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imagesHIGH NOON SHOWDOWN ON BLACK METAL THEORY

TOPICS IN THE AESTHETICS OF MUSIC AND SOUND

SEMINAR SERIES

Thursday, October 1, 2015

3:15-5 p.m. in U67

Institute for the Study of Culture (IKV) University of Southern Denmark (SDU) Campusvej 55, Odense

Panel discussion (Via Skype):

High Noon Showdown on Black Metal Theory

With …

Karl Spracklen is Professor of Leisure Studies at Leeds Beckett University, UK. He is the Editor of Metal Music Studies and the Secretary of the International Society for Metal Music Studies. He has extensive research interests relating to leisure spaces and leisure identities, and has contributed to debates regarding leisure theory. He has over seventy publications, including three research monographs, the most recent of which is Whiteness and Leisure (2013), published by Palgrave Macmillan.

Niall Scott is Senior Lecturer in Ethics at the University of Central Lancashire. He is editor of Helvete: A Journal of Black Metal Theory and Co-Editor of Metal Music Studies. He is one of the founders and Chair of the Society for Metal Music Studies, and has published over 40 pieces in the fields of metal studies, black metal theory, political philosophy, cultural theory, ethics and bioethics.

Edia Connole is co-author with Nicola Masciandaro of Floating Tomb: Black Metal Theory (Mimesis, 2015), and co-editor with Gary J. Shipley of Serial Killing: A Philosophical Anthology (Schism, 2015). With Scott Wilson, Edia Connole is also the co-founder of MOUTH, an actionist art project in culinary divinomics. mmmouth.wordpress.com

Black Metal Theory

Black Metal Theory

Abstract: In this seminar defenders and critics will debate the epistemic value of black metal theory (BMT). An amorphous “metallectual” movement initiated in 2009 with the symposium Hideous Gnosis, BMT has developed in the form of a distributed and vexed forum for trans-disciplinary intellectual work committed to thinking “with” rather than “about” black metal. For defenders of the discipline, its value lies in its ability to destroy creatively the boundary between black metal and theory—constituting itself in the space of their shared negativity, as stated on its inaugural website: “Not black metal. Not Theory. Not not black metal. Not not theory. Black metal theory. Theoretical blackening of metal. Metallic blackening of theory. Mutual blackening. Nigredo in the intoxological crucible of symposia.” For critics of the discipline, this trans-disciplinary approach is devoid of purpose and meaning, and makes the work of critically exploring black metal more difficult.

 

All are welcome – also via Skype

Outland

Outland

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Celestial Dome Inverted

Celestial Dome Inverted

DARK NIGHTS OF THE UNIVERSE

Recess, in conjunction with The Public School New York, Presents:

Dark Nights of the Universe
et nox sicut dies illuminabitur

A four-night theoretical exploration of mysticism in dialogue with Du noir univers, a text by François Laruelle.

April 26th – 29th, 2012

Classes nightly at 7pm

 

Night I: Eugene Thacker – Remote: The Forgetting of the World
Clodagh Emoe – Mystical Anarchism. Screening and discussion. Introduced by Simon Critchley.

 

Night II: Daniel Colucciello Barber – Whylessness: The Universe is Deaf and Blind.

 

Night III: Nicola Masciandaro – Secret: No Light Has Ever Seen the Black Universe

 

Night IV: Alexander Galloway – Rocket: Present at Every Point of the Remote

 

Classes will begin at 7pm. Visitors are welcome to join each day or a selection of days.

Recess will house a temporary library of relevant texts, which visitors may browse and annotate freely throughout Recess’s public hours and during the classes.  The exhibition will feature visual works by  Clodagh Emoe and Aaron Mette, and audio works by Eugene Thacker and Taku Unami.

Participants:

Daniel Colucciello Barber, Simon Critchley, Clodagh Emoe, Alexander Galloway, Nicola Masciandaro, Aaron Mette, Eugene Thacker, and Taku Unami.

Download Du noir univers. The English edition of this essay was first translated and published by Miguel Abreu as “Of Black Universe in the Human Foundations of Color” in the catalogue Hyun Soo Choi: Seven Large-Scale Paintings (New York: Thread Waxing Space, 1991): 2-4. It has been reproduced here with a few slight modifications. The original French essay, titled “Du noir univers: dans les fondations humaines de la couleur,” was published in La Décision philosophique 5 (April 1988): 107-112.

Audio archive of the series available here.

RSVP encouraged: click here.

Download the press release.

Click here to view images.

For image request or more information contact info@recessactivities.org

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Capitorg

Capitorg

POSTHUMANISMS

Call for Papers

Symploké: A journal for the intermingling of theoretical scholarship

Symploké: http://www.symploke.org/

Posthumanisms (Vol. 23, No. 1-2 [2015])

Welcome are papers that engage posthumanism in ways that avoid flattening “the human” into a monolithic or homogenous problematic. We are especially interested in papers that take up posthumanism in relation to the crisis of the humanities and the ongoing crises faced by marginalized “humans” around the globe. How might posthumanist thought be symptomatic of the crisis of the humanities and (higher) education more broadly? How has posthumanist inquiry ignored the lived heterogeneities of humanness distributed across raced, classed, gendered, and differently abled bodies? How can posthumanism’s critical political project benefit from being brought into intimate connection with critical race, queer, feminist, anti-colonial, and disability theories?(Deadline: 31 December 2014.)

Manuscripts must be received by December 31, 2014.

Submissions of any length which are appropriate to the aims of symplokē will be considered, although those between 4,000 and 6,500 words (approximately 16-26 typed, double-spaced pages) are preferred. Please keep in mind that submitted manuscripts need not be intended for an upcoming special issue; general submissions of high quality are encouraged. The editors reserve the right to make stylistic alterations in the interest of clarity. Authors will receive a complementary issue of the journal. All submissions must strictly follow the guidelines for copy preparation listed below. Articles not conforming to these guidelines may be sent back to the author for revision.

Preparation of Copy:
1. All submissions must provide a complete listing of references and use footnotes rather than endnotes.
2. Footnotes should generally consist only of references and are to be consecutively numbered throughout the manuscript.
3. References must include the names of publishers as well as places of publication. Also include full names and a complete listing of translators and editors.
4. The format of the manuscript must conform to the current MLA Style Manual.
5. All manuscripts must be submitted in duplicate. If the manuscript was word-processed, include a copy of your IBM- or Macintosh-compatible disk. Microsoft word or ASCII files are preferable.
6. All quotations, titles, names and dates must be checked for accuracy.
7. All articles must be written in English.
8. This journal has a policy of blind peer reviewing; thus the author’s name should not appear on the manuscript and a separate title page must be provided.
9. Material not kept for publication will be returned if accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope.

Address submissions to:

symplokē
Jeffrey R. Di Leo, Editor-in-Chief
University of Houston-Victoria
3007 North Ben Wilson
Victoria, TX 77901.

Or send attached files to the Editor-in-Chief at: editor@symploke.org.

All materials published in this journal are copyrighted by symplokē. Submission of an article to this journal entails the author’s agreement to assign copyright to symplokē. Articles appearing in symplokē may be reproduced for research purposes, personal reference, and classroom use without special permission and without fee payment. This permission does not extend to other kinds of reproduction such as copying for general distribution, for the creation of collected works or anthologies, for advertising or promotional purposes, or for resale. These and all other rights are reserved.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.co.uk

 

Glenn Rikowski’s latest paper, Crises in Education, Crises of Education – can now be found at Academia: http://www.academia.edu/8953489/Crises_in_Education_Crises_of_Education

Glenn Rikowski’s article, Education, Capital and the Transhuman – can also now be found at Academia: https://www.academia.edu/9033532/Education_Capital_and_the_Transhuman

 

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

BECOMING ECOFEMINISMS

CALL FOR PAPERS

PhaenEx: Journal of Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture

Vol.11-1 (2016)

PhaenEx: http://phaenex.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/phaenex/index

PhaenEx is seeking contributions for its next special topics issue on Becoming Ecofeminisms. Ecofeminism has many versions and genealogies. In the context of new kinds of environmental crises, imaginaries, and discourses, how might we rethink and reinvigorate ecofeminisms— telling alternative genealogies of this movement (sometimes considered outdated and essentialist), highlighting current practices, and envisioning its bold futures. We are interested in ecofeminisms in both theory and practice.

Proposals and papers related (but not limited) to the following are welcome:

  • Ecofeminist intersections with current discourse and practice in queer, anti-colonial, anti-racist, critical disability, and critical animal studies
  • Genealogies of and differences within ecofeminisms
  • Critiques of ecofeminism / Ecofeminist critique
  • Contemporary revival of ecofeminist approaches
  • Links or tension between ecofeminism and posthumanism, new materialism, object-oriented ontologies, speculative realism, etc.
  • Ecofeminist reappraisal of relationships, affects, and communities (anarchist praxis, solidarity-based movements, grassroots initiatives, transformative justice, etc.)
  • Ecofeminism in relation to creative practices including eco-art, bio-art,ecopoetics, cli-fi, etc.
  • Ecofeminist engagements with the anthropocene, deep time, resilience, the geological turn, the oceanic turn, re-wilding, green futures, or other salient contemporary concepts.

Deadline for submissions: 1st August 2015.

All papers will be peer-reviewed.

Contact: Astrida Neimanis (astrida.neimanis@gmail.com) and Christiane Bailey (christianebailey@gmail.com)

 

PhaenEx: http://www.phaenex.uwindsor.ca

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Philosophy

Philosophy

PHILOSOPHY IN EDUCATION

CALL FOR PAPERS

PhaenEx: Journal of Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture

PhaenEx:   http://phaenex.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/phaenex/index

Special Topics Section: Philosophy in Education (2015)

Lead Editors: Marc Lamontagne & Éric Martin

This issue will focus on the way philosophy operates within educational practice. A guiding question is: can we conceive of education as the very manifestation of philosophy insofar as both relate to culture? Recent criticisms of educational practice have underlined the hijacking of education by utilitarian priorities. These denunciations, albeit necessary, often create an impasse in the debate between those in favor of such transformations and those against. We thus invite authors to go beyond the limited framework of negative critique so that the question of the status and role of philosophy in education can be explicitly and positively addressed. This issue of PhænEx seeks contributions that go beyond simply noting how educational institutions are currently adrift: we encourage articles that could make a case for the rehabilitation of the place of philosophy in all branches of knowledge, and especially in the field of social sciences. Authors can tackle such issues as these: Can philosophy really see itself as part of the general curriculum while behaving as a specific discipline? What is the relation between philosophy, education, and culture? Are not philosophy, education, and culture synonyms for the way humans are constituted into a common world? What is a proper philosophical pedagogy?

Submission Deadline: Dec. 1st, 2014. For more information contact the Lead Editors: Marc Lamontagne (marc.lamontagne@cegepmontpetit.ca) or Éric Martin (eric.martin@cegepmontpetit.ca).

 
*GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR AUTHORS*

*French style guidelines are available here.

1. Submissions should represent original work not previously published.

2. It is the author’s responsibility to obtain appropriate written copyright permissions for the reproduction of any copyrighted material, including images.

3. Authors should adhere to gender-inclusive language in their manuscripts.

4. Generally, PhaenEx will not consider publication of the same author’s work in two consecutive Open issues, although authors may submit their work to consecutive Open and Special Topics issues.

5. Generally, scholarly articles are between 6000-9000 words in length, although exceptions can be made. Submissions that are clearly unrevised conference presentations, or which are excessively long without clear reason, will not be sent out for peer review. Authors should contact the Lead Editor(s) in advance of submission if they have questions or concerns about this requirement.

Authors are asked to comply fully with these requirements, as well as with the style requirements outlined below, and to follow the generally accepted norms of academic writing, including the provision of complete and accurate references. Failure to do so may constitute grounds for the rejection of a submission at any time during the editorial process. (PhaenEx recognizes the creative and other needs of its authors. Please write directly to the Lead Editor for permission to exceed these guidelines or the below style sheet.)

*STYLE REQUIREMENTS*

[voir lien ci- dessous pour les règles de mise en forme des textes en français]
Texts are to be saved in MS Word (.doc) or Rich Text Format (.rft).

The style requirements of PhaenEx are modeled on: Gibaldi, Joseph. MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing. 2nd ed. New York: The Modern Language Association of America, 1998.

*Format:

1) Use font Times New Roman size 12 throughout, including all entries in both Notes (to come at the end of the text, not at the bottom of the page) and Works Cited (to come after Notes).

2) Full justification, both left and right.

3) Double-space the main text.

4) Indent the first line of each new paragraph. (Do not leave a blank space between paragraphs.)

5) Use one space (not two) after sentence punctuation.

6) Single-space notes, but place a single blank line between each separate note.

7) Single-space all items in Works Cited, but place a single blank line between each separate entry.

8) To indicate emphasis, titles, and terms in a foreign language use italics (not underlining).

*Basic Layout:

1) The title should appear at the top of the first page, centred and boldface, and be followed by one blank double-spaced line.

2) If numbered, each section heading should use Roman numerals. Whether numbered or not, each section heading should be preceded by two blank double- spaced lines, centred, and boldface.

3) If numbered, each subheading should use lower case Arabic letters enclosed in parentheses, left-justified, boldface and italicized. Leave one double-spaced return between Section heading and sub-heading, and the same between sub-heading and text (i.e. please do not leave any
extra blank lines between heading and subheading, or between subheading and text).

4) Notes should be assembled at the end of the text (not the bottom of each page). They should be headed by the unnumbered section heading
“Notes,” which should be centred, boldface, set off from the preceding paragraph by one blank double-spaced line (i.e. two strokes of the “return” key should follow the punctuation of the final paragraph).

5) A list of works cited in the text should come after the final note. It should be headed by the unnumbered section heading “Works Cited,” which should be centred, boldface, set off from the last line of the last note by one blank double-spaced line (i.e. two strokes of the “return” key should follow the punctuation of the final note).

6) If using an epigraph, each line of the epigraph text should be indented to one tab, left-justified and italicized. Attribution of the epigraph should follow standard MLA parenthetical citation.

*Quotations:

1) Quotations longer than three lines should appear without quotation marks, be single- spaced, and be block- indented once from the left margin. Enter one blank double- spaced line immediately before and after the block-indented quotation (i.e. block- indented quotations should use standard double-spacing to separate the quote from the main text.)

2) Indicate all interpolations with square brackets.

3) All ellipses should be indicated with a group of three immediately consecutive dots, preceded and followed by a single space. Ellipses indicating excluded text should not be placed in brackets.

*Quotation marks and punctuation:

1) Use double quotation marks for first order quotations of less than three lines and integrate them in the text. Use single quotation marks for quotations within quotations.

2) Final punctuation goes inside quotation marks except when followed by a parenthetical citation. Exception: Block quotations should be punctuated as if they were normal sentences and parenthetical citation should follow one space after the punctuation.

3) When quotation marks are followed by a parenthetical citation, final punctuation is placed after the parentheses. Exception: when the quoted text ends with a question or exclamation mark, place the question or exclamation mark inside the quotation marks and place a period after the closing parenthesis.

4) Semicolons, exclamation marks, and question marks that are not part of the quoted material should be placed outside quotation marks.

5) “Scare quotes” should be avoided if possible, although may be appropriate to denote contested terminology. When used, please use double quote marks (unless they appear within quotations as second-order quotes, where single quote marks should then be used.)

6) In text em-dashes should be long, with no space between the dashes and the words on either side. (Most word processors automatically convert to this format if you type a word followed immediately by two dashes followed immediately by the next word and then a space.)

7) Please use serial commas (e.g. “peace, order, and good governance”).

8) Leave one space (not two) following punctuation between sentences.

*Use of foreign language words and quotations:

1) Quotations should be, where possible, translated into the language of the article using an official translation (and thus appropriately cited). Where no official translation is available, the author’s translation should be followed by a parenthetical note: (author’s trans.). This should be accompanied by an endnote that presents the translated text in its original language.

2) Where, for good reason, the original language of the quotation or word is kept in the main body of the article, single words or phrases should be italicized. Sentences and quotes should use format and punctuation guidelines of the article’s main language, rather than those of the foreign language.

*Parenthetical Citations:

1) MLA style uses in-text, parenthetical citations together with a Works Cited list at the end. The goal of parenthetical citation is (a) to provide immediate citation upon reading each specific passage in need of citation, (b) to indicate precisely the relevant item in Works Cited, and (c) to be as brief as possible.

2) When only one of the works of a particular author needs to be cited, citation appears as (last name page number), with no comma between the name and the page number. If more than one of the works of a particular author needs to be cited, citation appears as (last name, shortened book title in italics page number) OR (last name, “shortened article title within quotation marks” page number), with a comma between name and shortened title only. However, if (a) the author’s name and/or specific work is mentioned explicitly in leading sentences such that it is clear which text is being referred to in Works Cited, or if (b) it is clearly understood that the citation is the same as the immediately preceding citation, then the citation should be reduced to (page number). This replaces the need for ibid., an abbreviation which should not be used.

3) Parenthetical citations may also be used for merely supporting material, e.g., (see Smith). Full references are to be provided in Works Cited.

*Notes:

1) Notes appear in the body of the text in superscript and as consecutive, Arabic numerals.

2) Numbers appear in the Notes section also in superscript.

3) In the body of the text, superscript notes appear:
(a) outside punctuation, when no quotation marks or parenthetical citations are used, e.g., … lovers seek solitude.
(b) outside closing quotation marks, when no parenthetical citation appears, e.g., “… lovers seek solitude.”
(c) outside punctuation that follows the parenthetical citation, e.g., “… lovers seek solitude” (Sartre 273).

4) Follow MLA, parenthetical citation style for all quotations and references in the notes themselves. Full citations should appear only in the Works Cited list. For example: For a further discussion of this point, see Detmer (21-22).

*Works Cited:

1) Book paradigm:
Sartre, Jean-Paul. Being and Nothingness: A Phenomenological Essay on Ontology. Trans. Hazel Barnes. New York: Washington Square Press, 1956.

2) Article paradigm:
Simons, Margaret. “Two Interviews with Simone de Beauvoir.” Hypatia 3, no. 3 (1989): 11-27.

3) Chapter/Article in Book paradigm:
Gyllenhammer, Paul. “The Question of (In)Tolerance in Heidegger’s Notion of World- Disclosure.” Issues in Interpretation Theory. Ed. Pol Vandevelde. Milwaukee: Marquette University Press, 2006. 167-198.

4) Film paradigm:
Macbeth. Dir. Roman Polanski. Perf. Jon Finch, Francesca Annis, and Nicholas Selby. 1971. Columbia, 2002. DVD.

Please note: (a) When more than one work is used by the same author, subsequent references in Works Cited should include three combined dashes (an “em-dash”), followed by a period, in place of the name. (b) Inclusive page numbers must follow journal and chapter entries in the Works Cited list.

*Citing Online Sources (adapted from www.dianahacker.com):

1) MLA does not require a Web address (URL) in citations for online sources.

2) In general, citations should end by indicating the medium (i.e. Web) and the date the material was accessed (date Month year)

3) MLA style calls for a publisher or sponsor for most online sources. If a source has no publisher, use the abbreviation “N.p.” (no publisher). If there is no date of publication or update, use the abbreviation “N.d” (for no date), after the publisher/sponsor position. For an article in an online scholarly journal or an article from a database, give page numbers if they are available; if they are not, use the abbreviation “n. pag.”

4) If an author or editor is unknown, begin the citation with the title.

Examples and Paradigms:

(a) Entire Website with author or editor:
Peterson, Susan Lynn. The Life of Martin Luther. Susan Lynn Peterson, 2005. Web. 24 Jan. 2009.
Halsall, Paul, ed. Internet Modern History Sourcebook. Fordham U, 22 Sept. 2001. Web. 19 Jan. 2009.

(b) Entire Website with corporate (group) author:
United States. Environmental Protection Agency. Drinking Water Standards. EPA, 8 July 2004. Web. 24 Jan. 2005.

(c) Entire Website with unknown author:
Margaret Sanger Papers Project. History Dept., New York U, 18 Oct. 2000. Web. 6 Jan. 2009.

(d) Entire Website with no title:
Yoon, Mina. Home page. Oak Ridge Natl. Laboratory, 28 Dec. 2006. Web. 12 Jan. 2009.

(e) Short works from websites including articles, poems, and other documents that are not book length or that appear as internal pages on a Website: Shiva, Vandana. “Bioethics: A Third World Issue.” NativeWeb. NativeWeb, n.d. Web. 15 Sept. 2004.

(f) Online Book:
Milton, John. Paradise Lost: Book I. Poetryfoundation.org. Poetry Foundation, 2008. Web. 14 Dec. 2008.

(g) Article in an on-line journal:
Belau, Linda. “Trauma and the Material Signifier.” Postmodern Culture 11.2 (2001): n. pag. Web. 20 Feb. 2009.

(h) Article in an Online magazine or newspaper:
Paulson, Steve. “Buddha on the Brain.” Salon.com. Salon Media Group, 27 Nov. 2006. Web. 18 Jan. 2009.

(i) E-mail. Begin with the writer’s name and the subject line, followed by “Message to” and name of the recipient. End with the date of the message and the medium.
Wilde, Lisa. “Review Questions.” Message to the author. 15 Mar. 2009. E-mail. &am p;nb sp;

For all other examples see www.dianahacker.com.

*Standardized Spelling Guidelines:

Please standardize spelling to the Oxford Canadian English dictionary. Please note the following preferred spellings and guidelines:- post-structuralism, post-humanism, postmodernism, postcolonial- the Far East, the West (not west), Western[e.g. media, thought, intellectuals, culture, etc.], but western [Canada, parts of the city, etc.].- insofar>- naturally-ordered, largest-ever, etc.- avoid “&” in favour of “and”- towards rather than toward- farther denotes physical advancement in distance while further denotes advancement to greater degree, as in time<*On all other matters of style, please consult the MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing (2nd edition).
To Submit: Register or log-in if already registered.
Select author and then follow the step-by-step instructions.

 

http://phaenex.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/phaenex/about/submissions/callforpapers

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

London Radical BookfairTHE SOCIAL PATHOLOGIES OF CONTEMPORARY CIVILIZATION

Fifth International Conference

Erasmus University, Rotterdam, Netherlands

30 & 31 October 2014

www.socialpathologies.com

 

The fifth international conference on The Social Pathologies of Contemporary Civilization explores the nature of contemporary malaises, diseases, illnesses and psychosomatic syndromes in their relation to cultural pathologies of the social body. Usually these conditions are interpreted clinically in terms of individualized symptoms and framed in demographic and epidemiological profiles. They are represented and responded to discretely, as though for the most part unrelated to each other; each having its own professional discourse of etiology, diagnostics, therapeutics, as well as a task force developing health strategy and policy recommendations and interventions. However, these diseases also have a social and cultural profile, one that transcends the particularity of their symptomology and their discrete etiologies. These social pathologies are diseases related to cultural pathologies of the social body and disorders of the collective esprit de corps of contemporary society. They arise from individual and collective experiences of profound and drastic social changes and cultural shifts.

Multi-disciplinary in approach the conference addresses questions of how these conditions are manifest at the level of individual bodies and minds, as well as how the ‘bodies politic’ are related to the hegemony of reductive biomedical and individual psychologistic perspectives. Rejecting such a reductive diagnosis of contemporary problems of health and well-being, the central research hypothesis guiding the conference is that contemporary epidemics are to be analysed in the light of radical changes in our civilization and of the social hegemonization of the biomedical and psychiatric perspective.

A particular focus of the conference is the role of humanities and social sciences in helping to understand the connection between social transformations and psychiatric perceptions of health and well-being. The conference invites papers offering analyses of social malaises and the health of civilization from faculty, students and researchers in fields of philosophy, sociology, social theory, psychology, and anthropology.

 

Special sub-themes are the following:

􀁸The invented self– What is the status of the late modern subject? We live in so-called ‘neo-liberal’ times in which we experience an intense, marketed pressure to ‘be oneself’, as well as an extreme difficulty to ‘be a self’. Is our alleged individual freedom a strongly directed one? If so, how can we invent ourselves differently? And how should we understand the connection between this newly invented and that socially directed self?

􀁸The sympathetic self– Is a re-ethicization and moral regeneration of political, moral and libidinal economies possible? The domestic economics of the soul need to be scrutinized, ‘miraculous’ and healing social powers – such as the redemptive and transfiguring powers of beauty and love, and the power of gift relations – need to be explored in terms of their capacity to reverse pathogenic vicious circles of individuated egotism into saludogenic virtuous spirals of care, care of the self and care for others.

􀁸The diagnosed self– In most late modern societies in the West, we find a high prevalence of many psychiatric disorders. Such statistics have been known for years, but there is much uncertainty about how to interpret them. How do adults experience the process of receiving these diagnoses, and what does it mean for them to have their experience of suffering filtered through a diagnostic and psychiatric vocabulary?

􀁸The measured self– Research evidence is widely held as a key influence on mental health policy and practice. Whilst hypothesis testing in randomised controlled trials is held as the ‘gold standard’, qualitative research exploring people’s experiences continues to occupy a more marginal position, even though these experiences inform important inter-subjective phenomena. What is and what could be the specific role of qualitative research in contemporary mental health care?

􀁸The amnesiac self– The fading of individual and collective memory due to ongoing processes of individuation and acceleration and to experiences of shock, trauma, repression and aphasia in the psychic life of individuals and societies is amplified in contemporary contexts. Lacking memory, persons and societies live in a liminal extended present and become prone to solipsism and to manipulation. What is forgotten – and what can be remembered – is one of the most urgent ethical-political problems of our age.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski at Academia: http://independent.academic.edu/GlennRikowski

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Dialectics

Dialectics

DIALECTICS OF THE CONCRETE

Karel Kosík and Dialectics of the Concrete

Prague, June 4–6, 2014

A conference organised by the Department for the Study of Modern Czech Philosophy, Institute of Philosophy, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic.

In 1963 Karel Kosík published his path-breaking book Dialectics of the Concrete. It made an impact on both Marxist and non-Marxist thinkers, in Czechoslovakia and throughout the world. In this work Kosík set for himself an ambitious task—to re-think the basic concepts of the Marxist philosophical tradition and to employ them in the analysis of social reality. In the course of his analysis he touched on a wide array of issues that are still relevant today, including the problem of mystification or the “pseudo-concrete,” the social role of art, the conception of reality as a concrete totality, the conception of the human being as an onto-formative being, the systematic connection between labour and temporality, the relationship between praxis and labour, and the explanatory power of the dialectical method.

We would like to explore Kosík’s seminal work in both breadth and depth. To that end, we welcome papers addressing the following topics:

* Kosík in dialogue with other thinkers, such as Hegel, Marx, Labriola, Gramsci, Lukács, Heidegger, Marcuse, Popper, Gonseth, and Weber.

* Kosík’s response to other currents of thought, especially phenomenology, structuralism, existentialism, critical theory, and positivism.

* Kosík’s work in relation to other varieties of Marxist humanism.

* Dialectics of the Concrete in the context of Kosík’s overall philosophical œuvre.

* Dialectics of the Concrete and its influence on political theory, aesthetics, theology, cultural anthropology, sociology, pedagogy, and other fields.

The reception and critique of Kosík’s Dialectics of the Concrete in different parts of the world, such as East-Central Europe; in Germany, Italy, Russia, and Scandinavia; the Anglophone, Francophone, Hispanophone, and Lusophone worlds; China, Japan, and other countries in Asia.

Papers addressing other topics related to Kosík’s work are also welcome.

The conference will be conducted in English. Proposals—including a title and an abstract of 100–200 words—should be sent by 31 December 2013 to landa@flu.cas.cz. Submissions must be in .doc or .rtf format. Notice of acceptance will be sent by 30 January 2014. A conference fee of 100 Euros (60 Euros for students) will cover the costs of organising the conference (including conference accessories and coffee breaks). Details about the method of payment will be announced after abstract acceptance. The conference proceedings will be published as a book in 2015.

Organisers: Ivan Landa, Jan Mervart, Joseph Grim Feinberg

International Organising Committee: Johann P. Arnason, Peter Hudis, Joseph G. Feinberg, Ivan Landa, Michael Löwy, Jan Mervart, Francesco Tava

 

**END**

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Books

Books

THE LEFT HEMISPHERE: MAPPING CRITICAL THEORY

By Razmig Keucheyan

———————————–

Published July 2013

———————————–

A panoramic account of the world’s leading writers and thinkers

As the crisis of capitalism unfolds, the need for alternatives is felt ever more intensely. The struggle between radical movements and the forces of reaction will be merciless. A crucial battlefield, where the outcome of the crisis will in part be decided, is that of theory.

Over the last twenty-five years, radical intellectuals across the world have produced important and innovative ideas. The endeavour to transform the world without falling into the catastrophic traps of the past has been a common element uniting these new approaches.

This book—aimed at both the general reader and the specialist—offers the first global cartography of the expanding intellectual field of critical contemporary thought. More than thirty authors and intellectual currents of every continent are presented in a clear and succinct manner. A history of critical thought in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries is also provided, helping situate current thinkers in a broader historical and sociological perspective.

———————————–

“Explains the key ideas, and the contradictions within them, of authors who are often cited but rarely read.” – Le Monde diplomatique

“A precious tool permitting us to escape the whingeing about the mediocrity of thinkers today and to help us anticipate the tremors yet to come.” – Le Nouvel observateur

“Written with intelligence and clarity.”– Libération

“In this courageous and audacious work, the sociologist Razmig Keucheyan offers a robust . . . panorama of contemporary critical theories.” – Nonfiction.fr

“An impressive tour de force, providing us with a summary of contemporary critical theories that is both rigorous and clear.”

– Philosophie magazine

———————————–

Hardback / ISBN: 9781781681022 / $29.95 / £20.00 / $34.95CAN / 382 pages

 

For more information on LEFT HEMISPHERE: MAPPING CRITICAL THEORY or to buy the book visit: http://www.versobooks.com/books/1156-against-world-literature

———————————–

Visit Verso’s website for information on our upcoming events, new reviews and publications and special offers: http://www.versobooks.com

 

Sign up for the Verso mailing list: https://www.versobooks.com/users/sign_up

 

Become a fan of Verso on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Verso-Books/205847279448577

 

And get updates on Twitter too! http://twitter.com/VersoBooks

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Dissent

Dissent

DISSENT! HISTORIES AND MEANINGS OF OPPOSITION FROM 1968 TO THE PRESENT

Ben Dorfman is organizing a small conference on Dissent! Histories and Meanings of Opposition from 1968 to the Present at Aalborg University, January 16-17, 2014.

Details here: www.dissent.aau.dk

 

Jon Simons, Associate Professor

Department of Communication and Culture

Indiana University

USA

++1 812 856 0896

Blog: Picturing Peace

Editor-in-chief, 2013-14: Culture, Theory & Critique

Co-editor of Manchester University Press series: Reappraising the Political

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Knowledge

Knowledge

20th and 21st CENTURY FRENCH AND FRANCOPHONE STUDIES INTERNATIONAL COLLOQUIUM

 

20th and 21st Century French and Francophone Studies International Colloquium

New York City: March 6-8 2014

Co-organized and hosted by

NYU, CUNY Graduate Center and Columbia University

 

Call for Papers/ Appel à communications

Money / L’Argent

 

This conference, to be held in New York City on March 6, 7 and 8 2014, will focus on the role that money, economics, dépense, financial crises and equitable or unjust economic distribution have played in 20th and 21st century French and Francophone literatures, visual cultures, theatre, history, theory, translation studies and gender and ethnic studies. Since the financial crises of 2008, there has been an ever widening debate about the role that financial gain plays in the production of culture and the functioning of institutions of higher education throughout the world. At the same time, the crises have energized communities that put into question the culture of capital and the ties between capitalism and culture, all of which has created particularly dynamic, ideological, moral and cultural power struggles. This conference will serve as an open discussion on the way money has worked in stories, aesthetic forms, translations, methodologies, curricula and our own institutions from 1900 to the present.

 

Possible topics include:

Economics and the Cultural Field

National or Global Culture?

Financial Crises and the Avant-garde

Gender and Economic Disparities

Fetishism and the Taboo of Money

Writers and their Institutions

Cinematic Production and Globalization

Copyright and Royalties in the Digital Age

Cultural and Economic Centers and Peripheries

Culture and the Welfare State

Anti-capitalism

“Occupy Wall Street” and “le Comité invisible”

The Great Depression and Art

Money/Colonialism/Postcolonialism

Money/Migration/Art

Poetry and/versus Money

Cognitive Capitalism and the Study of Literature and Film

Esthetic Practices and the Working Class

 

Proposals for individual presentations and for complete panels can be submitted in French or English by August 31, 2013. Please send them to ffsmoney2014@gmail.com. The proposal should be from 200-250 words for each presentation and should include the affiliation, the name and the email address of each participant.

 

Organizers:

Peter Consenstein (CUNY)

Ludovic Cortade (NYU)

Madeleine Dobie (Columbia)

Philip Watts (Columbia)

 

20th and 21st Century French and Francophone Studies International Colloquium

New York City: March 6-8 2014

Co-organized and hosted by

NYU, CUNY Graduate Center and Columbia University

 

Call for Papers/ Appel à communications

Money / L’Argent

 

Ce colloque, qui aura lieu à New York le 6, 7 et 8 mars 2014, met l’accent sur les rôles que jouent l’argent, l’économie, la dépense, les crises financières et la répartition économique—juste ou injuste—dans la littérature, les cultures visuelles, le théâtre, l’histoire, la théorie, la traduction et l’étude de la sexualité et de l’ethnicité au sein des études françaises et francophones des 20e et 21e siècles. Les crises financières de 2008 ont lancé un débat de plus en plus étendu sur l’importance du gain financier dans la production culturelle et dans les systèmes universitaires dans le monde. Ces crises remettent en cause les rapports entre le capitalisme et la culture. Ainsi s’ouvrent des luttes de pouvoirs idéologique, culturelle et morale. Ce colloque se veut un lieu de discussion au sujet du rôle de l’argent dans la littérature, les formes esthétiques, les traductions, les méthodologies et même les programmes d’étude de nos propres universités du début du 20e siècle jusqu’à nos jours.

 

Pistes de réflexion (liste non exhaustive):

L’économie et les champs culturels

Culture nationale ou mondiale?

Les crises financières et les avant-gardes

Genre, sexualité et inégalités économiques

Fétichisme et tabou de l’argent

Les écrivains et les institutions

Le cinéma et la mondialisation

Les droits d’auteur à l’ère numérique

Centres et périphéries culturelles et économiques

La production culturelle et l’État-providence

L’Anticapitalisme

« Occupy Wall Street » et le « Comité invisible »

La crise économique des années 30 et l’art

Argent/Colonialisme/Post-colonialisme

Argent/Migration/Art

La poésie et/versus l’argent

Le capitalisme cognitif et l’étude de la littérature et du cinéma

Les pratiques esthétiques de la classe ouvrière

 

Les propositions de communication individuelles et de panels complets pourront être soumises en français ou en anglais jusqu’au 31 août 2013 à cette adresse email : ffsmoney2014@gmail.com. Veuillez joindre un résumé de 200-250 mots pour chaque communication ainsi que le nom, l’affiliation et le courriel de chaque participant.

Organisateurs :

Peter Consenstein (CUNY)

Ludovic Cortade (NYU)

Madeleine Dobie (Columbia)

Philip Watts (Columbia)

 

First published in: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-20th-21st-century-french-and-francophone-studies-colloquium-money-largent-nyc-6-8-march-2014

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Luddites

Luddites

SUBJECTS AND PRACTICES OF RESISTANCE

CALL FOR PAPERS

For two inter-linked, consecutive workshops under the theme of Subjects and Practices of Resistance to be held 9-11 September 2013 at University of Sussex.

The first workshop (9-10 Sept) is on Discipline(s), Dissent and Dispossession and the second on Counter-Conduct in Global Politics(10-11 Sept).  The workshop convenors encourage attendance at both workshops.  However, paper proposals should specify the intended workshop and which days participants would be able to attend.

The workshops are generously sponsored and supported by the BISA Poststructuralist Politics Working Group (PPWG) and the Centre for Advanced International Theory (CAIT) at the University of Sussex

 

Workshop 1: Discipline(s), Dissent and Dispossession

9-10 September 2013

Contemporary struggles against dispossession – from the 2011 Occupy movement to ongoing land rights conflicts in the Ecuadorian rainforest – not only remind us of existing forces of domination and exploitation, but also challenge the ready-made concepts and frameworks through which such struggles are often interpreted.   Building on a previous project – “Disciplining Dissent”* – this workshop aims to open up discussion on the intersections between the politics of resistance and the politics of knowledge. How might we conceptualise dissent or resistance in ways that are sensitive to the social and epistemic relations within which anti-systemic struggles are embedded? How might we frame the complementarity and tensions between political dissent and intellectual critique? How might available concepts and frameworks occlude the complex interplay between resistance and repression, discipline and dissent, obscuring what is at stake politically in existing practices of struggle?

We welcome contributions that consider these themes from diverse theoretical perspectives and academic disciplines, including international relations, international political economy, sociology, philosophy, geography and anthropology.

Questions that might be addressed include (but are not limited to): how is dissent rendered intelligible in ways that serve to contain, nullify or depoliticize struggles; the politics of knowledge in political dissent; the place of normative political critique in the absence of universal categories or emancipatory blueprints; the ways in which dissenting communities are building their own theories of dissent or are theorising out of their own dissenting practices; the forms of subjectivisation incited, subverted or arrested through practices of dissent and/or their relation to the types of dissenting subjects assumed by intellectuals and experts; the ways in which academic disciplines interpret, appropriate and discipline both dissent and critique; the nature and purpose of academic critique at a moment of austerity and economic “crisis”.

It is hoped that the workshop will serve as a basis for a journal special issue, as well as for further collobarations around these themes.

Abstracts of approx. 300 words should be sent to L.Coleman@sussex.ac.uk and cait@sussex.ac.uk by 31 May 2013 (please indicate whether or not you plan to attend both workshops).  

Convenors:

Lara Montesinos Coleman, University of Sussex

Doerthe Rosenow, OxfordBrookesUniversity

Karen Tucker, University of Bristol

*published as Lara Montesinos Coleman and Karen Tucker (eds.), Situating Global Resistance: Between Discipline and Dissent (Abingdon: Routledge, 2012) and as a special issue of Globalizations 8:3 (2011).

 

Workshop 2: Counter-Conduct in Global Politics: Theories and Practices

10-11 September 2013

Resistance, and its study, is on the rise. Protesting, agitating, dissenting, and occupying inter alia have received increased attention and theorisation in the past tumultuous decade since 11 September 2001. However, such academic and public attention has tended to focus on the visible and politically discernible practices of dissent against sovereignty, economic exploitation, dispossession and other forms of oppression. Little systematic attention has been paid to potentially less visible practices of resistance or those who do not participate in an expressly political register but that attempt to resist ‘power that conducts’ (Foucault 2007). To this end, the workshop has four main aims. First, to theoretically develop, refine and critically interrogate the concept and theorisation of ‘counter-conduct(s)’, a term that, until recently, has received scant attention within the social sciences. We encourage the further critique, development and modification of Foucault’s initial attempts to understand subjects’ ‘possible inventions’ as counter-conduct (1982, 2007). Second, to provide a space in which empirical, multi-disciplinary investigations of counter-conduct in a variety of thematic areas and spaces of global politics can be presented. Third, to facilitate reflection on the variable and contingent forms of counter-conduct, examining its close relationship with conducting power and revealing the processes of invigilation of resistance and adjustment of conducting strategies. Finally, to reflect on the methodological implications and issues, which affect the study of the variegated practices of counter-conduct.

We welcome contributions that consider these themes not only from a Foucaultian perspective but also that bring diverse theoretical perspectives  — and views from a variety of academic disciplines, including politics, international relations, international political economy, sociology, political theory and philosophy, geography and anthropology – to bear on the study of counter-conduct.

Format: consisting of longer paper presentations, followed by substantial constructive feedback from discussants and audience, the format of the Counter-Conduct in Global Politics workshop aims to facilitate intensive and extensive engagement among participants with a view to producing article length contributions to a significantly placed journal special issue. Given the lack of systematic focus on practices and subjects of counter-conduct, it is hoped that such a special issue will engender further debate and consideration of the study of counter-conduct in global politics and potentially act as a reference for postgraduate and doctoral research as well. Abstracts of approx. 250 words should be sent to L.Odysseos@sussex.ac.uk and cait@sussex.ac.uk by 31 May 2013 (please indicate whether or not you plan to attend both workshops).

Convenors:

Carl Death, University of Manchester (as of August 2013)

Helle Malmvig, Danish Institute of International Studies

Louiza Odysseos, University of Sussex

 

Centre for Advanced International Theory

Department of International Relations

University of Sussex

Falmer

East Sussex

BN1 9SJ

cait@sussex.ac.uk

T 01273 876615

Website: 

Revolt

Revolt

www.sussex.ac.uk/cait

Follow us on Twitter @SussexCAIT

 

**END**

 

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLjxeHvvhJQ (live, at the Belle View pub, Bangor, north Wales); and at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Educating from Marx

Educating from Marx

HISTORICAL MATERIALISM – VOLUME 20 ISSUE 4 (2012)

Historical Materialism: Research in Critical Marxist Theory

Volume 20, Issue 4, 2012

ISSN : 1465-4466

E-ISSN : 1569-206X

 

Articles

Marx on the Dialectics of Elliptical Motion

Author: Thomas Weston

pp. 3–38 (36)

Profitability and the Roots of the Global Crisis: Marx’s ‘Law of the Tendency of the Rate of Profit to Fall’ and the US Economy, 1950–2007

Authors: Murray E.G. Smith; Jonah Butovsky

pp. 39–74 (36)

A Critique of Localist Political Economy and Urban Agriculture

Author: Greg Sharzer

pp. 75–114 (40)

Islam in Gramsci’s Journalism and Prison Notebooks: The Shifting Patterns of Hegemony*

Author: Derek Boothman

pp. 115–140 (26)

French Absolutism and Agricultural Capitalism: A Comment on Henry Heller’s Essays

Author: Stephen Miller

pp. 141–161 (21)

Human Rights Are the Rights of the Infinite: An Interview with Alain Badiou*

Authors: Max Blechman; Anita Chari; Rafeeq Hasan

pp. 162–186 (25)

Perepiska [Letters], Mikhail Lifschitz and György Lukács, Moscow: Grundrisse, 2011; Pisma V. Dostalu, V. Arslanovu, M. Mikhailovu [Letters to V. Dostal, V. Arslanov, M. Mikhailov], Mikhail Lifschitz, Moscow: Grundrisse, 2011

Author: Evgeni V. Pavlov

pp. 187–198 (12)

The American Crucible: Slavery, Emancipation and Human Rights, Robin Blackburn, London: Verso, 2011*

Author: Charles Post

pp. 199–212 (14)

Cosmopolitanism and the Geographies of Freedom, David Harvey, New York: Columbia University Press, 2009

Author: Pete Green

pp. 213–225 (13)

Razzismo di Stato. Stati Uniti, Europa, Italia, edited by Pietro Basso, Milan: Angeli, 2010

Author: Corradi Laura

pp. 226–239 (14)

Experiment

pp. 241–250 (10)

Notes on Contributors

pp. 251–253 (3)

Back Issues

pp. 255–256 (2)

 

Brill Books & Journals: http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/1569206x/20/4

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/historical-materialism-20.4-is-now-online

 

**END**

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory

Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory