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Aesthetics

Aesthetics

PRAGMATIC PERSPECTIVES ON PHENOMENOLOGY

CALL FOR PAPERS

International Philosophical Conference in Prague, February 5th- 6th, 2015

Deadline for submission of abstracts: December 15th, 2014

The Institute of Philosophy and Religious Studies (Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Arts) organizes an international philosophical conference focused on the pragmatic theses that are present in the phenomenological works of M. Heidegger, M. Merleau-Ponty and J. Patočka. Inspired by a critical reassessment of already existing pragmatic readings of Heidegger, we want to explore the following themes as possible justifications for speaking about the pragmatic turn in phenomenology: the primacy of the practical over theoretical understanding, criticism of the representationalist account of perception and analysis of language and truth claims within the context of social and cultural practices.

The goals of our conference are thus the following ones:

1) To bring together both continental and Anglo-Saxon phenomenologists striving to develop pragmatic elements in works of M. Heidegger, M. Merleau-Ponty and Jan Patočka. Our first objective is to provide a new synoptic view of different recent pragmatic readings of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty in the Anglo-Saxon philosophy (Dreyfus, Rorty, Brandom, Okrent, Taylor, Wrathall, to name but a few).

2) To reconstruct the main phenomenological accounts of perception and language which stress the above mentioned pragmatic motives. We will namely seek to develop the consequences of addressing perception in terms of coping, with the focus on various criticisms of representational account of perceptual consciousness. Concerning language, we are interested in papers discussing Heidegger´s criticism of the primacy of the proposition (cf. Being and Time § 32f.) and establishing analogies and points of divergence between phenomenological approach and analytical ordinary language philosophy.

3) To revisit the theory-praxis distinction. The aim is to investigate the question of the genesis of the theoretical mode of behavior and to ask how theoretical thematizing arises out of circumspective concern. However, it is also vital to critically assess the oversimplifying interpretations of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty, insisting one-sidedly on the primacy of praxis over theory.

 

Papers are accepted under four broad topics, corresponding to four thematic sections of ryr conference:

  • The Issue of the ‘Pragmatic Turn’ in Phenomenology
  • Perception
  • Language
  • The Theory-Praxis Distinction Revisited

 

Paper presentations will have a maximum duration of 30 minutes. If you would like to participate in one of the above-mentioned panels with your paper, please state the title of the panel in question after the title of your abstract.

Submission deadline: Proposals should be sent until Monday, December 15, 2014 to the following email address: ondrej.svec@ff.cuni.cz Paper proposals will include a title and an abstract, with a maximum extension of 30 lines and 2,500 characters (without spaces).

Registration fee: For speakers accepted through an anonymous review process is 50 EUR. The conference registration fee includes: organization costs, morning and afternoon coffee breaks and conference banquet. The fee should be paid upon arrival of the participant.

The conference language will be English. Publication of selected conference papers in planned in a collected volume.

Organising committee: Jakub Čapek and Ondřej Svec (Charles University, Prague).

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:

Pavlos Kontos (University of Patras): Theory in Praxis: Aristotelian puzzles and Heidegger’s escape

Thomas J. Nenon (University of Memphis): Heidegger and His Pragmatist Readers

Mark Wrathall (University of California, Riverside): Always already more than a practitioner (‘immer schon mehr als Praktiker’): sense making and the limits of practical familiarity

Dan Zahavi (University of Copenhagen): Pragmatism and transcendental phenomenology

 

**END**

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Philosophy

Philosophy

PHILOSOPHY IN EDUCATION

CALL FOR PAPERS

PhaenEx: Journal of Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture

PhaenEx:   http://phaenex.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/phaenex/index

Special Topics Section: Philosophy in Education (2015)

Lead Editors: Marc Lamontagne & Éric Martin

This issue will focus on the way philosophy operates within educational practice. A guiding question is: can we conceive of education as the very manifestation of philosophy insofar as both relate to culture? Recent criticisms of educational practice have underlined the hijacking of education by utilitarian priorities. These denunciations, albeit necessary, often create an impasse in the debate between those in favor of such transformations and those against. We thus invite authors to go beyond the limited framework of negative critique so that the question of the status and role of philosophy in education can be explicitly and positively addressed. This issue of PhænEx seeks contributions that go beyond simply noting how educational institutions are currently adrift: we encourage articles that could make a case for the rehabilitation of the place of philosophy in all branches of knowledge, and especially in the field of social sciences. Authors can tackle such issues as these: Can philosophy really see itself as part of the general curriculum while behaving as a specific discipline? What is the relation between philosophy, education, and culture? Are not philosophy, education, and culture synonyms for the way humans are constituted into a common world? What is a proper philosophical pedagogy?

Submission Deadline: Dec. 1st, 2014. For more information contact the Lead Editors: Marc Lamontagne (marc.lamontagne@cegepmontpetit.ca) or Éric Martin (eric.martin@cegepmontpetit.ca).

 
*GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR AUTHORS*

*French style guidelines are available here.

1. Submissions should represent original work not previously published.

2. It is the author’s responsibility to obtain appropriate written copyright permissions for the reproduction of any copyrighted material, including images.

3. Authors should adhere to gender-inclusive language in their manuscripts.

4. Generally, PhaenEx will not consider publication of the same author’s work in two consecutive Open issues, although authors may submit their work to consecutive Open and Special Topics issues.

5. Generally, scholarly articles are between 6000-9000 words in length, although exceptions can be made. Submissions that are clearly unrevised conference presentations, or which are excessively long without clear reason, will not be sent out for peer review. Authors should contact the Lead Editor(s) in advance of submission if they have questions or concerns about this requirement.

Authors are asked to comply fully with these requirements, as well as with the style requirements outlined below, and to follow the generally accepted norms of academic writing, including the provision of complete and accurate references. Failure to do so may constitute grounds for the rejection of a submission at any time during the editorial process. (PhaenEx recognizes the creative and other needs of its authors. Please write directly to the Lead Editor for permission to exceed these guidelines or the below style sheet.)

*STYLE REQUIREMENTS*

[voir lien ci- dessous pour les règles de mise en forme des textes en français]
Texts are to be saved in MS Word (.doc) or Rich Text Format (.rft).

The style requirements of PhaenEx are modeled on: Gibaldi, Joseph. MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing. 2nd ed. New York: The Modern Language Association of America, 1998.

*Format:

1) Use font Times New Roman size 12 throughout, including all entries in both Notes (to come at the end of the text, not at the bottom of the page) and Works Cited (to come after Notes).

2) Full justification, both left and right.

3) Double-space the main text.

4) Indent the first line of each new paragraph. (Do not leave a blank space between paragraphs.)

5) Use one space (not two) after sentence punctuation.

6) Single-space notes, but place a single blank line between each separate note.

7) Single-space all items in Works Cited, but place a single blank line between each separate entry.

8) To indicate emphasis, titles, and terms in a foreign language use italics (not underlining).

*Basic Layout:

1) The title should appear at the top of the first page, centred and boldface, and be followed by one blank double-spaced line.

2) If numbered, each section heading should use Roman numerals. Whether numbered or not, each section heading should be preceded by two blank double- spaced lines, centred, and boldface.

3) If numbered, each subheading should use lower case Arabic letters enclosed in parentheses, left-justified, boldface and italicized. Leave one double-spaced return between Section heading and sub-heading, and the same between sub-heading and text (i.e. please do not leave any
extra blank lines between heading and subheading, or between subheading and text).

4) Notes should be assembled at the end of the text (not the bottom of each page). They should be headed by the unnumbered section heading
“Notes,” which should be centred, boldface, set off from the preceding paragraph by one blank double-spaced line (i.e. two strokes of the “return” key should follow the punctuation of the final paragraph).

5) A list of works cited in the text should come after the final note. It should be headed by the unnumbered section heading “Works Cited,” which should be centred, boldface, set off from the last line of the last note by one blank double-spaced line (i.e. two strokes of the “return” key should follow the punctuation of the final note).

6) If using an epigraph, each line of the epigraph text should be indented to one tab, left-justified and italicized. Attribution of the epigraph should follow standard MLA parenthetical citation.

*Quotations:

1) Quotations longer than three lines should appear without quotation marks, be single- spaced, and be block- indented once from the left margin. Enter one blank double- spaced line immediately before and after the block-indented quotation (i.e. block- indented quotations should use standard double-spacing to separate the quote from the main text.)

2) Indicate all interpolations with square brackets.

3) All ellipses should be indicated with a group of three immediately consecutive dots, preceded and followed by a single space. Ellipses indicating excluded text should not be placed in brackets.

*Quotation marks and punctuation:

1) Use double quotation marks for first order quotations of less than three lines and integrate them in the text. Use single quotation marks for quotations within quotations.

2) Final punctuation goes inside quotation marks except when followed by a parenthetical citation. Exception: Block quotations should be punctuated as if they were normal sentences and parenthetical citation should follow one space after the punctuation.

3) When quotation marks are followed by a parenthetical citation, final punctuation is placed after the parentheses. Exception: when the quoted text ends with a question or exclamation mark, place the question or exclamation mark inside the quotation marks and place a period after the closing parenthesis.

4) Semicolons, exclamation marks, and question marks that are not part of the quoted material should be placed outside quotation marks.

5) “Scare quotes” should be avoided if possible, although may be appropriate to denote contested terminology. When used, please use double quote marks (unless they appear within quotations as second-order quotes, where single quote marks should then be used.)

6) In text em-dashes should be long, with no space between the dashes and the words on either side. (Most word processors automatically convert to this format if you type a word followed immediately by two dashes followed immediately by the next word and then a space.)

7) Please use serial commas (e.g. “peace, order, and good governance”).

8) Leave one space (not two) following punctuation between sentences.

*Use of foreign language words and quotations:

1) Quotations should be, where possible, translated into the language of the article using an official translation (and thus appropriately cited). Where no official translation is available, the author’s translation should be followed by a parenthetical note: (author’s trans.). This should be accompanied by an endnote that presents the translated text in its original language.

2) Where, for good reason, the original language of the quotation or word is kept in the main body of the article, single words or phrases should be italicized. Sentences and quotes should use format and punctuation guidelines of the article’s main language, rather than those of the foreign language.

*Parenthetical Citations:

1) MLA style uses in-text, parenthetical citations together with a Works Cited list at the end. The goal of parenthetical citation is (a) to provide immediate citation upon reading each specific passage in need of citation, (b) to indicate precisely the relevant item in Works Cited, and (c) to be as brief as possible.

2) When only one of the works of a particular author needs to be cited, citation appears as (last name page number), with no comma between the name and the page number. If more than one of the works of a particular author needs to be cited, citation appears as (last name, shortened book title in italics page number) OR (last name, “shortened article title within quotation marks” page number), with a comma between name and shortened title only. However, if (a) the author’s name and/or specific work is mentioned explicitly in leading sentences such that it is clear which text is being referred to in Works Cited, or if (b) it is clearly understood that the citation is the same as the immediately preceding citation, then the citation should be reduced to (page number). This replaces the need for ibid., an abbreviation which should not be used.

3) Parenthetical citations may also be used for merely supporting material, e.g., (see Smith). Full references are to be provided in Works Cited.

*Notes:

1) Notes appear in the body of the text in superscript and as consecutive, Arabic numerals.

2) Numbers appear in the Notes section also in superscript.

3) In the body of the text, superscript notes appear:
(a) outside punctuation, when no quotation marks or parenthetical citations are used, e.g., … lovers seek solitude.
(b) outside closing quotation marks, when no parenthetical citation appears, e.g., “… lovers seek solitude.”
(c) outside punctuation that follows the parenthetical citation, e.g., “… lovers seek solitude” (Sartre 273).

4) Follow MLA, parenthetical citation style for all quotations and references in the notes themselves. Full citations should appear only in the Works Cited list. For example: For a further discussion of this point, see Detmer (21-22).

*Works Cited:

1) Book paradigm:
Sartre, Jean-Paul. Being and Nothingness: A Phenomenological Essay on Ontology. Trans. Hazel Barnes. New York: Washington Square Press, 1956.

2) Article paradigm:
Simons, Margaret. “Two Interviews with Simone de Beauvoir.” Hypatia 3, no. 3 (1989): 11-27.

3) Chapter/Article in Book paradigm:
Gyllenhammer, Paul. “The Question of (In)Tolerance in Heidegger’s Notion of World- Disclosure.” Issues in Interpretation Theory. Ed. Pol Vandevelde. Milwaukee: Marquette University Press, 2006. 167-198.

4) Film paradigm:
Macbeth. Dir. Roman Polanski. Perf. Jon Finch, Francesca Annis, and Nicholas Selby. 1971. Columbia, 2002. DVD.

Please note: (a) When more than one work is used by the same author, subsequent references in Works Cited should include three combined dashes (an “em-dash”), followed by a period, in place of the name. (b) Inclusive page numbers must follow journal and chapter entries in the Works Cited list.

*Citing Online Sources (adapted from www.dianahacker.com):

1) MLA does not require a Web address (URL) in citations for online sources.

2) In general, citations should end by indicating the medium (i.e. Web) and the date the material was accessed (date Month year)

3) MLA style calls for a publisher or sponsor for most online sources. If a source has no publisher, use the abbreviation “N.p.” (no publisher). If there is no date of publication or update, use the abbreviation “N.d” (for no date), after the publisher/sponsor position. For an article in an online scholarly journal or an article from a database, give page numbers if they are available; if they are not, use the abbreviation “n. pag.”

4) If an author or editor is unknown, begin the citation with the title.

Examples and Paradigms:

(a) Entire Website with author or editor:
Peterson, Susan Lynn. The Life of Martin Luther. Susan Lynn Peterson, 2005. Web. 24 Jan. 2009.
Halsall, Paul, ed. Internet Modern History Sourcebook. Fordham U, 22 Sept. 2001. Web. 19 Jan. 2009.

(b) Entire Website with corporate (group) author:
United States. Environmental Protection Agency. Drinking Water Standards. EPA, 8 July 2004. Web. 24 Jan. 2005.

(c) Entire Website with unknown author:
Margaret Sanger Papers Project. History Dept., New York U, 18 Oct. 2000. Web. 6 Jan. 2009.

(d) Entire Website with no title:
Yoon, Mina. Home page. Oak Ridge Natl. Laboratory, 28 Dec. 2006. Web. 12 Jan. 2009.

(e) Short works from websites including articles, poems, and other documents that are not book length or that appear as internal pages on a Website: Shiva, Vandana. “Bioethics: A Third World Issue.” NativeWeb. NativeWeb, n.d. Web. 15 Sept. 2004.

(f) Online Book:
Milton, John. Paradise Lost: Book I. Poetryfoundation.org. Poetry Foundation, 2008. Web. 14 Dec. 2008.

(g) Article in an on-line journal:
Belau, Linda. “Trauma and the Material Signifier.” Postmodern Culture 11.2 (2001): n. pag. Web. 20 Feb. 2009.

(h) Article in an Online magazine or newspaper:
Paulson, Steve. “Buddha on the Brain.” Salon.com. Salon Media Group, 27 Nov. 2006. Web. 18 Jan. 2009.

(i) E-mail. Begin with the writer’s name and the subject line, followed by “Message to” and name of the recipient. End with the date of the message and the medium.
Wilde, Lisa. “Review Questions.” Message to the author. 15 Mar. 2009. E-mail. &am p;nb sp;

For all other examples see www.dianahacker.com.

*Standardized Spelling Guidelines:

Please standardize spelling to the Oxford Canadian English dictionary. Please note the following preferred spellings and guidelines:- post-structuralism, post-humanism, postmodernism, postcolonial- the Far East, the West (not west), Western[e.g. media, thought, intellectuals, culture, etc.], but western [Canada, parts of the city, etc.].- insofar>- naturally-ordered, largest-ever, etc.- avoid “&” in favour of “and”- towards rather than toward- farther denotes physical advancement in distance while further denotes advancement to greater degree, as in time<*On all other matters of style, please consult the MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing (2nd edition).
To Submit: Register or log-in if already registered.
Select author and then follow the step-by-step instructions.

 

http://phaenex.uwindsor.ca/ojs/leddy/index.php/phaenex/about/submissions/callforpapers

 

**END**

‘Human Herbs’ – a song by Cold Hands & Quarter Moon: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Au-vyMtfDAs

Posted here by Glenn Rikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ Academia: http://independent.academia.edu/GlennRikowski

Glenn Rikowski @ ResearchGate: http://www.researchgate.net/profile/Glenn_Rikowski?ev=hdr_xprf

Online Publications at The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk/?page=pub&sub=Online%20Publications%20Glenn%20Rikowski

The Flow of Ideas: http://www.flowideas.co.uk

 

The Island

ONTOLOGY AND POLITICS

 

MANCHESTER WORKSHOPS IN POLITICAL THEORY 2011: August 31st – September 2nd 2011

Call for Papers: Ontology and Politics Workshop

Convenors: Paul Rekret (Queen Mary), Simon Choat (Kingston), Clayton Chin (Queen Mary)

Despite its pervasiveness, the question of the relation between ontology and politics continues to be a crucial one for Continental philosophy.  While the place and status of the question of being in the realm of the political has occupied much of social theory in the past twenty or thirty years, we remain no closer to drawing any common ground on these themes.

Post-structuralist or post-foundational political thought has insisted on the inherent contingency of any political ontology and has, from this notion, sought to draw out a framework for an emancipatory politics grounded in the concepts of difference and otherness. However, such a stance finds itself increasingly challenged today. On the one hand, thinkers such as Alain Badiou and Jacques Ranciere call for the need to think a politics grounded in a conception of universality rather than alterity, while on the other hand, so-called speculative realism more fundamentally challenges the very notion of ontology as it has been conceived by the majority of Continental thinkers in recent decades.  This panel aims to explore the intersections of politics and ontology and the resulting implications for thinking both the political and the philosophical.

We invite papers addressing the following and any other related themes:
-Is there a place for reflection on ontology in the theorisation and study of politics?
-Is there a necessary transitivity between the ontological and the political?  How should this relation be conceived?
-Is there a necessarily leftist or emancipatory ontology?
-Should the politics which has generally been thought to follow from post-foundational or post-structuralist ontologies be re-evaluated in light of recent critiques?
-Does a new and different relation between ontology and politics follow from recent speculative materialist ontologies?

If you would like to present a paper at this workshop, please submit an abstract of 300-500 words (or a full paper) to p.rekret@qmul.ac.uk or S.Choat@kingston.ac.uk by 15 June 2011.

For more information on the conference see: http://manceptworkshops.wordpress.com/

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THE SPIRIT OF CAPITAL – WITH MOISHE POSTONE

This message is to announce the Tenth Annual Graduate Student Conference in Philosophy at the New School For Social Research entitled “The Spirit of Capital: A Conference on Hegel and Marx

Date: April 28-29, 2011
Paper Submission Deadline: Dec 1st, 2010
Keynote Speaker: Moishe Postone (University of Chicago)

Submission Guidelines:

Papers ranging from 3,000 to 5,000 words should be submitted in blind review format via spiritofcapital@gmail.com and should include the following in the body of the email:

i. Author’s name

ii. Title of Paper

iii. Institutional affiliation

iv. Contact information (email, phone number, mailing address)
Please omit any self-identifying information within the body of the paper.

PLEASE POST, FORWARD AND CIRCULATE WIDELY

Sincerely,

Graduate Conference Committee 2010-2011, The New School for Social Research, spiritofcapital@gmail.com

THE SPIRIT OF CAPITAL: A CONFERENCE ON HEGEL AND MARX

THE TENTH ANNUAL GRADUATE STUDENT CONFERENCE IN PHILOSOPHY

AT THE NEW SCHOOL FOR SOCIAL RESEARCH

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: MOISHE POSTONE

APRIL 28TH -29TH, 2011

“It is impossible completely to understand Marx’s Capital, and especially its first chapter, without having thoroughly studied and understood the whole of Hegel’s Logic. Consequently, half a century later none of the Marxists understood Marx!!” wrote Lenin in 1915. In 1969, Althusser responded, “A century and a half later no one has understood Hegel because it is impossible to understand Hegel without having thoroughly studied and understood Capital.” What are we to make of this challenge today? Are we now ready to understand Hegel through Marx, and Marx through Hegel?

It is high time for a reassessment of the core stakes of the Marx-Hegel debate. What would it mean to think the concepts of capital and spirit together? This conference is a place to explore the internal relations between Hegel and Marx’s philosophical projects. Some possible questions include: how does Hegel’s phenomenology, logic, philosophy of nature, history and right internally contain the elements that Marx will use to decipher the world of property, labor, commodities and capital? Is Capital a logical theory of forms or a theory of history? How does Marx negate and realize Hegel’s project? What is the role of labor in Hegel, and the role of spirit in Marx? Does the development of history show the unfolding of freedom or the unfolding of capital?  This conference echoes the early Frankfurt School tradition, with its project for a critique of the social forms of the present. We encourage submissions on a wide range of topics and thinkers:

Possible Themes:

Capital and Spirit

Hegel’s Logic and Marx’s Grundrisse

Property, Alienation, and Class

Form and Content in Hegel and Marx

Concrete and Abstract Labor

Master and Slave

Critique, Dialectic and Method

Time and History

Freedom and Necessity

Substance and Subject in Capital

The Value-Form

Critique of Labor

Revolution and Negation

Materialism and Idealism

Proletarian Self-Abolition

Commodity, Money and Capital

The Philosophy of Right

Possible Thinkers:

I.I. Rubin

Gyorgy Lukacs

Karl Korsch

Ernst Bloch

Walter Benjamin

Alfred Sohn-Rethel

Theodore Adorno

Herbert Marcuse

CLR James

Raya Dunayevskaya

Guy Debord

Alexander Kojeve

Jean Hyppolite

Frantz Fanon

Helmut Reichelt

Hans-Georg Backhaus

Gillian Rose

EMAIL SUBMISSIONS TO: spiritofcapital@gmail.com

SUBMISSION DEADLINE is Dec 1st, 2010

Papers should be sent as word documents or pdfs, not exceeding 5000 words. Personal information including institutional affiliation is to be sent in the body of the email and should not appear on the paper itself or in the file name.

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