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Hegel

Hegel

HEGEL’S PHENOMENOLOGY OF SPIRIT AND ITS AFTERLIVES

CPCT Research Seminar 2015-2016: Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit and its Afterlives
Centre for Philosophy and Critical Thought

Goldsmiths, University of London

New Cross

London SE14 6NW
Wednesdays, 4-6pm @ RHB 352
[Autumn] Oct 14, 28, Nov 11, 25, Dec 9
[Spring] Jan 20, Feb 3, 17, Mar 2, 16
[Summer] May 4, 18, Jun 1, 15, 29

The research seminar, which will meet on a bi-weekly basis, is open to staff and graduate students affiliated with CPCT, and aims to serve as a forum for philosophical work and dialogue at Goldsmiths. Though the seminar is organised by the co-directors of the CPCT, Julia Ng and Alberto Toscano, we hope different members and affiliates of the CPCT will volunteer to lead the discussions each week.

 

Main text: Hegel, Phenomenology of Spirit, trans. A.V. Miller (OUP 1977); see also Terry Pinkard’s online translation, with facing German text

 

Structure

  1. Intro meeting; Phenomenology, Preface (pp.1-45, §72)
  2. Derrida, “Outwork, prefacing,” in Dissemination
  3. Phenomenology, Introduction to Force and Understanding (pp. 46-103, §165)
  4. Heidegger, ‘Hegel’s Concept of Understanding’; Charles Taylor, ‘The Opening Arguments of the Phenomenology’; Hans-Georg Gadamer, ‘Hegel’s “Inverted World”’
  5. Phenomenology, Self-Consciousness (pp. 104-138, §230)
  6. Hyppolite, Genesis and Structure of Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit (Part III)
  7. Phenomenology, Observing Reason (pp. 105-210, §346)
  8. Phenomenology, the rest of Reason (pp. 211-262, §437)
  9. Phenomenology, The Ethical Order (pp. 263-294, §483)
  10. Phenomenology, Culture (pp. 294-363, §595)
  11. Comay, Mourning Sickness
  12. Phenomenology, Morality (pp. 364-409, §671)
  13. Phenomenology, Religion (pp. 410-478, §787)
  14. Hamacher, ‘(The End of Art with the Mask)’
  15. Phenomenology, Absolute Knowing (pp. 479-493, §808) ​

 

Texts on the Phenomenology

Hyppolite, Genesis and Structure of Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit

Jameson, The Hegel Variations

Pinkard, Hegel’s Phenomenology: The Sociality of Reason

Kojève, Introduction to the Reading of Hegel

Heidegger, Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit

Houlgate, Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit: A Reader’s Guide

Yovel, Hegel’s Preface to the “Phenomenology of Spirit” (translation and commentary)

 

Further Information, see: http://www.gold.ac.uk/sociology/research-centres/cpct/res-seminar/

 

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cpct-goldsmiths-2015-16-research-seminar-hegels-phenomenology

 

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Ruth Rikowski at Serendipitous Moments: http://ruthrikowskiim.blogspot.co.uk/

Posthuman

Posthuman

CRITIQUING TECHNOLOGIES OF THE MIND

CALL FOR PAPERS

Critiquing Technologies of the Mind: Enhancement, Alteration, and Anthropotechnology

Special Issue of Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences

Over the past twenty or even thirty years, an international and interdisciplinary body of research has developed on the various ethical and philosophical issues raised by the possibility of using technological means to transform the human body beyond medical ends. The phrase that has emerged in the English-speaking bioethical debate to describe this new field is ‘human enhancement’. Some authors, particularly in France, have raised objections to the positive valuation that is implied in the preferred English terminology. As an alternative, the terms ‘anthropotechnics’ and ‘anthropotechnology’, combining the Greek words ‘anthropos’ and ‘techne’, have been suggested as preferable conceptual tools, which avoid the implicit positive valuation of ‘enhancement’, while directly addressing the question of technological intervention in and on the body for extra-medical ends.

This special issue will investigate a specific area of the anthropotechnics/enhancement debate: those modifications of the body aimed at affecting the processes of the mind. This field is generally referred to as ‘cognitive enhancement’, we prefer the more neutral and encompassing expression ‘technologies of the mind’. The issue will aim to address the fundamental ethical and philosophical questions surrounding this area of technology through the prism of the philosophically productive contrasts and conceptual differences between the (broadly speaking) Anglo-American and the (broadly speaking) French debates. The idea of anthropotechnics has emerged out of different philosophical traditions than the mainstream Anglo-American philosophical discourse around enhancement. We argue that a careful interrogation of the conceptual resources drawn upon by the French and, rather coarsely speaking, continental philosophical traditions (here we include phenomenology, hermeneutics, French epistemology, and post-structuralism) examined against a backdrop of the ‘enhancement’ debate more familiar perhaps to English speaking readers, will significantly enrich and broaden the philosophical literature in this area, as well as enlarging its international conceptual scope.

We propose four main axes for consideration, but welcome contributions on all topics and from all approaches within the scope outlined above:

What are the different technologies that are currently presented as cognitive enhancers? To what extents are the virtues attributed to them a reality? This includes the stage they are at on the path from hypothetical modification to widely used products, and the various philosophical questions arising from their use.

How is the concept of cognition is itself deployed in the idea of cognitive enhancement? Nick Bostrom and Anders Sandberg, two of the most prominent philosophers studying ‘enhancement’ define cognition as a set of processes that comprise acquiring information (perception), selecting (attention), representing (understanding) and retaining (memory) information, and using it to guide behaviour (reasoning and coordination of motor outputs)’. They insist that ‘interventions to improve cognitive function may be directed at any one of these core faculties’. But these faculties are generally approached uncritically in the literature, as is the question of how they overlap and interact with one another as well as with emotion, and aspects of embodiment. Also, most of the products that are presented as potential ‘cognitive enhancers’ (caffeine, Adderall, etc.) often appear, after more detailed studies, not to improve cognition itself, but the conditions of use of existing cognitive abilities. Likewise, in the existing literature, there are few studies interested in issues such as altered perception: the focus on a few products and specific functions like alertness and memory appears to hinder the consideration of technologies that may affect other aspects of cognition, and in other ways than enhancement narrowly conceived.

Does the modular approach to cognition, often ignoring the first-person perspective, and widespread in the ‘cognitive enhancement’ literature, present an accurate account of subjectivity, and specifically of the enhanced subject? In this respect, some qualitative studies already provide a more complete picture of the enhanced subject. But we argue that a wider use of phenomenological, neurophenomenological and narrative approaches to the subject is also needed, alongside more conceptually sophisticated accounts of subjective relations with environment.

What role should speculation and fiction play in the study of cognitive enhancement? Some philosophers emphasize the need for a ‘pre-emptive’ approach that tries to bring out the potential issues in technologies not yet developed, but on a speculative horizon, so as to be ethically and politically ready when they appear. But is this a legitimate and productive methodological approach? Are there past examples of such successful ‘pre-emptive’ philosophies of technology? How do these general considerations about speculative ethical thinking affect the particular topic of cognitive enhancement?

This aim of this issue is to explore these and other approaches to the questions surrounding ‘technologies of the mind’, in particular by setting up an dialogue between analytical and continental, English-speaking and French-speaking, philosophical traditions.

*Submission information*

Word limit: 8000 words

Deadline for submissions: 30 June 2015

Publication is expected in 2016/17

Peer review: all submissions will be subject to a double blind peer-review process. Please prepare your submission for blind reviewing.

Submissions should be made directly via the journal’s online submission system: (http://www.editorialmanager.com/phen) indicating: Special Issue: Critiquing Technologies of the Mind.

For further details, please check the website of Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences: http://www.springer.com/philosophy/philosophical+traditions/journal/11097

Specific questions about the special issue can be addressed to Darian Meacham (darian.meacham@uwe.ac.uk), Ruud ter Meulen (R.terMeulen@bristol.ac.uk), or Sylvie Allouche (allouche.sylvie@gmail.com). Please include the text “Special Issue: Critiquing Technologies of the Mind” in the subject line of the email.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

PRAGMATIC PERSPECTIVES ON PHENOMENOLOGY

CALL FOR PAPERS

International Philosophical Conference in Prague, February 5th- 6th, 2015

Deadline for submission of abstracts: December 15th, 2014

The Institute of Philosophy and Religious Studies (Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Arts) organizes an international philosophical conference focused on the pragmatic theses that are present in the phenomenological works of M. Heidegger, M. Merleau-Ponty and J. Patočka. Inspired by a critical reassessment of already existing pragmatic readings of Heidegger, we want to explore the following themes as possible justifications for speaking about the pragmatic turn in phenomenology: the primacy of the practical over theoretical understanding, criticism of the representationalist account of perception and analysis of language and truth claims within the context of social and cultural practices.

The goals of our conference are thus the following ones:

1) To bring together both continental and Anglo-Saxon phenomenologists striving to develop pragmatic elements in works of M. Heidegger, M. Merleau-Ponty and Jan Patočka. Our first objective is to provide a new synoptic view of different recent pragmatic readings of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty in the Anglo-Saxon philosophy (Dreyfus, Rorty, Brandom, Okrent, Taylor, Wrathall, to name but a few).

2) To reconstruct the main phenomenological accounts of perception and language which stress the above mentioned pragmatic motives. We will namely seek to develop the consequences of addressing perception in terms of coping, with the focus on various criticisms of representational account of perceptual consciousness. Concerning language, we are interested in papers discussing Heidegger´s criticism of the primacy of the proposition (cf. Being and Time § 32f.) and establishing analogies and points of divergence between phenomenological approach and analytical ordinary language philosophy.

3) To revisit the theory-praxis distinction. The aim is to investigate the question of the genesis of the theoretical mode of behavior and to ask how theoretical thematizing arises out of circumspective concern. However, it is also vital to critically assess the oversimplifying interpretations of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty, insisting one-sidedly on the primacy of praxis over theory.

 

Papers are accepted under four broad topics, corresponding to four thematic sections of ryr conference:

  • The Issue of the ‘Pragmatic Turn’ in Phenomenology
  • Perception
  • Language
  • The Theory-Praxis Distinction Revisited

 

Paper presentations will have a maximum duration of 30 minutes. If you would like to participate in one of the above-mentioned panels with your paper, please state the title of the panel in question after the title of your abstract.

Submission deadline: Proposals should be sent until Monday, December 15, 2014 to the following email address: ondrej.svec@ff.cuni.cz Paper proposals will include a title and an abstract, with a maximum extension of 30 lines and 2,500 characters (without spaces).

Registration fee: For speakers accepted through an anonymous review process is 50 EUR. The conference registration fee includes: organization costs, morning and afternoon coffee breaks and conference banquet. The fee should be paid upon arrival of the participant.

The conference language will be English. Publication of selected conference papers in planned in a collected volume.

Organising committee: Jakub Čapek and Ondřej Svec (Charles University, Prague).

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:

Pavlos Kontos (University of Patras): Theory in Praxis: Aristotelian puzzles and Heidegger’s escape

Thomas J. Nenon (University of Memphis): Heidegger and His Pragmatist Readers

Mark Wrathall (University of California, Riverside): Always already more than a practitioner (‘immer schon mehr als Praktiker’): sense making and the limits of practical familiarity

Dan Zahavi (University of Copenhagen): Pragmatism and transcendental phenomenology

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Aesthetics

Aesthetics

BECOMING ECOFEMINISMS

CALL FOR PAPERS

PhaenEx: Journal of Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture

Vol.11-1 (2016)

PhaenEx: http://phaenex.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/phaenex/index

PhaenEx is seeking contributions for its next special topics issue on Becoming Ecofeminisms. Ecofeminism has many versions and genealogies. In the context of new kinds of environmental crises, imaginaries, and discourses, how might we rethink and reinvigorate ecofeminisms— telling alternative genealogies of this movement (sometimes considered outdated and essentialist), highlighting current practices, and envisioning its bold futures. We are interested in ecofeminisms in both theory and practice.

Proposals and papers related (but not limited) to the following are welcome:

  • Ecofeminist intersections with current discourse and practice in queer, anti-colonial, anti-racist, critical disability, and critical animal studies
  • Genealogies of and differences within ecofeminisms
  • Critiques of ecofeminism / Ecofeminist critique
  • Contemporary revival of ecofeminist approaches
  • Links or tension between ecofeminism and posthumanism, new materialism, object-oriented ontologies, speculative realism, etc.
  • Ecofeminist reappraisal of relationships, affects, and communities (anarchist praxis, solidarity-based movements, grassroots initiatives, transformative justice, etc.)
  • Ecofeminism in relation to creative practices including eco-art, bio-art,ecopoetics, cli-fi, etc.
  • Ecofeminist engagements with the anthropocene, deep time, resilience, the geological turn, the oceanic turn, re-wilding, green futures, or other salient contemporary concepts.

Deadline for submissions: 1st August 2015.

All papers will be peer-reviewed.

Contact: Astrida Neimanis (astrida.neimanis@gmail.com) and Christiane Bailey (christianebailey@gmail.com)

 

PhaenEx: http://www.phaenex.uwindsor.ca

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Philosophy

Philosophy

PHILOSOPHY IN EDUCATION

CALL FOR PAPERS

PhaenEx: Journal of Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture

PhaenEx:   http://phaenex.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/phaenex/index

Special Topics Section: Philosophy in Education (2015)

Lead Editors: Marc Lamontagne & Éric Martin

This issue will focus on the way philosophy operates within educational practice. A guiding question is: can we conceive of education as the very manifestation of philosophy insofar as both relate to culture? Recent criticisms of educational practice have underlined the hijacking of education by utilitarian priorities. These denunciations, albeit necessary, often create an impasse in the debate between those in favor of such transformations and those against. We thus invite authors to go beyond the limited framework of negative critique so that the question of the status and role of philosophy in education can be explicitly and positively addressed. This issue of PhænEx seeks contributions that go beyond simply noting how educational institutions are currently adrift: we encourage articles that could make a case for the rehabilitation of the place of philosophy in all branches of knowledge, and especially in the field of social sciences. Authors can tackle such issues as these: Can philosophy really see itself as part of the general curriculum while behaving as a specific discipline? What is the relation between philosophy, education, and culture? Are not philosophy, education, and culture synonyms for the way humans are constituted into a common world? What is a proper philosophical pedagogy?

Submission Deadline: Dec. 1st, 2014. For more information contact the Lead Editors: Marc Lamontagne (marc.lamontagne@cegepmontpetit.ca) or Éric Martin (eric.martin@cegepmontpetit.ca).

 
*GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR AUTHORS*

*French style guidelines are available here.

1. Submissions should represent original work not previously published.

2. It is the author’s responsibility to obtain appropriate written copyright permissions for the reproduction of any copyrighted material, including images.

3. Authors should adhere to gender-inclusive language in their manuscripts.

4. Generally, PhaenEx will not consider publication of the same author’s work in two consecutive Open issues, although authors may submit their work to consecutive Open and Special Topics issues.

5. Generally, scholarly articles are between 6000-9000 words in length, although exceptions can be made. Submissions that are clearly unrevised conference presentations, or which are excessively long without clear reason, will not be sent out for peer review. Authors should contact the Lead Editor(s) in advance of submission if they have questions or concerns about this requirement.

Authors are asked to comply fully with these requirements, as well as with the style requirements outlined below, and to follow the generally accepted norms of academic writing, including the provision of complete and accurate references. Failure to do so may constitute grounds for the rejection of a submission at any time during the editorial process. (PhaenEx recognizes the creative and other needs of its authors. Please write directly to the Lead Editor for permission to exceed these guidelines or the below style sheet.)

*STYLE REQUIREMENTS*

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Texts are to be saved in MS Word (.doc) or Rich Text Format (.rft).

The style requirements of PhaenEx are modeled on: Gibaldi, Joseph. MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing. 2nd ed. New York: The Modern Language Association of America, 1998.

*Format:

1) Use font Times New Roman size 12 throughout, including all entries in both Notes (to come at the end of the text, not at the bottom of the page) and Works Cited (to come after Notes).

2) Full justification, both left and right.

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*Notes:

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2) Numbers appear in the Notes section also in superscript.

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(a) outside punctuation, when no quotation marks or parenthetical citations are used, e.g., … lovers seek solitude.
(b) outside closing quotation marks, when no parenthetical citation appears, e.g., “… lovers seek solitude.”
(c) outside punctuation that follows the parenthetical citation, e.g., “… lovers seek solitude” (Sartre 273).

4) Follow MLA, parenthetical citation style for all quotations and references in the notes themselves. Full citations should appear only in the Works Cited list. For example: For a further discussion of this point, see Detmer (21-22).

*Works Cited:

1) Book paradigm:
Sartre, Jean-Paul. Being and Nothingness: A Phenomenological Essay on Ontology. Trans. Hazel Barnes. New York: Washington Square Press, 1956.

2) Article paradigm:
Simons, Margaret. “Two Interviews with Simone de Beauvoir.” Hypatia 3, no. 3 (1989): 11-27.

3) Chapter/Article in Book paradigm:
Gyllenhammer, Paul. “The Question of (In)Tolerance in Heidegger’s Notion of World- Disclosure.” Issues in Interpretation Theory. Ed. Pol Vandevelde. Milwaukee: Marquette University Press, 2006. 167-198.

4) Film paradigm:
Macbeth. Dir. Roman Polanski. Perf. Jon Finch, Francesca Annis, and Nicholas Selby. 1971. Columbia, 2002. DVD.

Please note: (a) When more than one work is used by the same author, subsequent references in Works Cited should include three combined dashes (an “em-dash”), followed by a period, in place of the name. (b) Inclusive page numbers must follow journal and chapter entries in the Works Cited list.

*Citing Online Sources (adapted from www.dianahacker.com):

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4) If an author or editor is unknown, begin the citation with the title.

Examples and Paradigms:

(a) Entire Website with author or editor:
Peterson, Susan Lynn. The Life of Martin Luther. Susan Lynn Peterson, 2005. Web. 24 Jan. 2009.
Halsall, Paul, ed. Internet Modern History Sourcebook. Fordham U, 22 Sept. 2001. Web. 19 Jan. 2009.

(b) Entire Website with corporate (group) author:
United States. Environmental Protection Agency. Drinking Water Standards. EPA, 8 July 2004. Web. 24 Jan. 2005.

(c) Entire Website with unknown author:
Margaret Sanger Papers Project. History Dept., New York U, 18 Oct. 2000. Web. 6 Jan. 2009.

(d) Entire Website with no title:
Yoon, Mina. Home page. Oak Ridge Natl. Laboratory, 28 Dec. 2006. Web. 12 Jan. 2009.

(e) Short works from websites including articles, poems, and other documents that are not book length or that appear as internal pages on a Website: Shiva, Vandana. “Bioethics: A Third World Issue.” NativeWeb. NativeWeb, n.d. Web. 15 Sept. 2004.

(f) Online Book:
Milton, John. Paradise Lost: Book I. Poetryfoundation.org. Poetry Foundation, 2008. Web. 14 Dec. 2008.

(g) Article in an on-line journal:
Belau, Linda. “Trauma and the Material Signifier.” Postmodern Culture 11.2 (2001): n. pag. Web. 20 Feb. 2009.

(h) Article in an Online magazine or newspaper:
Paulson, Steve. “Buddha on the Brain.” Salon.com. Salon Media Group, 27 Nov. 2006. Web. 18 Jan. 2009.

(i) E-mail. Begin with the writer’s name and the subject line, followed by “Message to” and name of the recipient. End with the date of the message and the medium.
Wilde, Lisa. “Review Questions.” Message to the author. 15 Mar. 2009. E-mail. &am p;nb sp;

For all other examples see www.dianahacker.com.

*Standardized Spelling Guidelines:

Please standardize spelling to the Oxford Canadian English dictionary. Please note the following preferred spellings and guidelines:- post-structuralism, post-humanism, postmodernism, postcolonial- the Far East, the West (not west), Western[e.g. media, thought, intellectuals, culture, etc.], but western [Canada, parts of the city, etc.].- insofar>- naturally-ordered, largest-ever, etc.- avoid “&” in favour of “and”- towards rather than toward- farther denotes physical advancement in distance while further denotes advancement to greater degree, as in time<*On all other matters of style, please consult the MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing (2nd edition).
To Submit: Register or log-in if already registered.
Select author and then follow the step-by-step instructions.

 

http://phaenex.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/phaenex/about/submissions/callforpapers

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

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Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

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Philosophy

Philosophy

KANT & KANTIAN PHILOSOPHY – CALL FOR PAPERS

Paideia: International Philosophical Journal

Call for Papers

 

Monographic section

Paideia invites submissions for its next issue: Kant and Kantian Philosophy.

Every aspect of Kantian philosophy and work is welcome. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

– Historical insights in Kantian philosophy

– Genesis of Kantian thought

– Kant and the sciences (Biology, Mathematics, Physics)

– Religion within the Bounds of Bare Reason

– Kant on beauty

– Ethical theory in Kant’s works

– Kant and Idealism

– Kant and Phenomenology

– The importance of Kant in the contemporary philosophy

– Kant and the analytical philosophy

– A priori and a posteriori knowledge after Kant

– Kant and animal thought

– Kant and the non-classical logics

 

General section

Paideia is also going to consider articles from all the other field of philosophy. They will be published in a separate section.

submission@paideia-journal.com

Before submitting an article, please ensure you have read the Instructions for Authors.

Paideia: http://www.paideia-journal.com/

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‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

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Antonio Negri

Antonio Negri

REMEMBERING THE IMPOSSIBLE TOMORROW: ITALIAN THOUGHT AND THE RECENT CRISIS IN CAPITALISM

A Conference organised by Keith Crome, Lars Iyer, William Large, Andrea Mura and Stevphen Shukaitis

The British Society for Phenomenology 2013 Annual Conference

5th-7th April, 2013

St. Hilda’s College, Oxford

During Marx’s time radical thought was formed from a convergence of three sources: German philosophy, English economics, and French politics. In the introduction to Radical Thought in Italy: A Potential Politics (1996) Michael Hardt argued that these tides had shifted, with radical movements drawing from French philosophy, US economics, and Italian politics. More recently, Matteo Pasquinelli has argued that ‘Italian theory’ has attained an academic hegemony comparable to that held by French philosophy in the 1980s.

But despite the proliferation of analysis and organizing drawing from and inspired by the history of autonomous politics in Italy, where are these voices today? In 2012, if you listened to the mainstream politicians and economic experts and no-one else, you would hardly know that there was any financial crisis in 2008. You might have a faint recollection that for a brief moment alternative voices were heard in the media, but now it as if nothing at all had happened.  The waters that once had parted have now engulfed us again. It is the same voices articulating the same tired ideas as the whole of Europe slides into the nightmare of austerity, despite the fact they do not appear to have any relation to reality, and even those who speak them seem exhausted and worn out.

For some time now, many of us have noticed that there have been different voices, and they began speaking many years before 2008 warning us of an impending disaster. These voices were coming from Italy. Perhaps because of their own experience, the radical Italian thinkers never believed the logic of the market could solve its own problems or that life and capital were one and the same.  Our hope is to draw from this history as well as listen to some of the new generation of Italian political thinkers, to share their ideas, offer an alternative diagnosis of the present, and perhaps even a suggestion of what different future might look like.

Confirmed Speakers:

Dario Gentili
Paolo Do
Federico Chicchi
Christian Marazzi
Anna Simone
Franco Berardi
Tony O’Connor
Sinead Murphy

British Society for Phenomenology and Conference Details: http://britishphenomenology.org.uk/

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Capitalism IS Crisis

REMEMBERING THE IMPOSSIBLE TOMORROW: ITALIAN POLITICAL THOUGHT AND THE RECENT CRISIS IN CAPITALISM

Call for Papers
Remembering the Impossible Tomorrow: Italian Political Thought and the Recent Crisis in Capitalism
The British Society for Phenomenology 2013 Annual Conference
5th- 7th April, 2013
St Hilda’s College Oxford

During Marx’s time radical thought was formed from a convergence of three sources: German philosophy, English economics, and French politics. In the introduction to Radical Thought in Italy: A Potential Politics (1996) Michael Hardt argued that these tides had shifted, with radical movements drawing from French philosophy, US economics, and Italian politics. More recently, Matteo Pasquinelli has argued that ‘Italian theory’ has attained an academic hegemony comparable to that held by French philosophy in the 1980s.

But despite the proliferation of analysis and organizing drawing from and inspired by the history of autonomous politics in Italy, where are these voices today? In 2012, if you listened to the mainstream politicians and economic experts and no-one else, you would hardly know that there was any financial crisis in 2008. You might have a faint recollection that for a brief moment alternative voices were heard in the media, but now it as if nothing at all had happened. The waters that once had parted have now engulfed us again. It is the same voices articulating the same tired ideas as the whole of Europe slides into the nightmare of austerity, despite the fact they do not appear to have any relation to reality, and even those who speak them seem exhausted and worn out.

For some time now, many of us have noticed that there have been different voices, and they began speaking many years before 2008 warning us of an impending disaster. These voices were coming from Italy. Perhaps because of their own experience, the radical Italian thinkers never believed the logic of the market could solve its own problems or that life and capital were one and the same. Our hope is to draw from this history as well as listen to some of the new generation of Italian political thinkers, to share their ideas, offer an alternative diagnosis of the present, and perhaps even a suggestion of what different future might look like.

Confirmed Speakers:
Franco Barchiesi
Franco ‘Bifo’ Beradi
Federico Chicchi
Paolo Do
Silvia Federici
Dario Gentili

Please send an abstract of approx 500 words to Lars Iyer (lars.iyer@newcastle.ac.uk) by 24th September 2012.

The BSP conference does not have parallel sessions. As a consequence, there are only two places available for papers drawn from the Call for Papers.

 

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‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

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THE FUTURE OF EDUCATIONAL MATERIALISM

Call for papers – Educational Philosophy and Theory

Special edition on: The future of educational materialism

Edited by David R Cole, University of Technology, Sydney

This edition of the journal will attend to emerging developments in educational materialism by bringing together international scholars in this area. The basic questions that this edition of the journal will address are: How do educational materialisms work? and: What are the relevant theoretical variations on educational materialism and what are their practical applications?

As a starting point for this discussion one might take this quote from Ray Brassier: “While transcendental orthodoxy wastes time staving off the imminent liquidation of reason, sense, and life, transcendental materialism celebrates the deterritorialization of intelligence.”

There are a least three inter-related strands of educational materialism that this special edition will interrogate:

* Materialist dialectics: Deriving in main from the work of Karl Marx – the basic thesis behind this strand of educational materialism is that teaching and learning systems are directed towards the manipulation of capital. Schools deliver human capital to the markets – that assess and place qualifications, social status and individual capabilities in terms of capital. This situation has been further accelerated and complexified due to the global use of electronic markets and the emergence of virtual capital. This strand of educational materialism may include work on social capital that is often theorised using the ideas of Pierre Bourdieu.

* Transcendental materialism. The second theoretical platform for understanding educational materialism is derived from the work of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari. This strand accepts material dialectics, yet intensifies and broadens the scope in the ways capital transforms situations. This is because capitalism also acts on an irrational level, and this can be clearly seen if one analyses advertising or takes into account the ways in which media systems manipulate emotions. Transcendental materialism looks for escape routes out of situations that might lead to internalisation – and in the case of education, this includes putting contemporary practises such as examinations under erasure.

* Speculative materialism. This recent development in materialist theory reconciles materialism with realism – and avoids the potential for duality between materialism and idealism. The essential thesis of this strand of educational materialism stipulates that the designation of ‘the human’ or ‘the subject’ defines limiting criteria that restrict research. The path to forthright understanding of education therefore requires the elimination of phenomenology or any ‘mentalism’ that might contain and lock up the possibilities of material agency.

Interested scholars should send a 500 word abstract in the first instance to David R Cole at david.cole@uts.edu.au by December 1st 2009

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