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Fat Cat Food

NEOLIBERALISM AND ORDOLIBERALISM: ONE OR TWO CRITIQUES?

 

STAMP – Centre for the Study of States, Markets & People
School of Business & Law, University of East London, Annual Research Colloquium
On: “Neoliberalism and Ordoliberalism: One or Two Critiques?”

Tuesday 12 December 2017, 14.30pm – 19.30pm.
Venue: USS G.19/20, University of East London, 1 Salway Road, London, E15 1NF

(5 minutes’ walk from Stratford tube station)

Speakers and participants include: Professor Werner Bonefeld (York University), Dr. Gareth Dale (Brunel University), Professor Bülent Gökay (Keele University) Professor Bob Jessop (Lancaster University) and Dr. Mike Wilkinson (London School of Economics)

As the Euro-zone enters its ninth year of crisis and Britain posits itself for a hard Brexit, it is now widely accepted that German/Austrian ordoliberal policy principles — de-politicisation of central bank, deflationary policy and strong state — have long been institutionalised in the EU. But if the ordoliberal public policy in the Euro-zone and beyond manages EU processes, then what are its points of divergence and convergence with Anglo-American neo-liberalism — which some North American scholars identify as “New Constitutionalism”? If neo-liberal financialisation as a form of public policy could not arrest the slow and protracted decline of American Empire since the late 1960s, can German ordoliberalism re-launch the process of European integration, and on what policy basis? Was ordoliberalism a deliberate, post-war, policy plan to dominate Europe’s various state executives, or did it come about structurally and by way of France’s and Italy’s persistence to engage Germany in a currency union in order to control its superior industrial and monetary might? Under what forms of political governance, law and civic consciousness can neo-liberalism and ordoliberalism best operate? Last but not least, do we need one or two comprehensive critiques for these two separable, but not separate, public policies? These are some of the pertinent questions the STAMP Colloquium is proposing to address, launching a new research programme in the fields of global and European history, public policy, constitutional law and international
relations.

For further information about the workshop, please contact: Mr Seun Alele, e-mail: O.Alele@uel.ac.uk

Programme
14.30 – 14.45 Vassilis K. Fouskas (UEL) “Welcome and Opening Comments”
14.45 – 15.15 Gareth Dale (Brunel) “Ordoliberalism as a German Product: Origins, Evolution, Purposes”
15.15 – 15.45 Werner Bonefeld (York) “Stateless Money and State Power: Ordoliberal Insights and Capitalist Organisation”
15.45 – 16.30 Questions & Answers
16.30 – 17.00 Tea/Coffee
17.00 – 17.30 Bülent Gökay (Keele) “One neo-liberalism or many?”
17.30 – 18.00 Mike Wilkinson (LSE) “Authoritarian Liberalism: Exception or Norm?”
18.00 – 18.30 Questions & Answers
18.30 – 18.45 Bob Jessop (Lancaster) via skype “Financialization, Ordoliberalism, Neo-liberalization and the State of Permanent Austerity”
19.00 – 19.30 Conclusions and ideas about how to take this research programme forward. Bob Jessop to be engaged via skype

 

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Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski

Ruth Rikowski @ Academia: http://lsbu.academia.edu/RuthRikowski

Neoliberalism

Critique of Political Economy

Critique of Political Economy

INAUGURAL CONFERENCE ON CULTURAL POLITICAL ECONOMY: PUTTING CULTURE IN ITS PLACE IN POLITICAL ECONOMY

The Cultural Political Economy Research Centre (CPERC) http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/cperc/ in Lancaster University will be holding its Inaugural Conference between 1-2 September 2015. We are putting out a ‘Call for Papers’ and further information is available via http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/cperc-conf/.

Call for Papers

Title: Inaugural Conference on Cultural Political Economy: Putting Culture in its Place in Political Economy

Date: 1-2 September 2015

Place: Lancaster University

Plenary Speakers: Bob Jessop and Ngai-Ling Sum, Lancaster University

Cultural Political Economy (CPE) is an emerging and still developing trans-disciplinary approach oriented to post-disciplinary horizons. It engages with ‘cultural turns’ in the study of political economy to enhance its interpretive and explanatory power. Intellectually CPE originated in a synthesis of critical discourse analysis, critical political economy, neo-Gramscian state theory, neo-Gramscian International Political Economy, the regulation approach, feminism, postcolonialism, governmentality and governance studies. This two-day post-disciplinary conference will give researchers and post-graduate students an opportunity to examine and debate the philosophical and methodological foundations of CPE and to explore its substantive implications for research.

It invites discussion at the interface of ‘cultural turns’, critical realism, critical discourse analysis and political economy. Specifically, it focuses on the cultural (and semiotic) dimensi ons of political economy considered both as a field of inquiry and as an ensemble of social relations. In the light of multiple crises at many sites and scales in the global economic, political, and social order, the organizers invite papers that address theoretical or substantive aspects of the changing nature and dynamic of contemporary social formations and identities.

Potential topics might include, but are certainly not limited to:

  • Cultural Turns and Critical Realism
  • Critical Discourse Analysis and Political Economy
  • Intersectionalism and Political Economy
  • Marx, Gramsci and Foucault
  • Social Relations, Everyday Life and Subjectivities
  • State, Governance and Governmentality
  • Discourse, Power and Space
  • Global Capitalism, Crises and Imagined Recovery
  • Globalization of Production, Retail and Finance
  • Finance, Austerity and Debt
  • Work, Employment, Body and Embodiment
  • Competition, Competitiveness and Resilience
  • Globalization, Education and Societies
  • Sustainability and Green Capitalism
  • Inequalities of Wealth and Income
  • Subalternity, Social Movements and Resistance

Abstracts of 200-250 words should be sent to n.sum@lancaster.ac.uk by 5pm on 29th June 2015.

 

Ngai-Ling Sum

Reader in Cultural Political Economy

Politics, Philosophy and Religion Department Lancaster University Lancaster LA1 4YL http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/cperc/

Bob Jessop

Distinguished Professor in Sociology

Sociology Department

Lancaster University

Lancaster LA1 4YN

http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/sociology/profiles/bob-jessop

Only A Banker

Only A Banker

First Published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/inaugural-conference-on-cultural-political-economy-1-2-september-2015-in-lancaster-university

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

 Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

 

Karl Marx

Karl Marx

THE SEMINAR IN CONTEMPORARY MARXIST THEORY

The Seminar in Contemporary Marxist Theory is a collaborative project by Marxist scholars at King’s College London based in the departments of European and International Studies, Geography, and Management.

The following three talks are scheduled, and there are more to follow.
Bob Jessop (Lancaster University)
‘Re-reading Poulantzas in and for the current crisis’
21 January 2015 5pm
King’s College London, Strand Campus, Strand WC2R 2LS – Room K3.11

Matt Vidal (King’s College London)
‘Postfordism: the geriatric stage of Atlantic capitalism’
18 February 2015 5pm
King’s College London room TBC

Lucia Pradella (University of Venice Ca’ Foscari and SOAS)
‘Globalization and the critique of political economy: new insights from Marx’s manuscripts’
18 March 2015 5pm
King’s College London room TBC

Please direct any enquiries to Stathis Kouvelakis, stathis.kouvelakis@kcl.ac.uk

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.co.uk/

Books

Books

HOMELAND SECURITY, ITS LAW AND ITS STATE

By Christos Boukalas (Routledge 2014)

This book employs Marxist state theory (esp. Nicos Poulantzas and Bob Jessop) to assess US counterterrorism law and policy, and its impact on the US polity.

(More details: http://www.taylorandfrancis.com/books/details/9780415526319/)

This book assesses the impact of post-9/11 domestic counterterrorism policy on US political life. It examines political discourse, law, institutional architecture, and state-population relations, and shows that ‘homeland security’ is a project with wide-ranging implications for democratic institutions and culture. These implications are addressed through a novel approach that treats law and the state as social relations, and relates developments in law to those in the state and in social dynamics. On this basis, the book examines the new political representations in counterterrorism discourse, especially regarding the relation between the state and the population. It examines the form and content of counterterrorism law, the powers it provides, and the structure and functions it prescribes for the state.

By focusing on the new Department of Homeland Security and the restructuring of the intelligence apparatus, the book assesses the new, intelligence-led, policing model. Finally, it examines forms of popular support and resistance to homeland security, to discuss citizenship and state-population relations.

The author concludes that homeland security has turned the US into a hybrid polity; the legal and political institutions of democracy remain intact, but their content and practices become authoritarian and exclude the population from politics. These legal and political forms remain operative beyond counterterrorism, in the context of the present economic crisis. They are a permanent configuration of power.

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-from-routledge-homeland-security-its-law-and-its-state-by-christos-boukalas

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

CRISIS

CRISIS

CRISIS & CRTIQUE OF THE STATE

Call for Papers

Crisis & Critique of the State
Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference 2013
25 – 26 October 2013, Goldsmiths, University of London

Keynote Speakers:
Sara Farris, Goldsmiths, University of London
Bob Jessop, Lancaster University
Massimiliano Tomba, University of Padua

The ongoing crisis poses the question of state and democracy anew. While many commentators mourn the vanishing sovereignty of the state in the face of financial markets and globalisation, and declare our times to be post-democratic, their nostalgic image of the glorious days of democracy and sovereignty as bulwarks against capitalism is profoundly problematic. We consider it therefore not only necessary to discuss the question of the state and democracy again, but with Negri we could even say that “there must be a structural theory of the State-capital-society relationship and a political strategy adequate to the structural character of these interrelations.”

Revisit concepts and discussions…
The goal of the conference is to debate critical materialist notions of the state, which do not fall back into vulgar conceptions that see the state simply as the tool of the ruling class, but also refuse the common liberal position in which the state becomes the mere mediator of conflicting interests. We consider Poulantzas’s notion of the state as “the specific material condensation of a relationship of forces among classes and class fractions” to be a fruitful starting point. From Poulantzas’s perspective, which critically incorporates Althusser’s earlier attempt to complexify a materialist concept of the state, the state is the product of existing power relations; however, it can gain a relative autonomy from those structures and in turn transform them. That is also the backdrop against which democracy within capitalist societies can be discussed productively. But the question of democracy goes beyond the analysis of the existing: philosophical, social and empirical notions of democracy, sovereignty and the political are key to any present discussion of emancipatory politics.

…to address questions of the present.
We want to tie in with existing materialist conceptions and critiques of the state and think through their relevance to the present. What does it mean for the state to be the “ideal collective capitalist” (Engels) in times of the economic crisis? Is there a notion of the state that we should defend and what would it look like? What is a feminist critique of the state in the face of the crisis (of reproduction)? These are only a few of the many questions we hope to discuss from various disciplinary, theoretical as well as empirical, perspectives.

Topics include but are not limited to:
– (materialist) state theories
– state-form, sovereignty and the law
– the crisis and critique of democracy, representation and popular sovereignty
– critiques of the nation state, citizenship and immigration policies
– the state and race
– feminist critiques of the state
– governmentality / management and resistance in the economic crisis
– the politics of austerity and their cultural and economic implications
– the role of the state and political economy
– (post-)politics and the political
– the relationship between democracy, populism and fascism
– revolution and the state
– the relation of philosophy and politics vis-à-vis the state
– violence, repression and the state: “policing the crisis”
– state & the commons

The call is primarily addressed to postgraduate students, young researchers, activists, etc. We plan to have panels with academics from Goldsmiths and other universities responding to the presentations.
Please send abstracts of not more than 500 words to goldsmithsgradconference@gmail.com by Monday, 29th of July 2013. We also invite proposals for possible panels.

See: http://goldsmithsgradconference.wordpress.com/

First published at: http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/cfp-crisis-critique-of-the-state-goldsmiths-25-26-october

 

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Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Stagnant’ at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo (new remix, and new video, 2012)  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

 

Crisis

Crisis

NEVER WASTE A CRISIS

CALL FOR PAPER PROPOSALS

Never Waste a Crisis. Strategies of Representing and Managing Crisis after the Crash

1-2 November, 2012, Midland Hotel, Morecambe

Deadline for paper proposals: 17 June, 2012, to be sent to a.kutter@lancaster.ac.uk

Workshop organised by CPERC, Sociology Department, Lancaster University, within the frames of Bob Jessop’s ESRC professorial fellowship and the project “Great Transformations. A Cultural Political Economy of Crisis Management”  

The North Atlantic Financial Crisis that surfaced in 2007/08 and subsequent efforts at crisis management have produced unstable constellations. Whereas the financial sector has been rescued with large injections of capital but minor structural adjustments, the symptoms in many economies of ‘epic recession’ and fiscal crisis remain. Among political and economic elites, such finance-centred crisis management remains largely unchallenged. At the same time, the economic and social costs of the austerity packages and of a finance-dominated economy more generally have spurred contestation from various quarters. The workshop on ‘Strategies of Representing and Managing Crisis after the Crash’ seeks to explore the politics (broadly interpreted) of this constellation. Papers in the workshop will review different agents’ strategies of tackling the North Atlantic Financial Crisis through discursive construction, contestation, and policy-making. We encourage the submission of papers that highlight the discursive and semiotic of economic and political processes or that situate the analysis of crisis discourse in broader questions of political economy.

Speakers include so far: Colin Hay (tbc), David Howarth, Brigitte Young 

For more details and updates see: http://www.lancs.ac.uk/cperc/events/seminars.htm and 

http://www.lancs.ac.uk/cperc/research/great_transformations.htm 

**END**

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

‘The Lamb’ by William Blake – set to music by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3VloKBvZc

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Capitalism

THE CAPITALIST MODE OF POWER – VIDEOS

THE CAPITALIST MODE OF POWER: PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE
A conference of the Forum on Capital as Power
York University, October 20-21, 2011

The conference hosted ten panels, including keynote addresses by Randall Wray, Bob Jessop and Michael Perelman, as well as a faculty guest presentation by Jonathan Nitzan.

Videoshttp://bnarchives.yorku.ca/320/07/20111020_forumoncasp_cmp_conference_videos_web.htm

Conference page: http://bnarchives.yorku.ca/320/

***

Recent additions and updates to the Bichler & Nitzan Archives: http://bnarchives.yorku.ca/perl/latest

Free to repost and circulate with due attribution under the Creative Commons License (attribution-noncommercial-no derivative). To unsubscribe, reply to this email with “unsubscribe” in the subject field.

— 
Jonathan Nitzan
Political Science | Social and Political Thought
York University
4700 Keele St.
Toronto, Ontario, M3J-1P3
Canada
Voice: (416) 736-2100, ext. 88822
Fax: (416) 736-5686
Email: nitzan at yorku.ca
Website:http://bnarchives.net

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

‘Cheerful Sin’ – a song by Victor Rikowski: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIbX5aKUjO8

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Glenn Rikowski’s MySpace Blog: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski/blog

Dharma Initiative

THE RISE AND FALL OF NEOLIBERALISM

The Rise and Fall of Neoliberalism: The Collapse of an Economic Order?
London and New York: Zed Books, 2010
Edited by Kean Birch and Vlad Mykhnenko

Hardback: £70.00   ISBN: 9781848133488
Paperback: £18.99  ISBN: 9781848133495

Book website: http://www.zedbooks.co.uk/book.asp?bookdetail=4351 

About the Book

The recent, devastating and ongoing economic crisis has exposed the faultlines in the dominant neoliberal economic order, opening debate for the first time in years on alternative visions that do not subscribe to a ‘free’ market ethic. In particular, the core contradiction at the heart of neoliberalism – that states are necessary for the functioning of free markets – provides us with the opportunity to think again about how we want to organise our economies and societies. The Rise and Fall of Neoliberalism presents critical perspectives of neoliberal policies, questions the ideas underpinning neoliberalism, and explores diverse response to it from around the world.

In bringing together the work of distinguished scholars and dedicated activists to question neoliberal hegemony, the book exposes the often fractured and multifarious manifestations of neoliberalism which will have to be challenged to bring about meaningful social change.

What People Have Said About the Book

‘Since the 1970s, the politics of “neoliberalism,” based on the purported concern to minimize state interference in the economy and thus to unleash “free” markets, have been mobilized at various sites and scales across the world economy. This book provides useful intellectual tools for deciphering the ideological, social and institutional foundations of neoliberalism and its wide-ranging implications for the still ongoing regulatory reorganization of capitalism.’ – Neil Brenner, New York University 

‘This is an outstanding book not only because of the sophisticated critiques offered by some of the most highly regarded thinkers on the topic of the destruction and misery wrought through neoliberal capitalism, but also because its forward looking emphasis on a more egalitarian and hopeful future offers insights about the work that needs to be done by activists and scholars alike. Moreover, this book helps us recognize that the emergence of any talk of a post-neoliberal era is premature beyond helping to construct a road map for ways citizens of the world can collectively, and deliberately, move forward.’ – Nik Heynen, University of Georgia

‘This timely and wide ranging book traces the changing contours of neoliberalism, demonstrating how market-oriented policies gave rise to a globally hegemonic political-economic project. The emphasis is on identifying the different forms neoliberalism takes and the diverse responses to it. At a juncture when this political-economic project is under increasing scrutiny from supporters and opponents alike, the book challenges existing conceptions of neoliberalism and makes an important contribution to the reinvigorated search for political alternatives.’ – Wendy Larner, Professor of Human Geography and Sociology, University of Bristol

‘A timely volume on the nature, varied manifestations, and above all limitations of a an economic order that is failing so spectacularly with the financial crisis. Highly recommended for academics, students, or for that matter anyone interested in the politics of our times.’ – Magnus Ryner, Professor of International Relations, Oxford Brookes University.

Table of Contents:
1. Introduction: A World Turned Right-Way Up – Kean Birch and Vlad Mykhnenko

Part 1: The Rise of Neoliberalism

2. How Neoliberalism Got Where It Is: Elite Planning, Corporate Lobbying and the Release of the Free Market – David Miller

3. Making Neoliberal Order in the United States – Kean Birch and Adam Tickell

4. Neoliberalism, Intellectual Property and the Global Knowledge Economy – David Tyfield

5. Neoliberalism and the Calculable World: The Rise of Carbon Trading – Larry Lohmann

6. Tightening the Web: The World Bank and Enforced Policy Reform – Elisa van Waeyenberge

7. The Corruption Industry and Transition: Neoliberalising Post-Soviet Space? – Adam Swain, Vlad Mykhnenko and Shaun French

8. Remaking the Welfare State: From Safety Net to Trampoline – Julie MacLeavy
Part 2: The Fall of Neoliberalism

9. Zombieconomics: The Living Death of the Dismal Science – Ben Fine

10. From Hegemony to Crisis? The Continuing Ecological Dominance of Neo-Liberalism – Bob Jessop

11. Do It Yourself: A Politics for Changing Our World – Paul Chatterton

12. Dreaming the Real: A Politics of Ethical Spectacles – Paul Routledge

13. Transnational Companies and Transnational Civil Society – Leonith Hinojosa and Anthony Bebbington

14. Defeating Neo-liberalism: A Marxist Internationalist Perspective and Programme – Jean Shaoul

15. Conclusion: The End of an Economic Order? – Vlad Mykhnenko and Kean Birch

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

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Antonio Gramsci

GRAMSCI, LANGUAGE AND TRANSLATION

NEW BOOK!

Gramsci, Language and Translation (ed.) Peter Ives and Rocco Lacorte 
Lexington Books, ISBN 978-0-7391-1860-3 Paper

http://www.lexingtonbooks.com 

“A significant body of scholarship already exists that illuminates the manner in which Gramsci’s views on language and translation inform his analyses of the relationship between politics and culture. Yet, Anglophone readers have remained generally unaware of this very important dimension of Gramsci’s thinking and writing, even though it features prominently in his elaboration of such key concepts as hegemony, common sense, and subalternity. Peter Ives and Rocco Lacorte provide the perfect remedy by gathering in a single volume the seminal essays on the topic, including previously untranslated contributions by Tullio De Mauro, Franco Lo Piparo, Utz Maas, Derek Boothman, and Francisco Buey. Together with the recent publication of Gramsci’s translation notebooks, this timely volume will invigorate discussions on the intersections of language, politics, and culture.”– Joseph A. Buttigieg, University of Notre Dame

“In the crowded field of Gramsci studies, this is a gem of rare beauty. It provides an English readership with a wide-ranging introduction to an important set of insights, developed initially in Italy but taken up elsewhere, into Gramsci’s theory, methods, the key concept of hegemony, his approach to the language question, and more general issues of political strategy. The contributors are the key figures in this debate and, together, they productively highlight the role of arguments about language, philology, and translation for understanding Gramsci’s working methods and his theoretical and political conclusions. With a strong introduction and some excellent translations of earlier contributions, this book will enable readers to gain a better understanding of Gramsci’s place in Italian culture and politics as well as ideas about how to develop his arguments in their own work. I recommend this text wholeheartedly.”– Bob Jessop, Lancaster University

“This collection of essays inaugurates a new era of scholarly exchanges within and beyond the specialized fields of humanistic cultural studies. Expertly edited by Peter Ives and Rocco Lacorte, Gramsci, Language, and Translation gathers the rigorous and provocative inquiries of an impressive array of international scholars crossing the traditional boundaries of political science, sociology, linguistics, translation studies, history, etc. It’s a historic event that, by way of opening up the Gramscian/Marxist canon, promises to renew critical thinking on the problems of global political economy while implicitly engaging protagonists in the urgent controversies on justice, human rights, religion, terrorism, race, ethnicity, immigration, and the post-9/11 ‘culture wars.’ A major scholarly achievement and an extremely valuable equipment for the civic intelligence of our troubled times” — E. San Juan, Jr., W. E. B. Du Bois Institute, Harvard University, and director, Philippines Cultural Studies Center, Connecticut

Gramsci, Language, and Translation

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction-Translating Gramsci on Language, Translation, and Politics (Peter Ives and Rocco Lacorte)

# Part I-Gramsci’s Linguistics and Gramsci’s Marxism

* Chapter 1-The Linguistic Roots of Gramsci’s Non-Marxism (Franco Lo Piparo)

* Chapter 2-Linguistics and Marxism in the Thought of Antonio Gramsci (Luigi Rosiello)

* Chapter 3-Language from Nature to History: More on Gramsci the Linguist (Tullio De Mauro)

* Chapter 4-Linguistics and the Political Question of Language (Stefano Gensini)

* Chapter 5-Gramsci the Linguist (Utz Maas)

* Chapter 6-Gramsci from One Century to Another (Interview with Edoardo Sanguineti by Giorgio Baratta)

# Part II-Language, Translation, Politics, and Culture

* Chapter 7-Translation and Translatability (Derek Boothman)

* Chapter 8-Aunt Alene on Her Bicycle: Antonio Gramsci as Translator from German and as Translation Theorist (Lucia Borghese)

* Chapter 9-On ‘Translatability’ in Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks (Fabio Frosini)

* Chapter 10-Translations and Metaphors in Gramsci (Maurizio Lichtner)

* Chapter 11-Translatability, Language, and Freedom in Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks (Rocco Lacorte)

# Part III-Politics, Theory, and Method

* Chapter 12-Language and Politics in Gramsci (Francisco F. Buey)

* Chapter 13-Gramsci’s Subversion of the Language of Politics (Anne Showstack Sassoon)

* Chapter 14-Some Notes on Gramsci the Linguist (Tullio De Mauro)

* Chapter 15-The Lexicon of Gramsci’s Philosophy of Praxis (André Tosel)

* Chapter 16-Subalternity and Language: Overcoming the Fragmentation of Common Sense (Marcus Green & Peter Ives)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon Profile: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

What lies in the shadow of the statue?

INSECURE TIMES, EMERGENCY MEASURES: STATE(S) OF EXCEPTION?

One Day Workshop: Thursday 22nd July 2010

Institute of Advanced Studies, Lancaster University,
Room A010, 9.00 a.m. – 6.30 p.m.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS:

Conor Gearty, Law, LSE;

Bob Jessop, Sociology, Lancaster;

Costas Lapavitsas, Economics, SOAS;

Martin Loughlin Law, LSE.

OTHER PARTICIPANTS INCLUDE:

Christos Boukalas, Politics, Lancaster

Michael Dillon, Politics, Lancaster

Michael Kratke, Sociology, Lancaster

Mark Lacey, Politics, Lancaster

Christopher May, Politics, Lancaster

David Seymour, Law, Lancaster

David Sugarman, Law, Lancaster

The Centre of Law and Society at Lancaster University has organised a one-day Workshop on the subject of the ‘state of exception’ from researchers and scholars across the spectrum of the human sciences, lawyers, activists, and NGO’s.

The response of western states to the attacks on the World Trade Centre in late 2001 led to major shifts in state organisation and operating modes and in social practices and perceptions. It thus significantly affects the nexus of socio-political relations, as expressed in such spheres as law, political action, economy, popular ideology and culture, war, policing, work, international relations, and ultimately, the texture of everyday life.

Academic reflection on these developments seems, whatever its entry point or primary area of concern, to converge on the conclusion that we are dealing with some kind of “state of emergency”: whether as a derailment from the rule of law, unilateralism in international affairs, recurrence of a Schmittian ‘Political’ informing state power – and so on. It can be argued that the concept “state of emergency” not only re-appears, but claims predominance within social science in the early 21st century. Significantly, it seems to be the social-science concept that most resonates in society, as it is used by a variety of actors, in a variety of contexts.

In any case, the specific post-9/11 version of counterterrorism policy has by now developed and acquired its own history. Democrat dominance in the US political stage may imply that further changes lie ahead, while the ‘emergency’ mode of power seems to be migrating (again?) from security to economic policy.

Given its centrality in social theory, the importance of its referents, the range of areas in which it is now employed, the polyvalence of the term, and the indeterminacy characterising the present conjuncture, it is time to (re)assess the character of state power and its effects on the practices and meanings of early 21st century social life. To this end, it would be good to start by assessing the concept that has been the analytical lynchpin for current developments.

Accordingly, the Centre of Law and Society is organising a one-day Workshop on the “state of exception”.

The Workshop will bring together academics, lawyers, activists and NGO staff in an attempt to clarify the term’s meaning and connotations and to investigate its relevance and adequacy as a conceptual and analytical framework for contemporary socio-political phenomena.

For further information and registration, please contact:
Dr. Christos Boukalas,
Department of Politics and International Relations,
Lancaster University,
Lancaster LA1 4YD,
United Kingdom.
Email: c.boukalas@lancaster.ac.uk

Co-organisers
Christos Boukalas (Politics, Lancaster University) and
David Sugarman (Law, Lancaster University)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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THE GREEK CRISIS IN CONTEXT

Centre for Democracy and Human Rights
SEMINAR SERIES IN RADICAL POLITICAL & SOCIAL THOUGHT

The Greek Crisis in Context: De Te Fabula Narratur!

http://www.famss.salford.ac.uk/cms/resources/uploads/File/ESPaCH/Greek%20Crisis%204%20May%202010.pdf

In his preface to the first volume of Capital, Karl Marx declares to his German readers that, although England is used as the main illustrative case, de te fabula narratur (the tale is told of you)! To think of England as some anomalous case would be to severely misread the global scale of the forces in play; England was, for Marx, a precursor of what the future held for Germans and many others.

This seminar takes the same position vis-à-vis the Greek crisis. To treat it as a product of forces unique to Greece itself, or even to the entirety of Southern Europe (the PIGS as those peoples are labelled by many), is to misread the significance of the crisis toward capitalism and liberal democracy more generally. Through a series of roundtable discussions, three key sets of questions will be examined: what the crisis reveals about the fragility and character of the European project as it is presently constituted; the class character and stakes of current developments and struggles in Greece and beyond; and, most centrally, the possibility that the Greek case is simply an early example of a much deeper and wider crisis of the capitalist state.

Participants will include:
Peter Bratsis (University of Salford)
Costas Douzinas (Birkbeck College, University of London)
Carlos Frade (University of Salford)
Bob Jessop (University of Lancaster)
Stathis Kouvelakis (King’s College London, University of London)
Dimitris Papadimitriou (University of Manchester)
Spyros Sakellaropoulos (Panteion University)
Konstantinos Tsoukalas (University of Athens)

Tuesday May 4th, from 2-7pm
Clifford Whitworth Library, Conference Room, Salford

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Capitalist Crisis

THE CRISIS IN EUROPE: DEPRESSION ECONOMICS, SOCIAL CRISIS, STATE POLICY, ALTERNATIVES

The Crisis in Europe: Depression economics –social crisis – state policy –alternatives

International workshop by transform! europe
Vienna, 15th/16th January 2010

Please see: http://www.transform-network.net/uploads/media/Folder_transform_crisis_of_europe_2010-01-15.pdf 

Agenda

Friday, January 15th

13.00–13.15h

Welcome and opening by Elisabeth Gauthier (transform! europe)

13.15–14.45h

Joachim Bischoff (editor of the monthly review Sozialismus): Overaccumulation of capital: what does it mean for the understanding of the current crisis?

14.45–15.00h : Break

15.00–16.30h

Bob Jessop (Lancaster University): The role of the state today: internationalization and the nation state

16.30–17.00h: Break

 17.00–20.00h

Francisco Louça (Lisbon, tbc): Europe in the world economic crisis: comeback of Keynesian politics or launching of a ‘financial coup d’état’ (D. Harvey)?

Interventions by Euclides Tsakolotos (University of Athens), Peter Fleissner (Univ. prof. em., Vienna), Jiri Malek (transform!Czech Republic) and others (Spain, Italy…)

Saturday, January 16th

9.00–11.30h

Maria Karamessini (University Pantheion, Athens): The social crisis in Europe: politics of precariousness or shift to a new social model of regulation

Interventions by Stephen Bouquin (University Amiens France), Asbjörn Wahl (Norway, Trade unionist, tbc), Lutz Brangsch (Rosa Luxemburg Foundation Berlin)

11.30–12.00h: Break

12.00–15.00h

What are the lessons of the crisis and how can they be communicated?

Proposals and projects of ‘the left of the left’

Round table with: Thomas Händel (MEP) Jürgen Klute (MEP) Miguel Portas (MEP) Francis Wurtz (former leader of GUE/NGL in EP)

Inputs from transform!, European Left Party and members of GUE/NGL-Group

Walter Baier (transform!) is chairing the debate

Languages: English, German, French

Important: registration until December, 20th via E-Mail: office@transform.or.at transform!
Gußhausstraße 14/3, A-1040 Wien

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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