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Monthly Archives: December 2014

Christmas 2GLOBALIsATION AND THE CRITIQUE OF POLITICAL ECONOMY

A new book by Lucia Pradella

Dear all,

I am happy to announce that Globalisation and the Critique of Political Economy: New Insights from Marx’s Writings is out! The book investigates the international foundations of political economy and discusses the current relevance of Marx’s critique in the light of his still partially unpublished notebooks on the world market and precapitalist societies.
You can find a description of the book here: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415744102/
For more details, or to request a copy for review, please contact Renata Novak | Renata.Novak@tandf.co.uk
To get a 20% discount please use discount codes LRK69 (in 2014) and FDC20 (in 2015)

All the best,

Lucia Pradella

This book offers a new appreciation of the contemporary relevance of Marx’s critique of political economy in the light of the new historical critical edition of his writings (MEGA²), his partially unpublished notebooks in particular. This new material shows the centrality of the international sphere and non-European societies in Marx’s research. After exploring the international foundations of political economy, from mercantilism to Smith, Ricardo and Hegel, the book traces the developments of Marx’s critique from the early 1840s to Capital Volume 1. It shows that his elaboration of the laws of capitalist uneven and combined development allowed him to recognise the growth of a world working class. Marx’s work thus offers the necessary categories to develop an alternative to methodological nationalism and Eurocentrism grounded in a critique of political economy.

This book is part of the Routledge Frontiers of Political Economy series.

“A fresh and rich reading of capitalist modernity’s most important thinker. This book shows why those who dismiss Marx as ‘just another Eurocentric thinker’ are fundamentally mistaken.” – William K. Carroll, Professor of Sociology, University of Victoria, Canada.

“Contemporary globalization is an intensely contested process both intellectually and politically. In this important book Lucia Pradella traces the contradictory development of a non-Eurocentric understanding of the emerging capitalist world economy from the 16th century onwards. Her use of Marx’s unpublished notebooks, currently appearing in the new Marx-Engels Completed Works (MEGA2), helps to make this a study of exceptional value that throws new light of the construction of Capital.” – Alex Callinicos, King’s College London, UK

“This is a timely and original book. It draws on classical political economy using Marx’s recently published manuscripts to shed new light on his evolving approach to globalisation and internationalisation of capital, historical and contemporary debates on globalisation, and Eurocentrism and the role of the state.” – Dimitris Milonakis, University of Crete, Greece

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Christmas 2DIFFERENCES, INEQUALITIES AND THE SOCIOLGICAL IMAGINATION

Call for Papers:

‘Differences, Inequalities and the Sociological Imagination’

12th Conference of the European Sociological Association, Prague, Czech Republic, 25–28 August 2015

Critical Political Economy Research Network (RN06)

Re-Imagining Class – Materialities of Resistance, State Power and the Commons

In a context of increasingly authoritarian processes of austerity measures in response to the crisis in Europe and beyond, various groups and social movements have articulated quests for more democracy and reclaiming the Commons. Categories of public goods and the commons include amongst others education, health, environment, food, water, air, energy, land, housing, transport, cities, or waste management. These notions generally engender new forms of horizontal participatory and inclusive bottom up democratic decision-making and communal ownership structures not considered for profit. Democratic imaginaries are however only seldom spelled out, as if such wished-for democratic structures were without a teleology. This raises the question of which concrete conceptions the (radical) Left has to offer with respect to the political economy of democracy and the commons? Which lessons can be drawn from prefigurative politics and existing/real life examples in the organisation of the economy and public goods? Which implications would such imaginaries have for rethinking class, and the materialities within social movements? At the same time, in order to contextualise these processes in the concrete materiality of crisis and resistance, we need to understand the changes and continuities in the imaginaries of state power and authoritarian governance, and the relations between social forces struggling over the prerogatives of resistance and contestation.

As the overall conference theme suggests, it is through sociological imagination that we can begin to understand the current conjuncture and formulate alternatives. Re-imagining class should be a core focus in this process. We are interested in hosting a wide range of topics in sessions that are linked to the above themes. This could include a focus on various social movements on the Commons; contestation and resistance to austerity measures; new forms of democratic participation and citizenship; conceptual reflection and critique on the use of class concepts; authoritarian dimensions of the ongoing capitalist restructuring; new manifestations of the capital-labour conflict; or the social/human geography of contestation and resistance. Of particular importance here are critical feminist political economy perspectives that challenge underlying patriarchal structures and social relations.

We are interested in all of the above plus more. We invite contributions (papers and/or panel proposals) from those with an interest in critical political economy research, regardless of their disciplinary affiliation and whether they are in academia or not. We also hope to attract a diverse range of participants, from a number of countries and backgrounds.

Notes for Authors

Abstracts should not exceed 250 words. Abstracts must be submitted online to the submission platform, see below. Abstracts sent by email cannot be accepted. Abstracts will be peer-reviewed and selected for presentation by the Research Network; the letter of notification will be sent by the conference software system in early April 2015.

Abstract submission deadline: 1 February 2015. Conference website and abstract submission platform: www.esa12thconference.eu

If you have further questions regarding this call, or the Critical Political Economy research network, please contact us at cpern@criticalpoliticaleconomy.net.

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/call-for-papers-2018differences-inequalities-and-the-sociological-imagination2019

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Posthuman

Posthuman

PsychoPolitics in the Twenty First Century

Please see below for call for papers for a conference at in Liverpool on Wednesday 10th June 2015 organised in conjunction with the British Sociological Association Sociology of Mental Health Study Group. The conference title is PsychoPolitics in the Twenty First Century: Peter Sedgwick and radical movements in mental health

Background to the conference:

The work of Peter Sedgwick and in particular his classic text PsychoPolitics (1982) has a renewed relevance in the context of ‘austerity’, the privatisation of welfare provision and emergent forms of radical activism in mental health. This conference will provide an opportunity to explore Sedgwick’s ideas and assess his legacy in light of these contemporary developments.

The organisers welcome proposals for papers/workshops from academics, service users /survivors and mental health practitioners on the following topics (though this is not an exhaustive list):

  • The politics of mental health
  • Social movements in mental health; social movements and sociological knowledge on mental health
  • Alliances between service user/survivor movements and trade unions/anti-austerity campaigns
  • Alliances between disabled people’s and mental health service user/survivor movements
  • Mental health practice and resistance under neoliberalism
  • Contemporary applications of Sedgwick’s ideas
  • Links between mad studies, disability studies and the work of Sedgwick

The conference webpages are at www.hope.ac.uk/psychopoliticsc21. The email for mailing list and further info is: sedgwickconf2015@hope.ac.uk

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/call-for-papers-psychopolitics-in-the-21st-century-conference-june-2015

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Capitalism is Crisis

Capitalism is
Crisis

12th ANNUAL STOREP CONFERENCE ON ‘Shifting Boundaries: Economics in the Crisis and the Challenge of Interdisciplinarity’

(Torino, 2015)

11-13 June, 2015 | University of Torino, Torino, Italy

Conference Theme: “Shifting Boundaries: Economics in the Crisis and the Challenge of Interdisciplinarity”

The topic that we intend to explore is the relationship between economics and other disciplines. Especial attention will be devoted to the recent history of economic theory, while also considered will be how the current crisis has prompted new reflections on micro- and macroeconomic approaches.

Since its origins, economic theory has interacted with other sciences, and often adopted their paradigms and analytical tools (suffice to consider the role played by classical mechanics and evolutionary biology). At the end of the process that led to the neoclassical school’s dominance, the so-called “economics imperialism” led to the progressive expansion of economics into domains traditionally occupied by other social disciplines (political sciences, sociology, anthropology, psychology), doing so on the basis of the presumed superiority of the methods and theories of economics.

The situation today appears radically different. In recent decades, approaches originating from outside economics have contributed significantly to economic theory, inducing economics – and challenging it – to reopen discussion with the other social disciplines, and to adopt the perspectives and methods of new research fields. Game theory, behavioral economics, experimental economics, evolutionary economics, complexity economics are among the most striking examples of this evolution of economic inquiry, and they solicit scholars to deepen analysis of the new methodological and thematic horizons in economics.

Possible topics for the conference sessions include, but are not limited to:

  • Historical analysis of the relationship between economics and other disciplines;
  • Pluralism of methods and epistemological foundations of economics;
  • Economics imperialism in historical perspective;
  • (Economics) “imperialism” and “reverse imperialism”;
  • Economic crisis and the crisis of economics;
  • Critique of mainstream economics;
  • Evolution of the mainstream, between monism and pluralism;
  • Economics as a social discipline;
  • The contribution of economics to the development of interdisciplinary approaches;
  • The perspective of reunifying the social disciplines.

We are pleased to announce that distinguished colleagues:

  • Alan Kirman(University of Aix-Marseille III, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales),
  • John B. Davis(Marquette University, University of Amsterdam), and
  • Viktor Vanberg(Walter Eucken Institute) will join the conference as keynote speakers.

Selected papers on the main topic of the conference will be published in a special issue of History of Economic Ideas.

Besides plenary sessions, some parallel sessions will focus on the main topic of the conference; proposals of papers on all fields of the history of economic thought are also welcome.

An abstract of about 400 words for a paper and 600 words for a session (together with the abstracts of the three or four papers for the session) must be submitted before February 28, 2015 to:segretario@storep.org.

Notification of accepted and rejected abstracts will be sent by March 15, 2015.

Other important dates:

April 30, 2015: Deadline for early registration (early fees) and for submitting full papers.

May 31, 2015: Deadline for late registration (late fee).

All relevant information concerning registration fees, accommodation and programme will soon be published on the association’swebsite.

Young Scholar Awards

STOREP provides two kinds of awards for young scholars:

  1. Scholarships for young scholars (under 35 years of age). In order to be eligible, the applicant is required to submit a Curriculum Vitae and a paper on any topic relevant to the history of political economy. The authors of the papers selected will be awarded free STOREP Conference registration, including the social dinner and the association’s annual membership fee.
    All applications, with CV and the final version of the papers, should be sent to segretario@storep.orgno later than April 30, 2015. Applicants will be informed about the result of the evaluation process no later than May 15, 2015.
  2. The STOREP Award (of 500.00 €) for the best article presented at the Annual Conference by young scholars under 40 years of age.

All applications, with CV and the final version of the papers, should be sent to segretario@storep.org no later than September 15, 2015.

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

University for Strategic Optimism

University for Strategic Optimism

WAR CRIMES, ATROCITY AND JUSTICE

 

War Crimes, Atrocity and Justice

Polity, November 2014
By: Michael J. Shapiro

What do we know about war crimes and justice? What are the discursive practices through which the dominant images of war crimes, atrocity and justice are understood?

In this wide ranging text, Michael J. Shapiro contrasts the justice-related imagery of the war crimes trial (for example the solitary, headphone-wearing defendant at the Hague listening with intent to a catalogue of charges) with literary justice: representations in literature, film, and biographical testimony, raising questions about atrocities and justice that juridical proceedings exclude.

By engaging with the ambiguities exposed by the artistic and experiential genres, reading them alongside policy and archival documentation and critical theoretical discourses, Shapiro’s War Crimes, Atrocity, and Justice challenges traditional notions of responsibility in juridical settings. His comparative readings instead encourage a focus on the conditions of possibility for war crimes as they arise from the actions of states, non-state agencies and individuals involved in arms trading, peace keeping, sex trafficking, and law enforcement and adjudication.

Theory springs to life as Shapiro draws on examples from legal discourse, literature, media, film, and television, to build a nuanced picture of politics and the problem of justice. It will be of great interest to students of film and media, literature, cultural studies, contemporary philosophy and political science.

http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0745671543.html

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Occupy London

Occupy London

KRITIKOS – VOLUME 11, APRIL – SEPTEMBER 2014

Apocalypse Not, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Machine…(d.gunkel and b.cripe)

Apocalypse Not, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Machine…by David Gunkel and Billy Cripe, Kritikos V.11, April-Sept.2014

 

H.L.A. Hart on International Law…(a.h.lesser)

H.L.A. Hart on International Law…by Anthony H. Lesser, Kritikos V.11, April-Sept.2014

 

Kritikos Reviews: http://intertheory.org/reviews.htm
Intertheory Press, new books 2014:

Order now: Art After the Avant-Garde: Baudrillard’s Challenge
http://intertheory.org/coulter-baudrillard-avant-garde.htm
By Gerry Coulter

Product Description
After we have read Jean Baudrillard it is difficult to see the world as we previously did. Baudrillard offered a strong challenge to art and artists, as he did everyone else. Many believe that Baudrillard was against art when he was really against the majority of things which some person or group has attempted to pass off as art. Baudrillard’s significance for art however, is that he wipes the decks clear and allows us to think anew about the art we love, and the art we do not. One of the implications of this book – a book about seeing art after taking Baudrillard seriously – is that we learn art never had a better friend, than Jean Baudrillard.

About the Author
Gerry Coulter is the founding editor of the International Journal of Baudrillard Studies, and the author of Jean Baudrillard: From the Ocean to the Desert, or the Poetics of Radicality. He has received Bishop’s University’s highest award for teaching – the William and Nancy Turner Prize.

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

 

Marx's Grave

Marx’s Grave

HISTORICAL MATERIALISM CONFERENCE NEW YORK: RETURNS OF CAPITAL

New York University, April 24-26, 2015

http://hmny.org/

Capitalism is “back,” in more ways than one.  Since the crisis of 2008, academics and commentators beyond the usual confines of the Marxist left have once again begun discussing capitalism as a system.  Debates about class, exploitation, and inequality have assumed a prominence they have not seen in decades, exemplified in the media event surrounding the publication of Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the 21st Century.  Prompting these discussions is a capitalism that has “returned to form”. Austerity, casualization and precarity, and naked class aggression—attributes of capitalism proper rather than merely its neoliberal variant—have intensified. The years since the crisis have suggested that neoliberalism was no mere interlude, but rather a prelude to the “new normal.” But how “new” is this normalcy? Aspects of capitalism in the Victorian era are back—and for now, here to stay. Although this is in no way unprecedented, they represent new challenges to Marxist inquiry.

HMNY 2015 seeks to examine these twin returns.  What are the analytic  challenges of these returns within capitalism?  What have been the costs of the absence of Marxist answers?  In what ways has capitalism returned to form, while continuing to present novel problems?  And what does all of this mean for movements contesting capital?

The conference is part of an international project tied to the Historical Materialism journal and book series, published by Brill. The journal also sponsors conferences that take place in London, Toronto, Delhi, Rome and Australia. Please note: the HM conference is not a conventional academic conference, but rather a space for discussion, debate and the launching of collective projects. We strongly encourage speakers to participate in the whole of the conference.

For questions about submission policy and process, logistics, or anything else related to the conference, please email hmnewyork2014@gmail.com.

Abstracts may be submitted at http://hmny.org/ (Click on “CFP HMNY 2015”). Abstracts should be approximately 200 words, and the deadline for proposals is January 15, 2015. We especially welcome submissions and, in particular, panel proposals,  around the following conference themes:

TRACKS

  • Contemporary class formation
  • Capitalism, Ecology and Alternatives
  • New Research on the Socialist and Communist Tradition
  • Philosophical Foundations of Marxism
  • Politics and Philosophy of Gender
  • Circulation and Logistics
  • Revolution and Counterrevolution in the Middle East
  • The Economic and Political Logic of Austerity
  • Race, the State, and Capital
  • Marxism and Aesthetics
  • Capital and Sexuality
  • Debt and Finance in the Political Economy of Capitalism
  • Theories of Crisis
  • State Violence and Mass Incarceration
  • Social Protests: Riots, Revolt, Organization
  • Echoes of the Long 1970s: Wildcats and Rank and File Rebellion
  • Makings of the World Working Class
  • Revolution and Reform in Latin America

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

AHE Conference

AHE Conference

ASSOCIATION OF HETERODOX ECONOMICS – 17th ANNUAL CONFERENCE

CALL FOR PAPERS

When: July 2-4th 2015
Where: Southampton Solent University, UK

Conference Theme: Growth, Cycles and Sustainability

The conference theme concerns growth. How to create it, sustain it and can we avoid the ups and downs of it. Is it good anyway given our environmental challenges, and if growth actually happens will it be even or increase inequality further. Finally, when will it end again in crisis?

Please send us abstracts, whether related to the conference theme or any other heterodox topic area, by 31st January 2015.

Refereed and non-refereed options will be available for your paper (details to follow).

Please send all communications to: nick.potts@solent.ac.uk and simon.mouatt@solent.ac.uk
Further detail on conference fees, accommodation options to follow in due course.

Association for Heterodox Economics: http://hetecon.net/

Southampton Solent University

Southampton Solent University

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism

NARRATIVES OF ASPIRATIONS WITHIN NEOLIBERALISM

Dr Laura Harvey

Lecturer in Sociology, University of Surrey

Speaking at the University of East London

8 January 2015, 5 – 6pm

ED 2.02, Cass Building, Stratford Campus

We would like to invite you to attend our Research Seminar on 8 January 2015, details below.   You will be very welcome but please let Daniel Blackman, D.Blackman@uel.ac.uk, know so we have an idea of how many people to expect.

Regards

Veronica Burton

Administrator for Research and Knowledge Exchange

Cass School of Education and Communities

University of East London

In this presentation we will explore the stories that young people tell about their aspirations and imagined futures at a time of deepening social inequalities.   We will examine how neoliberal discourses of individualism, self-responsibility and enterprise feature in young people’s everyday talk about ‘success’ and ‘failure’. Our analysis draws on interview data with 14-17 year-olds across England from an ESRC-funded study of ‘The role of celebrity in young people’s classed and gendered aspirations’. We will highlight the pervasiveness of neoliberal discourses of individualism, meritocracy and hard work within young people’s accounts. But we will also unpack the contradictions, ambivalences and ambiguities within neoliberalism as it works within and through the messiness of everyday practices.

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

We Are the Crisis

We Are the Crisis

CAPITAL & CLASS – CALL FOR PAPERS

Submit your article to Capital & Class

Looking to publish critiques on global capitalism, Marxist theory, domestic labour or any other area in the study of capital and class? Have you considered the Capital & Class?

Capital & Class is the journal of the Conference of Socialist Economists (CSE) and since 1977 has been the main, peer-reviewed, independent source for a Marxist critique of global capitalism. Pioneering key debates on the state, value theory, domestic labour, and all other relevant areas, Capital & Class reaches out into the labour, trade union, anti-racist, feminist, environmentalist and other radical movements.

To find out more about if your article would be suitable for Capital & Class and to submit your paper please visit: http://bit.ly/CNCAcademia

The Conference of Socialist Economists (CSE) is an international, democratic membership organisation committed to developing a materialist critique of capitalism, unconstrained by conventional academic divisions between subjects. CSE runs multiple events every year alongside publishing Capital & Class three times a year.

Capital & Class: http://cnc.sagepub.com/

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The Capitorg

The Capitorg

CYBORGIAN IMAGES

First Issue Call for Articles

Yearbook of Moving Image Studies

Cyborgian Images: The moving image between apparatus and body

Deadline for Articles: December 31, 2014

The double-blind peer-reviewed Yearbook of Moving Image Studies (YoMIS) is now accepting articles from scientists, scholars, artists and film makers for the first issue entitled »Cyborgian Images: The moving image between apparatus and body.

YoMIS will be enriched by disciplines like media and film studies, image science, (film) philosophy, art history, game studies and other research areas related to the moving image in general. Modern perspectives on the structure of moving images exemplify a complex multimodal mechanism that interacts in specific ways with the recipient and various levels of the perception of images. In this case neither moving images nor the subjective reception are passive processes. Movement, time, space and different modalities interact with senses, memories and anticipation and create a complex hybrid structure of medium, recipient and sensory stimulus processing. This refers to the fact, that on the one hand the technological structure of displays and interfaces are relevant, and that on the other hand the role of the lived-body and mind is crucial for an understanding of the effects of the moving images. It is the interaction between the image, the dispositive and the recipient which brings the pictures to life and unfolds its meaning in diverse dimensions. This remark becomeS obvious when looking at the recent evolution in media technologies. New displays and interfaces like the Cinemizer (Zeiss), Oculus Rift (OculusVR) or Kinect (Microsoft) promote the progressive embodiment of the recipient or user by the medium, and, in doing so, they force the amalgamation of the subject of perception with the moving image.

Therefore »Cyborgian Images« addresses the broad field of the relationship between the technological dimension of the medium, its aesthetic and structural impact on the representational status of the moving image and the effect on the bodily level of the recipient, including affective and somatic reactions.

Contributions should be 5000 to 8000 words in length.

Please send your abstract, biographical informations, contact details and your article to Dr. Lars C. Grabbe and Prof. Dr. Patrick Rupert-Kruse via: kontakt@bewegtbildwissenschaft.de.

The official deadline for articles is the December 31, 2014.

If you are interested in contributing an article you will find a style sheet online: http://www.movingimagescience.com

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact the managing editors via mail.

YoMIS: http://www.buechner-verlag.de/index.php/programm/yearbook-moving-image-studies

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

NEOLIBERALISM AND HIGHER EDUCATION IN LATIN AMERICA

CALL FOR PAPERS

Since the globalization of the neoliberal economic model began during the 1980s, higher education systems have entered a phase of accelerated mercantilization throughout much of Latin America. If the first post-Soviet decade was marked by the new social movements as the main expression of opposition to late capitalism, the second saw uneven but often more prominent student uprisings. The capitalist crisis begun in 2008—variously interpreted as a global financial crisis, a structural or cyclical crisis, or exhaustion of the prevailing model—has accelerated protest. By 2010 secondary or university students had risen en masse against aspects of the neoliberal system in Chile, France and Greece (all 2006); the U.S. (California, 2009); Italy, England and Puerto Rico (2010); and finally, in the context of the Arab Spring, in several countries in the Middle East, starting with Tunisia and Algeria (2010). It is no coincidence that Chile—the world’s first country to adopt the “Chicago Boys” doctrine—has from 2011 been shaken by the largest student mobilizations since the 1960s, contesting the effects of the near-complete privatization of the education system.

Under the promise of democratization of access for the masses to higher education, governments and education corporations on a worldwide scale have transformed an area which was a state responsibility for much of the Twentieth century into one more frontier for the expansion of corporate capital and accumulation of private profit. As the product of neoliberal demands, the expansion of higher education has been accompanied by a transformation of the way the university and other higher education institutions define themselves and justify their existence. In this process, the liberal idea of the university as a space open to free intellectual debate with emphasis on autonomy, research, and contributing to the intellectual and moral formation of the nation has been assailed by market demands which prioritize productivity and performance indicators.

​The meanings and practices associated with this paradigm shift in higher education have permeated the diverse political-economic regions of the planet and have been instrumentalized by governments of both right and left. This has been particularly evident in Latin America, where such policies have combined privatization and government control. In Brazil, for instance, under the same argument of expansion and massification of higher education’s reach, policies quite different in appearance but not necessarily in consequences were tried by the administrations of presidents Fernando Henrique Cardoso and Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. Instead of promoting the expansion of higher education combining increased privatization with the drastic reduction of the salaries of academic staff and functionaries, and of the maintenance funds of public institutions—as did Cardoso—Lula promoted privatization while also investing in public higher education. Although statistically his government has funded private education even more than his predecessor, Lula’s government protected itself politically with the creation of new public institutions of higher education and the expansion of existing vacancies. But it has rendered such institutions increasingly less autonomous and subject to ever-increasing state control.

The aim of this special issue is to investigate how neoliberalism has transformed the university in Latin America, and concurrent expressions of resistance to this process. In brief: what kind of university has neoliberalism produced, or does it intend to produce? For whom, with whom and for what purposes?

We invite articles that present national or comparative studies panoramically and those that reflect on the new university structure, intellectual mission (e.g., curriculum, research) and/or culture in political, economic, ethnographic or historical perspective.

Topics which are particularly welcome, although not intended to preclude others, are:

  • The conditions of knowledge production under neoliberal policy and practice in Latin America.
  • The university as a new frontier of global capitalism (for example, via for-profit higher education, including on-line course delivery, corporate research agendas, student loans).
  • The instrumentalization of public universities by governments and the state, including transformation into an instrument for policy legitimation and implementation.
  • University autonomy under the pressures of state, national and international sponsoring agencies (Ford, Mellon, Rockefeller, IAF, CNPq, CAPES, etc.), and the effect of those agencies in defining research agendas and reshaping university curriculum.
  • The significance of new modalities of partnership between the public and private sectors.
  • Expanded higher education – democratization or massification? Transformation or reproduction of social hierarchies?
  • Neoliberalism, social inequalities and the university – the effect on university access of social disparities in public and private primary and secondary education; affirmative policies for marginalised or disadvantaged student groups (the poor, black and indigenous peoples.), including responsiveness to their particular intellectual and cultural needs.
  • Student and staff resistance movements; university reform movements; students and anti-neoliberal movements.
  • Universities as political actors including concepts of citizenship and relationship with student and popular movements.
  • The university in countries with anti-neoliberal governments.

Please submit inquiries about possible submissions to the issue editors:

Bernadete Beserra (bernabeserra@gmail.com)

Robert Austin (rwaustin64@gmail.com)

Rémi Lavergne (rfl2009@gmail.com)

Instructions for manuscript submission are available on the LAP website: http://latinamericanperspectives.com/

​Deadline for submission of articles: 30 September 2015

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-convocatoria-chamada-para-artigos-neoliberalism-and-higher-education-in-latin-america-ingles-castellano-portugues (Go here for Portuguese version)

 

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