Skip navigation

Tag Archives: International Law

Occupy London

Occupy London

KRITIKOS – VOLUME 11, APRIL – SEPTEMBER 2014

Apocalypse Not, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Machine…(d.gunkel and b.cripe)

Apocalypse Not, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Machine…by David Gunkel and Billy Cripe, Kritikos V.11, April-Sept.2014

 

H.L.A. Hart on International Law…(a.h.lesser)

H.L.A. Hart on International Law…by Anthony H. Lesser, Kritikos V.11, April-Sept.2014

 

Kritikos Reviews: http://intertheory.org/reviews.htm
Intertheory Press, new books 2014:

Order now: Art After the Avant-Garde: Baudrillard’s Challenge
http://intertheory.org/coulter-baudrillard-avant-garde.htm
By Gerry Coulter

Product Description
After we have read Jean Baudrillard it is difficult to see the world as we previously did. Baudrillard offered a strong challenge to art and artists, as he did everyone else. Many believe that Baudrillard was against art when he was really against the majority of things which some person or group has attempted to pass off as art. Baudrillard’s significance for art however, is that he wipes the decks clear and allows us to think anew about the art we love, and the art we do not. One of the implications of this book – a book about seeing art after taking Baudrillard seriously – is that we learn art never had a better friend, than Jean Baudrillard.

About the Author
Gerry Coulter is the founding editor of the International Journal of Baudrillard Studies, and the author of Jean Baudrillard: From the Ocean to the Desert, or the Poetics of Radicality. He has received Bishop’s University’s highest award for teaching – the William and Nancy Turner Prize.

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

 

Books

Books

HOMELAND SECURITY, ITS LAW AND ITS STATE

By Christos Boukalas (Routledge 2014)

This book employs Marxist state theory (esp. Nicos Poulantzas and Bob Jessop) to assess US counterterrorism law and policy, and its impact on the US polity.

(More details: http://www.taylorandfrancis.com/books/details/9780415526319/)

This book assesses the impact of post-9/11 domestic counterterrorism policy on US political life. It examines political discourse, law, institutional architecture, and state-population relations, and shows that ‘homeland security’ is a project with wide-ranging implications for democratic institutions and culture. These implications are addressed through a novel approach that treats law and the state as social relations, and relates developments in law to those in the state and in social dynamics. On this basis, the book examines the new political representations in counterterrorism discourse, especially regarding the relation between the state and the population. It examines the form and content of counterterrorism law, the powers it provides, and the structure and functions it prescribes for the state.

By focusing on the new Department of Homeland Security and the restructuring of the intelligence apparatus, the book assesses the new, intelligence-led, policing model. Finally, it examines forms of popular support and resistance to homeland security, to discuss citizenship and state-population relations.

The author concludes that homeland security has turned the US into a hybrid polity; the legal and political institutions of democracy remain intact, but their content and practices become authoritarian and exclude the population from politics. These legal and political forms remain operative beyond counterterrorism, in the context of the present economic crisis. They are a permanent configuration of power.

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-from-routledge-homeland-security-its-law-and-its-state-by-christos-boukalas

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Sociology

HISTORICAL SOCIOLOGY, HISTORICAL MATERIALISM AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

CALL FOR PAPERS
Spectrum Journal of Global Studies
Conference on:
Historical Sociology, Historical Materialism and International Relations

November 1-3, 2012
Middle East Technical University
Department of International Relations
Ankara – Turkey

The discipline of International Relations (IR) known as an “ American” social science has in the last decade or so been discovering the importance of alternative forms of explaining international relations. More so than any other field of social science, IR has been dominated by positivist conceptions of scientific inquiry. However recent approaches in the philosophy of sciences as well as the sociological turn in IR has changed the boundaries, assumptions and methodologies of our discipline.  Critical realism as an alternative to positivist as well as post-positivist understandings of social science is increasingly becoming the dominant form of philosophyzing about IR.

Historical sociological approaches are taking over the static, a-historical forms of theorizing. Marxist social theory has become more and more relevant to explain the current of changes in the international system. Internationalisation of capitalism has made the concerns of Marxism increasingly relevant to understand and explain the “international”. Recent controversies on the relation between the state system and capitalist mode of production have made important contributions to understand the link between what is traditionally understood from international relations and capitalist relations of production. These efforts have to go on as there are yet many other untouched aspects of international relations that require deconstruction and de-reification. This conference attempts to further our understanding of the links between historical sociology, critical realism and Marxism. Empirical works combining the insights of Marxist historical sociology and historical materialism with that of international relations is particularly welcome. We are extending an invitation to all researchers to present research that address the following issues and similar topics:

    • How does a historical materialist geopolitics address the traditional issues of IR?
    • Geopolitics of state formations
    • What is the relation between the state system and capitalism?
    • In what ways does critical realism help Marxism to analyse the international?
    • What are the limits and the potentials of he theory of combined and uneven development to explain the international?
    • Historical materialist analysis of international law
    • Contemporary forms of imperialism
    • International State Apparatuses and their role in the reproduction of capital
    • Marx’s method and the world market

We hope to see both individual papers and panels discussing these themes from different disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives.

We encourage scholars from all around the world to participate in this exciting attempt to link our conceptions of praxis and change with that of what constitutes the “international”.

Most papers presented in the conference will later be published in a special issue of the Spectrum journal or in a separate book.

We look forward to welcoming you all at METU in Ankara.
Key note speakers for the conference will later be announced.

For more information and to submit your papers and panel proposals, please contact spectrumconference@spectrumjournal.net

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

‘Stagnant’ – a new remix and new video by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YkP_Mi5ideo  

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Online Publications at: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

The Incident

LAW AND THE POSTCOLONIAL

Law and the Postcolonial: Ethics, Politics, & Economy

Series edited by Prof Denise Ferreira da Silva, Queen Mary University of London; Dr Mark A. Harris, La Trobe University and Dr Brenna Bhandar, University of Kent

Law and the Postcolonial: Ethics, Politics, & Economy seeks to expand the critical scope of racial, postcolonial, and global theory and analysis, focusing on how the global juridico-economic apparatus has been, and continues to be, shaped by the Colonial and the Racial structurings of power. It includes works that seek to move beyond the previous privileging of culture in considerations of racial and postcolonial subjectivity to offer a more comprehensive engagement with the legal, economic and moral issues of the global present.

The following categories of works have been identified which would fit with the aims and objectives of the series:

1. Architectures, Apparatuses, and Procedures: with a focus on the legal-economic institutions, frameworks, agreements, and processes, including multilateral agreements, the state, international financial institutions, International NGOs, etc.

2. Dispossession, Displacement and Obliteration: with a focus on the various strategies of appropriation of land and resources, exploitation of labour, processes that create forced and voluntary displacement of populations, or threaten or cause the eradication of local population

3. Occupation, Intervention, and Detention: with a focus on policing strategies and the related moral statements that sustain them, including humanitarian interventions, military occupations, the criminalization and detention of migrant works; the criminalization of economically dispossessed urban populations and racial and ethnic collectives

4. Grammars, Discourses, and Practices: with the focus on structures and mechanism of symbolic representation, and related moral (including religious), and legal frameworks, such as the Human Rights framework, with particular attention to how they enable the articulation of political subjects

This interdisciplinary series welcomes exclusively theoretical essays that engage with the conceptual and analytical questions detailed above and discussions of how particular conceptual approaches can illuminate existing processes and help in the study of the global landscape. In addition monographs and edited volumes, using qualitative and quantitative methods with a strong theoretical grounding, which deal with these questions and processes are also welcomed.

To discuss or propose an idea for a book, please contact the series editors:

Prof Denise Ferreira da Silva, d.ferreiradasilva@qmul.ac.uk, School of Business & Management,
Queen Mary College, University of London, London E1 4NS, United Kingdom, Tel. +44 (0) 20 7882 8414

Dr Brenna Bhandar, B.Bhandar@kent.ac.uk, Kent Law School, University of Kent, Kent CT2 7NS, United Kingdom, Tel. +44 (1227) 824774

Dr Mark A. Harris, Mark.Harris@latrobe.edu.au, School of Law, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3086, Australia, Tel. +61 (3) 94791276

Guidelines for preparing a book proposal can be found at: http://www.routledge.com/info/authors

 

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

World Crisis

SUMMER SCHOOL + MAY EVENTS AT YORK UNIVERSITY – TORONTO

Dear Colleagues:
This is to draw your attention to 3 sets of events we are organizing here at York in May: a graduate summer school in International Political Economy and Ecology, a one day conference The Future of Global Governance, and a SSHRC research workshop on New Constitutionalism and World Order.  We have places available for the summer school, which can be taken for credit or as an audit (details below).

Please see:

1.  A one-day public event on 25 May 2011: The Future of Global Governance.
Details & registration at http://www.yorku.ca/lefutur
Or call Lia Novario: 416-736-2100 extension 33782.
You are all very welcome to attend the lecture event.

2.  An SSHRC-funded international research workshop: New Constitutionalism and World Order. This is by invitation only but summer school, students will sit in.
This will be held 26-28 May 2011.
For details see: http://www.yorku.ca/nc2011/

Summer school information:

York University is now accepting outside applications for a graduate course entitled ‘New Constitutionalism and Global Political Economy.’ 
The 2011 International Political Economy and Ecology Summer School will take place from May 16-28 and will be directed by Distinguished Research Professor Stephen Gill, Political Science and Communications and Culture, York University. Hosted by Departments of Political Science and Geography, Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies, and by the Faculty of Environmental Studies, York University, this year’s International Political Economy and Ecology Summer School is integrated with a One-day Conference and a three-day Research Workshop, that form sessions of the course. Students are required to attend both.

The 2011 IPEESS will be held from May 16-28, Verney Room, Department of Political Science, 6th.FloorSouthRossBuilding,YorkUniversity,Toronto

Here is more detailed information on the summer school:  New Constitutionalism and Global Political Economy

York University Graduate Programs in Political Science, Geography and Environmental Studies Present:

International Political Economy and Ecology Graduate Summer School, May 16-28 2011

Leading lawyers, political economists, social and development theorists will meet with graduate students in May 2011 at York University to analyze and debate a central characteristic of the global political economy: the ‘new constitutionalism.’

This refers to the complex of politico-juridical and constitutional frameworks, regulations and rights that have emerged as key mechanisms of global governance to regulate political economy, society and ecology in the era of neo-liberal capitalism. For example: since 1980, perhaps over 80 states and associations have adopted neoliberal constitutional reforms, including adoption of charters and bills of rights, often in tandem with neoliberal trade and investment frameworks, such as NAFTA, the WTO and some 2700 Bilateral Investment Agreements. There have also been important legal and institutional changes in macroeconomic policy, exemplified by the proliferation of politically ‘independent’ central banks, currency boards and balanced budget laws. These affect not only economic but also social and ecological policies and practices.

Nevertheless, the political, legal and regulatory institutions and frameworks of global capitalism may be up for revision. The deep crisis of accumulation since 2008 has, in effect, created a conjecture that offers a unique opportunity to interrogate the nature and sustainability of new constitutionalism, and to initiate ground-breaking reconsideration of alternative mechanisms for governing our political economies and societies.  It also allows for reflection on the ontological and epistemological bases of comparative/international constitutionalism, political economy and environmental studies, and for critical rethinking of research agendas in these fields.

Classes will normally be held between 13:00-16:00 each day (full syllabus & times available on request).

The Summer School is integrated with two related events that also form class sessions:
1.  A one-day public event on 25 May 2011, 11:00-18:00: The Future of Global Governance. Please see http://www.yorku.ca/lefutur/ for further information and registration (required).
2.  An SSHRC-funded international research workshop: New Constitutionalism and World Order.  IPEESS students will be required to read the papers and offer comments and discussion on the workshop proceedings.  This will be held 9:00-18:00 on the 26th & 27th and 9:00-13:00 on 28 May 2011.  Please see http://www.yorku.ca/nc2011/ for further information.

Faculty: The Course Director is Stephen Gill. Other faculty include: Isabella Bakker (Political Science, York); Adam Harmes (Political Science, Western Ontario); David Schneiderman (Law, Toronto); Philip McMichael (Rural Sociology & Development Studies, Cornell); Robert Albritton (Emeritus, Political Science, York); Claire Cutler (Political Science & Law, Victoria); Upendra Baxi, (Emeritus Professor of Law, Warwick & Delhi) and Richard Falk (Emeritus, International Law & Politics, Princeton; Global Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara).

Applications: The deadline for applications is 16:25 on 3 May 2011.

Students and interested individuals are invited to apply. The course can be taken for credit. For Ontario graduate students the fee for the course is included in their regular tuition.  Non-Ontario students are welcome and should write for further details and enrolment costs.  For all students not seeking academic credit, the fee for the course is CDN $600. York students should submit applications to their GPD with a short statement (100 words) with their qualifications to take the class and it contribution to their program of studies.  GPDs should then forward applications to Judy Matadial, Political Science. All other applicants should submit their applications directly to Judy Matadial, matadial@yorku.ca

Other administrative contacts: Peggy McGrath, FES (peggym@yorku.ca); Yvonne Yim, Geography (yvonney@yorku.ca). For further information, please contact Paul Foley at: pfoley@yorku.ca. The Summer School Director, Stephen Gill, can be reached at: sgill@yorku.ca

Outline syllabus:
Students will be expected to read in advance and during the course.  A course reading kit is available on demand at the York bookstore. Approximately 50-60 pages of readings are allocated for each class session.
1. Introduction. The lineages and genealogy of the new constitutionalism: political theory and political economy. May 16. 13:00-16:00.
2. New constitutionalism, social reproduction and social governance. May 17. 13:00-16:00
3. New constitutionalism and the power of capital I: macroeconomics, central banks, balanced budget laws and crisis management. With special reference to the EU and Canada.  May 18. 13:00-16:00.
4. New constitutionalism and the power of capital II: trade, investment and the regulation of public services. May 19. 13:00-16:00.
5. New constitutionalism and the power of capital III: primitive accumulation and livelihood. With reference to the question of food, water and access to the “commons.”  May 20, 10:30-12:30.
6. New constitutionalism and sustainability:  the ecological question and the regulation of the environment. May 20.14:00-16:30.
7. New constitutionalism and the commodity form of law. May 24. 10-12:30
8. New constitutionalism, legitimacy and insurgent reason: the potentials for alternative forms of constitutionalism. May 24. 14:00-16:30.
9. One day lecture event. http://www.yorku.ca/lefutur/  Future of Global Governance? May 25. 11:00-18:00.
10. New Constitutionalism and World Order Workshop. http://www.yorku.ca/nc2011/ May 26-27: 09:00-18:00; May 28 09:00-13:00.

Dr. Stephen Gill, F.R.S.C.
Distinguished Research Professor
Department of Political Science
Ross S660, York University, 4700 Keele St, Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3, 
CANADA
Tel (direct): 416-736-2100 ext 88824; Tel: office reception 
416-736-5265; Fax: 416-736-5686
http://www.stephengill.com/

—END—

‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

The Battle in Seattle: Its Significance for Education

TRADE UNIONS, FREE TRADE AND THE PROBLEM OF TRANSNATIONAL SOLIDARITY

Two-day workshop at the Centre for the Study of Social and Global Justice (CSSGJ) at Nottingham University on 2 and 3 December 2011 with Samir Amin as keynote speaker

Since the completion of the GATT Uruguay Round and the establishment of the WTO in the mid-1990s, the international free trade agenda has been drastically expanded including now also issues related to intellectual property rights, trade in services and trade-related investment measures. The WTO Doha negotiations round launched in 2001 had been intended to complete ‘unfinished business’ especially in the area of free trade in services, public procurement and agriculture. At the same time, resistance to these developments has increased with the demonstrations at the WTO ministerial conference in Seattle in 1999 as a first landmark event. The latest attempt to revive the Doha round in July 2008 ended in failure. In view of the problems at the multilateral level, both the EU and the USA have increasingly engaged in bilateral strategies of free trade agreements. These strategies include the expanded trade agenda and are a tool to achieve what has been impossible within a multilateral setting.

Free trade strategies have increasingly become a problem for the international labour movement. On the one hand, trade unions in the North especially in manufacturing have supported free trade agreements. They hope that new export markets for products in their sectors will preserve jobs. On the other, trade unions in the Global South as well as social movements more generally oppose these free trade agreements, since they often imply deindustrialisation and the related loss of jobs for them. Unsurprisingly, transnational solidarity is difficult if not impossible to achieve as a result. At the same time, however, it has to be asked what free trade actually is and whether we can call the existing system really a free trade system? How trade unions understand both these questions is fundamental for their chances to understand each other. Understandings of free trade, which draw on alternative economic theories – see, for example, Samir Amin’s theory of unequal exchange and imperialism – may open up new avenues. 

Additionally, a focus is required on countries’ different position in the global economy, core, semiperiphery, periphery, the related dynamics of uneven and combined development structuring it, as well as the related implications for labour movements in view of free trade. Equally, a sector specific view is required, as particular sectoral dynamics are likely to have an influence on trade unions’ outlook on free trade.

In this workshop, we intend to focus on the problematic around free trade, the current free trade system and the related neo-liberal ideology, as well as analyse the problems for trade unions and social movements in more detail. The objective is to understand better the dynamics underlying free trade as well as explore possibilities for transnational solidarity against the background of uneven and combined development. This will also involve a discussion of alternative conceptualisations of free trade based on different economic theories and the related implications for labour movements. The workshop intends to reach beyond academia and facilitate discussions between academics and trade union researchers as well as social movement activists.

In more detail, we invite papers by academics, trade union researchers and social movement activists in the following areas:

• Basic analyses of what a ‘proper’ free trade system is;
• Analyses of current free trade policies, the implications of neo-liberalism as well as the concrete results of free trade policies for the populations affected. Can we call the current system a free trade system?
• Analyses of free trade policies and the relationships with other policies of neo-liberal restructuring;
• Implications of countries’ structural location in the global economy as well as sectoral specificities for trade unions’ positions on free trade;
• Analyses of resistance movements to concrete free trade agreements with a specific emphasis on co-operation and/or non – co-operation between trade unions and social movements;
• Analyses of the position of specific trade unions and/or social movements on free trade;

Paper proposals of ca. 250 words should be sent to Andreas.Bieler@nottingham.ac.uk by 9 May 2011. There is no registration fee for the workshop and all participants will be provided with coffee/tea breaks, two lunches and one evening dinner free of charge.

The workshop is supported with a small research grant of £6960 by the British Academy (SG102043) as well as a grant of £1750 by the University of Nottingham priority group Integrating Global Society.

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Roy Bhaskar

THE LAW OF LAW

The Westminster International Law & Theory Centre cordially invite you to
a one-day workshop on:

THE LAW OF LAW: Dialectics and Research

Organisers:
Pravin Jeyaraj, School of Law, University of Westminster
Prof Andreas Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos, School of Law, University of Westminster

Friday, 1 April, 2011
10:00-18:00

A one-day workshop to examine how different dialectical traditions have been applied to research in different legal and related non-legal disciplines. We aim to assert the relevance of various dialectical traditions – from its origin in ancient philosophies to its subsequent interpretation and reformulation by theorists such as Hegel, Marx, Luhmann and Bhaskar – to contemporary socio-legal and critical research and sketch potential future developments either confirming or moving away from this tradition.

Speakers:
Dr Brenna Bhandar (University of Kent)
Dr Alejandro Colás (Birkbeck University)
Dr Alex Fischer (SOAS)
Ms Kay Lalor (University of Westminster)
Professor Alan Norrie (University of Warwick)
Professor Andreas Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos (University of Westminster)
Dr Joseph Tanega (University of Westminster)
Dr Alberto Toscano (Goldsmiths College)

University of Westminster
The Boardroom, 309 Regent Street
London
W1B 2UW

Attendance is free, but places are limited
RSVP to Pravin Jeyaraj pravin.jeyaraj@my.westminster.ac.uk

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Glenn Rikowski on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/glenn.rikowski

Volumizer: http://glennrikowski.blogspot.com

Global Power

CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES ON GLOBAL GOVERNANCE

One-day public event in Helsinki on Friday May 7th 10:00-17:00

This one-day landmark event brings to Helsinki some of the world’s leading critical thinkers on global political economy, law and international relations. They will address the challenges of achieving sustainable and democratic global governance in the 21st century.  A central question that will give focus to the debates is encapsulated in this quotation:

“In the formation of leaders, one premise is fundamental: is it the intention that there should always be rulers and ruled, or is the objective to create the conditions in which this division … of the human race … is no longer necessary?” (Gramsci, Prison Notebooks)

Speakers are:

ISABELLA BAKKER, Professor of Political Economy, York University, Toronto; UPENDRA BAXI, Emeritus Professor of Law in Development, University of Warwick; SOLOMON (SOLLY) BENATAR, Emeritus Professor of Medicine, University of Cape Town and Professor, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto; CLAIRE CUTLER, Professor of International Relations and International Law in the Political Science Department at the University of Victoria, Canada; HILAL ELVER, Research Professor in Global and International Studies at the University of California Santa Barbara; RICHARD FALK, Albert G. Milbank Professor Emeritus of International Law at Princeton University and Research Professor in Global and International Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara; ADAM HARMES, Associate Professor in Political Science at the University of Western Ontario, Canada; MUSTAPHA KAMAL PASHA, Professor and Chair of the Department of Politics and International Relations at the University of Aberdeen, UK; NICOLA SHORT, Associate Professor of Political Science at York University, Toronto and TEIVO TEIVAINEN, Professor of World Politics at the University of Helsinki as well as Director of the Program on Democracy and Global Transformation at the San Marcos University in Lima, Peru

This event is open to the public, with free admission.  Venue: Small Assembly Hall, Fabianinkatu 33, University of Helsinki Main Building.

Further details can be found on: http://stephengill.com/news.htm or on http://www.helsinki.fi/collegium/events/critical_perspectives.htm

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

The Ockress: http://www.theockress.com

Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski