesarale

pp.: 33–43 (11)

 

Towards a Theory of the Integral State

Author: Bruno Bosteels

pp.: 44–62 (19)

 

Escaping the Throne Room

Author: Ian McKay

pp.: 63–98 (36)

 

Philosophy of Praxis, Ideology-Critique, and the Relevance of a ‘Luxemburg-Gramsci Line’

Author: Jan Rehmann

pp.: 99–116 (18)

 

Gramsci’s ‘Non-contemporaneity’

Author: Fabio Frosini

pp.: 117–134 (18)

 

Neither an Instrument nor a Fortress

Author: Panagiotis Sotiris

pp.: 135–157 (23)

 

Gramsci without the Prince

Author: Martin Thomas

pp.: 158–173 (16)

 

The Great Canadian Slump, 1990–92

Author: Geoffrey McCormack

pp.: 174–218 (45)

 

Book review: Ontology of Production: Three Essays, written by Nishida Kitarō

Author: Viren Murthy

pp.: 219–236 (18)

 

Book review: Utilitarianism and the Art School in Nineteenth-Century Britain, written by Malcolm Quinn

Author: Dave Beech

pp.: 237–256 (20)

 

Book review: Spatiality, Sovereignty and Carl Schmitt: Geographies of the Nomos, written by Stephen Legg

Author: Marijn Nieuwenhuis

pp.: 257–285 (29)

 

Notes on Contributors

pp.: 287–289 (3)

Back Issues

pp.: 290–291 (2)

 

Volume 22, Issue 2, 2014

ISSN: 1465-4466

E-ISSN: 1569-206X

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/hm-22.2-now-online

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

The Future PresentOUTUBRO

We would like to introduce you to the new edition of Outubro, a Marxist journal published since 1998 in Brazil.

www.revistaoutubro.com.br

https://www.facebook.com/revistaoutubro

From this edition on, Outubro will be published exclusively online with fully free access. Articles and book reviews continue to be published in Portuguese, and Abstracts in Portuguese and English. We believe that in this new format our journal will gain agility, ensure its periodicity, maintain its quality and increase its audience.

Despite the difficulties faced by Marxist journals in Brazil, October has kept over more than 16 years of existence, its financial, political and intellectual independence. It was the first Brazilian Marxist journal to publish its previous editions on the internet and the first to be indexed in several international databases.

 

Edition 21 (1/2014)

Content

Articles

 

Material world: the myth of the immaterial economy

Ursula Huws

 

Proletariat

Marcel van der Linden

 

The working class: a contemporary approach under the light of historical materialism

Marcelo Badaró Mattos

 

The Prerevolutionary strike movement in Russia (1912-1916)

Kevin Murphy

 

Labor movement, industrial belts and people’s power: experience and class consciousness during the Popular Unity in Chile

Mariano Vega Jara

 

Slum´s evictions in the city of Rio de Janeiro: a nowadays history

Romulo Costa Mattos

 

Revolutionary party and its degeneration: Gramsci, critic of Michels

Renato César Ferreira Fernandes

 

Fetishism and phantasmagoria of capitalist modernity: Walter Benjamin reader of Marx

Fabio Mascaro Querido

 

Marxism, politics and religion of “a convinced and confessed Marxist”: Michael Löwy reader of Jose Carlos Mariategui

Deni Ireneu Alfaro Rublo

 

Book Reviews

 

RIDENTI, Marcelo. Brasilidade revolucionária: um século de cultura e política. São Paulo: Unesp. 2010, by Daniela Vieira dos Santos

 

SPIVAK, Gayatri Chakravorty. Pode o subalterno falar? Belo Horizonte: Editora UFMG, 2010, by Camila Massaro de Góes

 

HOBSBAWM, Eric. Como mudar o mundo: Marx e o marxismo, 1840-2011. De São Paulo: Companhia das Letras, 2011, by Rodrigo Duarte Fernandes dos Passos e Diana Patricia Ferreira de Santana

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-edition-of-ouubro-journal

 

**END**

 

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

The Future of Education

The Future of Education

CRITICAL STUDIES IN EDUCATION – ASSOCIATE EDITOR INTERNSHIP FOR 2015

Dear CSE Friends,

The editorial team at Critical Studies in Education are seeking expressions of interest for an Associate Editor Internship for 2015.

Interested parties should email to Stephen Parker (stephen.parker@deakin.edu.au) a short statement (up to 500 words) outlining their interest in the Internship, a short CV emphasizing research experience and publications, and the names and contact details of two referees. Applicants should also have interests that match those of the journal.

Expressions of interest close 21 November 2014.

For more details, please see the flyer available from: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/pdf/RCSE_internship_flier.pdf

Please feel free to distribute this email and the flyer among your colleagues

Kind regards,
Dr Stephen Parker on behalf of the CSE editorial team.
Dr Stephen Parker | Editorial Assistant
Critical Studies in Education Editorial Office
stephen.parker@deakin.edu.au

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Labour

Labour

REFRAMING LABOUR AND WORKERS’ RESISTANCE FOR THE 21st CENTURY

Call for Papers

Working USA special issue

Issue Editors:

Maurizio Atzeni, Loughborough University, UK; m.atzeni@lboro.ac.uk

Immanuel Ness, Brooklyn College, CUNY, New York City; manny.ness@gmail.com

Interpretations of global labour in the age of neoliberal capitalism urgently demands robust and critical historical and comparative analysis. For decades, research on labour collective organisation has focused almost exclusively on workers collectively employed on a stable basis in industrial settings or in the public sector, defended by collective bargaining, represented by trade unions and inserted within relatively stable systems of industrial relations. This view however it has always failed to take into account the transformative potentialities of that vast, rich and meaningful array of ‘precarious’ work experiences and relations that allow the production and re-production of capital as a whole.

Women’s labour in the sphere of social reproduction, low-waged workers who work outside conventional work as subcontractors in global production chains or in the informal economy of the global cities or as crowd workers in the digital economy, migrant workers whose exploited work often lays at the margin of legality, new groups of dispossessed people forced into the labour market, are categories of workers traditionally excluded and neglected by the labour relations literature as labourers; often considered unproductive, unregulated, and thus unrepresentable. Considering the speed of development and intensity of integration of global capitalist processes and the political turn to neoliberalism, which have brought about new (or refreshed old) paradigms to increase workers’ productivity and profits, absent has been the signal importance of these ‘invisible’, precarious workers, today representing not just the vast majority of workers in the global South but also increasingly shaping the social landscape of cities across the world.

Broadening research on this underworld of precarious and not represented workers is important to understand one fundamental dimension of the process of capital accumulation in the global age but it also helps to address deep theoretical concerns, put in evidence by heterodox Marxist currents across the social sciences, originating from the use of narrow conceptions about work and workers:

  • The conventional notion of the working class, based on the industrial, waged worker, has been questioned for not considering how different labour regimes co-exist and contribute to the development of capitalism as a system, especially women engaged in social reproduction.
  • The social organisation and militancy of workers it has been reduced to workers’ resistance to official strikes organised by representative trade unions, the ‘institutionalised form of resistance’, leaving aside the rich history and tradition of workers’ self-organisation. This remains crucial today in framing precarious workers organisation and in setting possibilities for transformative agency.
  • Geographically research concentrated on struggles at the workplace without considering the linkages of these with broader struggles over workers’ daily lives.

In the past 30 years, one sided views of labour has been explicitly based on the political role assigned to the industrial workers. Either from a revolutionary or a reformist perspective this particular section of the working class was considered central to any transformative politics. The advent of neoliberalism has swept away many of the elements upon which this centrality was built, leaving a tabula rasa, politically and theoretically speaking. From an empirical point of view, diversity, heterogeneity, unevenness, unpredictability characterise most workers’ struggles of the 21st century.

Against this theoretical and empirical gap in knowledge, the aim of this special issue is twofold.

It aims to offer insights on the daily lives, organization and resistance of precarious workers, intending these in broader terms, as employed in a range of different sectors, geographical and spatial landscapes, economic environments, and regulatory employment regimes.

It aims to produce new knowledge into the connections between these different workers’ struggles and the specific socio-economic, historical and productive context in which have developed.

Within these aims and considering the scope of the journal, we seek submissions from any social sciences discipline concerned with the study of workers and labour using a range of empirical and methodological analyses. The editors however would especially welcome papers that reach theoretical insights in addressing the relevance of certain groups of workers’ experiences or develop their arguments through comparative/historical analysis; focus on global cities and diverse employment regimes, workplaces and daily lives experiences; consider the experiences of workers in strategic sectors of the economy (distribution, transportation, knowledge economy); search for connections of workers struggles in different locations across the global production chain;  or offer insights on new forms of organizing and resistance

 

DUE DATE FOR ABSTRACTS OF 750-1000 WORDS: 15 September 2014

WORD LENGTH: 6000-10,000 words

DUE DATE FOR FINAL SUBMISSION: end March 2015

PUBLICATION DATE: September 2015

INCLUDE NAME, AFFILIATION

WE ENCOURAGE PHD STUDENTS AND ESTABLISHED SCHOLARS TO CONTRIBUTE

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/call-for-papers-reframing-labour-and-workers2019-resistance-for-the-21st-century

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

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