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Books

Books

HOMELAND SECURITY, ITS LAW AND ITS STATE

By Christos Boukalas (Routledge 2014)

This book employs Marxist state theory (esp. Nicos Poulantzas and Bob Jessop) to assess US counterterrorism law and policy, and its impact on the US polity.

(More details: http://www.taylorandfrancis.com/books/details/9780415526319/)

This book assesses the impact of post-9/11 domestic counterterrorism policy on US political life. It examines political discourse, law, institutional architecture, and state-population relations, and shows that ‘homeland security’ is a project with wide-ranging implications for democratic institutions and culture. These implications are addressed through a novel approach that treats law and the state as social relations, and relates developments in law to those in the state and in social dynamics. On this basis, the book examines the new political representations in counterterrorism discourse, especially regarding the relation between the state and the population. It examines the form and content of counterterrorism law, the powers it provides, and the structure and functions it prescribes for the state.

By focusing on the new Department of Homeland Security and the restructuring of the intelligence apparatus, the book assesses the new, intelligence-led, policing model. Finally, it examines forms of popular support and resistance to homeland security, to discuss citizenship and state-population relations.

The author concludes that homeland security has turned the US into a hybrid polity; the legal and political institutions of democracy remain intact, but their content and practices become authoritarian and exclude the population from politics. These legal and political forms remain operative beyond counterterrorism, in the context of the present economic crisis. They are a permanent configuration of power.

 

First published in http://www.historicalmaterialism.org/news/distributed/new-from-routledge-homeland-security-its-law-and-its-state-by-christos-boukalas

 

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‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Richard Alpert

RADICAL FOUCAULT EXPANDED! AN INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

September 8th – 9th, Universityof East London(Docklands Campus)
Centre for Cultural Studies Research, University of East London
http://culturalstudiesresearch.org/?p=591

Following the  superb international response to our initial call for papers, we have decided to expand the  event into a two-day conference. This has opened up a very limited amount of space for further contributions. Abstracts of no more than 350 words are invited, to arrive no later than Sunday May 8th 201.

The publication of Michel Foucault’s Lectures at the Collège de France, 1983-84 in English will be complete in April 2011 and his first Collège de France lecture course, La Volunté de Savoir will be published for the first time in February. The Centre for Cultural Studies Research at the University of East London is holding a an international conference which will re-assess Foucault’s contribution to radical thought and the application of his ideas to contemporary politics. What does it mean to draw on Foucault as a resource for radical politics, and how are we to understand the politics which implicitly informs his work?

Many commentators today would seem to claim Foucault as  the theorist of a politics which eschews all utopian ambition in favour of a certain governmental pragmatism, while others would claim him for a rigorous but ultimately rather simple libertarianism: can either of these positions ever be adequate to the radicalism of Foucault’s  analyses? Does it matter?

What is the significance of Foucault’s ideas of ‘governmentality’ and ‘biopolitics’ in understanding his later oeuvre and its implications; do either of these terms deserve to carry the weight attributed to them by some commentators? What is the ongoing relevance of Foucault’s account of disciplinarity: is, it, as Lazzarato has claimed, a historical category no longer fully applicable to contemporary forms of power?

How can Foucauldian ideas be brought bear on the analysis of austerity politics? Is there a role for Foucault’s ideas in formulating effective resistance to the increasing erosion of civil liberties that operates both within countries and across state boundaries? Can the notion of bio-power account for contemporary forms of racism? How can Foucauldian epistemology enable an understanding of the biopolitics of contemporary scientific discourse?

Confirmed Keynotes:
Stuart Elden, Professor in the Department of Geography, Durham University.
Mark Kelly, Lecturer in Philosophy, Middlesex University.

Subjects may include, but are not limited to:
Foucauldian thought and contemporary subjectivation
Foucault and other thinkers
Governmentality and everyday life
Strategic discourses of war and terror
New technologies of the self
Foucault and new forms of resistance
Heterotopias  now and in the future
Foucault and the erosion of the state
Disciplinary society and the society of control
Foucault, British politics and the ‘big society’
Foucault, post-Fordism and post-democracy

Email abstracts to Jeremy Gilbert (j.gilbert@uel.ac.uk) and Debra Benita Shaw (d.shaw@uel.ac.uk)

Registration will cost £110.00 per delegate (including lunch, not including accommodation or dinner) for both days. A day-rate of 65.00 will be available, but delegates will be strongly encouraged to attend on both days, and the organisers cannot promise to accommodate requests to present on a particular day.

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‘I believe in the afterlife.

It starts tomorrow,

When I go to work’

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon, ‘Human Herbs’ at: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic (recording) and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h7tUq0HjIk (live)

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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Rikowski Point: http://rikowskipoint.blogspot.com

Alternative Culture

CULTURAL LOGIC: AN ELECTRONIC JOURNAL OF MARXIST THEORY AND PRACTICE

A NEW DOUBLE ISSUE

Dear colleagues and comrades:

I am pleased to announce that the new double-issue of ‘Cultural Logic: an electronic journal of marxist theory and practice’ is now available online at: http://clogic.eserver.org/

Below, please find the table of contents to each part of the double-issue.

Sincerely and in solidarity,

Joe Ramsey

Editor of the forthcoming 2010 Cultural Logic special issue on “Culture and Crisis” – jgramsey@gmail.com

Cultural Logic: an electronic journal of marxist theory and practice

New Double Issue 2008/2009

Issue 2008: http://clogic.eserver.org/2008/2008.html

Issue 2009: http://clogic.eserver.org/2009/2009.html

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Cultural Logic, ISSUE 2008: http://clogic.eserver.org/2008/2008.html

Articles

Stephen C. Ferguson II: “Contractarianism as Method: Rawls contra Mills”

Melissa Hull Geil: “Shakespeare and the Drama of Capital”

Nigel M. Greaves: “Intellectuals and the Historical Construction of Knowledge and Identity: A Reappraisal of Gramsci’s Ideas on Leadership”

Sven-Eric Holmström: “New Evidence Concerning the ‘Hotel Bristol’ Question in the First Moscow Trial of 1936”

Nicola Masciandaro: “Consciousness, Individuality, Mortality: Basic Thoughts about Work and the Animal/Human Boundary”

John H. McClendon III: “The African American Philosopher: The Missing Chapter in McCumber on McCarthyism”

J. C. Myers: “Traces of Utopia: Socialist Values and Soviet Urban Planning”

Garry Potter: “Humanism and Terror: Merleau-Ponty’s Marxism”

J. Jesse Ramirez: “Rage Against the Dying of the Light: Herbert Marcuse and the Politics of Death”

Jacek Tittenbrun: “Between Subjectivism and Individualism: A Critical Appraisal of the Austrian Case for Private Ownership”

Reviews

Lukas MacKenzie: Mark S. Blumberg, Basic Instinct: The Genesis of Behavior, and Michael Tomasello, Constructing a Language: A Usage-Based Theory of Language Acquisition

Poetry

Bruno Gulli: “Hölderlin’s Window”

Howard Pflanzer: “The Endless War”

*********************** 

Cultural Logic, Issue 2009:
http://clogic.eserver.org/2009/2009.html

Articles

Jeffrey Cabusao: “The Social Responsibility of Filipino Intellectuals in the Age of Globalization and Empire: An Interview with E. San Juan, Jr. and Delia D. Aguilar”

Alzo David-West: “The Literary Ideas of Kim Il Sung and Kim Jong Il: An Introduction to North Korean Meta-Authorial Perspectives”

Barbara Foley: “Rhetoric and Silence in Barack Obama’s Dreams from My Father”

Grover Furr: “Evidence of Leon Trotsky’s Collaboration with Germany and Japan”

Bülent Gökay and Darrell Whitman: “Mapping the Faultlines: A Historical Perspective on the 2008-2009 World Economic Crisis”

Dave Hill: “Culturalist and Materialist Explanations of Class and “Race”: Critical Race Theory, Equivalence/Parallelist Theory, and Marxist Theory”

Michele Frucht Levy: “‘For We Are Neither One Thing Nor The Other’: Passing for Croat in Vedrana Rudan’s Night”

Gregory Meyerson: “Post-Marxism as Compromise Formation” (Foreword by E. San Juan, Jr.)

Michael Joseph Roberto: “Crisis, Revolution, and the Meaning of Progress: The Poverty of Philosophy and its Contemporary Relevance”

Spyros Sakellaropoulos and Panagiotis Sotiris: “Peter Gowan’s Theorization of the Forms and Contradictions of US Supremacy: A Critical Assessment”

E. San Juan, Jr.: “An African American Soldier in the Philippine Revolution: An Homage to David Fagen”

Daniel F. Vukovich: “Uncivil Society, or, Orientalism and Tiananmen, 1989”

Reviews

Paul M. Heideman: Michael E. Brown, The Historiography of Communism

David Schwartzman: Eileen Christ and H. Bruce Rinker, eds., Gaia in Turmoil: Climate Change, Biodepletion and Earth Ethics in an Age of Crisis

Poetry

Christopher Barnes: Selected Poems

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

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MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/coldhandsmusic

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Wavering on Ether: http://blog.myspace.com/glennrikowski

Guernica

RETORT IN WHITECHAPEL

On the day Colin Powell appeared before the UN in January 2003 to present the case for war against Iraq, the tapestry of Picasso’s Guernica hanging outside the Security Council chamber was draped with a baby blue shroud. The UN media liaison, Abdellatif Kabbaj, explained: “We had a problem with, you know, the horse”.

For the past year the Guernica tapestry has been in London, on loan during renovations at the UN. It is hanging in the old public library, now part of the Whitechapel Gallery, and forms the centrepiece of Goshka Macuga’s installation, “The Nature of the Beast”.

Retort will host an event on the closing day of the installation. On Sunday, April 4th between 2 and 5 o’clock, at the round table in front of the tapestry copy of Guernica (referencing Calder’s Mercury Fountain in the 1937 Spanish Pavilion),  there will be a recorded discussion on the topic of terror against civilians as an instrument of modern statecraft and the failed efforts of popular movements to halt it. The conversation – between an invited panel and then opening to all in attendance – will be primed by a brief presentation, in front of the tapestry, of Retort’s case in Afflicted Powers that terror from the air is constitutive of modernity, and T.J. Clark’s argument in Picasso and Truth that Guernica registers a double mourning, for the Spanish republic in its death throes but also for an end to modern humanity’s hopes of a true space of belonging. In the light of this history – from Guernica to Gaza – what are the possibilities of renewal for an anti-war movement? If it was hard in 1937, how might “art against war” be conceived under contemporary conditions of spectacle and the new arsenal of image machines? 

The muse of remembrance in the Basque tradition will be invoked in performance by MacGillivray and Gwalia. 

Address and info/directions:

The Whitechapel Gallery, 77-82 Whitechapel High Street, Whitechapel, London, E1 7QX, 020 7334 3922

http://whitechapelgallery.org

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

Cold Hands & Quarter Moon at: https://rikowski.wordpress.com/cold-hands-quarter-moon/

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MySpace Profile: http://www.myspace.com/glennrikowski