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Philosophy

Philosophy

PHILOSOPHY IN EDUCATION

CALL FOR PAPERS

PhaenEx: Journal of Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture

PhaenEx:   http://phaenex.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/phaenex/index

Special Topics Section: Philosophy in Education (2015)

Lead Editors: Marc Lamontagne & Éric Martin

This issue will focus on the way philosophy operates within educational practice. A guiding question is: can we conceive of education as the very manifestation of philosophy insofar as both relate to culture? Recent criticisms of educational practice have underlined the hijacking of education by utilitarian priorities. These denunciations, albeit necessary, often create an impasse in the debate between those in favor of such transformations and those against. We thus invite authors to go beyond the limited framework of negative critique so that the question of the status and role of philosophy in education can be explicitly and positively addressed. This issue of PhænEx seeks contributions that go beyond simply noting how educational institutions are currently adrift: we encourage articles that could make a case for the rehabilitation of the place of philosophy in all branches of knowledge, and especially in the field of social sciences. Authors can tackle such issues as these: Can philosophy really see itself as part of the general curriculum while behaving as a specific discipline? What is the relation between philosophy, education, and culture? Are not philosophy, education, and culture synonyms for the way humans are constituted into a common world? What is a proper philosophical pedagogy?

Submission Deadline: Dec. 1st, 2014. For more information contact the Lead Editors: Marc Lamontagne (marc.lamontagne@cegepmontpetit.ca) or Éric Martin (eric.martin@cegepmontpetit.ca).

 
*GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR AUTHORS*

*French style guidelines are available here.

1. Submissions should represent original work not previously published.

2. It is the author’s responsibility to obtain appropriate written copyright permissions for the reproduction of any copyrighted material, including images.

3. Authors should adhere to gender-inclusive language in their manuscripts.

4. Generally, PhaenEx will not consider publication of the same author’s work in two consecutive Open issues, although authors may submit their work to consecutive Open and Special Topics issues.

5. Generally, scholarly articles are between 6000-9000 words in length, although exceptions can be made. Submissions that are clearly unrevised conference presentations, or which are excessively long without clear reason, will not be sent out for peer review. Authors should contact the Lead Editor(s) in advance of submission if they have questions or concerns about this requirement.

Authors are asked to comply fully with these requirements, as well as with the style requirements outlined below, and to follow the generally accepted norms of academic writing, including the provision of complete and accurate references. Failure to do so may constitute grounds for the rejection of a submission at any time during the editorial process. (PhaenEx recognizes the creative and other needs of its authors. Please write directly to the Lead Editor for permission to exceed these guidelines or the below style sheet.)

*STYLE REQUIREMENTS*

[voir lien ci- dessous pour les règles de mise en forme des textes en français]
Texts are to be saved in MS Word (.doc) or Rich Text Format (.rft).

The style requirements of PhaenEx are modeled on: Gibaldi, Joseph. MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing. 2nd ed. New York: The Modern Language Association of America, 1998.

*Format:

1) Use font Times New Roman size 12 throughout, including all entries in both Notes (to come at the end of the text, not at the bottom of the page) and Works Cited (to come after Notes).

2) Full justification, both left and right.

3) Double-space the main text.

4) Indent the first line of each new paragraph. (Do not leave a blank space between paragraphs.)

5) Use one space (not two) after sentence punctuation.

6) Single-space notes, but place a single blank line between each separate note.

7) Single-space all items in Works Cited, but place a single blank line between each separate entry.

8) To indicate emphasis, titles, and terms in a foreign language use italics (not underlining).

*Basic Layout:

1) The title should appear at the top of the first page, centred and boldface, and be followed by one blank double-spaced line.

2) If numbered, each section heading should use Roman numerals. Whether numbered or not, each section heading should be preceded by two blank double- spaced lines, centred, and boldface.

3) If numbered, each subheading should use lower case Arabic letters enclosed in parentheses, left-justified, boldface and italicized. Leave one double-spaced return between Section heading and sub-heading, and the same between sub-heading and text (i.e. please do not leave any
extra blank lines between heading and subheading, or between subheading and text).

4) Notes should be assembled at the end of the text (not the bottom of each page). They should be headed by the unnumbered section heading
“Notes,” which should be centred, boldface, set off from the preceding paragraph by one blank double-spaced line (i.e. two strokes of the “return” key should follow the punctuation of the final paragraph).

5) A list of works cited in the text should come after the final note. It should be headed by the unnumbered section heading “Works Cited,” which should be centred, boldface, set off from the last line of the last note by one blank double-spaced line (i.e. two strokes of the “return” key should follow the punctuation of the final note).

6) If using an epigraph, each line of the epigraph text should be indented to one tab, left-justified and italicized. Attribution of the epigraph should follow standard MLA parenthetical citation.

*Quotations:

1) Quotations longer than three lines should appear without quotation marks, be single- spaced, and be block- indented once from the left margin. Enter one blank double- spaced line immediately before and after the block-indented quotation (i.e. block- indented quotations should use standard double-spacing to separate the quote from the main text.)

2) Indicate all interpolations with square brackets.

3) All ellipses should be indicated with a group of three immediately consecutive dots, preceded and followed by a single space. Ellipses indicating excluded text should not be placed in brackets.

*Quotation marks and punctuation:

1) Use double quotation marks for first order quotations of less than three lines and integrate them in the text. Use single quotation marks for quotations within quotations.

2) Final punctuation goes inside quotation marks except when followed by a parenthetical citation. Exception: Block quotations should be punctuated as if they were normal sentences and parenthetical citation should follow one space after the punctuation.

3) When quotation marks are followed by a parenthetical citation, final punctuation is placed after the parentheses. Exception: when the quoted text ends with a question or exclamation mark, place the question or exclamation mark inside the quotation marks and place a period after the closing parenthesis.

4) Semicolons, exclamation marks, and question marks that are not part of the quoted material should be placed outside quotation marks.

5) “Scare quotes” should be avoided if possible, although may be appropriate to denote contested terminology. When used, please use double quote marks (unless they appear within quotations as second-order quotes, where single quote marks should then be used.)

6) In text em-dashes should be long, with no space between the dashes and the words on either side. (Most word processors automatically convert to this format if you type a word followed immediately by two dashes followed immediately by the next word and then a space.)

7) Please use serial commas (e.g. “peace, order, and good governance”).

8) Leave one space (not two) following punctuation between sentences.

*Use of foreign language words and quotations:

1) Quotations should be, where possible, translated into the language of the article using an official translation (and thus appropriately cited). Where no official translation is available, the author’s translation should be followed by a parenthetical note: (author’s trans.). This should be accompanied by an endnote that presents the translated text in its original language.

2) Where, for good reason, the original language of the quotation or word is kept in the main body of the article, single words or phrases should be italicized. Sentences and quotes should use format and punctuation guidelines of the article’s main language, rather than those of the foreign language.

*Parenthetical Citations:

1) MLA style uses in-text, parenthetical citations together with a Works Cited list at the end. The goal of parenthetical citation is (a) to provide immediate citation upon reading each specific passage in need of citation, (b) to indicate precisely the relevant item in Works Cited, and (c) to be as brief as possible.

2) When only one of the works of a particular author needs to be cited, citation appears as (last name page number), with no comma between the name and the page number. If more than one of the works of a particular author needs to be cited, citation appears as (last name, shortened book title in italics page number) OR (last name, “shortened article title within quotation marks” page number), with a comma between name and shortened title only. However, if (a) the author’s name and/or specific work is mentioned explicitly in leading sentences such that it is clear which text is being referred to in Works Cited, or if (b) it is clearly understood that the citation is the same as the immediately preceding citation, then the citation should be reduced to (page number). This replaces the need for ibid., an abbreviation which should not be used.

3) Parenthetical citations may also be used for merely supporting material, e.g., (see Smith). Full references are to be provided in Works Cited.

*Notes:

1) Notes appear in the body of the text in superscript and as consecutive, Arabic numerals.

2) Numbers appear in the Notes section also in superscript.

3) In the body of the text, superscript notes appear:
(a) outside punctuation, when no quotation marks or parenthetical citations are used, e.g., … lovers seek solitude.
(b) outside closing quotation marks, when no parenthetical citation appears, e.g., “… lovers seek solitude.”
(c) outside punctuation that follows the parenthetical citation, e.g., “… lovers seek solitude” (Sartre 273).

4) Follow MLA, parenthetical citation style for all quotations and references in the notes themselves. Full citations should appear only in the Works Cited list. For example: For a further discussion of this point, see Detmer (21-22).

*Works Cited:

1) Book paradigm:
Sartre, Jean-Paul. Being and Nothingness: A Phenomenological Essay on Ontology. Trans. Hazel Barnes. New York: Washington Square Press, 1956.

2) Article paradigm:
Simons, Margaret. “Two Interviews with Simone de Beauvoir.” Hypatia 3, no. 3 (1989): 11-27.

3) Chapter/Article in Book paradigm:
Gyllenhammer, Paul. “The Question of (In)Tolerance in Heidegger’s Notion of World- Disclosure.” Issues in Interpretation Theory. Ed. Pol Vandevelde. Milwaukee: Marquette University Press, 2006. 167-198.

4) Film paradigm:
Macbeth. Dir. Roman Polanski. Perf. Jon Finch, Francesca Annis, and Nicholas Selby. 1971. Columbia, 2002. DVD.

Please note: (a) When more than one work is used by the same author, subsequent references in Works Cited should include three combined dashes (an “em-dash”), followed by a period, in place of the name. (b) Inclusive page numbers must follow journal and chapter entries in the Works Cited list.

*Citing Online Sources (adapted from www.dianahacker.com):

1) MLA does not require a Web address (URL) in citations for online sources.

2) In general, citations should end by indicating the medium (i.e. Web) and the date the material was accessed (date Month year)

3) MLA style calls for a publisher or sponsor for most online sources. If a source has no publisher, use the abbreviation “N.p.” (no publisher). If there is no date of publication or update, use the abbreviation “N.d” (for no date), after the publisher/sponsor position. For an article in an online scholarly journal or an article from a database, give page numbers if they are available; if they are not, use the abbreviation “n. pag.”

4) If an author or editor is unknown, begin the citation with the title.

Examples and Paradigms:

(a) Entire Website with author or editor:
Peterson, Susan Lynn. The Life of Martin Luther. Susan Lynn Peterson, 2005. Web. 24 Jan. 2009.
Halsall, Paul, ed. Internet Modern History Sourcebook. Fordham U, 22 Sept. 2001. Web. 19 Jan. 2009.

(b) Entire Website with corporate (group) author:
United States. Environmental Protection Agency. Drinking Water Standards. EPA, 8 July 2004. Web. 24 Jan. 2005.

(c) Entire Website with unknown author:
Margaret Sanger Papers Project. History Dept., New York U, 18 Oct. 2000. Web. 6 Jan. 2009.

(d) Entire Website with no title:
Yoon, Mina. Home page. Oak Ridge Natl. Laboratory, 28 Dec. 2006. Web. 12 Jan. 2009.

(e) Short works from websites including articles, poems, and other documents that are not book length or that appear as internal pages on a Website: Shiva, Vandana. “Bioethics: A Third World Issue.” NativeWeb. NativeWeb, n.d. Web. 15 Sept. 2004.

(f) Online Book:
Milton, John. Paradise Lost: Book I. Poetryfoundation.org. Poetry Foundation, 2008. Web. 14 Dec. 2008.

(g) Article in an on-line journal:
Belau, Linda. “Trauma and the Material Signifier.” Postmodern Culture 11.2 (2001): n. pag. Web. 20 Feb. 2009.

(h) Article in an Online magazine or newspaper:
Paulson, Steve. “Buddha on the Brain.” Salon.com. Salon Media Group, 27 Nov. 2006. Web. 18 Jan. 2009.

(i) E-mail. Begin with the writer’s name and the subject line, followed by “Message to” and name of the recipient. End with the date of the message and the medium.
Wilde, Lisa. “Review Questions.” Message to the author. 15 Mar. 2009. E-mail. &am p;nb sp;

For all other examples see www.dianahacker.com.

*Standardized Spelling Guidelines:

Please standardize spelling to the Oxford Canadian English dictionary. Please note the following preferred spellings and guidelines:- post-structuralism, post-humanism, postmodernism, postcolonial- the Far East, the West (not west), Western[e.g. media, thought, intellectuals, culture, etc.], but western [Canada, parts of the city, etc.].- insofar>- naturally-ordered, largest-ever, etc.- avoid “&” in favour of “and”- towards rather than toward- farther denotes physical advancement in distance while further denotes advancement to greater degree, as in time<*On all other matters of style, please consult the MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing (2nd edition).
To Submit: Register or log-in if already registered.
Select author and then follow the step-by-step instructions.

 

http://phaenex.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/phaenex/about/submissions/callforpapers

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Marxism and Education

MARXIAN ANALYSIS OF SOCIETY, SCHOOL AND EDUCATION SIG #157(MASSES) – AERA 2013 

American Educational Research Association

Annual Meeting

San Francisco, California

April 27 – May 1, 2013

 

Marxian Analysis of Society, School and Education SIG #157

CALL FOR PAPERS

AERA 2013

The global financial crisis detonated in the West in 2007 has highlighted long-standing structural faults within capitalism, especially in its financialization of the economy – something that Marx and his predecessors already predicted. The current economic genocidal policies in nations such as Ireland, Greece, Portugal, Spain, Italy, and Cyprus, along with the bailouts to specific US corporations, and the slow down of China’s ‘new economy’, present a credibility check in the recognition of the predatory policies and practices of capitalism’s third hegemonic momentum. In fact such financialization of the economy, with its the recurrent and increasingly devastating financial debacles assailing the world’s capitalist economies, has been incapable of producing sustainable growth in any sector while creating economic genocide, and has resulted in driving societies towards social foreclosures strong-armed through painful strangulation of austerity policies that are asphyxiating public institutions and transforming the very notion of public good and democracy itself!

The 2013 Marxian Analysis of Society, School and Education SIG program asks scholars, educators and graduate students around the globe who are profoundly committed to the struggle for social and cognitive justice to help us examine the transformative role of education and schools in addressing the contemporary crises, as well as, addressing the role of educators in helping to resolve the contradictions of the present and to contribute to a better future for schools, education and society.

Therefore, we ask scholars, educators and graduate students to contribute papers, posters or symposium that utilize a Marxist/Class analysis that will critically address the impact of the late capitalism’s financialization of the economy on questions of schools, education and society and how to move from pre-history to history proper to create a more and just democratic society and education.

Note: All submissions will be reviewed without author identification.

Please submit them without author names on the abstracts or summaries.

Proposals that bear the names of the authors and/or participants will not be considered for review and, consequently, will not be considered for the SIG #157 program for the 2013 AERA Annual Meeting.

Thank You, Dr. Sheila Macrine, 2013 Program Chair

Sheila L. Macrine Ph.D, is Chair of the Teaching & Learning Department University of Massachusetts Dartmouth 285 Old Westport Road North Dartmouth, MA 02747 – Phone: 508-999-8262, Fax: 508-910-6916, Email: nmacrine@aol.com

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

John Dewey

FIFTH ANNUAL EDUCATIONAL THEORY SUMMER INSTITUTE

The Department of Education Policy, Organization and Leadership at the Universityof Illinois, Urbana-Champaign and the journal Educational Theory are pleased to announce the Fifth Annual Educational Theory Summer Institute.

Scholars in educational philosophy and theory from around the world will be invited to a three-day Institute to carry out a focused research project that will be published as a special issue of the journal Educational Theory. The journal will cover participants’ travel and lodging expenses and provide meals throughout the event. We hope that this Summer Institute provides a valuable opportunity for scholars to collaborate with each other and to interact with faculty and students from the University of Illinois, as well as other neighboring institutions.

Groups of scholars who are interested in participating should submit a prospectus for a project, which will be evaluated by University of Illinois faculty and, where appropriate, invited outside experts. The project that is selected will normally comprise 6-8 paper proposals, depending on the length of the papers. Draft versions of these papers will need to be completed before the Institute, so that colleagues at Illinois and other participants can review the materials before the invited scholars arrive. During the three-day visit, there will be closed sessions, limited to the proposal authors and a very small number of University of Illinois colleagues, to discuss the papers in a workshop format, providing critical and constructive feedback, considering the papers in relation to each other, and discussing how best to craft the set of papers as a collection for a special issue of Educational Theory. There will also be open sessions, where participants formally present their work as individual papers or in a panel format; these sessions will be open to anyone who wishes to attend, including students. The goal of the Institute is to have a focused set of conversations around the papers and the larger issues they raise.

We believe that the Summer Institute will be of great benefit to the invitees, to receive feedback on their work, to work with each other, and to get a chance to interact withUniversity ofIllinois colleagues. The result, we expect, will be a set of papers that are of high quality and more closely integrated with each other than is typical of most edited collections. Separate publication as a book may be a possibility.

 

Themes

We want to keep the scope of possible submissions broad, but any submission should relate philosophical and/or theoretical perspectives to a prevailing issue of educational research, policy or practice. This does not mean that only narrowly “applied” work will be considered. But the evaluation of the proposals will bear upon not only the quality of the papers as scholarly pieces; the salience and timeliness of the issues addressed will also be an important factor.

Deadlines

We request that all submissions be sent electronically to: EdTheory@illinois.edu by January 21, 2013. A decision will be made by February 11, 2013. The current dates for the Institute are August 19-21, 2013.

Application Process

Interested participants should submit the following materials:

(1) An overall description and rationale for the collection, roughly 1000 words, which highlights the significance and potential impact of the project;

(2) A list of the authors, with brief bios, and titles of the proposed papers along with an abstract for each of 750 words, including an estimated word length (the total word length of all the completed papers should not exceed 50,000 words, including footnotes);

(3) A letter from each participant promising that if the project is selected they will complete and submit a draft version of their paper by July 29, 2013, they will commit to attending the full three-day Institute at Illinois, and they will agree to have their paper published by Educational Theory as part of the symposium.

Eligibility

There are no restrictions on participants, though the total number of participants should not exceed eight. Due to length restrictions for a journal issue, the total number of articles should also not exceed eight. Co-authored papers are acceptable, but in such cases it may be necessary to designate one representative for on-site participation. Students, writing individually or as co-authors with other contributors, are not excluded from eligibility. Submissions that include international scholars are welcomed. Previous applicants are eligible to revise and resubmit earlier proposals, without prejudice.

Direct any questions to the Editor of Educational Theory, Nicholas Burbules (burbules@illinois.edu).

 

**END**

 

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Joanna Swann's New Book

LEARNING, TEACHING AND EDUCATION RESEARCH IN THE 21st CENTURY

Learning, Teaching and Education Research in the 21st Century: An Evolutionary Analysis of the Role of Teachers

By Joanna Swann

http://www.continuumbooks.com

Publication dates: 22 December 2011 in theUK; 23 February 2012 in theUSA

ISBN:  9781441163172 (paperback); 9781441161260 (hardcover)

Learning, Teaching and Education Research in the 21st Century: An Evolutionary Analysis of the Role of Teachers draws on Karl Popper’s evolutionary epistemology and challenges widespread assumptions about learning, teaching and research that are embedded in the practices of many teachers and in the design of most education institutions worldwide. Joanna Swann argues that to promote the growth of learning we need to encourage children and adolescents to exercise and develop their facility for creativity and criticality, and that we need to provide and maintain environments in which they can safely engage in self-initiated and self-directed exploratory activity. In accessible and engaging language, the author presents philosophical arguments that support the defence and development of non-authoritarian approaches to learning and teaching that can be used by individuals and groups working in or outside state-funded schools. In particular, she provides tried-and-tested guidelines for student-initiated curricula and a problem-based methodology for professional development and action research.

Joanna Swann is a Popperian philosopher of learning and method, known internationally for her innovative theoretical and practical explorations of the implications of evolutionary epistemology for teaching and education research. Formerly a Principal Lecturer at the University of Brighton, UK, she is now a freelance author.

 

Contents

Acknowledgements \ 1. The Purpose of this Book \ Part I: Learning \ 2. The Challenge of an Evolutionary Analysis of Learning \ 3. What Happens When We Learn \ 4. Addressing Some Problematic Ideas About Learning \ Part II: Encouraging Learning \ 5. What Promotes and What Inhibits Learning \ 6. Against the Intensive Use of Prescribed Curricula with Children and Adolescents \ 7. Developing Student-Initiated Curricula \ Part III: Developing Teaching \ 8. Research and the Development of Teaching \ 9. Developing a Popperian Science of School Teaching \ 10. Improving Our Practices as Teachers \ 11. Teaching for a Better World \ References \ Publisher Acknowledgements \ Index

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Heraclitus

POLICY FUTURES IN EDUCATION – VOLUME 9 NUMBER 1 (2011)

Now available at: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pfie/content/pdfs/9/issue9_1.asp

POLICY FUTURES IN EDUCATION
Volume 9 Number 1 2011 

ISSN 1478-2103
SPECIAL ISSUE
The Council of Europe’s White Paper on Intercultural Dialogue
Editors: TINA BESLEY, MICHAEL A. PETERS & JIANG XAIOPING

ARTICLES 

Tina Besley & Michael A. Peters. Introduction. Interculturalism, Ethnocentrism and Dialogue

Michalinos Zembylas & Vivienne Bozalek. The Council of Europe’s White Paper on Intercultural Dialogue: an analysis using the ethic of care

Peter Murphy. The Paradox of Dialogue

J. Gregory Keller. Dialogue as Moral Paradigm: paths toward intercultural transformation

Francesca Gobbo. Ethnographic Research in Multicultural Educational Contexts as a Contribution to Intercultural Dialogue

Naomi Hodgson. Dialogue and Its Conditions: the construction of European citizenship

John Igbino. Intercultural Dialogue: cultural dialogues of equals or cultural dialogues of unequals?

Evelin G. Lindner, Linda M. Hartling & Ulrich Spalthoff. Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies: a global network advancing dignity through dialogue

James Arthur. Intercultural versus Interreligious Dialogue in a Pluralist Europe

Driss Habti. Reason and Revelation for an Averroist Pursuit of Convivencia and Intercultural Dialogue

Monica E. Mincu, Maurizio Allasia & Francesca Pia. Uneven Equity and Italian Interculturalism(s)

Danielle Zay. A Cooperative School Model to Promote Intercultural Dialogue between Citizens-to-Be

Nina L. Dulabaum. A Pedagogy for Global Understanding – intercultural dialogue: from theory to practice

Roxana Enache. Possible Orientations of the European Dimension in Romanian Educational Policy

Ineta Luka. Fostering Intercultural Dialogue in Tourism Studies

Robert K. Shaw. The Nature of Democratic Decision Making and the Democratic Panacea

Julie Allan. Responsibly Competent: teaching, ethics and diversity

Inna Semetsky. Becoming-Other: developing the ethics of integration
Access to the full texts of current articles is restricted to those who have a Personal subscription, or those whose institution has a Library subscription. However, all articles become free-to-view 18 months after publication.

PERSONAL SUBSCRIPTION (single user access). Subscription to the 2011 issues (this includes full access to ALL BACK NUMBERS) is available to individuals at a cost of US$54.00. Personal subscriptions also include automatic free access to ALL PAST ISSUES. If you wish to subscribe you may do so immediately at www.wwwords.co.uk/subscribePFIE.asp

LIBRARY SUBSCRIPTION (institution-wide access). If you are working within an institution that maintains a Library, please urge them to purchase a Library subscription so access is provided throughout your institution; full details for libraries can be found at www.symposium-journals.co.uk/prices.html

For all editorial matters, including articles offered for publication, please contact Professor Michael A. Peters (mpet001@illinois.edu).

In the event of problems concerning a subscription, or difficulty in gaining access to the journal articles, please contact the publishers at support@symposium-journals.co.uk

Glenn Rikowski and Ruth Rikowski have a number of articles in Policy Futures in Education. These are:

Rikowski, Ruth (2003) Value – the Life Blood of Capitalism: knowledge is the current key, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.1 No.1, pp.160-178: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/viewpdf.asp?j=pfie&vol=1&issue=1&year=2003&article=9_Rikowski_PFIE_1_1&id=195.93.21.68

Rikowski, Glenn (2004) Marx and the Education of the Future, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.2 Nos. 3 & 4, pp.565-577, online at: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/viewpdf.asp?j=pfie&vol=2&issue=3&year=2004&article=10_Rikowski_PFEO_2_3-4_web&id=195.93.21.71

Rikowski, Ruth (2006) A Marxist Analysis of the World Trade Organisation’s Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.4 No.4: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/viewpdf.asp?j=pfie&vol=4&issue=4&year=2006&article=7_Rikowski_PFIE_4_4_web&id=205.188.117.66

Rikowski, Ruth (2008) Review Essay: ‘On Marx: An introduction to the revolutionary intellect of Karl Marx’, by Paula Allman, Policy Futures in Education, Vol.6 No.5, pp.653-661: http://www.wwwords.co.uk/pdf/validate.asp?j=pfie&vol=6&issue=5&year=2008&article=11_Rikowski_PFIE_6_5_web

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

All that is Solid for Glenn Rikowski: https://rikowski.wordpress.com

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com