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images (2)AVANT-GARDE PEDAGOGIES

Higher Education and Theory (HEAT) Network

The Institute for Modern and Contemporary Culture, and

The Philosophy of Education Research Centre, University of Winchester  

 

At: University of Westminster, London

309 Regent Street, London , W1B 2HW – View Map

8th and 9th July, 2016

 

CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

To book your seat for the Avant-Garde Pedagogies conference, please follow this link: Book Now!

 

Schedule (tbc)

 

FRIDAY 8TH JULY 2016

1.15pm – Registration (Foyer, 309 Regent Street)

1.30pm – Panel 1 (Room UG04)

–          Michael Kindellan, University of Sheffield, ‘Charles Olson’s pedagogical poetics’

–          Alan Golding, University of Louisville, ‘“Poetic Ambition on the Semester System”: Ezra Pound’s Avant-Gardism and Teaching Institutions’

2.45pm – Break (Room 209)

3.00pm – Panel 2 (Room UG04)

–          Kerstin Stutterheim, Bournemouth University, ‘Die Idee der Methode: Walter Gropius and the Bauhaus pedagogy’

–          Allan Parsons, University of Westminster, ‘You are Here Now: Design is (not) Dasein’

4.15pm – Break (Room 209)

4.30pm – Panel 3 (Room UG04)

–          Emile Bojesen, University of Winchester, tbc

–          Aislinn O’Donnell, Mary Immaculate College, University of Limerick, ‘How Things Teach Us: Experience and Experimentation in Spinoza’

5.45pm – Drinks reception (Foyer, 309 Regent Street)

 

SATURDAY 9TH JULY 2016

10.00am – Registration (Foyer, 309 Regent Street)

10.15am – Panel 4 (Room UG04)

–          Zlatina Nikolova, Royal Holloway, ‘Development of the Self: Women’s education in Bryher’s Early Prose’

–          Maria Teresa Cruz, New University of Libson (NOVA), ‘Avant-garde and Experimentation in the Age of Hyper Industrialization of Culture’

11.30am – Break (Room 209)

11.45am – Panel 5 (Room UG04)

–          Richard Miles, Leeds College of Art, ‘The School of the Damned: Autonomous Art education and the University Struggles’

–          David Blacker, University of Delaware, ‘The formula of inhumanity: moral challenge and neoliberal nihilism’

1.00pm – Lunch

2.00pm – Panel 6 (Room UG04)

–          Hannah Proctor, Birkbeck, University of London, tbc

–          Steven Cranfield, University of Westminster, ‘“Battles for the mind”: military psychiatry and pedagogic innovation in the ‘Cambridge English’ School

3.15pm – Break (Room 209)

3.30pm – Panel 7 (Room UG04)

–          Alys Moody, Macquarie University, ‘Learning with Brecht and Coetzee’

–          Gary Peters, York St John University, ‘The Music Teacher: The Pedagogy(s) of 20th Century Avant-garde Music’

4.45pm – Coffee Break (Room 209)

5.00pm – Panel 8 (Room UG04)

–          Peter Roberts, University of Canterbury, NZ, ‘Doubt, Despair and Education’

–          Closing Remarks

6.15pm – Conference Ends

 

Registration: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/avant-garde-pedagogies-tickets-25238609360

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

ICCE 6

ICCE 6

6th INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL EDUCATION – 2016

10 – 13 August 2016

Middlesex University

London

 

Extended Call for Papers: 31st May 2016

The Deadline for Abstracts for the upcoming 6th ICCE Conference has been extended to the end of May.

 

Plenary  Speakers include:
Peter McLaren (Chapman University, Orange, California, USA)
Hasan Hüseyin Aksoy (Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey)
Grant Banfield (Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia)
Joyce Canaan (Birmingham City University, Birmingham, UK)
Hana Cervinkova (University of Lower Silesia, Wroclaw, Poland)
Polina Chrysochou (Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, UK)
Agnieszka Dziemianowicz-Bąk (University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw, Poland)
Cassie Earl (Manchester Metropolitan Univesity, Manchester, UK)
Gail Edwards (Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK)
Ramin Farahmandpur (Portland State University, Portland, USA)
Derek Ford (Syracuse University, New York, USA)
Panayota Gounari (University of Massachusetts, Boston, USA)
Tom Griffiths (Newcastle University, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia)
George Grollios (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki,Thessaloniki, Greece)
Dave Hill (Institute for Education Policy Studies & National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece)
Gianna Katsampoura (National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens, Greece)
Leszek Koczanowicz (University of Sosial Sciences and Humanities, Wroclaw, Poland)
Vicky Makris (University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada)
Curry Malott (West Chester University of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania, USA)
Alpesh Maisuria (University of East London, London, UK)
Lilia Monzo (Chapman University, California, USA)
Jayne Osgood (Middlesex University, London, UK)
Periklis Pavlidis (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece)
Leena Helavaara Robertson (Middlesex University, London, UK)
Fevziye Sayilan (Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey)
Kostas Skordoulis (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece)
Juha Suoranta (University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland)
Spyros Themelis (University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK)
Meral Uysal (Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey)
Paolo Vittoria (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)
Ahmet Yildiz (Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey)
The conference website is http://icce-2016.weebly.com/

Speakers are listed at http://icce-2016.weebly.com/program-speakers.html

Abstract Submission Form is at: http://icce-2016.weebly.com/abstract-submission.html

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism

AN ALTERNATIVE TO NEO-LIBERAL EDUCATION

NEW ANARCHIST RESEARCH GROUP

JOINT MEETING WITH THE SOCIAL SCIENCE CENTRE (LINCOLN)

Saturday 28 November 2015

2.00 pm – 4.30pm

The Torriano Meeting House

99 Torriano Ave

Kentish Town

LONDON, NW5 2RX

The Torriano Meeting House: https://torrianomeetinghouse.wordpress.com/

The Social Science Centre (SSC) in Lincoln is a self-organised co-operative higher learning provider that is democratic at all levels of its organisation. The scholars who are members of the Centre work and study together whether they are traditionally students or teachers. One of the aims of the Centre is to analyse and dissolve the tensions in the relationships between research and teaching, and students and academics. Set up by academics from the University of Lincoln, the Centre has no relationship with the University, although it is a critique of the formal institution as a dysfunctional neoliberal arrangement in many ways. The SSC aims to ‘reinvent’ the University and transform the scholars’ relationship to knowledge in order to insert their own experiences into theoretical knowledges that aim to emancipate them as active change agents. The SSC engenders provocations, conversations and discussions that enliven the notion that all those who are involved in active knowledge work should become (co-) producers of knowledge. Two of the (student) scholars and an academic from Lincoln will be visiting the Anarchist Research Group to talk about the centre and their experiences studying there.

In this session, we would like to tell you a little about our experiences with the SSC and then invite a discussion on the SSC, self-organised education and the relationships between education, learning, and social change.

The Social Science Centre provides free public higher education in the city of Lincoln and emphasises the collective and collaborative nature of education. The Centre was opened in 2011 by academics and students and Lincoln residents who feel passionately that those wishing to study higher education should not have to take on the burden of debt. There is no fee to pay when joining the Centre, only what you can afford. Free also means freedom to study outside of the current disciplinary structures of higher education around topics and issues that are of direct concern to you and your local community.

ANARCHIST RESEARCH GROUP: Our meetings are friendly and informal. They are usually held on the fourth Saturday each month, at the Torriano Meeting House in Kentish town, 99 Torriano Avenue, London NW5 2RX between 2.00pm and 4.30 pm
Directions: From Kentish Town tube station walk up Leighton Road, and turn left into Torriano Avenue.

We take a collection after each meeting to cover the cost of the venue.

Website: http://torrianomeetinghouse.wordpress.com/where-we-are/ 

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Dr. Glenn Rikowski

Dr. Glenn Rikowski

CRISES, COMMODITIES AND EDUCATION: DISRUPTIONS, ERUPTIONS, INTERRUPTIONS AND RUPTIONS

 

Glenn Rikowski

This is my first writing in over a year.

It is paper prepared for the ‘Research in Critical Education Studies’ (RiCES) Seminar that I will be speaking to tomorrow in the School of Education, University of Lincoln.

It is on Academia, at: http://www.academia.edu/18511424/Crises_Commodities_and_Education_Disruptions_Eruptions_Interruptions_and_Ruptions

 

CONTENTS:

Introduction

 

PART I

 

Preliminary Investigations

Marxism, Fragility and Crisis – John Holloway

Crisis

Crisis – and Janet Roitman

 

Two Theories of Education Crisis

The Classical Theory of Education Crisis – Crises in Education

Critique of the Classical Theory of Education Crisis

The Autogenous Theory of Education Crisis

 

 PART II

 

Social Forms, Commodities and Capitalist Education

Social Forms

Commodity Forms and Education

       

Crises in Labour Power Production

Primitive Socialisation

Crises of Labour-Power Production in Education As Crises for Capital

 

Crises in the Production of General Commodities in Education

Another Bundle of Commodities

 Crises in the Production of General Commodities in Education

 

Interlude: Four Forms of Crisis Recognition

Disruption

Eruption

Interruption

Ruption (Rupture)

Mergation

       

Crises of Labour-power Production and Education

Disruption

Eruption

Interruption

Ruption (Rupture)

 

Crises of Production of General Commodities in Education

Disruption

Eruption

Interruption

Ruption (Rupture)

 

Comparative and Relative Moments

Comparative Moments

The Relative Moment

 

Conclusion

 

References

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

313111_coverTHE JOURNAL FOR CRITICAL EDUCATION POLICY STUDIES – VOL.13 NO.2 (OCTOBER 2015)

LATEST ISSUE NOW ONLINE

 

 

 

CONTENTS

 

Periklis Pavlidis

Social consciousness, education and transformative activity

 

Dave Hill, Christine Lewis, Alpesh Maisuria, Patrick Yarker and  Julia Carr

Neoliberal and Neoconservative Immiseration Capitalism in England: Policies and Impacts on Society and on Education

 

Curry Malott and Derek R. Ford

Contributions to a Marxist Critical Pedagogy of Becoming: Centering the Critique of the Gotha Programme: Part Two

 

Philippa Hall

Labour Subjectivities for the new world of work: A critique of government policy on the integration of entrepreneurialism in the university curriculum

 

Elisabeth Simbuerger and Mike Neary

Free Education! A “Live” Report on the Chilean Student Movement 2011-2014 – reform or revolution? [A Political Sociology for Action]

 

Amanda Oliveira Rabelo, Graziela Raupp Pereira and Maria Amélia Reis

Sex Education as a Transversal Subject

 

Lois Weiner

Democracy, critical education, and teachers unions: Connections and contradictions in the neoliberal epoch

 

Melanie Lawrence

Beyond the Neoliberal Imaginary: Investigating the Role of Critical Pedagogy in Higher Education

 

Conor Heaney

What is the University today?

 

Shawgi Tell

Can a Charter School Not be a Charter School?

 

Ş. Erhan Bagci

Decline of Meritocracy: Neo-feudal Segregation in Turkey

 

Declan McKenna

Policy over Procedure: A look at the School Completion Programme in Ireland. Is this State led educational intervention for disadvantaged children merely philanthropic and can current Global and National Neo Liberal Policy trends in Education be overcome?

 

Daniel B. Saunders

Resisting Excellence: Challenging Neoliberal Ideology in Postsecondary Education

 

Latest edition of The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies is now online at: http://www.jceps.com

 

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***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Education Crisis

Education Crisis

THE ABOLITION OF THE UNIVERSITY

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Open Library of Humanities (OLM)

CFP: The Abolition of the University: Deadline: Nov 1st, 2015

Deadline: 1st November 2015

In 1968, Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o and his colleagues at the University of Nairobi called for the abolition of the English department. They attacked an enduring colonial legacy and envisioned an intellectual renaissance in Africa. In 2012, at the University of Glasgow: “Forty years after Ngũgĩ and his colleagues argued for it in Nairobi, the abolition of the Scottish Department was achieved by managerial diktat in Glasgow.” Two institutional interventions: the first driven by the desire to liberate education from epistemological and pedagogical domination; the second, by the neoliberal business model. This special edition seeks to consider the chequered history of the westernised university, to diagnose its embattled present, and to imagine its future.

In recent months, academics, non-academic staff, students and their allies across the UK, Canada, the Netherlands, Ireland, Albania, Finland, Colombia, Mexico and elsewhere, have staged protests against neoliberal reform of universities. Wendy Brown argues that the evolution of neoliberalism from a set of economic policies into mode of reason imperils not just liberal institutions but democracy itself. Education across the board is jeopardised by the corporate university model. The liberal arts face multidirectional threats, of extinction and irrelevance. Yet as Gayatri Spivak suggests, if the humanities is the ethical healthcare of society, what resources can we summon to reform, destroy, transform, or re-create the university? Or less innocently, as Bill Readings suggests, simply foster a space where academics (and students) can “work without alibis” in acknowledgement that radical possibilities are constrained by the societies in which universities are situated.

This special edition calls for a cross-disciplinary response, from the humanities and social sciences to all critical, creative and deviant positionalities. Diverse submissions are encouraged from policy reform to short stories. In particular, the edition reaches out to those who traditionally or purposefully find themselves outside the ivory towers: those not included and unassimilated.

Contributions will be considered around (but not limited to) these themes:

  • The western / imperial history of the university
  • Literary / creative representations of the university
  • Epistemologies / pedagogies of possibility
  • Western imperial humanism and the humanities
  • The co-option of postcolonial / Black / queer studies and ‘minority’ / transnational / diasporic literatures
  • Education in an age of neoliberalism / neo-colonialism
  • New models for higher education, including cooperatives, free schools etc.
  • The pedagogy of debt
  • The ‘Student As Producer’
  • Accelerationism and competition in the university
  • Activism: Strike / Occupy / Transform (In / Against / Beyond)
  • Resistance through radical poetics / humanisms

The special collection, edited by Lou Dear (University of Glasgow, l.dear.1@research.gla.ac.uk) and Martin Eve (Birkbeck, University of London, martin.eve@bbk.ac.uk), is to be published in the Open Library of Humanities (ISSN 2056-6700). The OLH is an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation-funded open-access journal with a strong emphasis on quality peer review and a prestigious academic steering board. Unlike some open-access publications, the OLH has no author-facing charges and is instead financially supported by an international consortium of libraries.

Submissions should be made online at: https://submit.openlibhums.org/ in accordance with the author guidelines and clearly marking the entry as [“The Abolition of the University,” SPECIAL COLLECTION]. Innovative submissions that do not clearly fit the submission guidelines are welcome and we encourage authors to contact the editors to discuss this. Submissions will then undergo a double-blind peer-review process. Authors will be notified of the outcome as soon as reports are received.

See: https://www.openlibhums.org/2015/05/14/cfp-the-abolition-of-the-university-deadline-nov-1st-2015/

HEdownload

OPEN LIBRARY OF HUMANITIES: https://www.openlibhums.org/

 

***END***

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

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313111_coverMARX, CAPITAL, AND EDUCATION: TOWARDS A CRITICAL PEDAGOGY OF BECOMING

A new book by Curry Stephenson Malott and Derek R. Ford

Published by Peter Lang: New York, Bern, Berlin, Bruxelles, Frankfurt am Main, Oxford, Wien, 2015. XX, 165 pp.

Education and Struggle: Narrative, Dialogue and the Political Production of Meaning. Vol. 5

General Editors: Michael Peters and Peter McLaren

Print: ISBN 978-1-4331-3111-0 pb. (Softcover)

Print: ISBN 978-1-4331-3112-7 hb. (Hardcover)

eBook: ISBN 978-1-4539-1602-5

Order Online: http://www.peterlang.ch/index.cfm?event=cmp.ccc.seitenstruktur.detailseiten&seitentyp=produkt&pk=87064

Outline

With the contradictions of capitalism heightening and intensifying, and with new social movements spreading across the globe, revolutionary transformation is once again on the agenda. For radicals, the most pressing question is: How can we transform ourselves and our world into something else, something just? In Marx, Capital, and Education, Curry Stephenson Malott and Derek R. Ford develop a «critical pedagogy of becoming» that is concerned with precisely this question. The authors boldly investigate the movement toward communism and the essential role that critical pedagogy can play in this transition. Performing a novel and educational reading of Karl Marx and radical theorists and activists, Malott and Ford present a critical understanding of the past and present, of the underlying logics and (often opaque) forces that determine the world-historical moment. Yet Malott and Ford are equally concerned with examining the specific ways in which we can teach, learn, study, and struggle ourselves beyond capitalism; how we can ultimately overthrow the existing order and institute a new mode of production and set of social relations. This incisive and timely book, penned by two militant teachers, organizers, and academics, reconfigures pedagogy and politics.

Educators and organizers alike will find that it provides new ammunition in the struggle for the world that we deserve.

Contents

Contents: Becoming through Negation: Revisiting Marx’s Humanism – From Revolution to Counterrevolution and Back Again? The Global Class War and Becoming Communist – Becoming Communist in the Global Class War: Centering the Critique of the Gotha Programme – The «Cynical Recklessness» of Capital: Machinery, Becoming, and Revolutionary Marxist Social Studies Education – Teaching Ferguson, Teaching Capital: Slavery and the «Terrorist Energy» of Capital – Connecting «Economic Bondage« to «Personified Capital»: Another Step toward a Critical Pedagogy of Becoming.

About the Authors

Curry Stephenson Malott (PhD in curriculum and instruction, New Mexico State University) is Assistant Professor of Educational Foundations in the Department of Professional and Secondary Education at West Chester University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Malott is a regular contributor to the Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies.

Derek R. Ford’s (PhD candidate in cultural foundations of education, Syracuse University) professional writing has appeared in Educational Philosophy and Theory; Critical Studies in Education; Policy Futures in Education; and Studies in Philosophy and Education. He currently teaches in the Social Justice Studies Program at Hobart and William Smith Colleges.

Praise for Marx, Capital, and Education

“In Marx, Capital, and Education, Malott and Ford advance one of the boldest and [most] unmitigated analyses of education in the history of the field. Their unflinching and scholarly critique of the relationship between capitalism and compulsory education helps to reground the field of critical pedagogy, framing a renewed ‘revolutionary Marxist pedagogy.’ Their careful undertaking of Marx and contemporary scholars of Marx situate this text as a must-read across multiple disciplines including philosophy, political science, government, and education – a true classic in the making.” (Sandy Grande, Associate Professor and Chair, Education Department, Connecticut College)

“This is an essential text for all of those interested in the continuing potential of Marxism as an analytic tool and as a political movement, with implications for critical pedagogy and a truly liberatory education. It traces the history of the use of Marxist theory in education in ways that are insightful, and it provides a key set of categories for reading and using Marx in a ‘postmodern’ age. A rare achievement in educational scholarship.” (Dennis Carlson, Full Professor, Department of Educational Leadership, Miami University)

“This book boldly interrogates the internal contradictions of capital with the aim of galvanizing a critical pedagogy of becoming, a pedagogy capable of providing the conceptual and analytic resources necessary to locate and pry open spaces in education from which to push those contradictions to their breaking point so as to transform capitalism into communism. The authors patiently explain the dialectical logic of capital’s internal contradictions that incline capital towards self-negation, paying particular attention to capital’s compulsive quest for surplus value; they deepen this explanation with an exploration of Marx’s appropriation of dialectics from Hegel. Setting these explanations in motion and keeping capital’s thirst for surplus value firmly in view, Malott and Ford confront and intervene in some of the main debates related to education under capital, including the relation between educational labor and the reproduction of capitalist social relations, and the relation between race and class. This book propels forward the revolutionary struggle for liberation from class society.” (Deborah P. Kelsh, Professor of Teacher Education, The College of Saint Rose)

“Malott and Ford point to the horizon of possibilities that open up when Marx is put back into Marxism. Their bold advocacy of critical pedagogy as a self-conscious movement towards communism is a welcome antidote to the bourgeois fluff that has come to pass as ‘critical’ in education for too long. Marx, Capital, and Education is written by revolutionary educators for revolutionary educators.” (Grant Banfield, Lecturer, Faculty of Education, Humanities and Law, Flinders University, South Australia)

“Malott and Ford present a rigorous theoretical framework grounded in the actual practice of communist movement(s). Their approach to educational pedagogy is a must-read for anyone with a radical consciousness seriously concerned with not just interpreting, but changing the world.” (Eugene Puryear, author of Shackled and Chained: Mass Incarceration in Capitalist America; Organizer with the ANSWER Coalition)

“Malott and Ford in this exceptional work place capitalism ‘squarely within the crosshairs.’ Vague talk concerning issues of social justice is replaced with concrete explorations of our present historical moment within the horizon of communism and educators’ place in moving toward that horizon within a process of a critical pedagogy of becoming. This book will move critical thinkers toward the horizon. It is about time.” (William M. Reynolds, Associate Professor of Curriculum, Foundations, andReading, Georgia Southern University)

“Twenty-five years after the collapse of the Soviet Union, world ‘leaders’ continue to directly and indirectly promote anticommunist disinformation and propaganda. Today one is casually and smugly dismissed as passé or out of touch if they are still ‘gullible’ enough to fight for communism. Opposing this relentless capital-centered offensive which depoliticizes people and intensifies anticonsciousness, Malott and Ford have boldly put communism on the agenda. With courage, conviction, and serious analysis they show how and why existing political-economic arrangements can and must be replaced by a human-centered society and economic system, a world free of exploitation, alienated relations, and the division between mental and manual labor. To this end, the authors skillfully sketch the organic connections between critical pedagogy, transformation, and Marxist and Hegelian dialectics in order to advance ‘a pedagogy of becoming.’ Here the future lies within the present and negation is affirmation. But Malott and Ford remind us at every turn that this does not mean that phenomena unfold deterministically.” (Shawgi Tell, Associate Professor of Education, Department of Social and Psychological Foundations of Education, Nazareth College)

“This book is a weapon to be used not merely against capital, but in the revolutionary struggle to overthrow capitalism and realize a communist future that enables the becoming of humanity. In an era in which Marxist educational theorizing is making a comeback, Malott and Ford represent the best of a new generation of revolutionary thinkers who do not settle for merely interesting academic inquiry, but rather illustrate how deep intellectual inquiry can inform answers to questions about how we can teach, learn, and take action in the construction of a proletarian offensive in the global class war. Malott and Ford unapologetically embrace the goal of creating a new set of social relations that enable the absolute movement of becoming, that is communism. They put capitalism in the crosshairs and refuse to take cover under the empty shells that democracy, social justice, or domesticated critical pedagogy have become. Instead they return to Marx, offering crystal clear theoretical and practical responses to questions at the heart of conversations about how we can create not only new pedagogies, but a new world, free from the scourge of capitalism.” (E. Wayne Ross, Professor, Faculty of Education, University of British Columbia)

“This is a hugely important and impressive book by…two increasingly influential revolutionary Marxist theorists/activists. They assert and closely argue that ‘in order for education to contribute to the generation of a counterpower it has to place capital squarely in its crosshairs.’ They open up the field of possibilities for revolutionary education, enabling the imagination of ‘a world without the exploitation and oppression that characterizes capital.’ This book is hard-hitting and uncompromising. It is scholarly. It is activist. It is a remarkable addition to contemporary critical education and Marxist theory.” (Dave Hill, Professor of Education Research, Anglia Ruskin University, England; Chief Editor of the Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies; Co-founder and Co-organizer of the annual International Conference on Critical Education).

Curry Malott

Curry Malott

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Derek R. Ford

Derek R. Ford

Paulo Freire

Paulo Freire

CRITICAL KNOWLEDGE AND PRAXIS – REMINDER

ANGLIA RUSKIN SEMINAR

May 13th 2015, 3.30-6.30pm.

Marconi Building, Room 104, Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford Campus.

Professor Dave Hill and Cassie Earl and the Department of Education are delighted to invite you to a special session of the CEJ (Critical Education and Justice) Research Group at Anglia Ruskin University:

 

Critical Knowledge and Praxis

With Professor Mike Neary, Dr. Sarah Amsler & Dr. Joss Winn from the University of Lincoln

 

The seminar will explore the fate of critical knowledge and praxis and how it might have a role in progressive politics and revolutionary struggles against current injustices created and exacerbated by the violence of capitalist abstractions: Money, the State and its other institutional forms, e.g. the neoliberal university.

A key issue for the seminar will be the extent to which it is possible to operate as a critical scholar within a neo-liberal university, and to what extent it is necessary to develop other social institutions to carry through with the implications that form the substance of our work.

 

Reading

Amsler, S. (2014) For feminist consciousness in the academy, Special Issue on Materialist Feminisms against Neoliberalism, Politics and Culture. Sarah’s new book ‘The Education of Radical Democracy‘ will be published in April.

Neary, M. (2014) ‘Making with the University of the Future: pleasure and pedagogy in higher and higher education’.  In: J. Lea (Ed.) (2015) Enhancing Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: engaging with the dimensions of practice. Maidenhead: Open University Press.

Winn, J. (2015) The co-operative university: Labour, property and pedagogyPower and Education, 7 (1).

 

See: http://josswinn.org/2015/03/anglia-ruskin-seminar-critical-knowledge-and-praxis/

If you are coming from outside the University and need directions, please contact either Dave Hill (dave.hill@anglia.ac.uk) or Cassie Earl (cassie.earl@anglia.ac.uk)

**END**

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Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

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Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski

FUEL FOR THE LIVING FIRE: LABOUR-POWER!

My article Fuel for the Living Fire: Labour-Power! is now available at Academia.

It can be viewed at: https://www.academia.edu/11923648/Fuel_for_the_Living_Fire_Labour-Power_

It is Chapter 7 in The Labour Debate: An Investigation into the Theory and Reality of Capitalist Work, edited by Ana C. Dinerstein and Micheal Neary, Aldershot: Ashgate, 2002, pp.179-202.

Glenn Rikowski

**END**

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

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Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Living Fire

Living Fire

Mors Mystica

Mors Mystica

PEDAGOGIES IN THE FLESH

Call for Papers for New Phenomenologies of Difference – Edited Book

Pedagogies in the Flesh: Teaching, Learning, and the Embodiment of Sociocultural Differences in Education
Call for Papers
Book Overview

Current discourses surrounding education rely heavily upon developmental psychology and cognitive theory as the primary tools for depicting and explaining human experience and subjectivity. However, these tools prove to be inadequate, as they fail to account for the historicity and materiality of human development and personhood. Alternate approaches are needed if we are to understand the making of the self as a process through which socially and culturally situated bodies are construed and experienced within and against histories of racism, sexism, heteronormativity, ableism, and class inequality. Certainly the histories of oppression based on social hierarchies are addressed in social foundations literature as well as anti-oppressive pedagogies. However, these perspectives tend to focus on institutional critique, personal narrative, and/or critical sociology/ethnographic studies without recognizing the central role that actual bodies play in reproducing and resisting hierarchies of difference.

This collection explores the pedagogical moments or “flashpoints” when sociocultural formations of difference and power take hold through the corporeal capacities of the knowing body. In particular, this book is concerned with how the sensate human flesh acts as an interface or permeable membrane through which self and other as well as inside and outside come to influence one another, entering into complex relays of exchange, agonism, and entanglement. The notion of pedagogical “flashpoints” is an invitation to examine specific instances in which the body educates, and is educated in various formal and informal contexts, including schools, universities, museums, communities, and so forth. For this collection, we are interested in short, but powerful, phenomenological descriptions of such moments. The book will feature concise written accounts of flashpoints that attend to the somatic intensities of the flesh as a site of knowledge, resistance, and transformation. Contributions to the volume should utilize phenomenologically based methods for describing flashpoints through which the tacit, pre-conscious flesh of the body reveals how perceptual experience is always already shaped by hierarchies of difference. Although brief, these descriptions should succinctly illuminate how flashpoints are first and foremost fleshpoints that expose the embodied, intuitive context of our lived experiences of difference.

Chapter Guidelines
The chapters in this volume will be comprised of descriptions of no more than 1,500-1,700 words. The descriptions should focus on particular flashpoints that reveal the processes and structures of embodiment and perception within experiences that are punctuated by asymmetrical relations of race, gender, sexuality, class, ability, and other markers of difference. Topics and themes for description could include moments of physical or emotional encounter within educational settings where tensions around sociocultural difference became apparent. The viewing of an artwork or the reading of a text might have initiated these flashpoints. Embodied reactions that frame such flashpoints might include laughter, tears, pain, or a whole array of sensory responses.
Such descriptions may draw inspiration from not only the classic texts of Frantz Fanon, W.E.B. DuBois, Simone de Beauvoir, and others, but also contemporary feminism, queer studies, critical race theory, indigenous knowledge and postcolonial theory. While submissions should be informed by a phenomenological sensibility, descriptions should be more or less “jargon”-free, as this text is aimed at a broad readership composed of educators and students who might not be familiar with phenomenological literature.

If you are interested in contributing to this edited collection, please submit a brief proposal by May 15, 2015 following the format and procedures below:

Proposal Format: 300-word abstract, at least 3 references from the literature that serve as suggested further reading on issues brought forth in the chapter, and a chapter title. Please include author name, 200-word author bio that includes a statement on positionality, and contact information (email, mailing address, and phone number).

Submission Procedures: Submit proposals as .doc or .docx email attachments to fleshpoints@gmail.com.
Timeline:
Proposal Submission Due: May 15, 2015
Review Results Sent to Authors: June 15, 2015
Chapters Due: September 15, 2015
Requests for Revisions Sent to Authors: October 15, 2015
Final Chapters Due: November 15, 2015

See: http://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/node/61436

Co-editors

Sarah Travis is a PhD student in Art Education at the University of North Texas. Her scholarship focuses on historical and contemporary issues of equity within school-based (art) education contexts as well as racialized, classed, and gendered experiences of art students and art educators. Her current research involves inquiry into artistic identity formation with adolescent art students in post-Katrina New Orleans.

Amelia M. Kraehe is Assistant Professor in the Department of Art Education and Art History at the University of North Texas. Her research concerns the social, political and cultural contexts that influence education, with a particular focus on the pedagogic possibilities and impossibilities created through engagement in the arts and popular culture. Her scholarship is published in numerous journals including, among others, Race, Ethnicity and Education; Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society; and Educational Studies.

Emily Jean Hood is a mother, artist, emerging scholar and educator who is currently a PhD student in Art Education at the University of North Texas. Her areas of study and research include post-humanities as a means for furthering inclusivity for all beings. Thus, her scholarship in the field of art education delves into the notion of things as co-creators, specifically in artistic creative practices of perception and making.

Tyson E. Lewis is Associate Professor in the Department of Art Education and Art History at the University of North Texas. His research interests include philosophy of education, aesthetics, art education, and critical theory. He is author of The Aesthetics of Education: Theatre, Curiosity, and Politics in the Work of Jacques Rancière and Paulo Freire (London: Bloomsbury, 2014), and On Study: Educational Potentiality and Giorgio Agamben (New York: Routledge, 2013).

Black Metal Theory

Black Metal Theory

 

**END**

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

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Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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EDUCATION

EDUCATION

PERSPECTIVES FOR THE NEW UNIVERSITY

Call for Papers

Extended deadline: April 15: Perspectives for the New University

Krisis: Journal for Contemporary Philosophy

The occupation and appropriation of university buildings in Amsterdam and the protests of students and staff there and at other universities in the Netherlands triggered a wide-ranging debate about the future of higher education and research.

Krisis – Journal for Contemporary Philosophy – aims at bringing together challenging perspectives from, on and for what during the protests has been coined the ‘new university’.

We invite contributions and short essays (max. 3000 words) that reflect on what is happening, how to move forward and envision alternative educational institutes.

We specifically also invite contributions by students and non-academics for this interdisciplinary publication aimed at supporting debates on the future of knowledge institutions.

Krisis is also looking for artistic and visual contribution that envision the new university.

The special issue will initially appear open-access in pdf-format and, possibly, in print at a later stage.

Deadline: April 15

KRISIS

KRISIS

**END**

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

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Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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Bill AYERS

Bill AYERS

ANOTHER LEARNING IS POSSIBLE

University of Winchester, June 6th, 2015

Internationally renowned educational thinkers discuss how we might redirect our educational priorities towards learners who are creative, integrated, thoughtful and engaged.

Forced learning is destructive. It is destructive for our children, our society, our planet. An insistent government and teacher-lead diet of tracts and facts is sapping the creativity and motivation from learners. This major conference seeks to discuss and promulgate alternatives to the pedagogy peddled by all the major parties in the UK, and by successive governments in their Sisyphean search for international pre-eminence in spurious league tables. Some of the world’s foremost educational critics will open the discussion on how we might together redirect our educational priorities towards learners who are creative, integrated, thoughtful and motivated.

Day One features a series of keynotes from the indomitable US educational critic, Bill Ayers, along with a presentation from the great Harvard educator Eleanor Duckworth, and activist, academic and child advocate Bernadine Dohrn.

Those staying for Day Two will continue the discussion and take part in participant-centred workshops designed to deepen understanding of alternative pedagogies. Whatever the challenges we face, this conference proclaims, another learning is possible.

For more details see:

http://store.winchester.ac.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=2&deptid=10&catid=9&prodid=242

Bill Ayers, legendary and controversial Marxist, social justice campaigner and educational critic.

Eleanor Duckworth, the great Harvard educator and one-time colleague of Jean Piaget

Bernadine Dohrn, activist, academic and child advocate: http://www.aivit.org/bernardine-dohrn/

Bernadine Dohrn

Bernadine Dohrn

 

More speakers to be announced.

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/