Skip navigation

Tag Archives: Ghosts

Monsters

Monsters

GODS AND MONSTERS: HISTORISIZING RITUAL, PUBLIC MEMORY, AND THE RELIGIOUS IMAGINATION

Call for Papers!

History Students Association Conference 2015

In his seminal essay The Great Cat Massacre, Robert Darnton gave a sage bit of advice to academics who study culture : “When you realize that you are not getting something—a joke, a proverb, a ceremony—that is particularly meaningful to the natives, you can see where to grasp a foreign system of meaning in order to unravel it.”

The monster is a construct and a projection, always interpreting the moment in which it is created. So too we see constructions of self in cultural phenomena as diverse as comic book heroes, ghost stories, fertility rituals, hagiography-even the villainization of the “other” informs the moment in which it enter public consciousness.

It is in this spirit that the 2015 History Students Association Conference at San Francisco State University is seeking papers that explore the intersection between humanity and its constructs.

How does ritual inform mentality? What can the supernatural tell us about historic truth and memory? How can we interpret stories so as to better understand the storyteller? How does politicization shape religious experience? How does the demonization of the other inform cultural fear? What do the fantastic elements interwoven with oral histories help us to discover about cultural norms?

Cross disciplinary submissions from film studies, literature, religious and ethnic studies, art history, and anthropology are encouraged.

Submission Guidelines: Please submit abstracts of 300 words or less to: hsa@mail.sfsu.edu

Please include the title of the submitted paper, your name, affiliated institution, field of study, and contact information. The deadline for submissions is FEBRUARY 13, 2015. If selected, final papers will be due to your panel chair no later than MID MARCH, 2015. Conference will be held April 25, 2015 at San Francisco State University.

Recent works that resonate with the spirit of the conference include:

Louise White’s monograph published in 2000, Speaking with Vampires: Rumor and History in Colonial Africa serves as a cogent example of how tales of the fantastic can be examined and interpreted to allow us to better understand the mentalities of discursive or liminal groups.

Stefan Goeble’s brilliant book on medievalism published in 2007, The Great War and Medieval Memory: War, Remembrance and Medievalism in Britain and Germany, 1914-1940, looks at how elements of medieval chivalric culture were interpreted in war memorials, interpreting iconography to uncover how communal memory functions in the search for historical continuity in the face of such horrific events.

 

HSA Conference website: http://history.sfsu.edu/content/hsa-2015-conference

WW2download

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

BlackMetaldownload

Ghosts

Ghosts

CAPITALISM: A GHOST STORY

Arundhati Roy
March 26
7 pm
The New School
Launching her new book Capitalism: A Ghost Story (Haymarket Books)
See: http://www.eventbrite.com/e/ capitalism-a-ghost-story-a- reading-and-conversation-with- arundhati-roy-tickets- 10647632355
*
Palestinian author and activist Ali Abunimah is speaking in NYC three times next week at events launching his new book The Battle for Justice in Palestine (Haymarket Books)
The Battle for Justice in Palestine
http://www.haymarketbooks.org/ pb/The-Battle-for-Justice-in- Palestine

About the new book:
“This is the best book on Palestine in the last decade.” —Joseph Massad.

Efforts to achieve a “two-state solution” have finally collapsed; the struggle for justice in Palestine is at a crossroads. As Israel and its advocates lurch toward greater extremism, many ask where the struggle is headed. This book offers a clear analysis of this crossroads moment and looks forward with urgency down the path to a more hopeful future.

Ali Abunimah is the author of One Country: A Bold Proposal to End the Israeli Palestinian Impasse, and co-founder and director of the widely acclaimed publication The Electronic Intifada. Based in the United States, he has written hundreds of articles and been an active part of the movement for justice in Palestine for 20 years. He is the recipient of a 2013 Lannan Cultural Freedom Fellowship.

Event details:
The Battle for Justice in Palestine w/Ali Abunimah
Thursday, March 6, 2014 – 6:30pm
Brooklyn College
2900 Bedford Ave
Brooklyn, NY 11210
http://www.haymarketbooks.org/ event/3983

The Battle for Justice in Palestine w/Ali Abunimah
Friday, March 7, 2014 – 7:00pm
The New School
66 West 12th Street Room 404
New York, NY 10011
http://www.haymarketbooks.org/ event/3981

Ali Abunimah with Max Blumenthal
Monday, March 10, 2014 – 7:00pm
NYU
Global Center/Center for Spiritual Life room C95
238 Thompson Street
New York, NY 10011
http://www.haymarketbooks.org/ event/3993

These events are part of NYC Israeli Apartheid Week

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: https://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskpoint.blogspot.com

Karl Marx

HISTORICAL MATERIALISM CONFERENCE 2012 – NINTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE

The Ninth Annual HM Conference will take place in Central London from 8-11 November 2012

Weighs Like a Nightmare

Historical Materialism Ninth Annual Conference

Has Marx been reanimated once again? From mainstream media to academia, this question hangs in the air. The old ghosts of revolution appear to be shaking off their shackles and getting agitated. What is this spirit? Who are the militants haunting this ramshackle capitalism? Are these new spectres – stalking the streets of Syria, Tunisia and Egypt, Athens, Spain and Wall Street and beyond – or direct descendants of socialist and communist ones? How does the past haunt the present? How might the present haunt the future?

As new conflicts and struggles emerge, the old questions refuse to go away: What type of organisation is needed to sharpen the conflicts, if any? Who are the agents of history and change? Is the scope of political action national or international? What is the political value of alliances and fronts? Does history cunningly work a progressive path through and around the contingencies of struggle? Are the same mistakes to be made, the same failures repeated?

The ninth HM annual conference focuses on the returns and the persistence of political forms and theoretical problems, on the uses and abuses of the history of Marxism in this turbulent present and on the ways and forms in which an inheritance of various Marxist traditions can help us to organise and to act in contemporary struggles.

We invite proposals for presentations or panels (with two or three suggested participants) on topics such as: the echoes of the past in the present; learning or not learning from the past; the reanimation of revolution; history as farce, history as tragedy; historiography and Marxism; cycles; circulation; anti-memory as a political stance; new histories of capital and the labour movement; Marxism and ‘deep history’; theory as history; the role of archival sources in history and the place of theory; rhythms of historical development, combined, uneven or otherwise; concepts of pre-capitalism; the question of successive modes of production; historical or other materialisms; the return of radical politics in Eastern Europe and elsewhere; post-communism; the endless afterlives of ‘Classical’ Marxists and ‘Western’ Marxist theorists and others who refuse to go away; the reruns of crisis; the role of memory and the revisioning of history; forgotten figures suddenly blasted into contemporary relevance; perma-war; imperial ghosts and their legacies, racism’s haunting returns; old and new world orders; old and new cultures; avant-gardes and rearguards; the re-reading of classic texts; the question of Marxism’s relation to tradition; ideas of inheritance and ‘selective tradition’; recovery; recuperation; periodisation; continuities and discontinuities; narratives of new and old beginnings (of history, of culture, of the Left, of Marxism).

HM will also consider proposals on themes and topics of interest to critical Marxist theory not directly linked to the call for papers (we particularly welcome contributions on non-Western Marxism, history and politics, and on empirical inquiries employing Marxist methods and on Marxism and gender). While Historical Materialism is happy to receive proposals for panels, the editorial board reserves the right to change the composition of panels or to reject individual papers from panel proposals.

Please submit a title and abstract of between 200 and 300 words (or a fully worked through panel proposal) by registering at http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/conferences BEFORE 26 April 2012

Deadline for registration of abstracts: 26 April 2012

http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/conferences/annual9/submit

Preference will be given to subscribers to the journal and participants are expected to be present during the whole of the event – no tailor-made timetabling for individuals will be possible, nor will cameo-appearances be tolerated.

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Ghosts

ON HAUNTOLOGY \ CAPITALIST REALISM – TWO TALKS BY MARK FISHER

THE COLLOQUIUM FOR UNPOPULAR CULTURE AND NYU’S ASIAN/ PACIFIC/ AMERICAN STUDIES PROGRAM present:

TWO TALKS BY MARK FISHER

What are grey vampires and how do they retard the insurrectionary potential of digital  discourse?  How does Derrida’s notion of hauntology contribute to an understanding of dubstep artist Burial?  Is ‘Basic Instinct 2’, routinely derided as a cine-atrocity, a Lacanian reworking of Ballard, Baudrillard and Bataille in service of the creation of a ‘phantasmatic, cybergothic London’?  What is interpassivity and in what ways has it come to define the corporatized incarceration of modern academia?

Over the last decade, Mark Fisher has established a reputation as one of the exhilarating cultural theorists in Britain.  A co-founder of the Cybernetic Culture Research Unit (CCRU) at Warwick University ­and described by Simon Reynolds as the academic equivalent of Apocalypse Now’s Colonel Kurtz ­ he brings together psychoanalysis, political analysis and speculative fiction to create an extraordinary body of rogue scholarship, a theory-rush with few parallels.

Fisher is the author of ‘Capitalist Realism’, the editor of ‘The Resistible Demise of Michael Jackson’ (both Zer0 Books, 2009), and writes regularly for Sight and Sound, Film Quarterly, The Wire and Frieze, as well as maintaining a well-known blog at http://k-punk.abstractdynamics.org.  He teaches at the University of East London, Goldsmiths, University of London, and the City Literary Institute.

The Colloquium for Unpopular Culture and NYU’s Asian/ Pacific/ American Studies program are pleased to be hosting Fisher’s first talks inAmerica.

See ‘ The Metaphysics of Crackle’, at: http://pontone.pl/pontones-special-guest-mix-k-punk-the-metaphysics-of-crackle/

***

MARK FISHER, THESE ARE NON-TIMES AS WELL AS NON-PLACES: REFLECTIONS ON HAUNTOLOGY
 
WHEN: Wednesday 4 May 2011, 6:30pm
WHERE: Room 471, 20 Cooper Square [East 5th and Bowery]
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

”Through their generic and transient qualities ­ workstations devoid of personal effects, relations with colleagues as fleeting as those with passengers on a commuter journey ­ many workplaces now resemble non-places, either literally, as in the case of a hotel, corporate coffee chain or out-of-town supermarket, or symbolically, in the form of temporary assignments for faceless employers (dis)located in anonymous buildings, where the worker-commuter then follows the same global timetables, navigates the same software applications and experiences the same sense of placelessness, the feeling of being mere data in the mainframe.”

So writes Ivor Southwood in his analysis of precarious labour, ‘Non-Stop Inertia’ (2011). In the last decade, the proliferation of corporate non-places has been accompanied by the spread of cyberspace-time, or Itime, a distributed or unpunctuated temporality. It’s no coincidence that, as this unmarked time increasingly came to dominate cultural and psychic space, Derrida’s concept hauntology (re)emerged as the name for a paradoxical zeitgeist.  In ‘Specters of Marx’, Derrida argued that the hauntological was characterised by ‘a time out of joint’, and this broken time has been expressed in cultural objects that return to a wounded or distorted version of the past in flight from a waning sense of the present. Sometimes accused of nostalgia, the most powerful examples of hauntological culture actually show that nostalgia is no longer possible.

In conditions where pastiche has become normalised, the question has to be: nostalgia compared to what? James Bridle has recently argued that ‘the opposite of hauntology … [is] to demand the radically new’, but hauntology in fact operates as a kind of thwarted preservation of such demands in conditions where – for the moment at least – they cannot be met. Whereas cyberspace-time tends towards the generation of cultural moments that are as interchangeable as transnational franchise outlets, hauntology involves the staining of particular places with time – albeit a time that is out of joint. In this lecture, Fisher will explore the hauntological culture of the last few years in relation to the question of place, using examples from music (Burial, The Caretaker, Ekoplekz, Richard Skelton), film (Chris Petit, Patrick Keiller) and fiction (Alan Garner, David Peace).

MARK FISHER, DEPACIFICATION PROGRAM: FROM CAPITALIST REALISM TO POST-CAPITALISM

WHEN: Thursday 5 May 2011, 6:30pm
WHERE: Room 471, 20 Cooper Square [East 5th and Bowery]
FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

”It would be best, perhaps, to think of an alternate world – better to say the alternate world, our alternate world – as one contiguous with ours but without any connections or access to it. Then, from time to time, like a diseased eyeball in which disturbing flashes of light are perceived or like those baroque sunbursts in which rays from another world suddenly break into this one, we are reminded that Utopia exists and that other systems, other spaces, are still possible” (Fredric Jameson, ‘Valences of the Dialectic’).

In his 2009 book ‘Capitalist Realism’, Mark Fisher started to explore some of the affective, psychological and political consequences of the deeply entrenched belief that there is no alternative to capitalism. After 1989, capital seemed to enjoy full spectrum dominance of both global space and the unconscious. Every imaginable future was capitalist.  What has been mistaken for post-political apathy, Fisher argued, was a pervasive sense of reflexive impotence in the face of a neoliberal ideological program which sought to subordinate all of culture to the imperatives of business. The subject of post-Fordist capitalism is no passive dupe; this subject actively participates in an ‘interpassive’ corporate culture which solicits our involvement and encourages us to ‘join the debate’.

As Fisher argues in the book, education has been at the forefront of this process, with teachers and lecturers locked into managerialist self-surveillance, and students induced into the role of consumers.

In the eighteen months since ‘Capitalist Realism’ was published, the neoliberal program has been seriously compromised, but capitalist realism has intensified – with austerity programs pushed through on the basis that it is unthinkable that capitalism should be allowed to fail. At the same time, this new, more desperate form of capitalist realism has also faced unexpected challenges from a militancy growing in Europe, the Middle East and even in the heartlands of neoliberalism such as the UK and the US. Now that history has started up again, and Jameson’s ‘baroque sunbursts’ flare brighter than they have for a generation, we can begin to pose questions that had receded into the unimaginable during the high pomp of neoliberal triumphalism: what might a post-capitalism look like,
and how can we get there?

Fisher will argue that the Left will only succeed if it can reclaim modernity from a neoliberal Right that has lost control of it. This entails understanding how the current possibilities for agency are contoured and constrained by the machinery of what Deleuze and Foucault called the Control Society, including cyberspace, the media landscape, psychic pathologies and pharmacology – failures to act are not failures of will, and all the will in the world will not eliminate capitalism. It also entails recognising that neoliberalism’s global hegemony arose from capturing desires which it could not satisfy. A genuinely new Left must be shaped by those desires, and not be lulled, once again, by the logics of failed revolts.

Queries: ss162@nyu.edu

***END***

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

‘Maximum levels of boredom

Disguised as maximum fun’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales)  

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Culture

REVIEWS IN CULTURAL THEORY – UPDATE AUGUST 2010

New reviews in Reviews in Cultural Theory are now accessible online at reviewsinculture.com. We’re also seeking reviewers for new and forthcoming books. Please see our list of books for which we’re seeking reviewers below and email us at editors@reviewsinculture.com, if you are interested in contributing a review.

Summer reviews:

Erin Wunker reviews Barbara Godard’s Canadian Literature at the Crossroads of Language and Culture.

Will Straw reviews Davin Heckman’s A Small World: Smart Houses and the Dream of the Perfect Day. 

Evan Mauro reviews Seth Moglen’s Mourning Modernity: Literary Modernism and the Injuries of American Capitalism.

Matthew MacLellan reviews Gerald Raunig’s A Thousand Machines: A Concise Philosophy of the Machine as a Social Movement.

Gerry Canavan reviews Mark Bould and China Miéville’s Red Planets: Marxism and Science Fiction.

Melissa Aronczyk reviews Guy Julier and Liz Moor’s Design and Creativity: Policy, Management and Practice.

Books for review:

Anderson, Patrick. So Much Wasted: Hunger, Performance, and the Morbidity of Resistance. Duke UP, 2010.

Aronczyk, Melissa, and Devon Powers, eds. Blowing Up the Brand: Critical Perspectives on Promotional Culture. Peter Lang, 2010.

Blanco, Maria del Pilar and Esther Peeren. Popular Ghosts: The Haunted Spaces of Everyday Culture. Continuum Press, 2010. 

Bowman, Paul, ed. The Rey Chow Reader. Columbia UP, 2010. 

Chatterjee, Partha. Empire and Nation: Selected Essays. Columbia UP, 2010.

Coole, Diana and Samantha Frost, eds. New Materialisms: Ontology, Agency, and Politics. Duke UP, 2010.

Dabashi, Hamid. Brown Skin, White Masks. Pluto Press, 2010.

The Edu-factory Collective. Toward a Global Autonomous University: Cognitive Labor, The Production of Knowledge, and Exodus from the Education Factory. Autonomedia, 2009.

Foley, Barbara. Wrestling with the Left: The Making of Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man. Duke UP, 2010.

Floyd, Kevin. The Reification of Desire: Toward a Queer Marxism.  University of Minnesota Press, 2009.

Fumagalli, Andrea and Sandro Mezzadra, eds. Crisis in the Global Economy: Financial Markets, Social Struggles, and New Political Scenarios. Semiotext(e), 2010.

Gregg, Melissa and Gregory J. Seigworth, eds.  The Affect Theory Reader. Duke UP, 2010.

Grossberg, Lawrence. Cultural Studies in the Future Tense. Duke UP, 2010.

Hill, Rod and Tony Myatt. The Economics Anti-Textbook: A Critical Thinker’s Guide to Microeconomics. Zed, 2010.

Hitchcock, Peter. The Long Space: Transnationalism and Postcolonial Form. Stanford UP, 2010.

Holmes, Brian. Unleashing the Collective Phantoms: Essays in Reverse Imagineering. Pluto Press, 2010.

Johnson-Woods, Toni. Manga: An Anthology of Global and Cultural Perspectives. Continuum Press, 2010.

Kim, Jodi. Ends of Empire: Asian American Critique and the Cold War. U of Minnesota Press, 2010.

Kusch, Rodolfo. Indigenous and Popular Thinking in America. Duke UP, 2010.

Lanza, Fabio. Behind the Gate: Inventing Students in Beijing. Columbia UP, 2010.

Latour, Bruno. On the Modern Cult of the Factish Gods.  Duke UP, 2010.

Lepecki, Andre and Jenn Joy, eds. Planes of Composition: Dance, Theory and the Global. U of Chicago P, 2010.

Merrifield, Andy. Magical Marxism: Subversive Politics and the Imagination. Pluto Press, 2010.

Nguyen, Vinh-Kim. The Republic of Therapy: Triage and Sovereignty in West Africa’s Time of AIDS. Duke UP, 2010.

Paik, Peter. From Utopia to Apocalypse: Science Fiction and the Politics of Catastrophe. U of Minnesota P, 2010.

Pasotti, Eleonora. Political Branding in Cities: The Decline of Machine Politics in Bogota, Naples, and Chicago. Cambridge UP, 2010.

Rancière, Jacques, and Steven Corcoran. Chronicles of Consensual Times. Continuum, 2010.

Seth, Vanita. Europe’s Indians: Producing Racial Difference, 1500–1900. Duke UP, 2010.

Sharpe, Christina. Monstrous Intimacies: Making Post-Slavery Subjects. Duke UP, 2010.

Sholette, Gregory. Dark Matter: Art and Politics in the Age of Enterprise Culture. Pluto Press, 2010.

Toscano, Alberto. Fanaticism: On The Uses of An Idea. Verso, 2010.

Reviews in Cultural Theory

Department of English and Film Studies

3-5 Humanities Centre

University of Alberta

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

T6G 2E5

For more about, and the origins of, Reviews in Cultural Theory see: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/2010/03/31/reviews-in-cultural-theory/

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski