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THINGPROTEST AND ACTIVISM WITH(OUT) ORGANISATION

SPECIAL ISSUE CALL FOR PAPERS

The Journal for International Sociology and Social Policy

Guest Editors:

Richard J White – Sheffield Hallam University, UK

Patricia Wood – York University, Canada

The economic, political, social, cultural and environmental crises of our time continue to provoke and inspire a remarkable range of social movements into existence. These multiple forms of protest and activism express and embody a politics of hope – captured both in alternative narratives that envisage new post-crisis possibilities, and through the physicality of collective and popular resistance. In this context, the Special Issue of The International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy is particularly intend on interrogating the socio-spatial forms of ‘organisation’ that underpin protest and activism. When taking a closer look at the organisational nature across these activist landscapes for example, it becomes apparent that resistance led through membership-based, co-ordinated hierarchical organisations (e.g. Trade Unions, NGOs) still retains an important visibility and influence in agitating for change. However, in addition perhaps, and in some meaningful way beyond, these more traditional forms of organised resistance, there exists important diverse and spontaneous forms of everyday activism, one, perhaps, consistent with a more horizontal and anarchistic praxis of self-organisation.

Questioning the relationship between activism with – and without – organisation throws up some interesting and important inter-disciplinary questions. At the most fundamental level it gives us cause to interrogate the very idea of activism: where does activism begin and end? Who gets to be an activist? Seeking to engage a more nuanced understanding of the differences between organized and unorganized forms of activism, provokes the question of how informal experiences of activism, encourage engagement with more organised forms of activism (and vice versa). Is the relationship between the two antagonistic, competitive or complementary to each other? How are organisational forms of activism dictated to by specific social and spatial temporalities, particularly at a time of crisis? Indeed in these (post)modern times is it meaningful to frame the organisation of activism within a binary relationship (either formal or informal)? Rather should we be encouraged to consider them on an organisational spectrum of difference (more formal, less formal and so on)? If desirable, how can a more informed complex understanding of the organisational natures of activism allow us to better recognise, value, strengthen and link up different types of patterns of activism and resistance?

To these ends we welcome papers of up to 8000 words addressing empirical or theoretical aspects focused on organisation of activism and protest, past and present, situated in any part of the world and at any scale.

Timeline

Please send 250-300 word abstracts directly to the Guest Editors, Richard White (richard.white@shu.ac.uk)  and Tricia Wood (pwood@yorku.ca ) by 15 August 2015.

We aim to let authors know as to whether their papers have been accepted for inclusion in the Special Issue within two weeks of this deadline.

Completed papers – between 5,000 to 8,000 words – must be submitted on-line to the IJSSP journal by 01 December 2015.

More information about The Journal for International Sociology and Social Policy can be found here: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/journals.htm?id=ijssp .

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Althusser

Althusser

DÉCALAGES – VOLUME 1 ISSUE 4

A new issues of Décalages: An Althusser Studies Journal – is now online

Décalages: http://scholar.oxy.edu/decalages/

 

Current Issue: Volume 1, Issue 4 (2013)

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Lire le Capital: Conference
Decalages An Althusser Studies Journal

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Sobre Décalages y Demarcaciones / On Décalages and Demarcaciones
Decalages An Althusser Studies Journal

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On the Contemporary Phenomenon of “Fashion”
Louis Althusser

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Sur le phénomène actuel de la « Mode »
Louis Althusser

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Sobre el fenómeno actual de la “Moda”
Louis Althusser

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From Althusser to Mao: Les Cahiers Marxistes-Léninistes
Frédéric Chateigner

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Introducción
Pedro Karczmarczyk and Warren Montag

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Introduction
Pedro Karczmarczyk and Warren Montag

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Introduction à l’article de Michel Pêcheux « Oser penser, oser se révolter »
Peter Schöttler

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Oser penser Manuscript
Michel Pêcheux

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Introduction to Michel Pêcheux’s “Dare to Think and Dare to Rebel!”
Peter Schöttler

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Dare to Think and Dare to Rebel! Ideology, Marxism Resistance, Class Struggle
Michel Pêcheux

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Introducción al artículo de Michel Pêcheux “¡Osar pensar y osar rebelarse! Ideología, resistencia y lucha de clases”
Peter Schöttler

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Osar pensar y osar rebelarse. Ideologías, marxismo, lucha de clases
Michel Pêcheux

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Ousar pensar e ousar se revoltar: Ideologia, marxismo, luta de classes
Michel Pêcheux

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El discurso: ¿estructura o acontecimiento?
Michel Pêcheux

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Lengua, discurso, ideología, sujeto, sentido: de Thomas Herbert a Michel Pêcheux
Pierre Macherey

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Língua, discurso, ideologia, sujeito, sentido: de Thomas Herbert a Michel Pêcheux
Pierre Macherey

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La seconde disparition de Michel Pêcheux
Jean-Jacques Courtine

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De Michel Pêcheux al Subcomandante Marcos: descripción de lo unívoco, interpretación de lo equívoco e insurrección contra lo inequívoco
David Pavón-Cuéllar

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Língua, Leitura, História
Fábio Ramos Barbosa Filho

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A Análise Do Discurso No Brasil
Lauro José Siqueira Baldini and Mónica Graciela Zoppi-Fontana

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El texto y el mundo – el deseo de Michel Pêcheux
J. Guillermo Milán-Ramos

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Algunas reflexiones sobre la concepción del sujeto y la epistemología en el Análisis del Discurso de Michel Pêcheux
Ricardo Terriles and Silvia Hernández

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De las formas históricas de existencia de la individualidad a la forma sujeto del discurso: Marx, Althusser, Pêcheux
Pedro Karczmarczyk

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Robespierre. Une politique de la philosophie de Georges Labica
Mohamed Moulfi

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Paula Lucía Aguilar, El hogar como problema y como solución. Una mirada genealógica de la domesticidad a través de las políticas sociales. Argentina 1890-1940
Laura Fernández Cordero

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Vittorio Morfino, El materialismo de Althusser. Más allá del telos y el eschaton
Agustín Palmieri and Felipe Pereyra Rozas

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Ana Grondona. Saber de la pobreza. Discursos expertos y subclases en la Argentina entre 1956 y 2006
Mara Glozman

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Louis Althusser, On the Reproduction of Capitalism: Three Reading Strategies
Mateusz Janik

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A Dead Dog is Immortal. On Louis Althusser, Initiation à la philosophie pour les non-philosophes
Juan Domingo Sanchez

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/the-new-issue-of-decalages-is-online

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

imagesESOTERICISM AND THE COGNITIVE SCIENCE OF RELIGION

CALL FOR PAPERS

An Aries Special Issue

Together with Markus Altena Davidsen (Leiden University), I am setting up a special issue of Aries on “Esotericism and the Cognitive Science or Religion”. At this stage we are looking for abstracts from people who might be interested in contributing a full research article.

Please find details in the CfP, linked here and pasted below. Feel free to spread the word to anyone who might be interested in this project.

Call for Abstracts, Aries special issue on Esotericism and the Cognitive Science of Religion

(Edited by Egil Asprem and Markus Altena Davidsen)

The cognitive science of religion (CSR) and the academic study of Western esotericism have both made a significant impact on religious studies over the past two decades. The study of esotericism continues to deepen our understanding of the historical complexities of religion in the West, and has identified a number of blind-spots related to heterodox religion, radically experiential practices, and overlaps between “religion”, “magic”, and “science”.

Meanwhile, CSR is rapidly changing the way scholars think about and approach key processes of religious practice, adding important new experimental and analytic tools to the scholar’s toolbox. This special issue of Aries aims to explore the potential of bringing these two fruitful fields together. What happens when we apply CSR approaches to the empirical material studied by esotericism scholars? How can key areas of interest in the study of esotericism, such as the notion of (experiential) gnosis, correspondences, imagination, higher knowledge, rejected knowledge, magical thinking, secrecy, and initiation contribute to the development of new approaches in CSR? How can we think about ritual practices such as theurgy, divination, healing, and ceremonial magic in terms of CSR approaches to ritual? Moreover, how can we use CSR approaches to these issues to integrate the study of esotericism more firmly in the broader comparative study of religion?

We are looking to curate research articles that deal with these and related questions. We take an inclusive view of CSR, and are happy to consider approaches from e.g. personality- and social psychology. We are especially interested in hands-on approaches that demonstrate the use of CSR inspired methodology to esoteric subject matters. We look in particular for articles based on contemporary ethnographies, interview or experimental data, but are also open for articles that bring CSR to bear on historical sources. The important thing is that studies should be able to integrate cognitive and psychological perspectives with existing state-of-the-art scholarship on esotericism.

If you want to take part in this special issue, please send us an abstract of your proposed topic by June 15 2015. Please specify as far as possible the empirical scope of your proposed article, as well as the CSR approaches you plan to work with. Include a short bibliography of the key literature you intend to draw on. On the basis of received abstracts, we will invite authors to submit their completed articles for peer review. The deadline for receiving finished manuscripts will be February 1 2016.

 

Relevant subject matter includes but is not limited to:

  • New Age movement
  • Ritual magic
  • Channeling
  • Healing/holistic health
  • Correspondence thinking
  • Kabbalah / esoteric hermeneutics
  • Sex magic
  • Spiritualism
  • Neoshamanism
  • Contemporary paganism
  • Astrology
  • Alchemy
  • Western initiatory societies

 

Relevant CSR approaches include but are not limited to:

  • Epidemiological approaches to the spread of esoteric representations
  • Cognitive optimality theory (e.g., agency detection, promiscuous teleology, minimal counter-intuitiveness, theological correctness)
  • Cognitive ritual theory (e.g., ritual form hypothesis, two modes theory, cognitive resource depletion theory)
  • Embodied cognition
  • Neurocognitive, experimental, and psychological approaches to experiential practices
  • Personality and individual difference correlates for esoteric practitioners (e.g. positive schizotypy, absorption, hypnotizability)
  • Conceptual blending theory

 

Please email your proposed abstract to Egil Asprem (easprem@gmail.com) and Markus Altena Davidsen (m.davidsen@hum.leidenuniv.nl). If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact us.

images (5)

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

images (7)

SALVAGE

SALVAGE

SALVAGE

Salvage is a new quarterly magazine of politics, arts, culture and polemic. But magazines don’t come cheap…

For Issue 1 we’re asking for your help. For more information visit:

Salvage: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/salvage–3

—————

Issue 1 featuring Laura Oldfield Ford, Trish Kahle, Magpie Corvid, Rosie Warren, Joana Ramiro, Benjamin Kunkel, Alberto Toscano, Neil Davidson, China Mieville and more.

£10 / ISSN 2058-6361 / 1st May 2015

—————

The crisis of capitalism has been a crisis of its opposition. We stand in the rubble of the post-Left. The implosion has brought no victors but the predators…

With the financial crisis of 2008, it appeared to many that the neoliberal project would finally be laid to rest. The early signs – from Iceland to Greece, the Arab uprisings to Occupy – pointed to a renewed and reinvigorated left with the potential to break free from the ossified dogmas of the past and challenge the economic and political orthodoxy. Yet, seven years later and the neoliberal corpse staggers on while the Left, notwithstanding a few real glimmers of embattled hope, such as Syriza’s victory, lurches from one catastrophe to the next

Salvage Magazine is a new quarterly magazine of politics, art, culture and polemic aimed to debris neoliberalism. Founded in 2014 by Editors Rosie Warren and Jamie Allinson, Art Editor China Miéville, and Contributing Editors Richard Seymour, Charlotte Bence and Magpie Corvid, Salvage has drawn inspiration from the rise of intellectually, politically and culturally engaged publications on both sides of the Atlantic in the past decade,including Jacobin, Strike, n+1, New Inquiry and The White Review. ‘Intellectual and committed without being academic, dogmatic or philistine – and believing that serious content deserves the best design – its aim is to engage with the most pressing political and cultural questions of the day while advancing engagement and discussion on the left

Stridently internationalist and fearlessly political, Salvage issue 1 will feature a range of new and established writers, poets, activists and artists. It will include essays from some of the biggest names on the left: Magpie Corvid whores Marxism; Joana Ramiro reports from Greece; Jamie Allinson accelerates; Benjamin Kunkel defends the money-form; Rosie Warren objectifies women; China Miéville waxes Dystopian; Richard Seymour dissects Farrageism; Trish Kahle damns Missouri; Pablo Mukherjee submerges Modi; Alberto Toscano translates the forgotten genius of Salvage-Marxism; Kunle Wizeman is interviewed about the Nigerian political scene; Neil Davidson uncovers the Neoliberal gravediggers of capital; Morgan Merteuil builds the industrial struggle; Gareth Brown and Nicholas Beuret walk with the dead; Mark Bould roasts Milton Friedman; Mary Robertson rehouses Engels; Daniel Hartley communizes the Anthropocene.

With the poetry of:

Caitlin Doherty

Kunle Wizeman

With the artwork of:

Season Butler

Karen Mirza

Laura Oldfield Ford

With future projects by:

Jordan/a Rosenberg, Rob Knox, Charlotte Bence and many more.

—————

Of the £10,000:

£5000 will go on our first print run

£800 will pay our writers and artists

£3000 will pay our designer, Rupa, our accountant, Sylvia, and our videographer, Becky.

£1000 will pay the wages for a part-time admin assistant, John, at London living wage

£200 will pay for tote bags and merchandise

Anything we raise above £10,000 will help to pay for our launch and future events, and allow us to subsidise the next print run so that we can sell Salvage at the lowest price possible.

 

We will give you things for your donations.

 

£10 gets you

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on our website

 

£15 gets you

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on our website

& a tote bag

 

£20 gets you

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

 

£25 gets you

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

 

£35 gets you

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

& a Salvage keyring

 

£60 gets you

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

& Salvage keyring

& named thanks on the inside

& a one year subscription to Salvage (four issues)

 

£150 gets you

(x 50)

The first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

& named thanks on the inside

& lifetime subscription to Salvage

or

(x 3)

The first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

& named thanks on the inside

& a one year subscription to Salvage (four issues)

& one of three dirty stories written by Magpie Corvid written for and about YOU

 

£300 gets you (x 3)

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

& named thanks on the inside

& a one year subscription to Salvage (four issues)

& one advance copy of Three Moments of an Explosion, China Miéville’s forthcoming short-story collection (publishing in July 2015)

 

£1000 gets you (x 1)

the first issue of Salvage & named thanks on the website

& your issue signed & personalised by the founders

& a tote bag

& named thanks on the inside

& a one year subscription to Salvage (four issues)

& a one-of-a-kind copy of the Subterranean Press limited edition of Perdido Street Station personally ‘Salvaged’ by China Miéville

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/salvage-new-magazine-of-left-politics-art-culture-looking-for-funding

Salvaging, Steven Wilson: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gl2OJe5TwdQ

Salvage Too

Salvage Too

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

 

EDUCATION

EDUCATION

PERSPECTIVES FOR THE NEW UNIVERSITY

Call for Papers

Extended deadline: April 15: Perspectives for the New University

Krisis: Journal for Contemporary Philosophy

The occupation and appropriation of university buildings in Amsterdam and the protests of students and staff there and at other universities in the Netherlands triggered a wide-ranging debate about the future of higher education and research.

Krisis – Journal for Contemporary Philosophy – aims at bringing together challenging perspectives from, on and for what during the protests has been coined the ‘new university’.

We invite contributions and short essays (max. 3000 words) that reflect on what is happening, how to move forward and envision alternative educational institutes.

We specifically also invite contributions by students and non-academics for this interdisciplinary publication aimed at supporting debates on the future of knowledge institutions.

Krisis is also looking for artistic and visual contribution that envision the new university.

The special issue will initially appear open-access in pdf-format and, possibly, in print at a later stage.

Deadline: April 15

KRISIS

KRISIS

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Social Imaginaries

Social Imaginaries

SOCIAL IMAGINARIES

A NEW JOURNAL AT: http://www.zetabooks.com/journals/social-imaginaries.html

Issue 1 (May, 2015)

 

Table of Contents (with Abstracts)

 

1. Editorial by the Social Imaginaries Editorial Collective

 

2Social Imaginaries in Debate by Suzi Adams, Paul Blokker, Natalie J Doyle, John Krummel, and Jeremy C A Smith

Investigations into social imaginaries have burgeoned in recent years. From ‘the capitalist imaginary’ to the ‘democratic imaginary’, from the ‘ecological imaginary’ to ‘the global imaginary’ – and beyond – the social imaginaries field has expanded across disciplines and beyond the academy. The recent debates on social imaginaries and potential new imaginaries reveal a recognisable field and paradigm-in-the-making. We argue that Castoriadis, Ricoeur, and Taylor have articulated the most important theoretical frameworks for understanding social imaginaries, although the field as a whole remains heterogeneous. We further argue that the notion of social imaginaries draws on the modern understanding of the imagination as authentically creative (as opposed to imitative). We contend that an elaboration of social imaginaries involves a significant, qualitative shift in the understanding of societies as collectively and politically-(auto)instituted formations that are irreducible to inter-subjectivity or systemic logics. After marking out the contours of the field and recounting a philosophical history of the imagination (including deliberations on the reproductive and creative imaginations, as well as consideration of contemporary Japanese contributions), the essay turns to debates on social imaginaries in more concrete contexts, specifically political-economic imaginaries, the ecological imaginary, multiple modernities and their inter-civilisational encounters. The social imaginaries field imparts powerful messages for the human sciences and wider publics. In particular, social imaginaries hold significant implications for ontological, phenomenological and philosophical anthropological questions; for the cultural, social, and political horizons of contemporary worlds; and for ecological and economic phenomena (including their manifest crises). The essay concludes with the argument that social imaginaries as a paradigm-in-the-making offers valuable  means by which movements towards social change can be elucidated as well providing  an open horizon for the critiques of existing social practices.

 

3. Introduction to Castoriadis’s “The Imaginary As Such” by Johann P Arnason

 

4. The Imaginary As Such by Cornelius Castoriadis (translated by Johann P Arnason)

This text is a draft introduction to a planned work on imagination in society and history. It begins with reflections on the abilities and activities that set human subjects apart from other living beings and thus at the same time enable the ongoing creation of society and history. This is to be understood as an exploration within the “order of facts”, on the level of anthropological preconditions. The most elementary precondition is the human capacity to add an “unreal extension” to reality, and thus to put the latter at a distance; considered as an activity, this is what defines the imagination, but considered as a dimension of human existence, it is the realm of the imaginary. The two concepts are strictly complementary. To clarify their role in the proposed rethinking of social-historical being, we must link them to closer analysis of the latter’s two main components, representing and doing. On both sides, Castoriadis emphasizes the imaginary element as a decisive point against empiricist and rationalist reductions. Representing is as irreducible to perception as it is to thinking, and taking the argument one step further, both perception and thinking can be shown to be dependent on the imaginary. Similarly, on the level of doing, human action can neither be understood as a response to given needs nor as an application of pre-given representations; its creative potential presupposes an imaginary horizon. Finally it is argued that language – closely related to both representing and doing- has an imaginary dimension, central to the emergence and the enduring innovative capacity of meaning. The basic flaw of structural linguistics was its refusal to take the imaginary source into account.

 

5. Introduction to Nakamura Yūjirō and his Work by John Krummel

 

6. “The Logic of Place” and Common Sense by Nakamura Yujiro (translated by John Krummel)

The essay is a written version of a talk Nakamura Yūjirō gave at the Collège International de Philosophie in Paris in 1983.  In the talk Nakamura connects the issue of common sense in his own work to that of place in Nishida Kitarō and the creative imagination in Miki Kiyoshi. He presents this connection between the notions of common sense, imagination, and place as constituting one important thread in contemporary Japanese philosophy. He begins by discussing the significance of place (basho) that is being rediscovered today in response to the shortcomings of the modern Western paradigm, and discusses it in its various senses, such as ontological ground or substratum, the body, symbolic space, and linguistic or discursive topos in ancient rhetoric. He then relates this issue to the philosophy of place Nishida developed in the late 1920s, and after providing an explication of Nishida’s theory, discusses it further in light of some linguistic and psychological theories. Nakamura goes on to discuss his own interest in the notion of common sense traceable to Aristotle and its connection to the rhetorical concept of topos, and Miki’s development of the notion of the imagination in the 1930s in response to Nishida’s theory.  And in doing so he ties all three—common sense, place, and imagination—together as suggestive of an alternative to the modern Cartesian standpoint of the rational subject that has constituted the traditional paradigm of the modern West.

 

7. Interpreting the Present – a Research Programme by Peter Wagner

Sociologists have increasingly adopted the insight that “modern societies” undergo major historical transformations; they are not stable or undergoing only smooth social change once their basic institutional structure has been established. There is even some broad agreement that the late twentieth century witnessed the most recent one of those major transformations leading into the present time – variously characterized by adding adjectives such as “reflexive”, “global” or simply “new” to modernity. However, neither the dynamics of the recent social transformation nor the characteristic features of the present social constellation have been adequately grasped yet. Rather than assuming a socio-structural or politico-institutional perspective, as they dominate in sociology and political science respectively, this article concentrates on the way in which current social practices are experienced and interpreted by the human beings who enact them as parts of a common world that they inhabit together. It will be suggested that current interpretations are shaped by the experience of the dismantling of “organized modernity” from the 1970s onwards and of the subsequent rise of a view of the world as shaped by parallel processes of “globalization” and “individualization”, signalling the erasure of historical time and lived space, during the 1990s and early 2000s. In response to these experiences, we witness today a variety of interconnected attempts at re-interpretation of modernity, aiming at re-constituting spatiality and temporality. The re-constitution of meaningful time concerns most strongly questions of historical injustice, in terms of the present significance of past oppression and exclusion and in terms of the unequal effects of the instrumental transformation of the earth in the techno-industrial trajectory of modernity. The re-constitution of meaningful space focuses on the relation between the political form of a spatially circumscribed democracy and the economic practices of expansionist capitalism as well as on the spatial co-existence of a plurality of ways of world-interpretation.

 

8. Introduction to Johann P Arnason’s “The Imaginary Dimensions of Modernity” by Suzi Adams

 

9. The Imaginary Dimensions of Modernity by Johann P Arnason (translated by Suzi Adams)

This paper discusses the formation of Castoriadis’s concept of imaginary significations and relates it to his changing readings of Marx and Weber. Castoriadis’s reflections on modern capitalism took off from the Marxian understanding of its internal contradictions, but he always had reservations about the orthodox version of this idea. His writings in the late 1950s, already critical of basic assumptions in Marx’s work, located the central contradiction in the very relationship between capital and wage labour: Labour power was not simply transformed into a commodity, as Marx had argued; rather, the instituted attempt to treat it as a commodity was a contradiction in itself, between the subjectivity and the objectification of labour. Castoriadis then moved on to link this claim to Weber’s analysis of  the interconnections between capitalism and bureaucracy. The main contradiction of modern capitalism, whether wholly bureaucratized as in the Soviet model or increasingly bureaucratized as in the West, now seemed to be a matter of  incompatible systemic imperatives: the need to control and to mobilize the workforce. Finally, difficulties with this model – and with the revolutionary expectations based on it – led to a more decisive break with classical theories and to the formulation of a bipolar image of modernity, where the vision of an autonomous society is opposed to the logic of calculation and domination, embodied in capitalist development. On both sides there is an imaginary component, irreducible to empirical givens or systemic principles. In this regard, Castoriadis remained closer to Weber than to Marx, but he also anticipated, in a distinctive way, later emphasis on the cultural dimension of modernity, and more specifically the notion of modernity as a new civilization.

 

10. Introduction to Marcel Gauchet’s “Democracy: From One Crisis to Another” by Natalie J Doyle

 

11. Democracy: From One Crisis to Another by Marcel Gauchet (translated by Natalie J Doyle)

Democracy is in crisis. This crisis is the paradoxical outcome of its triumph over its erstwhile rivals. Having prevailed over the totalitarian projects of the first half of the 20th Century it has developed in such a way that it is now undermining its original goals of individual and collective autonomy. Modern liberal democracy – the outcome of an inversion of the values of tradition, hierarchy and political incorporation – is a mixed regime. It involves three different dimensions of social existence, political, legal, historical/economic, and organizes power around these. A balance was achieved after the upheaval of World War II in the form of liberal democracy, on the basis of reforms which injected democratic political power into liberalism and controlled the new economic dynamics it had unleashed. This balance has now been lost. Political autonomy, which accompanied modern historicity and its orientation towards the future, has been overshadowed by economic activity and its pursuit of innovation. As a result, the very meaning of democracy has become impoverished. The term used to refer to the goal of self-government, it is now taken to be fully synonymous with personal freedom and the cause of human rights. The legal dimension having come to prevail over the political one, democratic societies see themselves as “political market societies”, societies that can only conceive of their existence with reference to a functional language borrowed from economics. This depoliticisation of democracy has facilitated the rise to dominance of a new form of oligarchy.

 

12. Modern Social Imaginaries: A Conversation by Craig Calhoun, Dilip Gaonkar, Benjamin Lee, Charles Taylor and Michael Warner (edited by Dilip Gaonkar)

The conversation seeks to extend and complicate Charles Taylor’s (2004) account of three constitutive formations of modern social imaginaries: market, the public sphere, and the nation-state based on popular sovereignty in two critical respects. First, it seeks to show how these key imaginaries, especially the market imaginary, are not contained and sealed within autonomous spheres. They are portable and they often leak into domains beyond the ones in which they originate. Second, it seeks to identify and explore the new incipient and/or emergent imaginaries vying for recognition and demanding consideration in the constitution (as well as analysis) of contemporary social life, such as the risk-reward entrepreneurial culture.

 

**END**

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 Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Panopticon

Panopticon

WRITING AND RESISTANCE

New Formations

We are pleased to announce the publication of New Formations Issue 83: ‘Writing and Resistance’
For online details see http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/issue/nf83.html

[Please note that the deadline for the next general issue of New Formations is May 31st 2015. For  contributors guidelines see http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/contributors.htm]

Details for this issue:
This issue of New Formations presents a range of exciting new work which spans and connects the fields of cultural studies, literary theory and radical political philosophy. Two contributors are concerned with the specificities of contemporary sexual politics. Three others address the relationships between writing, disclosure and interpretation. A further two texts offer radical philosophical interpretations of emergent political currents in Greece, Spain, Turkey and beyond. While there is no single theme, all the contributions share a concern to bring the most sophisticated theoretical tools available to bear upon the analysis of a range of urgent and emergent political questions. This continues to be the overriding purpose of New Formations: to explore the intersections between culture, theory and politics in order to understand the changing nature of each in the twenty-first century.

CONTENTS

Jeremy Gilbert: Editorial
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_editorial.pdf

David Alderson: Acting Straight: Reality TV, Gender Self-Consciousness and Forms of Capital

Clare Birchall: Aesthetics of the Secret
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_birchall.pdf

Naomi Booth: ‘Bathetic masochism and the shrinking woman’

Elizabeth Coles: ‘Psychoanalysis and the Poem: On Reading in Sándor Ferenczi and D.W. Winnicott’

Costas Douzinas: ‘Notes Towards an Analytics of Resistance’
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_douzinas.pdf

Sarah Kember: Why ‘Write? Feminism, publishing and the politics of communication’

Serhat Karakayali and Özge Yaka: ‘The Spirit of Gezi: The Recomposition of Political Subjectivities in Turkey’

REVIEWS:

James Penney Better tables
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_reviews_penney.pdf

Dhanveer Singh Brar Hieroglyphics of the flesh
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_reviews_singh_brar.pdf

Jade Munslow Ong Women, Crime and Sexual Transgression
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_reviews_munslow_ong.pdf

Caspar Melville Can sociologists write?
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_reviews_melville.pdf

Joseph Darlington That Dawn to Be Alive
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_reviews_darlington.pdf

Elena Tzelepis    Again Antigone
http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/journals/newformations/pdfs/nf83_reviews_tzelepis.pdf

Jeremy Gilbert
http://www.jeremygilbert.org
@jemgilbert

**END**

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Things Aint Wot They Used T'be

Things Aint Wot They Used T’be

THING THEORY, MATERIAL CULTURE, AND OBJECT-ORIENTED ONTOLOGY

Call For Papers: Issue 27, Transformations

Thing Theory, Material Culture, and Object-Oriented Ontology

Transformations is calling for submissions for Issue 27, which is dedicated to the topic of Things.

The investigation of things is an important subject across many disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. In The Social Life of Things (1988), Arjun Appadurai provided an innovative exploration of how things, as commodities, shaped their human agents, rather than the other way around — an idea that would have important repercussions for a new scholarly interest in material culture. In attempting to illuminate the problematic notion of a “Thing Theory” (2001), Bill Brown has pointed to the complex relationship between objects and things, arguing that things lie outside a simple subject-object framework, leading a multifaceted “life” that humans only glimpse rather than truly see. More recently, in Vibrant Matter (2010), Jane Bennett has investigated the political ecology of things and scholars such as Gay Hawkins (2009) and Gillian Whitlock (2010) have taken up this rich field of enquiry in their explorations of topics as diverse as cultural detritus, the posthuman, the consumption of water and plastic, and the production, dissemination and reception of testimony and artifacts concerned with asylum seekers’ life narratives.

We welcome expressions of interest in submitting articles addressing, but not restricted to, the following research themes:

How can we understand “things” in relation to shifting technological and social contexts, to works of art or literature, or in relation to the cultural biographies or “lives” of things themselves?

Where are the lines that divide the sentient from the non-sentient, the human from the non-human, and what are their consequences?

Transformations invites proposals for academic journal articles on any aspect of the theme of “Things.”

Articles should be between 3,500 and 5,000 words and should conform to the style guide and submission guidelines on the Transformations website.

Please submit an abstract (200 words) as well as a succinct author biography (two sentences) and contact details via email to Associate Professor Jane Stadler at the University of Queensland (j.stadler@uq.edu.au) by 13 March 2015. Complete articles will be due by Monday 15 June 2015.

Stuff

Stuff

 

**END**

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Social Alternatives

Social Alternatives

SOCIAL ALTERNATIVES – CALL FOR THEMATIC ISSUES

Dear Colleagues

Social Alternatives is seeking proposals from Guest Editors for Thematic Issues

Social Alternatives: http://socialalternatives.com/contributions

Social Alternatives is an independent, quarterly refereed journal which aims to promote and inform public debate, commentary and dialogue about contemporary social, political, economic and environmental issues.

Social Alternatives analyses, critiques and reviews contemporary social issues and problems. The journal seeks to generate insight, knowledge, and understanding of contemporary circumstances in order to determine local, national, and global implications. We are committed to the principles of social justice and to creating spaces of dialogue intended to stimulate social alternatives to current conditions.

Social Alternatives values the capacity of intellectual and artistic endeavour to prompt imaginative solutions and alternatives and publishes refereed articles, review essays, commentaries and book reviews as well as short stories, poems, images and cartoons.

The journal has grappled with matters of contemporary concern for three decades, publishing articles and themed issues on topics such as: peace and conflict, racism, Indigenous rights, social justice, human rights, inequality and the environment.

If you are interested please send expressions of interest to: julie.matthews@adelaide.edu.au or julie@socialalternatives.com

 

**END**

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Black Metal Theory

Black Metal Theory

POLITICS AND BLACK METAL

Helvete: A Journal of Black Metal Theory

ISSUE 4 “POLITICS AND BLACK METAL” CALL FOR PROPOSALS

Call for Papers and Art

Proposals due August 1 2015.
Expectant publication, winter 2015

The complex subject of politics and black metal, directly and para-musically, has long been brushed up against within black metal theory work, but rarely unfolded at length. We would like to reserve this issue of Helvete as a forum to begin to address and perhaps even articulate some of these discussions.

While some may insist that black metal (as a diverse field of culture and music) exists outside of politics or cannot be described politically, it frequently sparks political repercussions, and its history courts political controversy. These include headline grabbing moments such as Varg Vikernes’s arrest in 2013 by the French government on accounts of suspicion of planning a terrorist attack; Norway’s implementation in 2011 of black metal education within its foreign diplomats; Nachtmystium’s forced cancellation in 2009 of a concert at Scion Rock Fest in Atlanta, Georgia; Inquisition’s forced cancellation in 2014 of their Vienna, Austria concert due to alleged connections to NSBM; and the complete ban on black metal in Malaysia in 2006. Most recently, Behemoth‘s recent encounter with Polish and Russian authorities has been well documented in the mainstream press. It may seem that the proposition that black metal is apolitical is itself a (privileged) political position.

The editors of Helvete are accepting proposals for essays that focus on politics and black metal. Contributors are encouraged to suggest topics such as Black Metal’s interactions with nation, race, linguistic, gender, religion, and culture. Special consideration will be given to the explorations of the negotiations that the individual makes within the city or community, using black metal as a verb rather than a noun.

In honor of this issue’s intent, and the innate politics of language, starting with Issue 4, Helvete will begin taking multi-lingual submissions. Please contact the editors for more details.

Helvete is an open access electronic and print journal dedicated to continuing the mutual blackening of metal and theory inaugurated by the Black Metal Theory Symposia. Not to be confused with a metal studies, music criticism, ethnography, or sociology, black metal theory is a speculative and creative endeavor, one which seeks ways of thinking that “count” as black metal events—and, indeed, to see how black metal might count as thinking. Theory of black metal, and black metal of theory. Mutual blackening. Black metal as a language of contemporary art practices a transmodality between sound and vision, mutually blackening both art and metal, and thus pushing the limits of contemporary academic genres by definition.

Essay proposals may be sent to the editors at helvetejournal@gmail.com
Art proposals may be sent to helvetejournalart@gmail.com
For detailed guidelines, see the Submission Checklist on our website: http://helvetejournal.org/forthcoming/submission-checklist/

Helvete

Helvete

Helvete: http://helvetejournal.org/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

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Black Metal Theory

Black Metal Theory

 

Occupy London

Occupy London

KRITIKOS – VOLUME 11, APRIL – SEPTEMBER 2014

Apocalypse Not, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Machine…(d.gunkel and b.cripe)

Apocalypse Not, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Machine…by David Gunkel and Billy Cripe, Kritikos V.11, April-Sept.2014

 

H.L.A. Hart on International Law…(a.h.lesser)

H.L.A. Hart on International Law…by Anthony H. Lesser, Kritikos V.11, April-Sept.2014

 

Kritikos Reviews: http://intertheory.org/reviews.htm
Intertheory Press, new books 2014:

Order now: Art After the Avant-Garde: Baudrillard’s Challenge
http://intertheory.org/coulter-baudrillard-avant-garde.htm
By Gerry Coulter

Product Description
After we have read Jean Baudrillard it is difficult to see the world as we previously did. Baudrillard offered a strong challenge to art and artists, as he did everyone else. Many believe that Baudrillard was against art when he was really against the majority of things which some person or group has attempted to pass off as art. Baudrillard’s significance for art however, is that he wipes the decks clear and allows us to think anew about the art we love, and the art we do not. One of the implications of this book – a book about seeing art after taking Baudrillard seriously – is that we learn art never had a better friend, than Jean Baudrillard.

About the Author
Gerry Coulter is the founding editor of the International Journal of Baudrillard Studies, and the author of Jean Baudrillard: From the Ocean to the Desert, or the Poetics of Radicality. He has received Bishop’s University’s highest award for teaching – the William and Nancy Turner Prize.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

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Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

 

We Are the Crisis

We Are the Crisis

CAPITAL & CLASS – CALL FOR PAPERS

Submit your article to Capital & Class

Looking to publish critiques on global capitalism, Marxist theory, domestic labour or any other area in the study of capital and class? Have you considered the Capital & Class?

Capital & Class is the journal of the Conference of Socialist Economists (CSE) and since 1977 has been the main, peer-reviewed, independent source for a Marxist critique of global capitalism. Pioneering key debates on the state, value theory, domestic labour, and all other relevant areas, Capital & Class reaches out into the labour, trade union, anti-racist, feminist, environmentalist and other radical movements.

To find out more about if your article would be suitable for Capital & Class and to submit your paper please visit: http://bit.ly/CNCAcademia

The Conference of Socialist Economists (CSE) is an international, democratic membership organisation committed to developing a materialist critique of capitalism, unconstrained by conventional academic divisions between subjects. CSE runs multiple events every year alongside publishing Capital & Class three times a year.

Capital & Class: http://cnc.sagepub.com/

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

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Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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